Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 19, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

2:00 pm
this is bbc news, the headlines. the astrazeneca covid jab is being used again in eu countries — but there may not be enough vaccine supplies to deal with a third wave. unfortunately the increase in the number of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for first minister nicola sturgeon to resign — as reports say msps have concluded the first minister misled the committee investigating the handling of allegations against her predecessor alex salmond. the continuing cost of the pandemic: government borrowing hit more than £19 billion last month, the highest february figure since records began.
2:01 pm
a lesson in primate parenting — bonobos have been seen for the first time adopting babies outside their family groups. we'll hear from the scientists behind the research later this afternoon. a number of eu countries have started using the oxford astrazeneca covid vaccine again — after the european medicines agency confirmed it is safe and effective. germany, france, italy and spain are among the countries that halted its use earlier this month, after concerns about blood clots. but with cases and deaths rising now across europe
2:02 pm
and millions of people in france being placed under lockdown at midnight tonight — there's been a stark warning from germany's health minister — who said there isn't enough vaccine supply in europe to prevent a third wave. our europe correspondent nick beake reports. paris in the spring, a city where the mood is darkening. the french capital is descending into another lockdown, part of the effort to stop a third wave of the virus taking hold across europe. translation: i would say i am more pessimistic, - but that's just because we don't have an end date. the curfew is the same. we've been living like this for almost two months and it's like it's normal now, when it's not. it's all a bit sad. translation: when is this going to end? - what if next year we haven't found a way out of this? what if next year, we have lockdown number eight? that's what scares me. the rise in cases comes as europe faces a vaccination crisis.
2:03 pm
france and other big countries are once again using the astrazeneca jab after the eu drugs regulator confirmed its long—held belief that it is safe for use. at a news conference in berlin, the german health minister warned there is not enough of the astrazeneca vaccine in europe to prevent a third wave by itself. he also said a rise in the number of cases could mean not only a delay in reopening the country but that some restrictions may have to be reimposed. back in paris, there are now more people in intensive care beds than during the second wave, last november. doctors warn the system is reaching breaking point. translation: you can always expand, but the elastic is getting _ tighter and tighter. we're not at the breaking point yet but we are coming very close, so, yes, that limit is not far away. and the worsening picture in europe could have an impact on the uk, the government made clear.
2:04 pm
i think what's going on in europe is a real wake—up call to us and a warning. people that say we could ease restrictions sooner, we just need to look at what's happened in the past, rises in europe have led to rises in the uk. i am hopeful it won't happen this time, not least thanks to the vaccine, but we really do have to stick by the rules to prevent this happening. in a sign of how the fates of nations are intertwined, the uk variant is now the most common strain in poland. it will soon account for 80% of cases. the prime minister said schools and leisure facilities would now have to close and if that didn't work, everything would have to be shut down. this morning, the husband and wife team behind the biontech pfizer vaccine received germany's highest civilian honour. their creation has given hope and has helped to offer a pathway out of the covid nightmare. but in europe at least, the pandemic
2:05 pm
is taking a worrying turn. i asked nick beake earlier why there seems to be a rise in covid cases in so many european countries. on the one hand, you've got the increase in the number of cases that we were talking aboutjust then in poland, for example, a 30% rise over the past week. we saw the picture in paris and other parts of france. so you've got the number of cases increasing, but also this problem of the shortage of vaccines. this week, the european commission said that the number of vaccines coming from astrazeneca was much fewer than they were hoping for, more than 100 million fewer. so that is a real worry. and then, of course, there's this reluctance we've been hearing about people willing to take the vaccines that are in europe. and one thing that is actually complicating things news from france, jane, in the past half an hour or so, although france is one of many eu countries to now resume
2:06 pm
the use of the astrazeneca vaccine after the regulator in europe yesterday saying it was absolutely fine to use that the benefits outweigh the risks. we're hearing that in france they're only going to be giving it to the over 55s. now, that is because of a very small part of the finding yesterday, saying that they want to look in more detail, the european regulator at that lower age group. and i think that sort of mixed message is really difficult when it's so vital that there needs to be public confidence in the vaccines we've got to try and take us out of this covid nightmare. here, borisjohnson is to receive his first dose of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine later today. ministers and health officials are reassuring the public that it is safe, as the rollout continues. and new figures show that last week coronavirus infections continued to fall across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, and increased in scotland. here's our health correspondent anna collinson.
2:07 pm
the message to the more than 11 million people in the uk who have received the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and the millions more waiting, is clear. from the regulator to the prime minister and scientists. the oxford jab is safe and the pfizerjab is safe. the thing that isn't safe is catching covid. there is no difference that blood clots in veins are occurring more than would be expected in the absence of vaccination. the risk benefit is really strongly in favour of getting vaccinated. l while vaccine confidence in the uk is very high, doctors are concerned some younger patients may be missing appointments because they think they are less at risk of the virus. and despite strong messaging from scientists there are concerns, unfounded fears about blood clots circulating in europe are damaging confidence here. we have had people calling us because they have concerns and they say,
2:08 pm
i have had a clot before so should i have it? it's taking the time, and you have to talk to them and try and reassure them. this morning, another grim reminder of why the vaccine roll—out is needed. with 89,000 lives lost to coronavirus last year, new data suggest the uk was one of the top ten worst hit countries in europe in 2020. the uk did have one of the highest death rates in the first half of the year but as this graph shows, it has since been overtaken, most notably by poland. but the pandemic is of course ongoing and these figures do not take into account the pressures and loss seen at the start of this year. as we move firmly into spring, the picture is much more hopeful. a survey suggests coronavirus infections have continued to decrease across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, although they increased in scotland. the government has insisted a drop in supply would not disrupt the schedule of vaccinating all adults by the summer but scientists warn
2:09 pm
the pace will reduce. i think the slightly lower amount of astrazeneca vaccine we are hearing about over the coming months will mean the roll—out of the second phase, which is people under the age of 50 without risk factors, will go more slowly and may even be delayed in terms of its start. one of those in line to get their astrazeneca vaccine today is the prime minister. borisjohnson knows the dangers of covid all too well after he was treated in intensive care for the virus last year and will be hoping his jab will encourage others. anna collinson, bbc news. we can speak now to professor martin marshall, chair of the royal college of gps. good afternoon. a couple of points there, we have talked on the last week about the issues and other european countries that concerns about blood clots, i am interested whether you are those you present
2:10 pm
have had people not even turn up for vaccine appointment or say they do not want one because of that issue. we are hearing isolated stories from gps that there might be a little bit of a drop off and taking up appointments. that does not surprise me greatly, be do not have data that is a major problem at the moment and in my experience as a gp and east london sometimes patients roll say unusual it is safe but they will have turned up and in fact taken off theirjumper and exposed their arm their jumper and exposed their arm ready for the jab theirjumper and exposed their arm ready for the jab when asking the question so they are not very concerned and almost all going ahead and it seems a level of confidence and it seems a level of confidence and the vaccine and the uk is much higher than we had healing and other european countries. we higher than we had healing and other european countries.— european countries. we are talking about the expected _ european countries. we are talking about the expected disruption - european countries. we are talking about the expected disruption to i about the expected disruption to supply the month, how concerned are you about that and the degree to which edible sloth things down? the
2:11 pm
which edible sloth things down? tue: disruption which edible sloth things down? tte: disruption and supplies is disappointing for people under the age of 50 who are looking forward to getting vaccinated, disappointing to the teams and clinicians and non—commissions around the country who have gained a great deal of momentum and pushing through at a rapid pace. but it is only disappointed, i don't think it is a major setback. over the next two weeks we have good supply, we will continue vaccinating the groups over the age 50, the higher risk people but come april we have enough supply to ensure we give the second dose to the people who receive the first dosein the people who receive the first dose injanuary and february the people who receive the first dose in january and february so the people who receive the first dose injanuary and february so the people who will miss out may be delayed for three or four weeks under the age of 50 who looks like a have to wait until may before they get their vaccines. t have to wait until may before they get their vaccines.— have to wait until may before they get their vaccines. i am interested how it is progressing _ get their vaccines. i am interested how it is progressing the - get their vaccines. i am interested how it is progressing the pace, - get their vaccines. i am interested | how it is progressing the pace, you are in east london, how it is progressing and groups that have
2:12 pm
been underrepresented, members of communities that had not and the early stages been coming forward for the jab, have improvements been made in that regard? slaw the jab, have improvements been made in that regard?— in that regard? slow uptake and articular in that regard? slow uptake and particular peeple _ in that regard? slow uptake and particular people from - in that regard? slow uptake and particular people from bame . particular people from bame communities was a real worry going back a month or so, the most recent data suggest that is picking up particularly and asian groups who are receiving about 75% of the level of vaccination seen in white communities a month ago, that is up to about 93% that has improved greatly. uptake and black communities as a little less, more of a concern but there are a lot of initiatives going on at a local level to improve uptake by getting into communities and using community leaders and making the vaccine more accessible, addressing concerns that all of those initiatives seem to be bearing fruit which is good news. t5
2:13 pm
bearing fruit which is good news. is that even more that central government could be done on as at one of those things that is best tackled at local level? it is people like you, public health officials and the region who know what is going on and who needs to perhaps have a conversation with. tt is have a conversation with. it is both, and _ have a conversation with. it is both. and we _ have a conversation with. it is both, and we must _ have a conversation with. te 3 both, and we must uptake a foot off the pedal because any deduction and uptake amongst groups we know from the data are at higher risk of picking up the virus are being admitted to hospital and of dying, any reduction in uptake is going to be a great concern so we need to keep depression up, need to support people and over communities, address their concerns full on and it seems we are getting the and at national and local level and local action is probably going to be most effective. thank you.
2:14 pm
latest figures from the ons infection survey suggest that infections have "continued to decrease" across england and wales and have "levelled off" in northern ireland and increased in scotland in the week to 13th march 2021 let's talk to our head of statistics robert cuffe. you might about geographic variation. the level of i this is about one and 330 people have: a virus and the uk according to estimates, you little bit higher in england, a little law and and northern ireland but that ballpark. and the falls are probably driven by
2:15 pm
wales, portions of england like the south—west and london and flight and the rest of england and northern ireland and slight rises in scotland. one thing that has been to be said as they do not reflect the effect of school openings and england last week because they only grab too much i3th. moscow is on the 8th of march. —— most schools in the 8th of march. —— most schools in the 8th of march. if second the school pupils bring an infection and pass it around and make not sure funny couple of days and not move the numbers some probable another week until we see any effect of that. so perhaps next friday we would reflect on that little or even after. the scientist to have been advising governments say maybe we should calm down about the infection numbers, ease of that because infections
2:16 pm
don't matter unless they lead to people getting sick and the person who is infected getting sick on spreading extra someone who does. but they are saying we should focus on more and more as people going into hospital, the death rate and the numbers which have been unequivocally positive for a long time, they have been coming down and continue to come down so even though maybe there is a hand of the infection rate for slowing it is not time to get too worried and even fa move up a little bit that is not time to pull the ripcord either. we have been reflecting on europe because france for example people going into lockdown at midnight, a different picture and a what of continental europe and there are figures that tell us how the uk compares to much of the rest of europe in terms of death rate. this is building back to last year, but one thing to say as the infections we are seeing in europe at more risk because that is most vaccination and
2:17 pm
europe, it is vaccination that breaks the link between infection and serious sickness and the uk is kind of ahead of that so we might be less worried about it but not on the continent. africa back to last year there is another analysis out today which says around june orjuly the uk had probably one of the worst death rates in europe have not the world from coronavirus but by the end of the year that was not long in the case, a number of countries with a new look past the uk, cut like poland or bulgaria that were not hurt at all when the first wave had had a very bad wave and autumn. spain or belgium that one end and are owned not looking great and the summer and have continued to get a bit worse so no one has had a good time, the epidemic has not been good for everyone but that was a very clear pattern that the uk was one of the how to set countries in the world and many other countries have joined that club towards the end of the year and that is a long way to
2:18 pm
go because that is until the end of 2020 and with the pattern we have been discussing and how that is going to play out to go with the very long story of this epidemic. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... countries in europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for first minister nicola sturgeon to resign — as reports say msps have concluded the first minister misled the committee investigating the handling of allegations against her predecessor alex salmond. the scottish conservative leader at holyrood, ruth davidson,
2:19 pm
says nicola sturgeon should resign if she has a "shred of integrity". a majority of the committee investigating the scottish government's handling of harassment claims against alex salmond are understood to have voted last night that ms sturgeon had not given them accurate information. she's insisted she told them the truth. a report about whether the first minister broke the ministerial code is expected within the next week. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. scotland's first minister is facing significant pressure, just weeks ahead of the scottish parliament election. for some time, she's faced claims she's not told the full story about what she knew when about harassment allegations against alex salmond. i solemnly, sincerely and truly declare... now, a committee of msps has concluded she misled them about meetings she had with mr salmond three years ago. by a narrow majority, split along party lines,
2:20 pm
the committee decided ms sturgeon�*s account to them had not been accurate. the first minister says she stands by her evidence and that some on the committee had made their minds up before she appeared. i do not believe the first minister should resign. i do not believe she has misled parliament and i have absolute confidence in her veracity of what she said in those eight hours of evidence to that committee, in her integrity and in her professionalism. and i am not going to comment on unattributed briefings about a report which has not yet been published. this row between two first ministers is reaching its climax, the most bitter battle between two former allies. alex salmond has said his one—time protege has broken the rules that ministers have to follow. ms sturgeon has said he's peddling false conspiracy theories. but this crisis couldn't come at a worse time for the snp. there's just seven weeks until scotland goes to the polls and opposition parties are claiming
2:21 pm
ms sturgeon can't be trusted. the parliament was misled by the first minister. now, that is, to me, a clear breach of the ministerial code and i think that, if she had a shred of integrity, nicola sturgeon would be considering her position. she has every opportunity to resign. on a campaign visit, labour's leader said the allegations were serious and could be a resignation matter. if the report suggests that the first minister has misled parliament and potentially breached the ministerial code, then that is incredibly serious. obviously, the focus is very much on the individual, nicola sturgeon, but actually, it's bigger than that, it's about the integrity of the scottish parliament, it's about the integrity of the office of first minister. the full committee report will be published on tuesday. as well as accusing ms sturgeon of misleading msps, it's expected to criticise other parts of the account she gave. and nickjoins us now live.
