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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 19, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm clive myrie. the headlines... countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. translation: unfortunately the increase in the number. of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab shortly — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating the handling of allegations against her predecessor alex salmond. the bbc says it is extremely concerned about one of its reporters in myanmar who's been abducted in the country's capital. and coming up this hour — mark kermode gives his unique take on the best and worst of the week's
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film and dvd releases, that's in the film review. a number of eu countries have started using the oxford astrazeneca covid vaccine again — after the european medicines agency confirmed it is safe and effective. germany, france, italy and spain are among the countries that halted its use earlier this month, after concerns about blood clots. but with cases and deaths rising now across continental europe — and millions of people in france being placed under lockdown at midnight tonight — there's been a stark warning from germany's health minister — who said there isn't enough vaccine supply across the continent to prevent a third wave. our europe correspondent nick beake reports.
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paris in the spring, a city where the mood is darkening. the french capital is descending into another lockdown, part of the effort to stop a third wave of the virus taking hold across europe. translation: i would say i am more pessimistic, - but that's just because we don't have an end date. the curfew is the same. we've been living like this for almost two months and it's like it's normal now, when it's not. it's all a bit sad. translation: when is this going to end? - what if next year we haven't found a way out of this? what if next year, we have lockdown number eight? that's what scares me. the rise in cases comes as europe faces a vaccination crisis. france and other big countries are once again using the astrazeneca jab after the eu drugs regulator confirmed its long—held belief that it is safe for use. at a news conference in berlin, the german health minister warned there is not enough of the astrazeneca vaccine in europe to prevent a third wave by itself.
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he also said a rise in the number of cases could mean not only a delay in reopening the country but that some restrictions may have to be reimposed. back in paris, there are now more people in intensive care beds than during the second wave, last november. doctors warn the system is reaching breaking point. translation: you can always expand, but the elastic is getting _ tighter and tighter. we're not at the breaking point yet but we are coming very close, so, yes, that limit is not far away. and the worsening picture in europe could have an impact on the uk, the government made clear. i think what's going on in europe is a real wake—up call to us and a warning. people that say we could ease restrictions sooner, we just need to look at what's happened in the past, rises in europe have led to rises in the uk. i am hopeful it won't happen this time, not least thanks to the vaccine, but we really do have to stick by the rules
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to prevent this happening. in a sign of how the fates of nations are intertwined, the uk variant is now the most common strain in poland. it will soon account for 80% of cases. the prime minister said schools and leisure facilities would now have to close and if that didn't work, everything would have to be shut down. this morning, the husband and wife team behind the biontech pfizer vaccine received germany's highest civilian honour. their creation has given hope and has helped to offer a pathway out of the covid nightmare. but in europe at least, the pandemic is taking a worrying turn. for more on the situation in france and germany, hugh schofield in paris. but firstjenny hill in berlin. well, experts here say that germany is now in a situation where case numbers are rising exponentially, they're extremely concerned. there was a real surge of infection here over christmas,
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which took intensive care capacity to its limits. some experts say, actually, if cases continue to rise, as they're doing now, and we could see a similar surge of infection happening again at around easter, it's quite clear that germany, like so many other of its neighbours, is now in the grip of what appears to be a very vicious third wave of infection. and that's of particular concern here, because as you've seen in that report, just 8% of the german population has had a first dose of vaccine. so far, a very slow national roll—out of the vaccination programme. and so experts are extremely worried about what will happen next. all of this is compounded, i think, by the fact that germany had started to actually ease some lockdown restrictions. the easter holidays are coming up. the government is appealing to people not to travel either inside the country or abroad, not to get together with people other than immediate family. but they are facing, i think, a bit of an uphill battle on that.
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and angela merkel is due to sit down with regional leaders again on monday to talk about what happens next. but experts here are clear. they say what's needed right now is a hard and fast return to lookdown. a third of the french are going to be affected, 21 million people in paris and its surrounding area, then a swathe of territory leading up to the northern belgian border around calais, a couple of departments in normandy and then down in the south around nice. these are all areas where a threshold has been passed in the last few days, where there are now more than 400 cases of covid per 100,000 people. and in accordance with the government's own set of provisions, that means they fall into a new kind of category and the lockdown is kicking in from midnight. and it won't be quite as bad a lockdown as we had in november, which was in itself a lighter lockdown than the one we had last march.
