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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 18, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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# stand in front of you and i pour my heart out...# for maria, a teacher and aspiring singer, life in lockdown has turned many certainties upside down. i never used to worry as much about everything, and then i suddenly found myself in a circle, where really, everything seemed quite, quite uncertain, everything seemed really difficult to plan ahead, and even think about what you're doing next week, or the week after. maria and her fiance chris had a wedding planned for last summer, but the stop—start of lockdowns has forced them to cancel it, twice. that's what i think really triggered all my worries and anxieties. having a little bit of guilt, at times, when i've spent sleepless nights, worrying about the wedding, whether it's going to go ahead, and thinking, actually, there are bigger things out there that are happening. lockdown has made some of us
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more anxious and less confident as people, but there have been gains, too. we listen to the birdsong more, we speak to neighbours that we didn't previously know, we are more connected to our surroundings and our communities. for some, the pandemic has meant new roots. sam walker and family moved house for more space. when we were in london, we lived in an upstairs maisonette. we were inside the flat, you know, with no outside space apart from a really small balcony that we had, so that really was the motivation to get a house with a garden. sam is a make—up artist who's seen all her work disappear. it's changed her as a person. before, i had a lot more focus on my work and my career, and that has flipped 100%. you know, so now i realise, you know, where i get my values from, my family and my home. did you feel lonely? a little bit, because i didn't have as many people around me, -
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because i was used to, _ like, as we were going to school, i was used to having quite a lot of people around me, - and also being in public. for artistjoel "chidi3s" sydenham, the changing landscape of lockdown life has led to shifting perspectives of his own. i don't think anybody knew it was going to go on for a year, so i, genuinely, ifelt like it was going to be two or three months, and then everything would be fine. being forced to slow down has forced me to grow up as a human being, and as an artist, and as a teacher, too. many young people, he says, feel frustrated and even angry about the last year. it is an emergency, it is a pandemic, like, knowing it is unprecedented, and i don't think anybody young feels like they have had a say. they don't feel heard or they don't feel like their opinions have been valued. despite the frustrations, joel is hopeful. i have a strong belief that the world will go back to normal, and all those things, they have just been postponed, they haven't really been cancelled. this spring, we are taking tentative steps towards our old lives and our old selves, without really knowing if either are entirely retrievable.
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reeta chakrabarti, bbc news, eltham. that's it. goodnight. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the broadcaster henry bonsu and former trade minister lord jones. welcome both, do say hello to each other, i love it when you do that. hi, henry. hello, lord jones, how are you doing? — doing? very well, good to doing? — very well, good to see you. doing? ve well, aood to see ou. , very well, good to see you. they alwa s very well, good to see you. they always do — very well, good to see you. they always do this, _ very well, good to see you. they always do this, so _ very well, good to see you. they always do this, so it's _ very well, good to see you. they always do this, so it's lovely - very well, good to see you. they always do this, so it's lovely to see both of you greet each other, really good stuff. right, starting with some of the front pages we
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already have. we will look at the telegraph which says, "the jab is safe, the thing that isn't safe is catching covid," the telegraph quotes the prime minister as he urges the public to get their vaccines following safety concerns in regard to the oxford astrazeneca jab. the metro leads with the eu reversing its decision to suspend the astrazeneca vaccine over claims it caused blood clots — the european medicines agency has confirmed it is a �*safe and effective' vaccine and eu countries will now resume the rollout. the same story is on the front of the guardian, with the paper also reporting that nhs leaders have privately accused ministers of putting pressure on staff to meet vaccine deadlines, while underplaying the risk of disruption to vaccine supply. "sturgeon in peril" is the is headline which reports scotland's first minister "misled parliament" about her role in the scottish government's investigation into alex salmond and the financial times writes former prime minister david cameron lobbied the government to increase greensill capital's access to state—backed covid—i9 loan
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schemes — months before the finance company collapsed. the paper notes that mr cameron's alleged lobbying attem pts were u nsuccessful. soap, lots of papers to get through, and lots of stories. the main story dominating is the oxford astrazeneca vaccination, and now that you also arejoining the uk regulatory bodies in saying that it is safe. interestingly, actually, lord jones, let's start with you, both the prime minister and the french prime minister and the french prime minister will be having this particularjob tomorrow. particular “ob tomorrow. yes, i think particularjob tomorrow. yes, i think actually _ particularjob tomorrow. yes, i think actually in _ particularjob tomorrow. yes, i think actually in the _ particularjob tomorrow. yes, i think actually in the daily - think actually in the daily telegraph, it's quite nice. if you see where they are coming from, here is a newspaper, this is a paper review, and if you look at the way