2:22 pm
more to come, this is not over, what more could there be when bc the report. as well as concluding that nicola sturgeon misled the committee and her evidence we expect that report will question some of the accounts she has given of meetings she held with alex salmond and also to raise some concerns about why she took so long to record those meetings as official government business. she did not do that right away, one of the main accusations she has faced from opposition parties when it comes to the claim that she broke the ministerial code. you got a flavour from the package there of how heated the election campaign in scotland is going to be, it is about to be dominated by some of these claims about nicola sturgeon. herspokesman of these claims about nicola sturgeon. her spokesman has put out a hugely critical comment on the committee within the last couple of
2:23 pm
hours, i want to read you a part of it in particular saying the committee appears to have resorted to baseless assertion, supposition and smear. this is not how serious parliamentary committees are supposed to work. it is quite clear that nicola sturgeon is going to try and ride out the conclusions of this committee by painting it as a politically partisan group of politicians, it was opposition parties who outvoted the snp to come up parties who outvoted the snp to come up with most of these critical conclusions. there is another report coming on at the moment from her independent adviser on the coach, james hamilton who has been looking at whether she broke the ministerial code. that is something had a policy she is found guilty of she will have to design over. we expect that report to come in the next few days, probably the start of next week although to be honest it is completely unclear exactly when that
2:24 pm
role the officially published. there are only a few days left until holyrood breaks up, this extraordinary row engulfing scottish politics and six weeks to go until voters have their say. thank you. the bbc has said it's extremely concerned after a bbc news burmese reporter, aung thura , was taken away by unidentified men in the capital, naypyitaw. he was reporting outside a district court in when a group of civilian clothed men, in an unmarked van arrived and demanded to see him. he has been uncontactable since. the bbc has called on the myanmar authorities to help locate him and confirm that he is safe. former british cycling and team sky chief doctor richard freeman has been permanently struck off the medical register. the medical practitioners tribunal imposed the strongest possible
2:25 pm
sanction after a tribunal found dr freeman guilty of ordering the banned performance enhancing drug, testosterone, in 2011 — knowing or believing it would be used to dope an athlete. dr freeman is currently working as a gp in lancashire, where he is taking part in the covid—19 vaccination programme. new powers are to be given to the northern ireland secretary, brandon lewis, to compel the stormont executive to implement abortion laws in full. the government at westminster says it is disappointed that services aren't available across all of northern ireland a year after making it possible for terminations to take place in all circumstances in the first twelve weeks of pregnancy. the democratic unionist party says it will vigorously oppose any attempt to intervene in what is a devolved matter. sinn fein has said there should be no further delay to the provision of abortion services.
2:26 pm
with the cost of pandemic support measures continuing — new figures show the uk government borrowed 19.1 billion pounds last month — the highest february figure since records began in 1993. earlier i spoke to our economics correspondent andy verity. i asked him if this trend in borrowing is set to continue. it looks eye watering, and the natural reaction is to say, well, if i have big debts in my household, that's scary. the bailiffs might come around sometime soon. i could be in trouble. i could have my house repossessed. but it's not like that for the government at all. you've got £355 billion is forecast to be borrowed this financial year. by far the highest in peacetime. but the interest rates are so low that the cost of servicing that debt is easily manageable. so you by no means have to cut spending in order to deal with it. and certainly there's no urgency to raise taxes either.
2:27 pm
now, there's two ways you can deal with a deficit, which means you're spending more than your income. one is to cut your way out of it, which they tried over the last 12 years, didn't work very well. we didn't get into surplus in all of those years in spite of all the austerity. the other is to grow your way out of it. now, the last time the budget was in surplus was around 2002 under gordon brown. and if you look at what the obr the official forecaster is forecasting for debt, well, is going to climb this year, you can see a big spike where it really gets high. but then it's forecasting because we're going to get a snap back kind of growth next year it will drop really quickly. so in two years from now, it will only be about a third of what it is and then it will get down to a much more manageable level, according to the forecast, by the end of five years. briefly today, we are hearing about the impact of the decision, government decision to sell some shares in. to sell some shares in rbs. yeah, well, this is interesting. we paid £46 billion for rbs back in 2008 and 2009. and the government decided actually five years ago under george osborne
2:28 pm
to sell it at a loss. so the share price we paid was £5 and they fetched a lot less in the market. the government's put something like a £2 billion loss, but you put that in the context of the amount rishi sunak is borrowing it is not such a large sum. it's red nose day — and tonight's tv show on bbc1 will be unlike previous years. daniel craig, keira knightly and olivia colman are among those taking part in a socially distant comic relief. what isn't different though is the aim to raise money to tackle hunger, homelessness, domestic abuse and mental health. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. this is the first socially distanced comic relief. red nose day will be different this year. we know that it's hard financially for so many people right now. but we'd love you to join us, even if it's just to share a laugh. tonight's show will be shorter, only three hours, but the vicar of dibley returns
2:29 pm
with a special message. last year, i was sponsored £5 per villager if i could squeeze a whole granny smith into my mouth. job done. while david tennant and michael sheen take part in an historical version of their lockdown hit staged. i'm going to write about this. about the plague? yeah _ is that what people want? yeah, they want social realism. do they? 0k. yeah. and catherine tate's nanjoins james bond for a secret briefing, so secret, all that's been released so far is this one photo. this is pretty funny. the money raised by comic relief will be used to support those who have been hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. but the night's other aim is to simply make people laugh. colin patterson, bbc news.
2:30 pm
now, tomasz schafernaker has the weather. little change on the weather front as we head into the weekend for most of us, fairly cloudy, a little on the nippy side, although some spots in scotland have been quite sunny and warm recently. these are the evening temperatures now tonight. again, a fairamount of cloud across the uk, with a few clear spells here, and they're not particularly cold. overnight temperatures hovering around about five or six degrees celsius. and then saturday, the first day of astronomical spring, the spring equinox. and again, another fairly cloudy day. but i think the best of the sunshine on saturday may be eastern scotland to the east of the pennines. and also once any rain clears earlier in the day in the north of scotland, there should be some sunshine, too. and again, around nine to 13 celsius and little change expected into sunday.
2:31 pm
the weather will eventually change, but not until later next week. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: the astrazeneca covid jab is being used again in eu countries, but there may not be enough vaccine supplies to deal with a third wave. unfortunately the increase in the number of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating how allegations against alex salmond were handled.
2:32 pm
we will have more on all those stories over the course of the afternoon. right now, as we try to at this time, generally, we will catch up with all the latest sports news with jane. one of the highlights of the jump season is due to get underway in half an hour — the cheltenham gold cup. rachael blackmore is one to watch and she's had a fantastic start to the final day of the festival. she won the triumph hurdle on quilixios, she was already the leading jockey and that makes it six wins this week. blackmore could become the first woman to win the gold cup, which goes off at 5 past 3 —
2:33 pm
she's riding "ah plu tar" which is joint—favourite with "al— boum photo", who's going for a third successive win. in the last half hour, jockey kevin sexton has won the county handicap hurdle on belfast banter. glasgow rangers say several of their players have received "racist, threatening and sicking abuse online" after their europa league defeat to slavia prague, during which it's alleged, one of the czech players directed managing director stewart robertson said in a statement... uefa say they're investigating several incidents from the match. and slavia prague's quarter—final opponents will be arsenal, after they beat olympiakos. they actually lost 1—0, but their advantage from the first leg was enough to take them through 3—2 on aggregate. arsenal will be favourites to beat slavia prague, but the czech side have already seen off leicester, as well as
2:34 pm
rangers this season. manchester united are the only other british side still in the europa league — thanks to paul pogba's goal against ac milan last night. and they've been drawn against granada, who're playing in the competition for the first time. here's the line—up in full — and the draw for the semis was also made, so if united make it through, they could face ajax — the team they beat to win the trophy in 2017. arsenal are in line for a possible meeting with dinamo zagreb, who knocked out tottenham last night. the draw for the champions league quarter and semi finals has taken place in switzerland. three english teams involved, liverpool, manchester city and chelsea. and there's a tough draw for liverpool — they'll face real madrid, in a repeat of the 2018 final. after losing that, liverpool went on to lift the trophy the following year, of course. manchester city were drawn against borussia dortmund — earling haarland up against the side his father played for. chelsea will take on porto
2:35 pm
and defending champions bayern munich will play paris saint germain — the side that comes through that one will face the winner of manchester city's tie in the semi—finals, and we could see liverpool up against chelsea. gemma grainger has been named as the new manager of wales women, on a four—year contract. she replaces jayne ludlow, who left the post in january by mutual consent. grainger was part of the england coaching staff for euro 2017, where they reached the quarter—finals. she's spent 11 years working across the development squads. her appointment is understood to have been well received by the players, who were disappointed at ludlow�*s departure after seven years in charge. the government is considering the use of covid certificates to enable fans to return to sporting events. culture minister oliver dowden said they were working to get as many supporters as possible into the semi—finals and the final of this summer's european championship. he added that the future of the sporting industry depended on fans filling seats.
2:36 pm
castleford tigers head coach daryl powell has announced he'll be leaving the club at the end of the season. he took over his boyhood side eight years ago, when they were bottom of the super league table and turned them into title contenders. they won the league leaders' shield in 2017 and reached a challenge cup final and a grand final under powell's leadership. he said it was the right time to step down, for him and the club. and we've heard this afternoon that the former british cycling and team sky chief doctor richard freeman has been struck off, after he was found guilty of ordering banned testosterone in 2011. that's it for now from us. more sport and the next hour. we return now to more coverage of coronavirus. over the last year numerous families across the uk have experienced loss because of coronavirus.
2:37 pm
chelsea richardson's mum sarah died from the virus in october — chelsea is only 21, and as well as dealing with her own grief, she also took on the responsibility of looking after her four yonger siblings. heidi tomlinson has been to meet her. have you got your mask? have you got your key? a busy morning routine, seeing younger siblings off to school and college is big sister chelsea's responsibility. she stepped into the caring role after their mum died last year. see you later! wait a minute. see you! 42—year—old mum of five sarah richardson contracted covid and developed a blood disorder. she passed away in october. my mum was amazing. like, my dad's not been around so it's always been my mum. she was, like, the only person we had and now she's gone, so, you know, ithink about her every day, yeah. she was pretty.
2:38 pm
and helped people. well, it's been hard, but then, my sister's brought us all together and done everything for us. not only has she taken the reins of home life, 21—year—old chelsea is a trainee nurse at st james' in leeds. she's grieving but puts aside her feelings to bolster the family. she was everything to me. i'm really sorry. she'd do everything for us. she was my rock and i was her rock. you've taken on so much, chelsea. are you coping? it's difficult. i'm not going to lie. i didn't know what i was expecting, but it's definitely a lot harder than i anticipated. so, today, a special delivery to help. milford sports club nominated the family in a competition to win a year's supply of meat.
2:39 pm
we got 805 applications. when we came across chelsea's, there was no doubt about it. it were a worthy winner. i'm really, really pleased we've found somebody who deserves it. phil's friend, neil the grocer, has also pledged weekly fruit and veg. it puts into perspective your little silly things that you've got - going on, that actually really i aren't that massive, they're just minute when you look- at what chelsea's got to do. i've got to be honest, l there's not a lot of girls of chelsea's age could - take on what she's doing. i just want to say thank you because you don't actually realise how much it means and how much it does help. it will make everyday life easier, as chelsea ploughs on with her unexpected responsibilities. what would your mum think about doing you doing all of this? i hope she'd be proud. she raised me to be strong. and do the best that i can. and i'm trying my best, so i hope she's proud.
2:40 pm
chelsea richardson ending that report from heidi tomlinson. a woman who argued that care workers in the uk should be paid the national minimum wage when they have to sleep overnight at work has lost her case at the supreme court. earlier our social affairs correspondent alison holt gave me the background to this case. the case was brought by claire tomlinson—blake, against the learning disability charity mencap, where she was a care worker. mrs tomlinson—blake was paid less than £30 for an overnight sleep—in shift. this is where she was working between 10pm and 7am. she was expected to sleep but also keep a listening ear out for the residents in case they needed help. and during 16 months she was called on six times, first hour she wasn't paid any extra, after that she was paid extra. but she argued she should have been paid the national minimum wage for all of that time,
2:41 pm
even when she was asleep. she won her employment tribunal case, and this has been going through the courts since then because although mencap now pays the national minimum wage, what it said was that it couldn't afford the back pay, it would have cost it £15 million, and it is a charity. across the sector, it was estimated it would cost £400 million for care providers, who would then be liable for backpay. today the supreme court has been really clear, it has said that there is an exemption in a national minimum wage legislation around sleep—ins. so national minimum wage does not have to be paid in that case. mencap says it is relieved but this isn't a time for celebration, because the whole care sector is underfunded. and mrs tomlinson—blake says she feels it is a betrayal because it underlines how undervalued care workers are. all week we have been hearing stories sourced and produced by young people between the ages of 11 and 18 as part of the bbc young reporter competition.
2:42 pm
today we hear from 17—year—old ben, an apprentice footballer at burton albion. he tells us about the pressures of trying to make it as a professional. there has been a couple of lads recently who have been released by clubs who have taken their own lives. that should not be how it is. young people are often overshadowed on the mental side, you kind of see, you're playing football every day, what can be wrong with you? who knows what is going on inside? i am 17 years old and i play for burton albion football club. i am a first scholar at the moment so it's my first year of two years. there's loads of pressures and different kinds of things going on. the football is kind of a hour and a half of your day. you are leaving school, you are leaving your mates, you are leaving your whole kind of last 12 years, almost, to come and play football. and if you don't get a pro
2:43 pm
at the end of it, it's a big step to make. yeah, ijust kind of wanted to highlight the importance of the mental health side of football. people think, you are a footballer, you are living life, but it's not that at all, you are going home, you are sore, you're aching, you've got to wake up the next morning, you've got to get through it and it's what you've got to do if you want to be a footballer. if you are not training well enough, you're out of the team. it is hard, you are going home, you're not playing in 90 minutes and thinking what am i doing here? so, yeah, highlighting the importance of that side of the game is vital. an academy footballer is harder than people think. you are in there every day, monday to saturday, you've got gym training in the morning, you've got college, monday, wednesday, thursday, you've got tactical sessions, you've got video sessions, you've got extras at the end if you want to do that, getting up early, getting home late, it's hard. if you do not do your work, you're not playing in the team. there's loads of different assignments with different teachers.