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for example, it will be possible to go outside for exercise almost at will. there's no limit to how much time you can spend outside taking exercise. but it also needs to be said that the curfew, nationwide curfew has been in place for some weeks and remains in place. so life is already quite difficult. so not that much necessarily will change in the day to day lives of people here in paris. but it is a psychological burden, i think that everyone feels it means also that they're going to have to produce these pieces of paper for the police whenever they leave their home to justify that they're being out of their homes and that and they can't leave paris either. all of this, i think, adds to the pressure and makes it a very gloomy city today. the french prime minister, jean castex was one of the first people in the country to receive the aztrazeneca vaccine, after the re—start of its roll—out today. he said he wanted to set an example.
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borisjohnson is to receive his first dose of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine somtime today. ministers and health officials are reassuring the public that it is safe, as the roll—out continues. and new figures show that last week coronavirus infections continued to fall across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, and increased in scotland. here's our health correspondent anna collinson. the message to the more than 11 million people in the uk who have received the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and the millions more waiting, is clear. from the regulator to the prime minister and scientists. the oxford jab is safe and the pfizerjab is safe. the thing that isn't safe is catching covid. there is no difference that blood clots in veins are occurring more than would be expected in the absence of vaccination. the risk benefit is really strongly
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in favour of getting vaccinated. l while vaccine confidence in the uk is very high, doctors are concerned some younger patients may be missing appointments because they think they are less at risk of the virus. and despite strong messaging from scientists there are concerns, unfounded fears about blood clots circulating in europe are damaging confidence here. we have had people calling us because they have concerns and they say, i have had a clot before so should i have it? it's taking time, and you have to talk to them and try and reassure them. this morning, another grim reminder of why the vaccine roll—out is needed. with 89,000 lives lost to coronavirus last year, new data suggest the uk was one of the top ten worst hit countries in europe in 2020. the uk did have one of the highest death rates in the first half of the year but as this graph shows, it has since been overtaken, most notably by poland. but the pandemic is of course
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ongoing and these figures do not take into account the pressures and loss seen at the start of this year. as we move firmly into spring, the picture is much more hopeful. a survey suggests coronavirus infections have continued to decrease across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, although they increased in scotland. the government has insisted a drop in supply would not disrupt the schedule of vaccinating all adults by the summer but scientists warn the pace will reduce. i think the slightly lower amount of astrazeneca vaccine we are hearing about over the coming months will mean the roll—out of the second phase, which is people under the age of 50 without risk factors, will go more slowly and may even be delayed in terms of its start. one of those in line to get their astrazeneca vaccine today is the prime minister. borisjohnson knows the dangers of covid all too well after he was treated in intensive care for the virus last year
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and will be hoping his jab will encourage others. anna collinson, bbc news. the housing and communities secretary, robertjenrick, says the uk is still set to meet its vaccination target this april, despite supply concerns. we are working with astrazeneca and a range of manufacturers, they are working through the supply issues that they have had, however we are still on course to meet our target, which is those important one to nine groups will all get vaccinated by the middle of april and anybody who has had an appointment, that will still be honoured. no need for anybody to be worried and today we will have to vaccinate over 600,000 people, whose number, so the programme continues to go extremely well. linda bauld is professor of public health at the university of edinburgh and joins me now. hello and good afternoon thank you forjoining us. i wonder if there is
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a wider cause for concern at looking at the latest data from the office for national statistics given that levels of infections are following in england and wales, leveling off the northern ireland but a small uptick in scotland.— uptick in scotland. there is. interesting _ uptick in scotland. there is. interesting because - uptick in scotland. there is. interesting because we - uptick in scotland. there is. | interesting because we have uptick in scotland. there is. - interesting because we have seen that in the reported figures, official figures those people coming forward for a test over the last couple of weeks, but the test positivity has been down, we have been testing a lot but the value of the ons survey is a random sample of the ons survey is a random sample of the community so the effect is probably rail although it is a single week, schools have been back three weeks, so that might be part of it and that is just a primary school pupils, younger pupils i emphasise, and obviously moving around, not so much we had our bricks and schools, very few but it is what associated with that. i've also seen data to suggest that as we head into the warmer months and this talk of lockdown easing in the