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that the telegraph, their role, you know, they are conservative focus newspaper, they are getting full square behind the prime minister. they are saying he is landing his job tomorrow, but there's income you know, it is safe, but what isn't safe is coronavirus. get this job know, it is safe, but what isn't safe is coronavirus. get thisjob in your arm, and they are really pushing that more than two other things than you would expect from the telegraph, one would be that they have had every opportunity to kick that you again because of that you's shambles. they don't do that. secondly, thejuxtaposition, if you notice where they put on the paper front page all about what ijust said, and you would've thought they really would want to put the boot into nicola sturgeon and as you reported about did she did you not mislead scottish parliament. they find room for that on the front page, but it is quite low down, and it is quite nowhere near as what you
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might have thought would do about what's effectively the opposition to the conservatives in scotland. so i find that very interesting. what i am pleased about is that at last, there are, they have done away, the regulators have done away with this doubts owned by politicians. it was never the medics who said that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine was unsafe because of possible clotting. it was never the medics, it was always the politicians. you can't help but feel there is a little bit of vaccine nationalism and all of this, and because it's british, it's not french or german, i'm not saying that's all the story, but you can't help politicians for indulging in a bit of that. in the scientist have come to the right conclusion, in my view, you know, the risks of not
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having it far outweighed by the risks of having covert. interestingly, in the telegraph story, it actually says the spat that the chances of dying from a blood clot or whatever from taking the astrazeneca, the chances are one in a million. where is if you are aged a0 and you catch coronavirus, the chances of you dying are one in 1000. so it's perfectly clearjust on that probability odd, you're infinitely better off by taking the vaccination. i'm very pleased for the good of europe, you know, for the good of europe, you know, for the good of people, for the good of human beings, i am just thrilled to bits, but i think it's well done in the telegraph. they in my view, get the emphasis right and where it should be, and they don't indulge in the normal kick and push that you would expect. the normal kick and push that you would “pect— the normal kick and push that you would owed-— the normal kick and push that you would expect. henry, i'm surprised ou would expect. henry, i'm surprised you haven't — would expect. henry, i'm surprised you haven't interjected _ would expect. henry, i'm surprised you haven't interjected as - would expect. henry, i'm surprised you haven't interjected as such - would expect. henry, i'm surprised
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you haven't interjected as such just yet, but ijust need to clarify, we will talk about nicola sturgeon in a moment, but wejust will talk about nicola sturgeon in a moment, but we just have to say that the final report hasn't been published yet, such as stressing that, and we welcome like i say, we will talk about that in a moment. let's get your reaction to the oxford astrazeneca vaccination and the metro also looking at the aspect from the european union, safe and effective is that you's verdict. as well as in the uk, henry.- effective is that you's verdict. as well as in the uk, henry. very much so. i well as in the uk, henry. very much so- i agree — well as in the uk, henry. very much so- i agree with _ well as in the uk, henry. very much so. i agree with what _ well as in the uk, henry. very much so. i agree with what digby - well as in the uk, henry. very much so. i agree with what digby said - so. i agree with what digby said there _ so. i agree with what digby said there i— so. i agree with what digby said there. i didn't interrupt him because _ there. i didn't interrupt him because he was clearly getting into his stride, — because he was clearly getting into his stride, but this is a really embarrassing period for the european union _ embarrassing period for the european union leaders, because it sows the seeds_ union leaders, because it sows the seeds of— union leaders, because it sows the seeds of doubt when there was a concern — seeds of doubt when there was a concern about astrazeneca and its effectiveness in dealing with the south _ effectiveness in dealing with the south african variant and then its effectiveness in the over 65 group. we have _ effectiveness in the over 65 group. we have this extreme area position
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of this_ we have this extreme area position of this worry around the world about the supply— of this worry around the world about the supply of the astrazeneca vaccine, — the supply of the astrazeneca vaccine, particularly from india where — vaccine, particularly from india where a — vaccine, particularly from india where a huge amount of it is being manufactured, the eu is blocking supplies— manufactured, the eu is blocking supplies of the vaccine manufactured in the _ supplies of the vaccine manufactured in the european union to britain, even _ in the european union to britain, even though they haven't been able to give _ even though they haven't been able to give away or inject half of the supply— to give away or inject half of the supply they've already got because they have — supply they've already got because they have sown so much doubt in the minds _ they have sown so much doubt in the minds of— they have sown so much doubt in the minds of european union citizens. they— minds of european union citizens. they say— minds of european union citizens. they say that of the 13 countries, that suspended use of the astrazeneca vaccine this week, 12 have _ astrazeneca vaccine this week, 12 have now — astrazeneca vaccine this week, 12 have now fallen underlying given the european _ have now fallen underlying given the european medicines agency the green li-ht european medicines agency the green light earlier today. what we are seeing — light earlier today. what we are seeing hesitancy grow in the uk where _ seeing hesitancy grow in the uk where we — seeing hesitancy grow in the uk where we have had a huge response, positive _ where we have had a huge response, positive response to getting the vaccine — positive response to getting the vaccine i— positive response to getting the vaccine. i got mine as an early 50—something yesterday and i was expected _ 50—something yesterday and i was expected to wait a long time at the school— expected to wait a long time at the school which is doubling up as a vaccine — school which is doubling up as a vaccine centre, and i was straight and there — vaccine centre, and i was straight and there i— vaccine centre, and i was straight and there, i had a sign, there was a