2:44 pm
it's a big part of the scholarship doing college work, yeah. yeah, it's not like anything else, i don't think. we are all mates but you are fighting with each other. if he is taking your place as a pro contract, then you are not going to be happy, so, yeah, it's a bit fake, in a sense, that you're mates obviously but you want to be better than them and you need to be better than them if you want to be a footballer. i have got plans if football doesn't work out. probably uni, i have been thinking like kind of america and different kind of english ones, but, hopefully, get a pro contract. my whole life goal has been to be a footballer, so i am trying to work towards that. yes, doing everything i can to do it. that was ben. and if you've been enjoying
2:45 pm
the stories told by the winners of this year's bbc young reporter competition — dojoin us at 8.30pm tonight — for a special half hour programme showcasing their work. at the peak of the pandemic, as cases climbed and hospital admissions increased, the nhs was at risk of being overwhelmed. but tens of thousands of nursing students stepped in to volunteer, with many of them working on the front line for the very first time. now, many of those are preparing to graduate this year. we've been hearing from eight student nurses from across the uk, to find out what it was like to train in the middle of a national emergency. i would probably sum it up as a roller—coaster. my student experience before covid was absolutely amazing. socialising a lot with all of my uni colleagues and things. _
2:46 pm
you were allowed to make mistakes, you were allowed to sort of take time in learning but i think that changed with covid. so, i'm just on my way to a placement. it's 6:30am. we were out on placement in march last year when the first few cases started coming through. things were changing on a daily basis, so one day the rules were this, the next day, the rules were this. it was just such a feeling, walking in and thinking, like, wow, all of these beds could have been filled with patients with covid—19. even wearing the ppe - was challenging, you know, you were sweating. it's definitely a completely different experience from what it was like before covid. it's been a really difficult time just now in the hospital for the patients, not only because they're ill but because they're not allowed to see family and have no visitors. you know, the elderly like to talk about their grandchildren a lot. the younger patients, they kind of like to talk
2:47 pm
about missing the pubs, and missing seeing their friends. but for myself personally, although there is a big change in the hospital, not being able to see my family has been really, really difficult. hello! my mum and dad are both working from home at the minute so i've been quite cautious about obviously not wanting to bring it home. so, i'm just going to put my uniform straight in the washing machine. i've got little sistersl who are four and six, and i have missed birthdays, i i've missed them growing up. we are always on video and i ring them and stuff so it's ok - but i would like to hug them at some point. _ a bit of a tough day, one of our patients passed away unfortunately today. so it's been quite upsetting for obviously all the staff and their family as well. there's no words you can to sayi to someone who's just lost mum and dad to the same virus. i just sat with that person and held their hand and i said, you know, "i know i'm
2:48 pm
not your family, you don't know me, but just know that you're not alone and i'll be here with you". i'm tired today. it's... it's sad going to all these people's houses that are completely isolated. i definitely struggled - during the first lockdown, with mental health. i spoke to my gp, because i wasjust finding it so difficult _ because you want to reach out and ask for support _ but this has never happened before to our generation. i when i was told i was going to the respiratory ward, i was very anxious, i was worried not for myself, i was worried about bringing something home to my family. try to keep positive, going for walks, watched a lot of stupid tv, just trying to lift my mood. it's also really good living with two other nursing students because the first thing we ask one another as we come home through the door is, how was your day? so everybody vents and tells their stories. usually you end up laughing about it
2:49 pm
which is really nice, i'd rather laugh than cry. it's currently quarter to four in the morning, coming in for my break. say hello! you can definitely see there's light at the end of the tunnel. we've come out of it a lot stronger, a lot more positive. i'm definitely proud to say that i was a student nurse during the pandemicjust because, because we got through it, really. when i look at all my friends and fellow nursing students, i'm just so proud, you know. not only proud of myself, but proud of them. i'm so excited for everybody graduating, to start their proper nursing journey. i'm studying for an exam that we have in a couple of weeks, our last exam of the three years. i know in my little tutorial group, we are always, every week, someone saying, please, when this is all over, let's just go for dinner, drinks, and pretend life is normal. so, yeah, i think we're all looking forward to that.
2:50 pm
well done to all those student nurses, and an extraordinary training for them. now we're going to take a few minutes to talk about something entirely different that we haven't been able to touch on far today. here is a curious item. scientists have witnessed bonobo apes adopting infants who were born outside of their social group for the first time in the wild. researchers from durham university and the university of kyoto say the findings give us greater insight into the parental instincts of one of humans' closest relatives, and could help to explain the emotional reason behind why people readily adopt children who they have had no previous connection with. let's speak now to marie—laure poiret who took part in the research.
2:51 pm
hello, good afternoon. you tell me, i believe these were animals that were examined in the wild, explain how it was done, where they are living and everything he discovered. the they are living and everything he discovered-— they are living and everything he discovered. , , , discovered. the study took place in an amazing — discovered. the study took place in an amazing field _ discovered. the study took place in an amazing field site _ discovered. the study took place in an amazing field site in _ discovered. the study took place in an amazing field site in the - an amazing field site in the democratic republic of the congo. bonobos there have been studied for over 50 years so they are well adapted to humans and i've been spending six months there i had the chance to follow them every day and had the chance to see these amazing cases. ., . .,, i. ., , had the chance to see these amazing cases. ., . i. ., , ., cases. how close were you able to net to cases. how close were you able to get to them? _ cases. how close were you able to get to them? well, _ cases. how close were you able to get to them? well, we _ cases. how close were you able to get to them? well, we are - cases. how close were you able to get to them? well, we are trying l cases. how close were you able to | get to them? well, we are trying to sta uuite get to them? well, we are trying to stay quite away _ get to them? well, we are trying to stay quite away from _ get to them? well, we are trying to stay quite away from them - get to them? well, we are trying to stay quite away from them because | get to them? well, we are trying to i stay quite away from them because we don't want to disturb them. we are trying to stay at least ten metres
2:52 pm
away. but that is quite nice because they are quite big. that away. but that is quite nice because they are quite big.— they are quite big. that is quite close! are _ they are quite big. that is quite close! are they _ they are quite big. that is quite close! are they tame? - they are quite big. that is quite close! are they tame? no, - they are quite big. that is quite| close! are they tame? no, they they are quite big. that is quite - close! are they tame? no, they are not. we close! are they tame? no, they are not- we want _ close! are they tame? no, they are not. we want them _ close! are they tame? no, they are not. we want them to _ close! are they tame? no, they are not. we want them to feel- close! are they tame? no, they are not. we want them to feel like - close! are they tame? no, they are not. we want them to feel like we | not. we want them to feel like we are trees, moving trees, we are not interrupting them disturbing them but we are not giving them anything. we just want them to consider us as useless! useless beings following them day after day. you useless! useless beings following them day after day.— useless! useless beings following them day after day. you are far from useless but — them day after day. you are far from useless but i — them day after day. you are far from useless but i understand _ them day after day. you are far from useless but i understand what - them day after day. you are far from useless but i understand what you i useless but i understand what you are saying, you don't want to destruct their habitat, you don't want to encroach on them because they are living in the wild. what they've been doing, the images are remarkable, but you saw several animals that over a period of time
2:53 pm
took in a youngster, a baby, i'm probably not using the right terminology! took in a youngster that you knew was not from their group? that you knew was not from their arou - ? . that you knew was not from their i rou . ? ., , that you knew was not from their u-rou? ., , , group? yeah, the first case my colleague. _ group? yeah, the first case my colleague, one _ group? yeah, the first case my colleague, one day _ group? yeah, the first case my colleague, one day she - group? yeah, the first case my colleague, one day she noticed group? yeah, the first case my - colleague, one day she noticed there was one more infant in the group that she was following everyday, and it was really weird. yeah, she realised it was an infant from another social group. and probably the mother is gone, died, and the mother, an adult female, in this group who have already had two dependent offspring, which is quite amazing. dependent offspring, which is quite amazinu. ~ ., ., dependent offspring, which is quite amazinu. ., ., ., a dependent offspring, which is quite amazin_ ., ., ., m amazing. what sort of ages? as you can tell i amazing. what sort of ages? as you can tell i really _ amazing. what sort of ages? as you can tell i really know— amazing. what sort of ages? as you can tell i really know nothing, - amazing. what sort of ages? as you can tell i really know nothing, whatl can tell i really know nothing, what sort of ages they live two? bonobos live around — sort of ages they live two? bonobos
2:54 pm
live around 15 _ sort of ages they live two? bonobos live around 15 years _ sort of ages they live two? bonobos live around 15 years old _ sort of ages they live two? bonobos live around 15 years old in _ sort of ages they live two? bonobos live around 15 years old in the - live around 15 years old in the wild, and so here mother's role is crucial for the survival of the infants. in these cases, if the female did not adopt this infant, they would probably have died. yeah, thatis they would probably have died. yeah, that is why, the thing is during the first five years of their life bonobos need constant care and attention from the mother. and this female decided out of nowhere, for no obvious reason, to adopt this young individual. and this is a really costly behaviour, very exhausting, as you can imagine, just like humans, taking care of tiny babies like this.— like humans, taking care of tiny babies like this. especially if you aet babies like this. especially if you net to m babies like this. especially if you get to my age! _ babies like this. especially if you get to my age! that's _ babies like this. especially if you get to my age! that's absolutely j get to my age! that's absolutely exhausting- _ get to my age! that's absolutely exhausting. the _ get to my age! that's absolutely exhausting. the point _ get to my age! that's absolutely exhausting. the point is - get to my age! that's absolutely exhausting. the point is they - get to my age! that's absolutely | exhausting. the point is they are similar in many ways to humans. that is why all yourfindings similar in many ways to humans. that is why all your findings are so interesting.
2:55 pm
as i said, we did not find any obvious reason why these adult females would have adopted this infants because they don't gain an apparent benefit for that, so it means probably this behaviour might have been driven by a strong drive to help others or at least strong attraction to infants, just as we can observe in humans. tt is attraction to infants, just as we can observe in humans.- attraction to infants, just as we can observe in humans. it is a case of actually — can observe in humans. it is a case of actually what _ can observe in humans. it is a case of actually what is _ can observe in humans. it is a case of actually what is it _ can observe in humans. it is a case of actually what is it for _ can observe in humans. it is a case of actually what is it for them, - of actually what is it for them, just sheer instinct that they doing that. it's public not possible to summarise, but what is that like for you, to be really quite close to them and experience this? this is remarkable. tt them and experience this? this is remarkable-— remarkable. it is. you know, my phd ro'ect is remarkable. it is. you know, my phd preject is for — remarkable. it is. you know, my phd project is for these _ remarkable. it is. you know, my phd project is for these infants _ remarkable. it is. you know, my phd project is for these infants and - project is for these infants and juvenile behaviours and when i look at them, it is like looking at human infants, it is crazy the way they play and interact with each other and sometimes they throw tantrums,
2:56 pm
just like humans!— just like humans! really fascinating to observe- — just like humans! really fascinating to observe. just _ just like humans! really fascinating to observe. just like _ just like humans! really fascinating to observe. just like humans! - just like humans! really fascinating | to observe. just like humans! really lovely to speak to you. thank you so much for taking the time this afternoon. that is marie—laure poiret, who is a researcher based with durham university, and what a really remarkable story, and all that research in the democratic republic of congo and elsewhere. really interesting. let's pause at this time and catch up let's pause at this time and catch up with the weather prospects whenever you are. tomasz shafernaker has the weather. for most of us, not much change on the weather front since yesterday. a fair amount of cloud across the uk and that's how it's going to stay into the weekend. however, the seasons are changing. in fact, today, the last day of astronomical winter, tomorrow is the spring equinox. and the high pressure which is here today will be with us tomorrow and into next week as well, so hence, very little change
2:57 pm
on the weather front. here's the jet stream pattern — you can see the jet stream to the north of us, but notice how the jet stream goes around this area of higher and slightly milder air. it's actually quite cold over europe at the moment, a real nip in the air, barely above freezing in some areas. so, scotland has recently been one of the warmest places in europe, believe it or not. through tonight, clear spells mean temperatures will dip down to 4 degrees in glasgow, maybe 3 in the southeast of england and east anglia as well. but generally speaking, another cloudy evening and night to come. tomorrow, high pressure still with us, so light winds, variable amounts of cloud floating around the uk. this is what it looks like early in the morning. notice just a suggestion of a weak weather front getting into scotland, so probably some rain there in the north of the highlands and the western isles. temperatures could get up to 1a degrees in the northeast of england, maybe around hull, this is where we're expecting the best of the sunny breaks. i mentioned how chilly
2:58 pm
it is in europe at the moment, take a look at these temperatures — berlin around 4 celsius, warsaw, just a couple of degrees above freezing. helsinki, similar weather, the same for moscow. it is not particularly warm across parts of the mediterranean as well. unsettled weather there around turkey and greece and even in rome and barcelona, around 13 or 1a degrees, so about as mild as it has been currently in scotland. here's the forecast for sunday. the high pressure still with us, light winds, some sunshine around but the temperatures, nothing spectacular, around 8 to 13 celsius. here's the outlook into next week. by the time we get to tuesday night into wednesday, the weather will start turning in the northwest of the uk and by thursday, it will be windier and more unsettled throughout.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
a achievable this a achievable is bbc news, the headlines. this is bbc news, the headlines. countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. unfortunately the increase in the number of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating how allegations against her predecessor alex salmond were handled. the supreme court rules that care workers who have to sleep at their workplace in case they are needed — are not
3:01 pm
entitled to the minimum wage for their whole shift. it'll be a very different comic relief red nose day this year — but celebrities are still coming together to raise money for good causes a number of eu countries have started using the oxford astrazeneca covid vaccine again — after the european medicines agency confirmed it is safe and effective. germany, france, italy and spain are among the countries that halted its use earlier this month, after concerns about blood clots. but with cases and deaths rising now across continental europe — and millions of people in france
3:02 pm
being placed under lockdown at midnight tonight — there's been a stark warning from germany's health minister — who said there isn't enough vaccine supply across the continent to prevent a third wave. our europe correspondent nick beake reports. paris in the spring, a city where the mood is darkening. the french capital is descending into another lockdown, part of the effort to stop a third wave of the virus taking hold across europe. translation: i would say i am more pessimistic, - but that's just because we don't have an end date. the curfew is the same. we've been living like this for almost two months and it's like it's normal now, when it's not. it's all a bit sad. translation: when is this going to end? - what if next year we haven't found a way out of this? what if next year, we have
3:03 pm
lockdown number eight? that's what scares me. the rise in cases comes as europe faces a vaccination crisis. france and other big countries are once again using the astrazeneca jab after the eu drugs regulator confirmed its long—held belief that it is safe for use. at a news conference in berlin, the german health minister warned there is not enough of the astrazeneca vaccine in europe to prevent a third wave by itself. he also said a rise in the number of cases could mean not only a delay in reopening the country but that some restrictions may have to be reimposed. back in paris, there are now more people in intensive care beds than during the second wave, last november. doctors warn the system is reaching breaking point. translation: you can always expand, but the elastic is getting _ tighter and tighter. we're not at the breaking point yet but we are coming very close, so, yes, that limit is not far away. and the worsening picture in europe
3:04 pm
could have an impact on the uk, the government made clear. i think what's going on in europe is a real wake—up call to us and a warning. people that say we could ease restrictions sooner, we just need to look at what's happened in the past, rises in europe have led to rises in the uk. i am hopeful it won't happen this time, not least thanks to the vaccine, but we really do have to stick by the rules to prevent this happening. in a sign of how the fates of nations are intertwined, the uk variant is now the most common strain in poland. it will soon account for 80% of cases. the prime minister said schools and leisure facilities would now have to close and if that didn't work, everything would have to be shut down. this morning, the husband and wife team behind the biontech pfizer vaccine received germany's highest civilian honour. their creation has given hope and has helped to offer a pathway out of the covid nightmare. but in europe at least, the pandemic
3:05 pm
is taking a worrying turn. for more on the situation in france and germany we've been hearing from our correspondents hugh schofield in paris and jenny hill in berlin. we'll hearfrom hugh on the latest lockdown that affects paris in a moment — but first here'sjenny hill on the latest upsurge in covid cases in germany. well, experts here say that germany is now in a situation where case numbers are rising exponentially, they're extremely concerned. there was a real surge of infection here over christmas, which took intensive care capacity to its limits. some experts say, actually, if cases continue to rise, as they're doing now, and we could see a similar surge of infection happening again at around easter, it's quite clear that germany, like so many other of its neighbours, is now in the grip of what appears to be a very vicious third wave of infection.
3:06 pm
and that's of particular concern here, because as you've seen in that report, just 8% of the german population has had a first dose of vaccine. so far, a very slow national roll—out of the vaccination programme. and so experts are extremely worried about what will happen next. all of this is compounded, i think, by the fact that germany had started to actually ease some lockdown restrictions. the easter holidays are coming up. the government is appealing to people not to travel either inside the country or abroad, not to get together with people other than immediate family. but they are facing, i think, a bit of an uphill battle on that. and angela merkel is due to sit down with regional leaders again on monday to talk about what happens next. but experts here are clear. they say what's needed right now is a hard and fast return to lookdown. a third of the french are going to be affected, 21 million people in paris and its surrounding area, then a swathe of territory leading
3:07 pm
up to the northern belgian border around calais, a couple of departments in normandy and then down in the south around nice. these are all areas where a threshold has been passed in the last few days, where there are now more than 400 cases of covid 100,000 people. and in accordance with the government's own set of provisions, that means they fall into a new kind of category and the lockdown is kicking in from midnight. and it won't be quite as bad a lockdown as we had in november, which was in itself a lighter lockdown than the one we had last march. for example, it will be possible to go outside for exercise almost at will. there's no limit to how much time you can spend outside taking exercise. but it also needs to be said that the curfew, nationwide curfew has been in place for some weeks and remains in place. so life is already quite difficult. so not that much necessarily will change in the day to day lives of people here in paris.