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planning, there may be a less compliance with everything to the letter. but it is just a single week as she gradually opened up you will see more cases and we need to keep a close eye on that. is see more cases and we need to keep a close eye on that.— close eye on that. is there perhaps less concerned _ close eye on that. is there perhaps less concerned then _ close eye on that. is there perhaps less concerned then there - close eye on that. is there perhaps less concerned then there might i close eye on that. is there perhaps| less concerned then there might be because the vaccination programme has started and is kicking in coachella it really is. you can see that in the data across the uk but if i focus on scotland for a moment, the reductions in the number of people in hospital a really excellent.— people in hospital a really excellent. ':::::: , excellent. 0ver1000 people in hos - ital excellent. 0ver1000 people in hospital back _ excellent. 0ver1000 people in hospital back in _ excellent. 0ver1000 people in hospital back in february - excellent. 0ver1000 people in hospital back in february 26, i excellent. 0ver1000 people in i hospital back in february 26, now down to over 400. a big drop and also you can seek nursing home vests are down hugely, only 14 and the last week and deaths in hospitals. that i think from the studies we have seen from public health scotland and others in the vaccine effect amongst the most vulnerable and probably also a legacy of some of these lockdown restrictions. haw of these lockdown restrictions. how worried should _ of these lockdown restrictions. how worried should we be across the uk about the situation on the
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continent? and we are seeing suggestions, pole and certainly, germany, france, potentially third wave of infection. == germany, france, potentially third wave of infection.— wave of infection. -- poland. 1.2m new cases — wave of infection. -- poland. 1.2m new cases across _ wave of infection. -- poland. 1.2m new cases across the _ wave of infection. -- poland. 1.2m new cases across the european - wave of infection. -- poland. 1.2m . new cases across the european region last week. over 20,000 deaths and debbie h0 europe is very concerned about this. i think the b 117 variant as you said your report is playing a big role. it came to garrett later of course and it develops here unfortunately so they are now grappling with that and the vaccination programme is a big concern in the eu average is 8.6% now for a single dose and as you know we are hovering around about almost four and ten. so it is a critical situation in many parts of europe come i think restrictions will have an impact but we have to have these two things happening in parallel, using the public health measures very dispiriting data to do again and also rolling out the vaccines and i hope the vaccine programme in new york will pick up pace in the coming weeks. the world health organization _ pace in the coming weeks. the world health organization is _ pace in the coming weeks. the world
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health organization is now _ pace in the coming weeks. the world health organization is now said - pace in the coming weeks. the world health organization is now said that l health organization is now said that it is backing the european medicines agency decision yesterday that the astrazeneca vaccine is safe and we know the french prime minister has got his own astrazeneca jab today but i wonder, all of us are sort of wondering can we go abroad, will we be able to get out of this mess. once the lockdown is ease potentially if the road map is stopped too. —— is stuck to here in the uk. do you foresee a situation where the situation gets so bad in europe that we are actually locked on this island for the summer? i think all of us hope that is not the case. spain and portugal are doing pretty well actually at the moment and contractor some of the other european but what i will say is that in the road map we've heard from the prime minister a while ago there were some signs that may the 17th we might be able to open up more international travel and that is a very ambitious date given what is happening in europe, i think we need to be extremely cautious about
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international travel even though many of us really wish we could do that and soon. i think it is a threat. so as we move out of restrictions, like other countries around the world have, keeping an eye on not importing cases and new variants will continue to be a priority. variants will continue to be a riori . , , ., priority. this might be in a possible — priority. this might be in a possible question - priority. this might be in a possible question to - priority. this might be in a l possible question to answer priority. this might be in a - possible question to answer but i wonder how long would it take for the rest of the eu to actually catch up the rest of the eu to actually catch up to the level of immunisation with their vaccine roll—out? —— an impossible question. compared to the uk. i impossible question. compared to the uk. ., �* ., , impossible question. compared to the uk. i haven't done this calculation. it is uk. i haven't done this calculation. it is variable _ uk. i haven't done this calculation. it is variable across _ uk. i haven't done this calculation. it is variable across europe. - uk. i haven't done this calculation. it is variable across europe. over l it is variable across europe. over ten to i2% in some of the scandinavian countries. parts of europe where the majority of health care workers have been vaccinated so i haven't done those calculations but thinking about how long it took from us from the 9th of december two now, almost heading towards a mid—late march, to get to four in ten, in some countries in europe are really below 8%, it will take some