3:08 pm
but it is a psychological burden, i think that everyone feels it means also that they're going to have to produce these pieces of paper for the police whenever they leave their home to justify that they're being out of their homes and that and they can't leave paris either. all of this, i think, adds to the pressure and makes it a very gloomy city today. the french prime minister, jean castex was one of the first people in the country to recieve the aztrazeneca vaccine after the resumption of its use today. mr castex said he wanted to set an example. this comes as france announced a limited month—long lockdown in paris and fifteen other areas it takes effect at midnight tonight, to try to combat a potential third wave. here, borisjohnson is to receive his first dose of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine later today. ministers and health officials are reassuring the public that it is safe, as the rollout continues. and new figures show that last week
3:09 pm
coronavirus infections continued to fall across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, and increased in scotland. here's our health correspondent anna collinson. the message to the more than 11 million people in the uk who have received the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and the millions more waiting, is clear. from the regulator to the prime minister and scientists. the oxford jab is safe and the pfizerjab is safe. the thing that isn't safe is catching covid. there is no difference that blood clots in veins are occurring more than would be expected in the absence of vaccination. the risk benefit is really strongly in favour of getting vaccinated. l while vaccine confidence in the uk is very high, doctors are concerned some younger patients may be missing appointments because they think they are less at risk of the virus. and despite strong messaging from scientists there are concerns,
3:10 pm
unfounded fears about blood clots circulating in europe are damaging confidence here. we have had people calling us because they have concerns and they say, i have had a clot before so should i have it? it's taking time, and you have to talk to them and try and reassure them. this morning, another grim reminder of why the vaccine roll—out is needed. with 89,000 lives lost to coronavirus last year, new data suggest the uk was one of the top ten worst hit countries in europe in 2020. the uk did have one of the highest death rates in the first half of the year but as this graph shows, it has since been overtaken, most notably by poland. but the pandemic is of course ongoing and these figures do not take into account the pressures and loss seen at the start of this year. as we move firmly into spring, the picture is much more hopeful. a survey suggests coronavirus infections have continued to decrease across england
3:11 pm
and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, although they increased in scotland. the government has insisted a drop in supply would not disrupt the schedule of vaccinating all adults by the summer but scientists warn the pace will reduce. i think the slightly lower amount of astrazeneca vaccine we are hearing about over the coming months will mean the roll—out of the second phase, which is people under the age of 50 without risk factors, will go more slowly and may even be delayed in terms of its start. one of those in line to get their astrazeneca vaccine today is the prime minister. borisjohnson knows the dangers of covid all too well after he was treated in intensive care for the virus last year and will be hoping his jab will encourage others. anna collinson, bbc news. let's talk more now about the challenges facing the uk's supply of the astrazeneca vaccine. five million doses of the jab manufactured in india have been held up by four weeks.
3:12 pm
the serum institute in india is the world's largest manufacturer of vaccines and has pledged to "try to supply more later, based on the current situation and the requirement for the government immunisation programme in india". dr srinath reddy is president of the public health foundation of india, a think tank in new delhi to tell me about india's capacity to produce the oxford/astrazeneca jab. good the oxford/astrazeneca jab. afternoon. what is yo| understanding good afternoon. what is your understanding of what the hold—up is. understanding of what the hold-up is. . , understanding of what the hold-up is. ., , ., , ., understanding of what the hold-up is. initially there was a statement made by the _ is. initially there was a statement made by the head _ is. initially there was a statement made by the head of— is. initially there was a statement made by the head of the - is. initially there was a statement made by the head of the serum . made by the head of the serum institute of india that they were holding back some of the supplies for indian needs but later it has been clarified both by the indian
3:13 pm
government as well as the british prime minister himself that there has been no restriction imposed on exports to uk. now it turns out again from sources that much of the production delays and because of some essential ancillary elements required for vaccine production, not becoming available on the time from the united states because of the different production act invoked. in the us that has been invoked essentially to double up —— develop faster availability of vaccines for the united states itself but because the united states itself but because the act also imposes restrictions on export of a variety of things which are also ancillary materials required for vaccine production in india and other countries the capacity that exists in india is not
3:14 pm
currently underutilised and that compose a challenge unless some exemptions are given in order to ensure things like specialised vaccine centres, sculpture media, single use tubing and specialised chemicals required for production are made available.— chemicals required for production are made available. everything you are made available. everything you are sa in: are made available. everything you are saying there — are made available. everything you are saying there reminds _ are made available. everything you are saying there reminds us - are made available. everything you are saying there reminds us what l are made available. everything you are saying there reminds us what a connected world we are and how the manufacture of a vaccine requires elements from sometimes what's of different places. —— lots of different places. —— lots of different places. -- lots of different places. -- lots of different places. absolutely, if su - -l different places. absolutely, if supply chains _ different places. absolutely, if supply chains are _ different places. absolutely, if supply chains are interrupted l different places. absolutely, if. supply chains are interrupted then we get into problems. a recent agreement between the united states, japan, australia and india recommended that indian capacity must be utilised for augmenting the global supply of vaccines and there
3:15 pm
would be an increased investment in that capacity. it is counterintuitive that when you are actually trying to invest in indian capacity you are hindering it by not allowing ancillary elements. share capacity you are hindering it by not allowing ancillary elements. are you able to summarise _ allowing ancillary elements. are you able to summarise the _ allowing ancillary elements. are you able to summarise the situation - able to summarise the situation inside india in terms of vaccine availability, who is getting it, who can get it. availability, who is getting it, who can aet it. availability, who is getting it, who canuetit. , availability, who is getting it, who can et it. ,., availability, who is getting it, who canuetit. ,., ., can get it. the vaccines are not bein: can get it. the vaccines are not being given _ can get it. the vaccines are not being given on _ can get it. the vaccines are not being given on the _ can get it. the vaccines are not being given on the basis - can get it. the vaccines are not being given on the basis of - can get it. the vaccines are not l being given on the basis of initial priority where people in the health force and other essential working areas have been given the vaccine, it has not been extended to people above 60 and also people above 45 with a known associated health condition or, ability and over a period of time it will be extended to over age groups. meanwhile the
3:16 pm
criteria is being extended to other groups like schoolteachers, judicial officers, banking employees are so that both categories of being essential and vulnerability are expanded. essential and vulnerability are expanded-_ latest figures from the ons infection survey suggest that infections have "continued to decrease" across england and wales and have "levelled off" in northern ireland and increased in scotland in the week to 13th march 2021. earlier i spoke to our head of statistics robert cuffe about the figures. the falls are probably driven by wales, portions of england like the south—west and london and flat in the rest of england
3:17 pm
and northern ireland and slight rises in scotland. one thing that has to be said is they do not reflect the effect of school openings in england last week because they only go up to much 13th. go up to march 13th. most schools opened on the 8th of march. if secondary school pupils bring an infection and pass it around it may not show up for a couple of days would not move the numbers so probably another week until we see any effect of that. so perhaps next friday we would reflect on that a little or even after. maybe longer, but the scientists who have been advising government say maybe we should calm down about the infection numbers, ease off that because infections don't matter unless they lead to people getting sick and the person who is infected getting sick or spreading it
3:18 pm
to someone who does. they are saying we should focus on more and more people going into hospital, the death rates and the numbers which have been unequivocally positive for a long time, they have been coming down and continue to come down so even though maybe there is a hint of the infection rate fall slowing it is not time to get too worried and even if they move up a little bit that is not time to pull the ripcord either. we have been reflecting on europe because france for example people going into lockdown at midnight, a different picture in a lot of continental europe and there are figures that tell us how the uk compares to much of the rest of europe in terms of death rate. this is building back to last year, but one thing to say is the infections we are seeing in europe are more risk because there is less vaccination in europe, it is vaccination that breaks the link between infection and serious sickness and the uk is kind of ahead of that so we might be less worried about it
3:19 pm
but not on the continent. going back to last year there is another analysis out today which says around june orjuly the uk had probably one of the worst death rates in europe if not the world from coronavirus but by the end of the year that was no longer the case, a number of countries passed the uk, like poland or bulgaria that were not hit at all in the first wave then had a very bad first wave in autumn. spain or belgium that weere in and around not looking great spain or belgium that were in and around not looking great in the summer and have continued to get a bit worse so no one has had a good time, the epidemic has not been good for everyone but there was a very clear pattern that the uk was one of the hardest hit countries in the world and many other countries have joined that club towards the end of the year. there is a long way to go because that is until the end of 2020 and with the pattern we have been discussing and how that is going to play out to go with the very long story
3:20 pm
of this epidemic. the scottish conservative leader at holyrood, ruth davidson, says nicola sturgeon should resign if she has a "shred of integrity". a majority of the committee investigating the scottish government's handling of harassment claims against alex salmond are understood to have voted last night that ms sturgeon had not given them accurate information. she's insisted she told them the truth. a report about whether the first minister broke the ministerial code is expected within the next week. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. scotland's first minister is facing significant pressure, just weeks ahead of the scottish parliament election. for some time, she's faced claims she's not told the full story about what she knew when about harassment allegations against alex salmond. i solemnly, sincerely and truly declare... now, a committee of msps has concluded she misled them about meetings she had
3:21 pm
with mr salmond three years ago. by a narrow majority, split along party lines, the committee decided ms sturgeon's account to them had not been accurate. the first minister says she stands by her evidence and that some on the committee had made their minds up before she appeared. i do not believe the first minister should resign. i do not believe she has misled parliament and i have absolute confidence in her veracity of what she said in those eight hours of evidence to that committee, in her integrity and in her professionalism. and i am not going to comment on unattributed briefings about a report which has not yet been published. this row between two first ministers is reaching its climax, the most bitter battle between two former allies. alex salmond has said his one—time protege has broken the rules that ministers have to follow. ms sturgeon has said he's peddling false conspiracy theories. but this crisis couldn't come
3:22 pm
at a worse time for the snp. there's just seven weeks until scotland goes to the polls and opposition parties are claiming ms sturgeon can't be trusted. the parliament was misled by the first minister. now, that is, to me, a clear breach of the ministerial code and i think that, if she had a shred of integrity, nicola sturgeon would be considering her position. she has every opportunity to resign. on a campaign visit, labour's leader said the allegations were serious and could be a resignation matter. if the report suggests that the first minister has misled parliament and potentially breached the ministerial code, then that is incredibly serious. obviously, the focus is very much on the individual, nicola sturgeon, but actually, it's bigger than that, it's about the integrity of the scottish parliament, it's about the integrity of the office of first minister. the full committee report will be published on tuesday. as well as accusing ms sturgeon of misleading msps, it's expected to criticise other parts
3:23 pm
of the account she gave. and nickjoins us now live. there is some way to go with this, the formal report is yet to emerge. we should see eight on tuesday morning and is well as saying that nicola sturgeon must lead the committee on the evidence session a couple of weeks ago we are also expecting edible raise questions about why she took so long to record meetings with alex salmond about how government harassment investigation into him. but also to look into whether she was completely telling the truth when she first found out about allegations about alex salmond's behaviour and november 2017. the most serious allegation as that she misled the committee and i think that sets up a few bruising weeks
3:24 pm
ahead of the scottish election where you are going to have opponents like ruth davidson saying that nicola sturgeon cannot be trusted and her government is not telling the truth. may cost option singh her political opponents at harnessing a particle point. there is another investigation on the misted awkward, james hamilton who could report any day now, looking specifically at whether she broke the ministerial code and whether she should have to design as a result. that is the one that the scottish government seem to be putting ever more emphasis on, i do not think nicola sturgeon will design over the committee, we have seen her team try and pass that off as a partisan decision, a political point scoring opportunity for opponents in parliament but holyrood
3:25 pm
breaks up on wednesday and there will be a lot of drama before then which will pave the way for what looks like a bitter campaign over the next six weeks or so. thank you. a woman who argued that care—workers should be paid the national minimum wage when they have to sleep overnight at work, has lost her supreme court case. claire tomlinson—blake was paid less than £30 for a sleep—in shift between 10pm and 7am. although she could sleep, she was expected to provide support to patients if needed during the night. if she had won the case, charities and care providers warned they would have faced an estimated £400m bill for backpay, which they said they couldn't afford. let's get more on this
3:26 pm
from amanda morling, a care worker in beccles who says she's worked �*countless' sleep—in shifts. good afternoon. your thoughts first of all broadly on the fact this appears to be the end of the road legally for this case, it has gone to the supreme court which is as far as it can go. to the supreme court which is as far as it can 90-— as it can go. absolutely outrageous. there are some _ as it can go. absolutely outrageous. there are some many _ as it can go. absolutely outrageous. there are some many of— as it can go. absolutely outrageous. there are some many of us - as it can go. absolutely outrageous. there are some many of us doing i as it can go. absolutely outrageous. l there are some many of us doing this kind of work, ifeel cared there are some many of us doing this kind of work, i feel cared workers in general are underpaid and undervalued and to be honest across the care sector everywhere you go it is the same amount of pay and hours, the hours of long and what we we are saying about those we support are not worth more than £30 a night because when i want and care and did sleep inside got £30 a night from 10pm until 7am sleep inside got £30 a night from 10pm until7am and sleep inside got £30 a night from 10pm until 7am and had five people
3:27 pm
in my care, one that would wake up regularly. this is an ongoing problem. regularly. this is an ongoing roblem. ., , regularly. this is an ongoing problem-— regularly. this is an ongoing roblem. ., ,, ., , problem. unions are essentially sa in: as problem. unions are essentially saying as a _ problem. unions are essentially saying as a result _ problem. unions are essentially saying as a result of— problem. unions are essentially saying as a result of the - problem. unions are essentially saying as a result of the case i problem. unions are essentially i saying as a result of the case that actually their argument as this shows it is time for a wholesale reform of the system, it shows a fundamental problem and that is a key point. fundamental problem and that is a ke oint. ~ , , fundamental problem and that is a key point-_ we - fundamental problem and that is a key point._ we have . key point. absolutely. we have reflected so — key point. absolutely. we have reflected so much _ key point. absolutely. we have reflected so much during - key point. absolutely. we have reflected so much during the i reflected so much during the pandemic about the role of care workers and the importance and the pay whether those who are driving during the day are paid when the driving to the next person they are looking after. actually it is the whole system that is a problem. how would you like to see this change? definitely more money put into making care work a much more a job
3:28 pm
thatis making care work a much more a job that is paid more money because the people work hard, everybody wants out, we all have to work to live obviously but why is it care that people who are administering medication, pose lives at risk and people with particularly learning disabilities are not being valued is it because they have a learning disability that they cannot argue for themselves at is ok to pay the people that are working for them this silly amount of money. i don't know but the answer is to move forward that people deserve more than they are currently getting. £8 and i will as peanuts. at the end of the day you are doing a highly skilled job that a nurse would do on some occasions. not some person who has come off the street, had a little training to give medication
3:29 pm
to one person, when is that right question market is totally wrong. i do myjob because i love it and the people i work for, i am in a different area now in regards to where i used to work when i did sleep ins, however across the board at is not anyone place. if you talk to any carer they will tell you they are on minimum wage. taste to any carer they will tell you they are on minimum wage.— to any carer they will tell you they are on minimum wage. we will see if an hinu are on minimum wage. we will see if anything more _ are on minimum wage. we will see if anything more emerges _ are on minimum wage. we will see if anything more emerges as _ are on minimum wage. we will see if anything more emerges as a - are on minimum wage. we will see if anything more emerges as a result i are on minimum wage. we will see if| anything more emerges as a result of this particular case was not thank you. meanwhile in scotland, the health secretary has said that the majority of social care workers will receive a five hundred pound "thank you" from the scottish government next month. the one—off, pro—rata payment is intended as a bonus for the work done by health and care staff
3:30 pm
to combat covid—19. it was initially announced at the snp's autumn conference by the first minister, nicola sturgeon. more than 400,000 social care staff are meant to be eligible, providing they have worked in the sector for at least a continuous four week period between march and november last year. apologies, that clearly is linked and that is a bonus for people working in that sector, specifically, in scotland. and now we will pause and take a look at the weather. little change on the weather front as we head into the weekend for most of us, fairly cloudy, a little on the nippy side, although some spots in scotland have been quite sunny and warm recently. these are the evening temperatures now tonight. again, a fairamount of cloud across the uk, with a few clear spells here,
3:31 pm
and they're not particularly cold. overnight temperatures hovering around about five or six degrees celsius. and then saturday, the first day of astronomical spring, the spring equinox. and again, another fairly cloudy day. but i think the best of the sunshine on saturday may be eastern scotland to the east of the pennines. and also once any rain clears earlier in the day in the north of scotland, there should be some sunshine, too. and again, around nine to 13 celsius and little change expected into sunday. the weather will eventually change, but not until later next week.