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time. �* ~ , ., , , time. but the key really is the vaccination _ time. but the key really is the vaccination programme. - time. but the key really is the vaccination programme. that| time. but the key really is the l vaccination programme. that is time. but the key really is the - vaccination programme. that is what will help unlock europe the way potentially it will help unlock the uk? ., . . ., ., potentially it will help unlock the uk? ., ., ., , uk? the vaccination programme is the key measure — uk? the vaccination programme is the key measure in — uk? the vaccination programme is the key measure in terms _ uk? the vaccination programme is the key measure in terms of _ uk? the vaccination programme is the key measure in terms of getting - uk? the vaccination programme is the key measure in terms of getting us - key measure in terms of getting us out of this crisis and it is different from 2020 and will hopefully prevent repeat it restrictions a lockdowns but i don't think we can be complacent. keeping ourfocus on ventilation think we can be complacent. keeping our focus on ventilation and international travel, some of these other measures during the two in parallel but we should have much more openness in of 2021 and i hope across europe and indeed in other countries as well.— across europe and indeed in other countries as well. professor, good to talk to talk — countries as well. professor, good to talk to talk to _ countries as well. professor, good to talk to talk to you. _ countries as well. professor, good to talk to talk to you. thank - countries as well. professor, good to talk to talk to you. thank you . to talk to talk to you. thank you forjoining us. let's talk now to dr fari ahmad, who hasjust finished giving out some doses of the vaccine at a clinic in winslow. hello to you. thank you for being with us. it was of the astrazeneca vaccine? , with us. it was of the astrazeneca vaccine?- and _ with us. it was of the astrazeneca vaccine? yes. and what was the ublic vaccine? yes. and what was the public response _ vaccine? yes. and what was the public response to _ vaccine? is; and what was the
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public response to that? vaccine? yes. and what was the public response to that? so - vaccine? yes. and what was the - public response to that? so actually most peeple — public response to that? so actually most people were _ public response to that? so actually most people were ok _ public response to that? so actually most people were ok with - public response to that? so actually most people were ok with having i public response to that? so actually| most people were ok with having it. i think we had to have a few discussions with some people who had a few worries. they had been listening to all the news. we've been having a lot of discussions before today, people have been calling up and saying i'm dying to have this vaccine and i have some worries about that. that has taken up worries about that. that has taken up some of my time as well. what worries about that. that has taken up some of my time as well. what do ou sa to up some of my time as well. what do you say to those _ up some of my time as well. what do you say to those people _ up some of my time as well. what do you say to those people who - up some of my time as well. what do you say to those people who are - up some of my time as well. what do you say to those people who are a - you say to those people who are a little bit worried? is you say to those people who are a little bit worried?— little bit worried? is “ust explaining fl little bit worried? is “ust explaining the i little bit worried? is “ust explaining the rest h little bit worried? isjust explaining the rest of. little bit worried? isjust - explaining the rest of them. everything we do, any medicine we take, there is benefits and risks to it. even the paracetamol comes with a whole leaflet of side effects but you take it because you know the benefit of it. i think it is keeping that in that context. there are five cases and ii that in that context. there are five cases and 11 million, those numbers are high and we know the benefit from having it stops you getting severe covid—i9 we have to go in hospital. that's where you have to go in. some people want to stop that
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but they just need go in. some people want to stop that but theyjust need that reassurance. they did take it.— they did take it. your clinic, you don't have _ they did take it. your clinic, you don't have any _ they did take it. your clinic, you don't have any say _ they did take it. your clinic, you don't have any say in _ they did take it. your clinic, you don't have any say in which - they did take it. your clinic, you i don't have any say in which vaccine you get, do you? don't have any say in which vaccine you get. do you?— don't have any say in which vaccine you get, do you? know. we get a very short notice- _ you get, do you? know. we get a very short notice- -- — you get, do you? know. we get a very short notice. -- no _ you get, do you? know. we get a very short notice. -- no we _ you get, do you? know. we get a very short notice. -- no we don't. - you get, do you? know. we get a very short notice. -- no we don't. and - short notice. —— no we don't. and then we get a delivery of whatever they feel that we need to have. it is a bit chaotic and a bit hard to plan because we are still doing rgb surgery is still seeing patients in our demand has gone up 40% so we still have to do that, and in the vaccination so if we have noticed or people were saying this is coming here, we can plan around it, certainly going forward and vaccinating the next call, the people younger than 50, gp surgery it would very much like to be involved in it but because we are not getting this organisation and the support from nhs england, a lot of db surgeries are now being asked to look again and see if they can carry on vaccinating which is a