3:32 pm
hello this is bbc news. the headlines: countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. unfortunately the increase in the number of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating how allegations against her predecessor alex salmond were handled. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougal. good afternoon. the nine—to—one shot minella indo has won the cheltenham gold cup, riden byjack kennedy and trained
3:33 pm
by henry de bromhead. it completes an historic triumph for de bromhead, as he becomes the first trainer to win cheltenham's big three of the gold cup, the queen mothers�* champion chase and the champion hurdle at the same festival. female jockey rachael blackmore was hard on his heels, but could only come second on board ah plu tar — also trained by de bromhead. they battled along the straight and to the line, kennedy climbing up in the saddle to celebrate the biggest win of his career. the favourite al boum photo — who had been aiming for three gold cups in a row, came third. so second place in the gold cup for rachael blackmore, having earlier added to her list of festival winners. she rode ouilixios to victory in the triumph hurdle to make it six wins this week, more than any otherjockey with just a couple of races left to go. glasgow rangers say several of their players have received "racist, threatening and sicking abuse online" after their europa league defeat to slavia prague,
3:34 pm
during which it's alleged, one of the czech players directed racist language at glen kamara. managing director stewart robertson said in a statement... uefa say they're investigating several incidents from the match. and slavia prague's quarter—final opponents will be arsenal, after they beat olympiakos. they actually lost 1—0 in the second leg last night, but their advantage from the first match of the tie was enough to take them through 3—2 on aggregate. here's the line—up in full — with manchester united drawn against spanish side granada. the draw for the semis was also made, so if united make it through, they could face ajax — the team they beat to win the trophy in 2017. arsenal are in line for a possible meeting with dinamo zagreb, who knocked out
3:35 pm
tottenham last night. the draw for the champions league quarter and semi finals has taken place in switzerland. three english teams involved, liverpool, manchester city and chelsea. and there's a tough draw for liverpool — they'll face real madrid, in a repeat of the 2018 final. that means mo salah coming up against sergio ramos again. you might remember during that final in kiev, the two coming together in an incident which saw salah having to be substituted. after losing that final, liverpool went on to lift the trophy the following year. manchester city were drawn against borussia dortmund — erling haaland up against the side his father played for. chelsea will take on porto, and defending champions bayern munich will play paris saint germain — the winner of that one will face either manchester city or dortmund in the semi—finals, and we could see liverpool up against chelsea. gemma grainger has been named as the new manager of wales women, on a four—year contract. she replaces jayne ludlow,
3:36 pm
who left the post in january by mutual consent. grainger was part of the england coaching staff for euro 2017, where they reached the quarter—finals. she's spent 11 years working across the development squads. her appointment is understood to have been well received by the players, who were disappointed at ludlow�*s departure after seven years in charge. raymond van barnaveld needed medical assistance after collapsing at the pdc super series two event in milton keynes earlier today. the pdc said in a statement that the five—time world champion wasn't taken to hosptial but had to be treated by paramedics on site. van barnaveld returned to his hotel room to be monitored. the government is considering the use of covid certificates to enable fans to return to sporting events. culture minister oliver dowden said they were working to get as many supporters as possible into the semi—finals and the final of this summer's european championship. he added that the future of the sporting industry depended on fans filling seats.
3:37 pm
and we've heard this afternoon that the former british cycling and team sky chief doctor richard freeman has been struck off, after he was found guilty of ordering banned testosterone in 2011. more details on that story on the bbc website. that's it from us for now. government borrowing has hit a new record, reaching £279 billion, in the 11 months from april to february. that's five—and—a—half times as much as in the same period in the previous financial year and reflects the continuing costs of the pandemic support measures. earlier i spoke to our economics correspondent andy verity. i asked him if this trend in borrowing is set to continue. it looks eye watering, and the natural reaction is to say, well, if i have big debts in my household, that's scary. the bailiffs might come around sometime soon. i could be in trouble. i could have my house repossessed. but it's not like that
3:38 pm
for the government at all. you've got £355 billion is forecast to be borrowed this financial year. by far the highest in peacetime. but the interest rates are so low that the cost of servicing that debt is easily manageable. so you by no means have to cut spending in order to deal with it. and certainly there's no urgency to raise taxes either. now, there's two ways you can deal with a deficit, which means you're spending more than your income. one is to cut your way out of it, which they tried over the last 12 years, didn't work very well. we didn't get into surplus in all of those years in spite of all the austerity. the other is to grow your way out of it. now, the last time the budget was in surplus was around 2002 under gordon brown. and if you look at what the obr the official forecaster is forecasting for debt, well, it is going to climb this year, you can see a big spike where it really gets high. but then it's forecasting because we're going to get a snap back kind of growth next year it will drop really quickly. so in two years from now, it will only be about a third
3:39 pm
of what it is and then it will get down to a much more manageable level, according to the forecast, by the end of five years. briefly today, we are hearing about the impact of the decision, government decision to sell some shares in rbs. yeah, well, this is interesting. we paid £46 billion for rbs back in 2008 and 2009. and the government decided actually five years ago under george osborne to sell it at a loss. so the share price we paid was £5 and they fetched a lot less in the market. the government's put something like a £2 billion loss, but you put that in the context of the amount rishi sunak is borrowing, it is not such a large sum. the bbc has said it's extremely concerned after a bbc news burmese reporter, aung thura, was taken away by unidentified men in the capital, naypyitaw. he was reporting outside a district court when a group of civilian clothed men, in an unmarked van arrived
3:40 pm
and demanded to see him. he has been uncontactable since. the bbc has called on the myanmar authorities to help locate him and confirm that he is safe. over the last year numerous families across the uk have experienced loss because of coronavirus. chelsea richardson's mum sarah died from the virus in october — chelsea is only 21, and as well as dealing with her own grief, she also took on the responsibility of looking after her four yonger siblings. heidi tomlinson has been to meet her. have you got your mask? have you got your key? a busy morning routine, seeing younger siblings off to school and college is big sister chelsea's responsibility. she stepped into the caring role after their mum died last year. see you later! wait a minute. see you! 42—year—old mum of five sarah richardson contracted covid and developed a blood disorder. she passed away in october.
3:41 pm
my mum was amazing. like, my dad's not been around so it's always been my mum. she was, like, the only person we had and now she's gone, so, you know, ithink about her every day, yeah. she was pretty. and helped people. well, it's been hard, but then, my sister's brought us all together and done everything for us. not only has she taken the reins of home life, 21—year—old chelsea is a trainee nurse at st james' in leeds. she's grieving but puts aside her feelings to bolster the family. she was everything to me. i'm really sorry. she'd do everything for us. she was my rock and i was her rock. you've taken on so much, chelsea. are you coping? it's difficult.
3:42 pm
i'm not going to lie. i didn't know what i was expecting, but it's definitely a lot harder than i anticipated. so, today, a special delivery to help. milford sports club nominated the family in a competition to win a year's supply of meat. we got 805 applications. when we came across chelsea's, there was no doubt about it. it were a worthy winner. i'm really, really pleased we've found somebody who deserves it. phil's friend, neil the grocer, has also pledged weekly fruit and veg. it puts into perspective your little silly things that you've got - going on, that actually really i aren't that massive, they're just minute when you look- at what chelsea's got to do. i've got to be honest, i there's not a lot of girls of chelsea's age could - take on what she's doing. i just want to say thank you because you don't actually realise how much it means and how much it does help. it will make everyday life easier, as chelsea ploughs on with her unexpected responsibilities.
3:43 pm
what would your mum think about doing you doing all of this? i hope she'd be proud. she raised me to be strong. and do the best that i can. and i'm trying my best, so i hope she's proud. chelsea richardson ending that report from heidi tomlinson. all week we have been hearing stories sourced and produced by young people between the ages of 11 and 18 as part of the bbc young reporter competition. today we hear from 17—year—old ben, an apprentice footballer at burton albion. he tells us about the pressures of trying to make it as a professional, both physical and mental. there has been a couple of lads recently who have been released by clubs who have taken their own lives. that should not be how it is. young people are often overshadowed
3:44 pm
on the mental side, you kind of see, you're playing football every day, what can be wrong with you? who knows what is going on inside? i am 17 years old and i play for burton albion football club. i am a first scholar at the moment so it's my first year of two years. there's loads of pressures and different kinds of things going on. the football is kind of a hour and a half of your day. you are leaving school, you are leaving your mates, you are leaving your whole kind of last 12 years, almost, to come and play football. and if you don't get a pro at the end of it, it's a big step to make. yeah, ijust kind of wanted to highlight the importance of the mental health side of football. people think, you are a footballer, you are living life, but it's not that at all, you are going home, you are sore, you're aching, you've got to wake up the next morning, you've got to get through it and it's what you've got to do if you want to be a footballer. if you are not training well enough, you're out of the team.
3:45 pm
it is hard, you are going home, you're not playing in 90 minutes and thinking what am i doing here? so, yeah, highlighting the importance of that side of the game is vital. an academy footballer is harder than people think. you are in there every day, monday to saturday, you've got gym training in the morning, you've got college, monday, wednesday, thursday, you've got tactical sessions, you've got video sessions, you've got extras at the end if you want to do that, getting up early, getting home late, it's hard. if you do not do your work, you're not playing in the team. there's loads of different assignments with different teachers. it's a big part of the scholarship doing college work, yeah. yeah, it's not like anything else, i don't think. we are all mates but you are fighting with each other. if he is taking your place as a pro contract, then you are not going to be happy, so, yeah, it's a bit fake, in a sense, that you're mates obviously but you
3:46 pm
want to be better than them and you need to be better than them if you want to be a footballer. i have got plans if football doesn't work out. probably uni, i have been thinking like kind of america and different kind of english ones, but, hopefully, get a pro contract. my whole life goal has been to be a footballer, so i am trying to work towards that. yes, doing everything i can to do it. that was ben. and if you've been enjoying the stories told by the winners of this year's bbc young reporter competition — dojoin us at 8.30pm tonight — for a special half hour programme showcasing their work. the headlines on bbc news: countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca vaccines — but germany's health minister warns there may not be enough supplies to stop a coronavirus third wave. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public
3:47 pm
the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating how allegations against her predecessor alex salmond were handled. scientists have witnessed bonobo apes adopting infants who were born outside their social group — for the first time in the wild. researchers from durham university and the university of kyoto say the findings give us greater insight into the parental instincts of one of humans' closest relatives, and could help to explain the emotional reason behind why people readily adopt children who they have had no previous connection with. the study took place in an amazing field site in the
3:48 pm
democratic republic of congo. bonobos here have been studied for over 50 years so they are well adapted to humans, and i've been spending six months there, and i had the chance to follow them every day and had the chance to see these two amazing cases. how close were you able to get to them? well, we are trying to stay quite away from them because we don't want to disturb them. we are trying to stay at least ten metres away. but that is quite nice because they are quite big. that is quite close! are they tame? no, they are not. we want them to feel like we are trees, moving trees,
3:49 pm
we are not interrupting them disturbing them but we are not giving them anything. we just want them to consider us as useless! useless beings, following them day after day. you are far from useless, but i understand what you are saying — you don't want to destruct their habitat, you don't want to encroach on them because they are living in the wild. what they've been doing, the images are remarkable, but you saw several animals that over a period of time took in a youngster, a baby — i'm probably not using the right terminology! took in a youngster that you knew was not from their group? yeah, the first case my japanese colleague, one day she noticed there
3:50 pm
was one more infant in the group that she was following every day, and it was really weird. yeah, she realised it was an infant from another social group. and probably the mother is gone, died, and the mother was adopted by an an adult female, in this group who have already had two dependent offspring, which is quite amazing. what sort of ages? as you can tell i really know nothing, what sort of ages they live to? bonobos live around years old in the wild, and so here mother's role is crucial for the survival of the infa nts.
3:51 pm
in these cases, if the female did not adopt this infant, they would probably have died. yeah, that is why, the thing is during the first five years of their life bonobos need constant care and attention from the mother. and this female decided out of nowhere, for no obvious reason, to adopt this young individual. and this is a really costly behaviour, very exhausting, as you can imagine, just like humans, taking care of tiny babies like this. yes, especially if you get to my age! that's absolutely exhausting. the point is they are similar in many ways to humans. that is why all your findings are so interesting. as i said, we did not find any obvious reason why these adult females would have adopted these infants because they don't gain an apparent benefit for that, so it means probably this behaviour might have been driven by a strong drive to help others or at least strong attraction to infants, just as we
3:52 pm
can observe in humans. it is a case of actually what is in it for them, just sheer instinct that they doing that. it's probably not possible to summarise, but what is that like for you, to be really quite close to them and experience this? this is remarkable. it is. you know, my phd project is focused on infants and juvenile behaviours and when i look at them, it is like looking at human infants, it is crazy the way they play and interact with each other and sometimes they throw tantrums, just like humans! really fascinating to observe. just like humans! it's been described as the most beautiful car in the world. 60 years ago one of britain's greatest ever sports
3:53 pm
cars was unveiled. the jaguar e—type became synonymous with the swinging 60s and remains popular to this day. our correspondent phil mackie has been behind the wheel of the first one ever sold. at the start of the �*60s, britain was dull, drab and grey. and then the jaguar e—type came along. made in coventry, it's probably still the ultimate british sports car. even today, it's one of the most sought—after cars in the world. back in �*61, when this first went on sale, you could have bought it forjust under £3,000. now, it would set you back 100 times that amount. built here in the midlands, many people still regard this as the greatest british sports car of all time. at this workshop in shropshire, they specialise in restoring jaguars. typically, they have around 50 e—types, more than anywhere else in the world. e—type bewitched public and prince alike. launched a year before the beatles first hit the charts, it became the embodiment of the swinging sixties.