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shame. �* , ., ., shame. are you getting through the numbers of people _ shame. are you getting through the numbers of people within _ shame. are you getting through the numbers of people within the - shame. are you getting through the numbers of people within the most| numbers of people within the most risky cohorts, the first nine, are you getting too high enough percentage for the figures locally infections to be going down coachella i think we are. you can come u- coachella i think we are. you can come up with _ coachella i think we are. you can come up with the _ coachella i think we are. you can come up with the older - coachella i think we are. you can come up with the older cohorts, | coachella i think we are. you can i come up with the older cohorts, the over 80 and 90, they were very happy to have it and there are very few who declined it. as we have gone into the younger age groups, i think we are saying there is more people we are saying there is more people we are saying there is more people we are choosing not to have it or have more concerns about it. and i'm wondering as it goes on we might encounter more of that. one of the my order patient said to me she said that you don't have to say tell me about it, i live through polio and i know. i know will get the vaccine can do what i thought was actually quite at way of putting it. great can do what i thought was actually quite at way of putting it.- quite at way of putting it. great to net our quite at way of putting it. great to get your perspective. _ quite at way of putting it. great to get your perspective. thank - quite at way of putting it. great to get your perspective. thank you i quite at way of putting it. great to | get your perspective. thank you for joining us. that's quite an apt way
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of putting it. the latest uk government figures show that another 4,802 people have tested positive for the virus in the latest 24 hour period. a further 101 people have died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test in the uk. meanwhile, more than 26.2 million people have now received their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine. the scottish conservative leader at holyrood, ruth davidson, says nicola sturgeon should resign if she has a "shred of integrity". a majority of the committee investigating the scottish government's handling of harassment claims against alex salmond are understood to have voted last night that ms sturgeon had not given them accurate information. she's insisted she told them the truth. a report about whether the first minister broke the ministerial code is expected within the next week. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. scotland's first minister is facing significant pressure, just weeks ahead of the scottish parliament election.
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for some time, she's faced claims she's not told the full story about what she knew when about harassment allegations against alex salmond. i solemnly, sincerely and truly declare... now, a committee of msps has concluded she misled them about meetings she had with mr salmond three years ago. by a narrow majority, split along party lines, the committee decided ms sturgeon's account to them had not been accurate. the first minister says she stands by her evidence and that some on the committee had made their minds up before she appeared. i do not believe the first minister should resign. i do not believe she has misled parliament and i have absolute confidence in her veracity of what she said in those eight hours of evidence to that committee, in her integrity and in her professionalism. and i am not going to comment on unattributed briefings about a report which has not yet been published. this row between two first ministers is reaching its climax, the most bitter battle
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between two former allies. alex salmond has said his one—time protege has broken the rules that ministers have to follow. ms sturgeon has said he's peddling false conspiracy theories. but this crisis couldn't come at a worse time for the snp. there's just seven weeks until scotland goes to the polls and opposition parties are claiming ms sturgeon can't be trusted. the parliament was misled by the first minister. now, that is, to me, a clear breach of the ministerial code and i think that, if she had a shred of integrity, nicola sturgeon would be considering her position. she has every opportunity to resign. on a campaign visit, labour's leader said the allegations were serious and could be a resignation matter. if the report suggests that the first minister has misled parliament and potentially breached the ministerial code, then that is incredibly serious. obviously, the focus is very much on the individual, nicola sturgeon, but actually, it's bigger than that, it's about the integrity
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of the scottish parliament, it's about the integrity of the office of first minister. the full committee report will be published on tuesday. as well as accusing ms sturgeon of misleading msps, it's expected to criticise other parts of the account she gave. and nickjoins us now live... the snp suggesting that few shenanigans going on as far as that committee is concerned. that vote last night that found nicola sturgeon had misled the committee. broke down party lines. five opposition msps devoted to saying she had misled the committee, before snp members said she hadn't and i think there were a number of votes that basically fell that way, the committee also raise some concerns about miss sturgeon's meetings with alex hammond and why she did not record them in the time even though they were going meet meetings alex salmon. and some concern saying it