3:54 pm
jaguar is a special breed of car. it was a massive success around the world. overall, it's probably the most important classic car model in the world, definitely. and its importance to motoring and certainly to sports cars in general, you can't underestimate it. yeah, epoch setting. they're still sought after by celebrities and royalty alike. it's hard to put a price on this one, it was the first one ever sold. only a few people can afford them any more. sadly, i'm not one. phil mackie, bbc news, shropshire. it's red nose day — and tonight's tv show on bbc1 will be unlike previous years. daniel craig, keira knightly and olivia colman are among those taking part in a socially distant comic relief. what isn't different though is the aim to raise money to tackle hunger, homelessness, domestic abuse and mental health. our entertainment correspondent
3:55 pm
colin paterson reports. this is the first socially distanced comic relief. red nose day will be different this year. we know that it's hard financially for so many people right now. but we'd love you to join us, even if it's just to share a laugh. tonight's show will be shorter, only three hours, but the vicar of dibley returns with a special message. last year, i was sponsored £5 per villager if i could squeeze a whole granny smith into my mouth. job done. while david tennant and michael sheen take part in an historical version of their lockdown hit staged. i'm going to write about this. about the plague? yeah _ is that what people want? yeah, they want social realism. do they? 0k. yeah. and catherine tate's nanjoins james bond for a secret briefing, so secret, all that's been released
3:56 pm
so far is this one photo. this is pretty funny. the money raised by comic relief will be used to support those who have been hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. but the night's other aim is to simply make people laugh. colin patterson, bbc news. don't try that at home, i think that's what we should be saying! now, tomasz shafernaker has the weather. for most of us, not much change on the weather front since yesterday. a fair amount of cloud across the uk and that's how it's going to stay into the weekend. however, the seasons are changing. in fact, today, the last day of astronomical winter, tomorrow is the spring equinox. and the high pressure which is here today will be with us tomorrow and into next week as well, so hence, very little change on the weather front.
3:57 pm
here's the jet stream pattern — you can see the jet stream to the north of us, but notice how the jet stream goes around this area of higher and slightly milder air. it's actually quite cold over europe at the moment, a real nip in the air, barely above freezing in some areas. so, scotland has recently been one of the warmest places in europe, believe it or not. through tonight, clear spells mean temperatures will dip down to 4 degrees in glasgow, maybe 3 in the southeast of england and east anglia as well. but generally speaking, another cloudy evening and night to come. tomorrow, high pressure still with us, so light winds, variable amounts of cloud floating around the uk. this is what it looks like early in the morning. notice just a suggestion of a weak weather front getting into scotland, so probably some rain there in the north of the highlands and the western isles. temperatures could get up to 14 degrees in the northeast of england, maybe around hull, this is where we're expecting the best of the sunny breaks. i mentioned how chilly
3:58 pm
it is in europe at the moment, take a look at these temperatures — berlin around 4 celsius, warsaw, just a couple of degrees above freezing. helsinki, similar weather, the same for moscow. it is not particularly warm across parts of the mediterranean as well. unsettled weather there around turkey and greece and even in rome and barcelona, around 13 or 14 degrees, so about as mild as it has been currently in scotland. here's the forecast for sunday. the high pressure still with us, light winds, some sunshine around but the temperatures, nothing spectacular, around 8 to 13 celsius. here's the outlook into next week. by the time we get to tuesday night into wednesday, the weather will start turning in the northwest of the uk and by thursday, it will be windier and more unsettled throughout.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news, the headlines. countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. unfortunately the increase in the number of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. good news for people in cumbria, cornwall and northumberland — they'll be among the first in england to get ultrafast broadband. the bbc says it is extremely concerned about one of its reporters in myanmar who's been abducted in the country's capital and coming up this hour, as part of our young reporter series, we hear from an apprentice footballer about the pressures of
4:01 pm
trying to make it as a professional. a number of eu countries have started using the oxford astrazeneca covid vaccine again — after the european medicines agency confirmed it is safe and effective. germany, france, italy and spain are among the countries that halted its use earlier this month, after concerns about blood clots. but with cases and deaths rising now across continental europe — and millions of people in france being placed under lockdown at midnight tonight — there's been a stark warning from germany's health minister — who said there isn't enough vaccine supply across the continent to prevent a third wave. our europe correspondent nick beake reports.
4:02 pm
paris in the spring, a city where the mood is darkening. the french capital is descending into another lockdown, part of the effort to stop a third wave of the virus taking hold across europe. translation: i would say i am more pessimistic, - but that's just because we don't have an end date. the curfew is the same. we've been living like this for almost two months and it's like it's normal now, when it's not. it's all a bit sad. translation: when is this going to end? - what if next year we haven't found a way out of this? what if next year, we have lockdown number eight? that's what scares me. the rise in cases comes as europe faces a vaccination crisis. france and other big countries are once again using the astrazeneca jab after the eu drugs regulator confirmed its long—held belief that it is safe for use. at a news conference in berlin, the german health minister warned there is not enough of the astrazeneca vaccine in europe to prevent a third wave by itself.
4:03 pm
he also said a rise in the number of cases could mean not only a delay in reopening the country but that some restrictions may have to be reimposed. back in paris, there are now more people in intensive care beds than during the second wave, last november. doctors warn the system is reaching breaking point. translation: you can always expand, but the elastic is getting _ tighter and tighter. we're not at the breaking point yet but we are coming very close, so, yes, that limit is not far away. and the worsening picture in europe could have an impact on the uk, the government made clear. i think what's going on in europe is a real wake—up call to us and a warning. people that say we could ease restrictions sooner, we just need to look at what's happened in the past, rises in europe have led to rises in the uk. i am hopeful it won't happen this time, not least thanks to the vaccine, but we really do have
4:04 pm
to stick by the rules to prevent this happening. in a sign of how the fates of nations are intertwined, the uk variant is now the most common strain in poland. it will soon account for 80% of cases. the prime minister said schools and leisure facilities would now have to close and if that didn't work, everything would have to be shut down. this morning, the husband and wife team behind the biontech pfizer vaccine received germany's highest civilian honour. their creation has given hope and has helped to offer a pathway out of the covid nightmare. but in europe at least, the pandemic is taking a worrying turn. the latest coronavirus figures have just come into us, 4000 new cases in
4:05 pm
the latest 24—hour period compared with 6300 a day earlier, those are the latest figures. on deaths we have 101 new covid deaths reported of people who have died with coronavirus on the death certificate over the last 28 days. 95 deaths were reported in the previous 24—hour period. vaccinations, 26 million 200,000 have had the first dose, just over 1.5 million up on the previous period. lots to talk about with the statistics and you will get more on that later. for more on the situation in france and germany i've been speaking to our correspondents hugh schofield in paris and jenny hill in berlin. we'll hear from hugh schofield on the latest lockdown that
4:06 pm
affects paris in a moment—— but first here'sjenny hill on the latest upsurge in covid cases in germany. well, experts here say that germany is now in a situation where case numbers are rising exponentially, they're extremely concerned. there was a real surge of infection here over christmas, which took intensive care capacity to its limits. some experts say, actually, if cases continue to rise, as they're doing now, and we could see a similar surge of infection happening again at around easter, it's quite clear that germany, like so many other of its neighbours, is now in the grip of what appears to be a very vicious third wave of infection. and that's of particular concern here, because as you've seen in that report, just 8% of the german population has had a first dose of vaccine. so far, a very slow national roll—out of the vaccination programme. and so experts are extremely worried about what will happen next. all of this is compounded, i think, by the fact that germany had started to actually ease some lockdown restrictions. the easter holidays are coming up. the government is appealing
4:07 pm
to people not to travel either inside the country or abroad, not to get together with people other than immediate family. but they are facing, i think, a bit of an uphill battle on that. and angela merkel is due to sit down with regional leaders again on monday to talk about what happens next. but experts here are clear. they say what's needed right now is a hard and fast return to lookdown. a third of the french are going to be affected, 21 million people in paris and its surrounding area, then a swathe of territory leading up to the northern belgian border around calais, a couple of departments in normandy and then down in the south around nice. these are all areas where a threshold has been passed in the last few days, where there are now more than 400 cases of covid per 100,000 people. and in accordance with the government's own set of provisions, that means they fall into a new kind of category and the lockdown is kicking in from midnight.
4:08 pm
and it won't be quite as bad a lockdown as we had in november, which was in itself a lighter lockdown than the one we had last march. for example, it will be possible to go outside for exercise almost at will. there's no limit to how much time you can spend outside taking exercise. but it also needs to be said that the curfew, nationwide curfew has been in place for some weeks and remains in place. so life is already quite difficult. so not that much necessarily will change in the day to day lives of people here in paris. but it is a psychological burden, i think that everyone feels it means also that they're going to have to produce these pieces of paper for the police whenever they leave their home to justify that they're being out of their homes and that and they can't leave paris either. all of this, i think, adds to the pressure and makes it a very gloomy city today.
4:09 pm
the french prime minister, jean castex was one of the first people in the country to recieve the aztrazeneca vaccine after the re—start of its roll—out today. he said he wanted to set an example. it comes as france ahead of a limited month—long lockdown in paris and fifteen other departments, to take effect from midnight on friday, to combat a third wave of infections. borisjohnson is to receive his first dose of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine later today. ministers and health officials are reassuring the public that it is safe, as the rollout continues. and new figures show that last week coronavirus infections continued to fall across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, and increased in scotland. here's our health correspondent anna collinson. the message to the more than 11 million people in the uk who have received the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and the millions more waiting, is clear. from the regulator to the prime minister and scientists. the oxford jab is safe and the pfizerjab is safe. the thing that isn't
4:10 pm
safe is catching covid. there is no difference that blood clots in veins are occurring more than would be expected in the absence of vaccination. the risk benefit is really strongly in favour of getting vaccinated. l while vaccine confidence in the uk is very high, doctors are concerned some younger patients may be missing appointments because they think they are less at risk of the virus. and despite strong messaging from scientists there are concerns, unfounded fears about blood clots circulating in europe are damaging confidence here. we have had people calling us because they have concerns and they say, i have had a clot before so should i have it? it's taking the time, and you have to talk to them and try and reassure them. this morning, another grim reminder of why the vaccine roll—out is needed. with 89,000 lives lost to coronavirus last year, new data suggest the uk was one of the top ten worst hit countries in europe in 2020. the uk did have one of the highest
4:11 pm
death rates in the first half of the year but as this graph shows, it has since been overtaken, most notably by poland. but the pandemic is of course ongoing and these figures do not take into account the pressures and loss seen at the start of this year. as we move firmly into spring, the picture is much more hopeful. a survey suggests coronavirus infections have continued to decrease across england and wales, levelled off in northern ireland, although they increased in scotland. the government has insisted a drop in supply would not disrupt the schedule of vaccinating all adults by the summer but scientists warn the pace will reduce. i think the slightly lower amount of astrazeneca vaccine we are hearing about over the coming months will mean the roll—out of the second phase, which is people under the age of 50 without risk factors, will go more slowly and may even be delayed in terms of its start.
4:12 pm
one of those in line to get their astrazeneca vaccine today is the prime minister. borisjohnson knows the dangers of covid all too well after he was treated in intensive care for the virus last year and will be hoping his jab will encourage others. anna collinson, bbc news. latest figures from the ons infection survey suggest that infections have "continued to decrease" across england and wales and have "levelled off" in northern ireland and increased in scotland in the week to 13th march 2021. we've also had the latest r number this afternoon — its estimated to be between 0.6 and 0.9 across the uk. a reminder that an r number under one means the epidemic is shrinking and if it is above one the level of infection is growing. let's talk to our head of statistics robert cuffe. first off — what conclusions can we draw from these figures. why a slight increase in scotland?
4:13 pm
the falls are really driven by wales and england are likely south—west and england are likely south—west and london and the east and elsewhere kind of flat but as we get fewer infections at is harder to estimate these trends precisely because it is a survey so the margin of error gets wider so we do not want to court as booming up in scotland. secondly the levels are lower in scotland than the rest of the uk, about one in three hunterdon 30, the ons estimate and infected, you little higher in england so the levels are lower there. the next thing to say is we need to be careful about reading too much into infections because of the vaccination programme. what infections really matter as a few get sick or give the virus to something who gets sick which is happening less and less because of vaccinations and if you look at people going into hospital with
4:14 pm
coronavirus in scotland that number continues to go down so all those hard measures of the damage dividers is doing are all moving in the right direction. the latest figures for vaccinations, and england, not across the uk, more than half of adults have now had a vaccination. these figures have just come out, just over 22 million adults, we think roughlyjust over 50%, depending on the numbers you use because one way of estimating how many people need to be vaccinated as gp registers which is great and getting all people, not so good for under 30s to move around. if you do it with ons estimates and that gives you a number of 15.5% but these numbers are not super precise, just another reminder we need a census.
4:15 pm
as if by magic one is arriving on sunday so it is a reminder for everyone to fill in their forms because one of the key thing is to understand what is happening has been the quality of information and the census is vital to that. if you caveats but what is clear is that england, the uk compared to the rest of europe is much better picture, why is that? a whole host of things but can you boil down to a few factors. at the moment things are looking better in the uk and i would not be the expert to speak on the whole history of vaccine supply but the narrative has changed for the uk even before b got to the vaccine roll—out. last rely the study was the uk was the sick man of europe, the uk was the sick man of europe, the highest death rates due to coronavirus and what we saw in the autumn was that change so an analysis published by the ons today looks at the best measure we can do
4:16 pm
of how many people have died and the death rates, the age—adjusted mortality, uk probably the worst in europe in the summer but by december no longer the worst because poland and bulgaria who missed the first wave had terrible first waves when it landed in autumn and also countries like belgium and spain without nip and tuck with the uk pass to the uk. no one has had a good team but it does not look like the uk by the end of 2020 was the worst and we have hopefully the vaccination roll—out this year that will change that picture further. the headlines on bbc news... countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today —
4:17 pm
after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. good news for people in cumbria, cornwall and northumberland — they'll be among the first in england to get ultrafast broadband. the bbc has said it's extremely concerned after one of its burmese service reporter, aung thura, was taken away by unidentified men in the capital, naypyitaw. he was reporting outside a district court in when a group of civilian clothed men, in an unmarked van arrived and demanded to see him. the bbc has called on the myanmar authorities to help locate him and confirm that he is safe. i'm joined now by mary hockaday, who's the director of bbc news, international services. what international services. is the latest you understanc
4:18 pm
about what is the latest you understand about the circumstances surrounding what seems to be some kind of abduction. what seems to be some kind of abduction-— what seems to be some kind of abduction. ., ., �* �* abduction. earlier on friday the bbc services, bernese _ abduction. earlier on friday the bbc services, bernese services - abduction. earlier on friday the bbc services, bernese services reporter| services, bernese services reporter aung thura was taken by unidentified men into a vehicle and we currently do not know his whereabouts and we are very concerned about this. we are very concerned about this. we are calling on the authorities in myanmar to confirm his location and that he is safe. he is an accredited journalist, working in naypyidaw for many years. we know that have been otherjournalist many years. we know that have been other journalist detentions since february and it is concerning for us and we really want to know that he is ok and witty as. —— where he is. the coup has led to a place crackdown that has led to
4:19 pm
journalists being targeted? thea;r journalists being targeted? they have been protests _ journalists being targeted? tte: have been protests and journalists being targeted? tte have been protests and retaliation is, people have died and my anime butjournalists have been detained summer when the remain in detention. there have been crackdowns on media organisations. the bbc remain determined to report accurately and fairly what is going on in myanmar as we do all round the world and it is concerning that he has been detained. �* , ., is concerning that he has been detained. �* ,, .., . is concerning that he has been detained. �* i. _, . ., detained. are you concerned for the other bbc journalists _ detained. are you concerned for the other bbc journalists on _ detained. are you concerned for the other bbc journalists on the - detained. are you concerned for the other bbcjournalists on the ground| other bbcjournalists on the ground there? fist other bbc “ournalists on the ground there? �* ., ., , , there? at the moment over focus is on aunu there? at the moment over focus is on aung thura _ there? at the moment over focus is on aung thura and _ there? at the moment over focus is on aung thura and from _ there? at the moment over focus is on aung thura and from other- on aung thura and from other organisations but we are doing everything we can to keep good care of bbc staff and the country. find of bbc staff and the country. and the foreign _ of bbc staff and the country. and the foreign office is involved? of bbc staff and the country. and i the foreign office is involved? they are of course _ the foreign office is involved? they are of course aware, _ the foreign office is involved? they are of course aware, yes. _ the foreign office is involved? they are of course aware, yes. thank- the foreign office is involved? theyl are of course aware, yes. thank you. the scottish conservative leader
4:20 pm
at holyrood, ruth davidson, says nicola sturgeon should resign if she has a "shred of integrity". a majority of the committee investigating the scottish government's handling of harassment claims against alex salmond are understood to have voted last night that ms sturgeon had not given them accurate information. she's insisted she told them the truth. a report about whether the first minister broke the ministerial code is expected within the next week. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. scotland's first minister is facing significant pressure, just weeks ahead of the scottish parliament election. for some time, she's faced claims she's not told the full story about what she knew when about harassment allegations against alex salmond. i solemnly, sincerely and truly declare... now, a committee of msps has concluded she misled them about meetings she had with mr salmond three years ago. by a narrow majority, split along party lines, the committee decided ms sturgeon's account to them had not been accurate.
4:21 pm
the first minister says she stands by her evidence and that some on the committee had made their minds up before she appeared. i do not believe the first minister should resign. i do not believe she has misled parliament and i have absolute confidence in her veracity of what she said in those eight hours of evidence to that committee, in her integrity and in her professionalism. and i am not going to comment on unattributed briefings about a report which has not yet been published. this row between two first ministers is reaching its climax, the most bitter battle between two former allies. alex salmond has said his one—time protege has broken the rules that ministers have to follow. ms sturgeon has said he's peddling false conspiracy theories. but this crisis couldn't come at a worse time for the snp. there's just seven weeks until scotland goes to the polls and opposition parties are claiming ms sturgeon can't be trusted. the parliament was misled by the first minister.
4:22 pm
now, that is, to me, a clear breach of the ministerial code and i think that, if she had a shred of integrity, nicola sturgeon would be considering her position. she has every opportunity to resign. on a campaign visit, labour's leader said the allegations were serious and could be a resignation matter. if the report suggests that the first minister has misled parliament and potentially breached the ministerial code, then that is incredibly serious. obviously, the focus is very much on the individual, nicola sturgeon, but actually, it's bigger than that, it's about the integrity of the scottish parliament, it's about the integrity of the office of first minister. the full committee report will be published on tuesday. as well as accusing ms sturgeon of misleading msps, it's expected to criticise other parts of the account she gave. and nickjoins us now live. the committee on tuesday although it seems as though it has broken along party lines, will that be
4:23 pm
essentially nicola sturgeon's defence? i think it already is, be have heard from her spokesman and the last couple of hours saying that the last couple of hours saying that the committee appears to have resorted to what he called baseless assertions and supposition and smear. it is pretty clear this book along party lines with opposition parties saying miss sturgeon had misled them and snp members are saying she had not. that is going to be responsible get from the scottish government. there is another enquiry going on which the scottish government points towards which could be far more influential which is from her independent adviser on the ministerial code, james hamilton who is due to report we think early next week. his findings a few does say that miss sturgeon did break the
4:24 pm
ministerial code will heap pressure on her. the context is extraordinary, there is only five days until holyrood breaks up for the scottish parliament elections and there is an academy position with a committee of msps will say that miss sturgeon misled them, also raise questions about other parts of her evidence likely claim she had never heard any allegations against alex salmond before november 2017. we are going to have a report from the independent adviser on the ministerial code, nobody knows for sure what way that will go. the scottish tories are saying they will force a vote of no confidence on miss sturgeon on wednesday if she does not resign from a heated atmosphere leading up to the start of the election campaign officially on wednesday and it seems pretty clear that the next six weeks of that oration campaign are absolutely going to be dominated by this issue. miss sturgeon's article upon it
4:25 pm
saying she cannot be trusted and she has not told heathrow, miss sturgeon and her party saying they are trying to weapon eyes harassment investigation into mr salmond. leave the sleeve the snp in terms of the scottish elections? all the polls still suggest the snp are miles ahead of other parties, i don't think there's anybody in scottish politics who is really predicting that snp are not going to win this election. the big question is can they win a majority because if they win a majority they will phone up borisjohnson the day win a majority they will phone up boris johnson the day after the election and say we have a mandate for another independence referendum. opposition parties if they can stop the snp getting that majority will tell round and say look you do not have the mandate for that referendum that you want. it is multiplicative than that because even at the snp do not win a majority then mr b april referenda majority when you factor end the green party, likewise even at that as an snp majority boris
4:26 pm
johnson is likely to say no in the immediate term to another referendum. the whole campaign is going to be based on whether the snp can win a majority and opposition parties seem to think the question of integrity is going to be damaging for miss sturgeon. thank you. with the cost of pandemic support measures continuing — new figures show the uk government borrowed 19.1 billion pounds last month — the highest february figure since records began in 1993. borrowing for the financial year to date — between april and february — has now reached more than £278 billion. as our economics correspondent andy verity explains, this trend in borrowing looks set to continue. it looks eye watering, and the natural reaction is to say, well, if i have big debts in my household, that's scary. the bailiffs might come around sometime soon. i could be in trouble. i could have my house repossessed. but it's not like that for the government at all. you've got £355 billion is forecast
4:27 pm
to be borrowed this financial year. by far the highest in peacetime. but the interest rates are so low that the cost of servicing that debt is easily manageable. so you by no means have to cut spending in order to deal with it. and certainly there's no urgency to raise taxes either. now, there's two ways you can deal with a deficit, which means you're spending more than your income. one is to cut your way out of it, which they tried over the last 12 years, didn't work very well. we didn't get into surplus in all of those years in spite of all the austerity. the other is to grow your way out of it. now, the last time the budget was in surplus was around 2002 under gordon brown. and if you look at what the obr the official forecaster is forecasting for debt, well, it is going to climb this year, you can see a big spike where it really gets high. but then it's forecasting because we're going to get a snap back kind of growth next year it will drop really quickly. so in two years from now, it will only be about a third of what it is and then it will get down to a much more manageable
4:28 pm
level, according to the forecast, by the end of five years. it's red nose day — and tonight's tv show on bbc1 will be unlike previous years. daniel craig, keira knightly and olivia colman are among those taking part in a socially distant comic relief. what isn't different though is the aim to raise money to tackle hunger, homelessness, domestic abuse and mental health. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. this is the first socially distanced comic relief. red nose day will be different this year. we know that it's hard financially for so many people right now. but we'd love you to join us, even if it's just to share a laugh. tonight's show will be shorter, only three hours, but the vicar of dibley returns with a special message. last year, i was sponsored £5 per villager if i could squeeze a whole granny smith into my mouth. job done.
4:29 pm
while david tennant and michael sheen take part in an historical version of their lockdown hit staged. i'm going to write about this. about the plague? yeah _ is that what people want? yeah, they want social realism. do they? 0k. yeah. and catherine tate's nanjoins james bond for a secret briefing, so secret, all that's been released so far is this one photo. this is pretty funny. the money raised by comic relief will be used to support those who have been hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic. but the night's other aim is to simply make people laugh. colin patterson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker little change on the weather front as we head into the weekend for most of us, fairly cloudy, a little on the nippy side, although some spots in scotland have been quite sunny and warm recently. these are the evening temperatures now tonight.
4:30 pm
again, a fairamount of cloud across the uk, with a few clear spells here, and they're not particularly cold. overnight temperatures hovering around about five or six degrees celsius. and then saturday, the first day of astronomical spring, the spring equinox. and again, another fairly cloudy day. but i think the best of the sunshine on saturday may be eastern scotland to the east of the pennines. and also once any rain clears earlier in the day in the north of scotland, there should be some sunshine, too. and again, around nine to 13 celsius and little change expected into sunday. the weather will eventually change, but not until later next week.
4:31 pm
and by thursday, it will be windier and more unsettled throughout. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: countries in continental europe
4:32 pm
resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. unfortunately the increase in the number of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. good news for people in cumbria, cornwall and northumberland — they'll be among the first in england to get ultrafast broadband. the bbc says it is extremely concerned about one of its reporters in myanmar who's been abducted in the country's capital. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougal. good afternoon. the nine—to—one shot minella indo has won the cheltenham gold cup, riden byjack kennedy and trained by henry de bromhead. it completes an historic triumph for de bromhead, as he becomes the first trainer to win cheltenham's big three of the gold cup, the queen mothers�* champion chase
4:33 pm
and the champion hurdle at the same festival. female jockey rachael blackmore was hard on his heels, but could only come second on board ah plu tar — also trained by de bromhead. they battled along the straight and to the line, kennedy climbing up in the saddle to celebrate the biggest win of his career. the favourite al boum photo — who had been aiming for three gold cups in a row came third. he says the achievement is yet to sink in. tt he says the achievement is yet to sink in. , . , ., ~ sink in. it is incredible to think, ou sink in. it is incredible to think, you know. _ sink in. it is incredible to think, you know. we _ sink in. it is incredible to think, you know, i've been _ sink in. it is incredible to think, you know, i've been coming - sink in. it is incredible to think, i you know, i've been coming here sink in. it is incredible to think, - you know, i've been coming here for a lot of years now, plenty of tough years and tough results but also some great ones. to do this, yeah. as i say, everyone is working with us, all the crew and everyone at home, and everyone here, we could not do it without our client supporting us and that will give us
4:34 pm
the opportunity... just feel extremely lucky. so second place in the gold cup for rachael blackmore, having earlier added to her list of festival winners. she rode ouilixios to victory in the triumph hurdle to make it six wins this week. she will be the leading jockey at cheltenham this year, no—one can overtake her. the scottish government has confirmed that the old firm match at celtic park will go ahead this weekend, despite concerns over crowds gathering in defiance of covid safety rules. rangers and celtic have since repeatedly urged their supporters to stay away from sunday's game at parkhead. the scottishjustice secretary humza yousaf says the decision to allow the match to go ahead follows "extensive engagement" with the clubs, the league, police scotland and glasgow city council. police scotland is warning officers will make arrests if there are any mass gatherings after the match. meanwhile, rangers say several of their players have received "racist, threatening and sicking abuse online" after their europa league
4:35 pm
defeat to slavia prague, during which it's alleged, one of the czech players directed racist language at glen kamara. slavia say they're considering a criminal complaint against kamara in relation to a later incident in the tunnel. rangers managing director stewart robertson said in a statement... so, rangers didn't feature in the europea league quarterfinal draw which was made earlier, with slavia prague drawn against arsenal. here's the line—up in full — with manchester united also going through last night. they've been drawn against spanish side granada. the draw for the semis was also made, so if united make it through, they could face ajax — the team they beat to win
4:36 pm
the trophy in 2017. arsenal are in line for a possible meeting with dinamo zagreb, who knocked out tottenham last night. the champions league quarterfinal draw has also taken place with liverpool drawn against real madrid in a repeat of the 2018 final. manchester city will play borussia dortmund — earling haarland up against the side his father played for. chelsea will take on porto, and defending champions bayern munich will play paris saint germain in a repeat of last year's final. the winner of that one will face either manchester city or dortmund in the semi—finals, and we could see liverpool up against chelsea. gemma grainger has been named as the new manager of wales women, on a four—year contract. she replaces jayne ludlow, who left the post in january by mutual consent. grainger was part of the england coaching staff for euro 2017, where they reached the quarter—finals. that's all the sport for now.