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is not immense by mr arjun story that she first found out about any concerns about mr salmond behaviour in november 2017 as she told them. we have the first on the record comment from anyone in this committee within the last hour, remember, all the leaks so far have involved no public comment from anybody on the committee but the snp members havejust anybody on the committee but the snp members have just pretty extraordinary statement when you think the report hasn't come out yet, saying without a shred of evidence the opposition simply used a majority on the committee to insert 11 that were premeditated political assertions and they say that this was never about evidence, it was never about the women who had been failed by a harassment policy, it was all about the pursuit of political ends and what they call the politics of desperation. that is from the three snp members of the committee. in the snp member who is the convening was put out another statement saying she is dismayed of what has happened and i think it is
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pretty clear from that and from what we've heard of nicola sturgeon's team today they are not going to accept with this committee says, they will rubbish it as political point scoring, the same time the opposition will say this is evidence that nicola sturgeon cannot be trusted going into the election campaign. there is another review going on off what is going on from nicola sturgeon's independent adviser on the ministerial coat and i think we will get that early next week and that will be a big moment as well because if james hamilton, the independent adviser, find she has broken the ministerial code, it will heat pressure on the first minister death before the official campaign for the scottish parliament starts next wednesday before parliament breaks up. five days before the holyrood election breaks up. so the parliament except for the election and we have this extraordinary position where a committee is saying that nicola sturgeon misled them and we still do
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hear the report from the independent adviser and this scottish tories are saying they are prepared to hold a vote of no—confidence for mr arjun on wednesday, when they run up to an election campaign. on wednesday, when they run up to an election campaign-— election campaign. indeed. thank you for that. election campaign. indeed. thank you for that- -- — election campaign. indeed. thank you forthat- -- for— election campaign. indeed. thank you for that. -- for mr— election campaign. indeed. thank you for that. -- for mr nguyen _ election campaign. indeed. thank you for that. -- for mr nguyen on - for that. —— for mr nguyen on wednesday. the bbc has said it's extremely concerned after one of its burmese service reporter, aung thura, was taken away by unidentified men in the capital, naypyitaw. he was reporting outside a district court in when a group of civilian clothed men, in an unmarked van arrived and demanded to see him. the bbc has called on the myanmar authorities to help locate him and confirm that he is safe. mary hockaday, who's the director of bbc news, international services gave us this update. earlier on friday the bbc services, bernese services reporter aung thura was taken by unidentified men into a vehicle and we currently do not know his whereabouts and we are very concerned about this. we are calling on the authorities in myanmar to confirm his location and that he is safe.
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he is an accredited journalist, working in naypyidaw for many years. we know that have been other journalist detentions since february and it is concerning for us and we really want to know that he is ok and where he is. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. little change on the weather front as we head into the weekend for most of us, fairly cloudy, a little on the nippy side, although some spots in scotland have been quite sunny and warm recently. these are the evening temperatures now tonight. again, a fairamount of cloud across the uk, with a few clear spells here, and they're not particularly cold. overnight temperatures hovering around about five or six degrees celsius. and then saturday, the first day of astronomical spring, the spring equinox.
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and again, another fairly cloudy day. but i think the best of the sunshine on saturday may be eastern scotland to the east of the pennines. and also once any rain clears earlier in the day in the north of scotland, there should be some sunshine, too. and again, around nine to 13 celsius and little change expected into sunday. the weather will eventually change, but not until later next week.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. translation: unfortunately the increase in the number. of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab shortly —
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after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating the handling of allegations against her predecessor alex salmond. the bbc says it is extremely concerned about one of its reporters in myanmar who's been abducted in the country's capital. and coming up in 15 minutes — mark kermode gives his unique take on the best and worst of the week's film and dvd releases, that's in the film review. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougal. the 9 to 1 shot minella indo has won the cheltenham gold cup, riden byjack kennedy and trained by henry de bromhead. it completes an historic triumph for de bromhead, as he becomes the first trainer to win cheltenham's big three of the gold cup, the queen mothers�* champion chase and the champion hurdle at the same festival.