4:37 pm
the world health organization's advisory committee on vaccine safety hasissued advisory committee on vaccine safety has issued a formal statement advising the continued use of the astrazeneca vaccine following concerns in europe over possible connections with a blood clotting. we know the european medicines agency agreed that it would continue to monitor and investigate all adverse events in relation to the astrazeneca vaccine but they made it clear as far as they were concerned, the vaccine is safe to be used across the european union. of course, the astrazeneca vaccine has been cleared for use in the uk. now the world health organization is adding its voice saying its advisory committee on vaccine safety has issued a formal statement advising the continued use of the astrazeneca vaccine is safe. president biden says he is "proud" of secretary of state antony blinken after the first day of talks
4:38 pm
between american and chinese diplomats in their first face—to—face meeting under the new administration. the two—day negotiations are continuing in alaska after an ill—tempered exchange of words yesterday. the chinese delegation accused the us of inciting other countries to attack it. the us delegation said their chinese counterparts had arrived at the talks in alaska, �*intent on grandstanding�*. today we will have an opportunity to discuss _ today we will have an opportunity to discuss key — today we will have an opportunity to discuss key priorities both domestic and global, so that china can better understand — and global, so that china can better understand our administration's intentions — understand our administration's intentions and approach. we also discuss _ intentions and approach. we also discuss our— intentions and approach. we also discuss our deep concerns with actions — discuss our deep concerns with actions by— discuss our deep concerns with actions by china, including hong kong, _ actions by china, including hong kong, taiwan, cyber attacks on the united _ kong, taiwan, cyber attacks on the united states, economic coercion towards _ united states, economic coercion towards our allies. i've said that the united — towards our allies. i've said that the united states' relationship with china _ the united states' relationship with china will— the united states' relationship with china will be competitive where it should _ china will be competitive where it should be, — china will be competitive where it should be, collaborative what it can be an _ should be, collaborative what it can be an adversarial were it must be. translation: the people of the two
4:39 pm
countries and the world, _ they are hoping to see practical outcomes coming out of our dialogue. and for xinjiang, tibet and taiwan, they are on part of china�*s territory. —— inalienable part of china's territory _ china is firmly opposed to us interference in china�*s internal affairs. we have expressed our staunch opposition to such interference and we will take firm action is in response. our washington correspondent barbara plett usher is in anchorage — where the meeting is taking place. she says both parties went into the meeting with quite different agendas. it was quite a rare public sparring match. this is not the way you start, normally, a staid diplomatic meeting, and it went on for some time. it was extended even after the formal remarks, back and forths. you know, in public comments before
4:40 pm
the meeting, the biden administration had been quite blunt about its criticisms of china and they brought those same comments to the meeting, so the chinese must have known what was coming and they really came prepared to hit back in kind. one of the senior chinese officials basically said the us should stop pushing its own version of democracy, it�*s got its own problems, it�*s got its own domestic problems. that this is not a model, necessarily, for the world, to paraphrase. and many other comments like that. and as you mentioned, afterwards, after this sort of quite sparked beginning, they apparently had a serious was an unusual degree. i think the chinese might have been angry, really, by the way the biden administration had been talking about them beforehand, and also just a day before sanctions had been imposed on china over its actions against
4:41 pm
democracy activists in hong kong. so it all came to an atmosphere at the beginning that was quite unusually undiplomatic. a woman who argued that care—workers should be paid the national minimum wage when they have to sleep overnight at work, has lost her supreme court case. claire tomlinson—blake was paid less than £30 for a sleep—in shift between 10pm and 7am. although she could sleep, she was expected to provide support to patients if needed during the night. if she had won the case, charities and care providers warned they would have faced an estimated £400 million bill for backpay, which they said they couldn�*t afford. meanwhile in scotland, the health secretary has said that the majority of social care workers will receive a £500 "thank you" from the scottish government next month. the one—off, pro—rata payment is intended as a bonus for the work done by health and care staff
4:42 pm
to combat covid—19. it was initially announced at the snp�*s autumn conference by the first minister, nicola sturgeon. more than 400,000 social care staff are meant to be eligible, providing they have worked in the sector for at least a continuous four week period between march and november last year. people in cumbria, cornwall and northumberland will be among the first in england to get ultrafast broadband. it�*s part of the government�*s plan to roll out high speed broadband to the majority of homes across the uk by the end of 2025. work will begin next year, with more than a million homes in rural areas set to benefit from the first stage of the scheme. let�*s speak now to councillor nick oliver from northumberland county council, one of the first areas to be involved in the governments ultra—fast broadband roll—out. in thanks for being with us. you are a happy council of today, i assume? a very happy. we�*ve been talking to the government for 3.5 years about this, ruralareas
4:43 pm
the government for 3.5 years about this, rural areas traditionally have been behind the curve on broadband connectivity but we are going to get ahead of the curve which is great news. , ., , ., news. delighted. how did you convince the _ news. delighted. how did you convince the government - news. delighted. how did you| convince the government your news. delighted. how did you - convince the government your area should be first ahead of others? there was a danger rural areas would get left behind even further as people... it was broadband and now superfast broadband. we needed to make sure we leapfrogged, we did the work, we looked at the areas and made the economic case, identified the market where there were market failures, and we�*ve worked closely with the cms to make a really strong case and delighted they�*ve listened to us and they are delivering and we are delighted. to us and they are delivering and we are delighted-— are delighted. obviously it means some people _ are delighted. obviously it means some people might— are delighted. obviously it means some people might be _ are delighted. obviously it means some people might be able - are delighted. obviously it means some people might be able to - some people might be able to download their netflix movies a little bit quicker and there are other movie providers out there as well, but economically what does it mean for the region as a whole? tt
4:44 pm
mean for the region as a whole? tit is mean for the region as a whole? tt is essential. we've got large is essential. we�*ve got large swathes of a very rural area in northumberland, we are a huge county and towns and villages will get left behind if we cannot get predicted connected properly. it is a wonderful place to live and work but you need an intimate connection, no more so than now. the covid crisis has demonstrated that very clearly. it's has demonstrated that very clearly. it�*s really important, tourism cannot survive these days without proper connectivity. rural businesses cannot grow. it is essential to make these connections. it makes one wonder why hasn�*t it happened earlier? given that the benefits of all of this. tt is happened earlier? given that the benefits of all of this.— benefits of all of this. it is hard and it is expensive. _ benefits of all of this. it is hard and it is expensive. we've - benefits of all of this. it is hard and it is expensive. we've got| benefits of all of this. it is hard | and it is expensive. we've got a near here and —— we have one near here at that and it is £64,000 to take the connection down their drive. it is a really expensive job
4:45 pm
and i guess that is why it�*s taken as long as it has. hopefully that is being addressed, £5 billion will make a huge difference. iloathed being addressed, £5 billion will make a huge difference. what all the talk from this — make a huge difference. what all the talk from this government _ make a huge difference. what all the talk from this government about - talk from this government about levelling up and trying to sort of improve the services in many parts of the north and north—east, this is a crucial part of that, isn�*t it? tt a crucial part of that, isn't it? tt is. there are lots of rural areas and at the north and big counties like northumberland and county durham and cumbria, we have huge swathes of sparsely populated areas, and those areas needed to be levelled up much as the urban towns in the north—east. this is great. it gives people confidence and gives the commercial sector confidence to move into our larger towns. just this week we�*ve had announcements about that as well, yesterday the growth deal was signed with more money for broadband in cumbria and northumberland. all heading in the
4:46 pm
right direction, all of our buses have arrived at once.— right direction, all of our buses have arrived at once. given what the andemic have arrived at once. given what the pandemic has _ have arrived at once. given what the pandemic has done _ have arrived at once. given what the pandemic has done in _ have arrived at once. given what the pandemic has done in terms - have arrived at once. given what the pandemic has done in terms of- pandemic has done in terms of forcing people to work from home, do you perhaps see a day when fewer people will end up feeling that they�*ve got to go outside the region in order to work? maybe they can continue working and get high paying jobs and whatever within the region because they�*ve got access to superfast broadband? because they've got access to superfast broadband? absolutely. there's always — superfast broadband? absolutely. there's always been _ superfast broadband? absolutely. there's always been a _ superfast broadband? absolutely. there's always been a brain - superfast broadband? absolutely. there's always been a brain drain | there�*s always been a brain drain from northumberland and people are now coming back. it is proper at levelling up. it�*s a very exciting. i�*ve lived in london, i would much rather live here! a lot less travelling and i can walk out of my door and be climbing up a hill in 30 seconds. just a beautiful place to be. i think lots of people would love to be able to live that sort of life, and it is happening, yeah, very exciting.
4:47 pm
life, and it is happening, yeah, very exciting-— life, and it is happening, yeah, ve excitina. ., ., ,�* ., ., very exciting. london isn't all that bad, though. _ very exciting. london isn't all that bad, though, honestly! _ very exciting. london isn't all that bad, though, honestly! but- very exciting. london isn't all that bad, though, honestly! but you i very exciting. london isn't all that i bad, though, honestly! but you live in a beautiful part of the world, thank you so much forjoining us. thank you, nick. the headlines on bbc news. countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab today — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. good news for people in cumbria, cornwall and northumberland — they�*ll be among the first in england to get ultrafast broadband. the at the peak of the pandemic — as cases climbed and hospital admissions increased — the nhs was at risk of being overwhelmed. but tens of thousands of nursing
4:48 pm
students stepped in to volunteer, with many of them working on the front line for the very first time. now, many of those are preparing to graduate this year. we�*ve been hearing from eight student nurses from across the uk, to find out what it was like to train in the middle of a national emergency. i would probably sum it up as a roller—coaster. my student experience before covid was absolutely amazing. socialising a lot with all of my uni colleagues and things. _ you were allowed to make mistakes, you were allowed to sort of take time in learning but i think that changed with covid. so, i�*m just on my way to a placement. it�*s 6:30am. we were out on placement in march last year when the first few cases started coming through. things were changing on a daily basis, so one day the rules were this, the next day, the rules were this. it was just such a feeling, walking in and thinking, like, wow, all of these beds could have been filled with patients with covid—19.
4:49 pm
even wearing the ppe - was challenging, you know, you were sweating. it�*s definitely a completely different experience from what it was like before covid. it�*s been a really difficult time just now in the hospital for the patients, not only because they�*re ill but because they�*re not allowed to see family and have no visitors. you know, the elderly like to talk about their grandchildren a lot. the younger patients, they kind of like to talk about missing the pubs, and missing seeing their friends. but for myself personally, although there is a big change in the hospital, not being able to see my family has been really, really difficult. hello! my mum and dad are both working from home at the minute so i've been quite cautious about obviously not wanting to bring it home. so, i'm just going to put my uniform straight in the washing machine. i've got little sistersl who are four and six, and i have missed birthdays, i i've missed them growing up.
4:50 pm
we are always on video and i ring them and stuff so it's ok - but i would like to hug them at some point. _ a bit of a tough day, one of our patients passed away unfortunately today. so it's been quite upsetting for obviously all the staff and their family as well. there's no words you can to sayi to someone who's just lost mum and dad to the same virus. i just sat with that person and held their hand and i said, you know, "i know i�*m not your family, you don�*t know me, but just know that you�*re not alone and i�*ll be here with you". i�*m tired today. it's... it�*s sad going to all these people�*s houses that are completely isolated. i definitely struggled - during the first lockdown, with mental health. i spoke to my gp, because i wasjust finding it so difficult _ because you want to reach out and ask for support _ but this has never happened before to our generation. i when i was told i was going
4:51 pm
to the respiratory ward, i was very anxious, i was worried not for myself, i was worried about bringing something home to my family. try to keep positive, going for walks, watched a lot of stupid tv, just trying to lift my mood. it�*s also really good living with two other nursing students because the first thing we ask one another as we come home through the door is, how was your day? so everybody vents and tells their stories. usually you end up laughing about it which is really nice, i�*d rather laugh than cry. it�*s currently quarter to four in the morning, coming in for my break. say hello! you can definitely see there�*s light at the end of the tunnel. we�*ve come out of it a lot stronger, a lot more positive. i'm definitely proud to say that i was a student nurse during the pandemicjust because, because we got through it, really. when i look at all my friends and fellow nursing students, i�*m just so proud, you know.
4:52 pm
not only proud of myself, but proud of them. i�*m so excited for everybody graduating, to start their proper nursing journey. i�*m studying for an exam that we have in a couple of weeks, our last exam of the three years. i know in my little tutorial group, we are always, every week, someone saying, please, when this is all over, let�*s just go for dinner, drinks, and pretend life is normal. so, yeah, i think we�*re all looking forward to that. all week we have been hearing stories sourced and produced by young people between the ages of 11 and 18 as part of the bbc young reporter competition. today we hear from 17—year—old ben, an apprentice footballer at burton albion. he tells us about the pressures
4:53 pm
of trying to make it as a professional — both physical and mental. there has been a couple of lads recently who have been released by clubs who have taken their own lives. that should not be how it is. young people are often overshadowed on the mental side, you kind of see, you�*re playing football every day, what can be wrong with you? who knows what is going on inside? i am 17 years old and i play for burton albion football club. i am a first scholar at the moment so it�*s my first year of two years. there�*s loads of pressures and different kinds of things going on. the football is kind of a hour and a half of your day. you are leaving school, you are leaving your mates, you are leaving your whole kind of last 12 years, almost, to come and play football. and if you don�*t get a pro at the end of it, it�*s a big step to make. yeah, ijust kind of wanted to highlight the importance of the mental health side of football. people think, you are a footballer, you are living life, but it�*s not that at all, you are going home, you are sore, you�*re aching,
4:54 pm
you�*ve got to wake up the next morning, you�*ve got to get through it and it�*s what you�*ve got to do if you want to be a footballer. if you are not training well enough, you�*re out of the team. it is hard, you are going home, you�*re not playing in 90 minutes and thinking what am i doing here? so, yeah, highlighting the importance of that side of the game is vital. an academy footballer is harder than people think. you are in there every day, monday to saturday, you�*ve got gym training in the morning, you�*ve got college, monday, wednesday, thursday, you�*ve got tactical sessions, you�*ve got video sessions, you�*ve got extras at the end if you want to do that, getting up early, getting home late, it�*s hard. if you do not do your work, you�*re not playing in the team. there�*s loads of different assignments with different teachers. it�*s a big part of the scholarship doing college work, yeah. yeah, it�*s not like anything else,
4:55 pm
i don�*t think. we are all mates but you are fighting with each other. if he is taking your place as a pro contract, then you are not going to be happy, so, yeah, it�*s a bit fake, in a sense, that you�*re mates obviously but you want to be better than them and you need to be better than them if you want to be a footballer. i have got plans if football doesn�*t work out. probably uni, i have been thinking like kind of america and different kind of english ones, but, hopefully, get a pro contract. my whole life goal has been to be a footballer, so i am trying to work towards that. yes, doing everything i can to do it. that was ben. and if you�*ve been enjoying the stories told by the winners of this year�*s bbc young reporter competition — dojoin us at 8.30pm tonight — for a special half hour programme showcasing their work. it�*s been described as the most beautiful car in the world. 60 years ago one of britain�*s greatest ever sports cars was unveiled.
4:56 pm
the jaguar e—type became synonymous with the swinging �*60s and remains popular to this day. our correspondent phil mackie has been behind the wheel of the first one ever sold. at the start of the �*60s, britain was dull, drab and grey. and then the jaguar e—type came along. made in coventry, it�*s probably still the ultimate british sports car. even today, it�*s one of the most sought—after cars in the world. back in �*61, when this first went on sale, you could have bought it forjust under £3,000. now, it would set you back 100 times that amount. built here in the midlands, many people still regard this as the greatest british sports car of all time. at this workshop in shropshire, they specialise in restoring jaguars. typically, they have around 50 e—types, more than anywhere else in the world.
4:57 pm
i remember seeing it for the first time and itjust change my life. the time and it 'ust change my life. the sha -e and time and itjust change my life. tte shape and the sound in the fact it is local history as well, coming from the midlands and being a midland boy wrapped up to everything else. launched a year before the beatles first hit the charts, it became the embodiment of the swinging sixties. jaguar is a special breed of car. it was a massive success around the world. overall, it's probably the most important classic car model in the world, definitely. and its importance to motoring and certainly to sports cars in general, you can't underestimate it. yeah, epoch setting. they�*re still sought after by celebrities and royalty alike. it�*s hard to put a price on this one, it was the first one ever sold. only a few people can afford them any more. sadly, i�*m not one.
4:58 pm
phil mackie, bbc news, shropshire. me neither, phil! me neither. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker little change on the weather front as we head into the weekend for most of us, fairly cloudy, a little on the nippy side, although some spots in scotland have been quite sunny and warm recently. these are the evening temperatures now tonight. again, a fairamount of cloud across the uk, with a few clear spells here, and they�*re not particularly cold. overnight temperatures hovering around about five or six degrees celsius. and then saturday, the first day of astronomical spring, the spring equinox. and again, another fairly cloudy day. but i think the best of the sunshine on saturday may be eastern scotland to the east of the pennines. and also once any rain clears earlier in the day in the north of scotland, there should be some sunshine, too. and again, around nine to 13 celsius and little change expected into sunday. the weather will eventually change, but not until later next week. our
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
this is bbc news, i�*m clive myrie. the headlines... countries in continental europe resume giving astrazeneca jabs — but the german health minister warns, there may not be enough vaccine to stop a coronavirus third wave. translation: unfortunately the increase in the number. of new cases has increased in the past few days. it is now very clearly exponential. borisjohnson will be given the astrazeneca covid jab shortly — after reassuring the public the vaccine is safe. calls for nicola sturgeon to resign — as msps conclude the first minister misled the committee investigating the handling of allegations against her predecessor alex salmond. the bbc says it is extremely concerned about one of its reporters in myanmar who�*s been abducted in the country�*s capital. and coming up this hour — mark kermode gives his unique take on the best and worst of the week�*s
5:01 pm
film and dvd releases, that�*s in the film review.

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on