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female jockey rachael blackmore was hard on his heels, but could only come second on board ah plu tar — also trained by de bromhead. they battled along the straight and to the line, kennedy climbing up in the saddle to celebrate the biggest win of his career. the favourite al boum photo — who had been aiming for three gold cups in a row came third. de bromhead says the achievement is yet to sink in. it's incredible to think of it. they coming here for a lot of years now and plenty of tough years of tough results is relevant but also some great ones. and to do this, yeah. but as i say everyone that's working with us and all of the crew at home, everyone here and, could not do any of it without our clients in supporting us and they give us the opportunity to buy these good horses and just feel extremely
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lucky. so second place in the gold cup for rachael blackmore, having earlier added to her list of festival winners. she rode quilixios to victory in the triumph hurdle to make it six wins this week, she will be the leading jockey at cheltenham this year, no—one can overtake her. the scottish government has confirmed that the old firm match at celtic park will go ahead this weekend, despite concerns over crowds gathering in defiance of covid safety rules. rangers and celtic have repeatedly urged their supporters to stay away from sunday's game at park head. the scottishjustice secretary humza yousaf says the decision to allow the match to go ahead follows "extensive engagement" with the clubs, the league, police scotland and glasgow city council. celtic have confirmed they won't be giving rangers a guard of honour, after their rivals won the league. meanwhile, rangers say several of their players have received "racist, threatening and sicking abuse online" after their europa league defeat to slavia prague, during which it's alleged, one of the czech players directed racist language at glen kamara.
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slavia say they're considering a criminal complaint against kamara in relation to a later incident in the tunnel. rangers managing director stewart robertson said in a statement: "uefa will be well uefa say they're investigating several incidents from the match. so, rangers didn't feature in the europea league quarterfinal draw — made earlier — with slavia prague drawn against arsenal. here's the line—up in full. manchester united also went through last night. they've been drawn against spanish side granada. the draw for the semis was also made, so if united make it through, they could face ajax — the team they beat to win the trophy in 2017. arsenal are in line for a possible meeting with dinamo zagreb, who knocked out tottenham last night. the champions league quarterfinal draw has also taken place with liverpool drawn against real madrid
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in a repeat of the 2018 final. manchester city will play borussia dortmund — earling haarland up against the side his father played for. chelsea will take on porto, and defending champions bayern munich will play paris saint germain in a repeat of last year's final. the winner of that one will face either manchester city or dortmund in the semi—finals, and we could see liverpool up against chelsea. raymond van barnaveld needed medical assistance after collapsing at the pdc super series 2 event in milton keynes earlier today. the pdc said in a statement that the five—time world champion wasn't taken to hosptial but had to be treated by paramedics on site. van barnaveld returned to his hotel room to be monitored. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six.
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president biden says he is "proud" of secretary of state antony blinken after the first day of talks between american and chinese diplomats in theirfirst face—to—face meeting under the new administration. the two—day negotiations are continuing in alaska after an ill—tempered exchange of words yesterday. the chinese delegation accused the us of inciting other countries to attack it. the us delegation said their chinese counterparts had arrived at the talks in alaska — �*intent on grandstanding'. today we will have an opportunity to discuss key priorities both domestic and global, so that china can better understand our administration's intentions and approach. we also discuss our deep concerns with actions by china, including hong kong, taiwan, cyber attacks on the united states, economic coercion towards our allies. i've said that the united states' relationship with china will be competitive where it should be, collaborative what it can be an adversarial were it must be.
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translation: the people of the two countries and the world, _ they are hoping to see practical outcomes coming out of our dialogue. and for xinjiang, tibet and taiwan, they are an inalienable part of china's territory. china is firmly opposed to us interference in china's internal affairs. we have expressed our staunch opposition to such interference and we will take firm action is in response. our washington correspondent barbara plett—usher has travelled to anchorage — where the meeting is taking place. she says both parties went into the meeting with quite different agendas. it was quite a rare public sparring match. this is not the way you start, normally, a staid diplomatic meeting, and it went
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on for some time. it was extended even after the formal remarks, back and forths. you know, in public comments before the meeting, the biden administration had been quite blunt about its criticisms of china and they brought those same comments to the meeting, so the chinese must have known what was coming and they really came prepared to hit back in kind. one of the senior chinese officials basically said the us should stop pushing its own version of democracy, it's got its own problems, it's got its own domestic problems. that this is not a model, necessarily, for the world, to paraphrase. and many other comments like that. and as you mentioned, afterwards, after this sort of quite sparked beginning, they apparently had a serious and sustained conversation in private afterwards. i suppose there's always a bit of posturing involved but this was an unusual degree. i think the chinese might have been angry, really, by the way the biden administration
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had been talking about them beforehand, and also just a day before sanctions had been imposed on china over its actions against democracy activists in hong kong. so it all came to an atmosphere at the beginning that was quite unusually undiplomatic. a woman who argued that care workers in the uk should be paid the national minimum wage when they have to sleep overnight at work has lost her case at the supreme court. let's get more details from our social affairs correspondent alison holt. this is a fascinating case. what was her argument?— this is a fascinating case. what was her argument? welcome of the case was brought — her argument? welcome of the case was brought by _ her argument? welcome of the case was brought by claire _ her argument? welcome of the case was brought by claire tomlinson - was brought by claire tomlinson blake against the learning disability charity man cap, she was employed as a care work in sheep was paid less than £30 it from a ship between 10pm and seven a:m., she was expected to sleep during that shift but also to keep a listening ear out
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for residents in case they needed help during that time. over 16 months she was called on six times receiving no extra money for the first hour and then after that she was paid the full daytime rate. she argued that she should have been paid the full national minimum wage for all of the hours she was there even when she was asleep. she won that at the employment tribunal but since then it has been going through the courts of the last five years ending up in the supreme court. they pursued it because they said if they didn't they would face a backpay bill in the region of £50 million and across the sector it would be 400 million which they said they could not afford. the court today ruled that the exemption within the legislation meant that the minimum wage did not have to be paid. 50 legislation meant that the minimum wage did not have to be paid. so was the supreme — wage did not have to be paid. so was the supreme court _ wage did not have to be paid. so was the supreme court mindful _ wage did not have to be paid. so was the supreme court mindful of - wage did not have to be paid. so was the supreme court mindful of the - the supreme court mindful of the fact that these care homes would
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face a huge bill, or did they simply focus on the law which is potentially this loophole? i focus on the law which is potentially this loophole? i think for this they _ potentially this loophole? i think for this they simply _ potentially this loophole? i think for this they simply focus - potentially this loophole? i think for this they simply focus on - potentially this loophole? i think for this they simply focus on the | for this they simply focus on the law and actually there's a clause within national minimum wage legislation which talks about sleep ins and is very clear on this matter. so it's clarified the law obviously for mrs tomlinson blake it was a huge blow, she describes as a betrayal and underlining the lack of value placed in the work done by care workers. i have to say they also say whilst it was a relief not to have the backpay bill they also say it's no cause for celebration because they say it underlines the underfunding within this vital sector. , ., .,, , over the last year numerous families across the uk have experienced loss because of coronavirus. chelsea richardson's mum sarah died from the virus in october — chelsea is only 21, and as well as dealing
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with her own grief, she also took on the responsibility of looking after her 4 yonger siblings. heidi tomlinson has been to meet her. have you got your mask? have you got your key? a busy morning routine, seeing younger siblings off to school and college is big sister chelsea's responsibility. she stepped into the caring role after their mum died last year. see you later! wait a minute. see you! 42—year—old mum of five sarah richardson contracted covid and developed a blood disorder. she passed away in october. my mum was amazing. like, my dad's not been around so it's always been my mum. she was, like, the only person we had and now she's gone, so, you know, ithink about her every day, yeah. she was pretty. and helped people. well, it's been hard, but then, my sister's brought us all together and done
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everything for us. not only has she taken the reins of home life, 21—year—old chelsea is a trainee nurse at st james' in leeds. she's grieving but puts aside her feelings to bolster the family. she was everything to me. i'm really sorry. she'd do everything for us. she was my rock and i was her rock. you've taken on so much, chelsea. are you coping? it's difficult. i'm not going to lie. i didn't know what i was expecting, but it's definitely a lot harder than i anticipated. so, today, a special delivery to help. milford sports club nominated the family in a competition to win a year's supply of meat. we got 805 applications. when we came across chelsea's, there was no doubt about it. it were a worthy winner. i'm really, really pleased we've found somebody who deserves it.
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phil's friend, neil the grocer, has also pledged weekly fruit and veg. it puts into perspective your little silly things that you've got - going on, that actually really i aren't that massive, they're just minute when you look- at what chelsea's got to do. i've got to be honest, i there's not a lot of girls of chelsea's age could - take on what she's doing. i just want to say thank you because you don't actually realise how much it means and how much it does help. it will make everyday life easier, as chelsea ploughs on with her unexpected responsibilities. what would your mum think about doing you doing all of this? i hope she'd be proud. she raised me to be strong. and do the best that i can. and i'm trying my best, so i hope she's proud. chelsea richardson ending that report from heidi tomlinson. the headlines on bbc news... countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister
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warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab shortly — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating the handling of allegations against her predecessor alex salmond. now it's time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review with me mark kermode. rounding out the best new movies available for viewing in the home while we look forward to cinemas reopening in may.

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