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form, _ and there, i had a sign, there was a form. and— and there, i had a sign, there was a form, and they said to me, it's astrazeneca, is that 0k? form, and they said to me, it's astrazeneca, is that ok? i said no problem. — astrazeneca, is that ok? i said no problem. it— astrazeneca, is that ok? i said no problem, if they really think i was going _ problem, if they really think i was going to _ problem, if they really think i was going to say no, some people are saying _ going to say no, some people are saying i_ going to say no, some people are saying i want to hold out for pfizer, — saying i want to hold out for pfizer, and this is something that is to save — pfizer, and this is something that is to save people. we need to herd immunity— is to save people. we need to herd immunity from vaccinations, and i'm pleased _ immunity from vaccinations, and i'm pleased to _ immunity from vaccinations, and i'm pleased to see that overall, it's holding — pleased to see that overall, it's holding up in this country. in time, inthe— holding up in this country. in time, in the european union, people will for a _ in the european union, people will for a whole — in the european union, people will for a whole range of reasons give their— for a whole range of reasons give their arm — for a whole range of reasons give their arm or— for a whole range of reasons give theirarm ortheir for a whole range of reasons give their arm or their shoulder and get back to _ their arm or their shoulder and get back to normal, because we are now in a third _ back to normal, because we are now in a third spike, a third wave in several— in a third spike, a third wave in several countries, france, germany and italy. _ several countries, france, germany and italy, and that is something they need — and italy, and that is something they need like a hole in the head. so that— they need like a hole in the head. so that means that i am out of you both, i'm the last one, i haven't had a vaccination yet, but it is good to know... you are so much younger.
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i am — you are so much younger. i am going to say that is a commentary on how young you are, not the availability of the vaccine. i will take the flattery. i know, digby, the last time we spoke, you are talking, we appreciate that you have a fear of needles and you are talking about how you went and the staff, the nhs staff, they distracted you while you are having it so kudos for sharing that story with us. i it so kudos for sharing that story with us. , ., ., with us. i 'ust thought the whole thin 'ust with us. i just thought the whole thing just was — with us. i just thought the whole thing just was done _ with us. i just thought the whole thing just was done brilliantly. . with us. i just thought the whole i thing just was done brilliantly. i'm a great fan. i would give all the front line staff in the nhs for the last year, the nurses, doctors, the care home workers, i think they have been fabulous. but i do think that the problems, the inherent problems with the nhs, the procurements, the administration from of the facilities management, all of that husband found seriously wanting, and its heritage say it, and people get
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crossfit criticised the nhs at all, but there is this distinction between the front line where they have been wonderful and a lot of that back office, and i think with the delivery of the vaccination, this harmonisation of things, as henry said, i mean, the whole thing has been brilliantly done. and it's also been done with this lovely warm, almost humourous, but certainly friendly smiling way for everything from when they first get in touch to when they put it in your arm. it's ten out of ten, and the nation has risen to that. you can tell the morale of the country has gone up. people are feeling more positive, and a lot of it is down to the experience they have had in getting there vaccine.— getting there vaccine. that's anecdotal — getting there vaccine. that's anecdotal story _ getting there vaccine. that's anecdotal story of _ getting there vaccine. that's anecdotal story of people i getting there vaccine. that's i anecdotal story of people being concerned when they hear that it is astrazeneca, digby, any thoughts on that, because we heard from i'm quite surprised they said that to
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you, henry, but digby, what did you make of that? i’m you, henry, but digby, what did you make of that?— make of that? i'm surprised that the said make of that? i'm surprised that they said it _ make of that? i'm surprised that they said it because _ make of that? i'm surprised that they said it because it _ make of that? i'm surprised that they said it because it was - make of that? i'm surprised thatl they said it because it was almost reported, you almost set it as if they were about to give you a choice or indeed the trace being you don't have to have this vaccine.— have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? _ have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? it _ have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? it was _ have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? it was more _ have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? it was more a - have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? it was more a case i have to have this vaccine. cannot intervene? it was more a case of| intervene? it was more a case of they— intervene? it was more a case of theyiust — intervene? it was more a case of theyjust wanted to warn me, you know, _ theyjust wanted to warn me, you know. but— theyjust wanted to warn me, you know. but i— theyjust wanted to warn me, you know, but i think they might have been _ know, but i think they might have been worried that i might and say, oh, been worried that i might and say, oh. no, _ been worried that i might and say, oh. no, no, — been worried that i might and say, oh. no, no, i— been worried that i might and say, oh, no, no, isaid no, it's fine, and— oh, no, no, isaid no, it's fine, and interestingly, itweeted oh, no, no, isaid no, it's fine, and interestingly, i tweeted about it earlier— and interestingly, i tweeted about it earlier today and i got lots and lots of _ it earlier today and i got lots and lots of responses from people who are saying — lots of responses from people who are saying to me, well—done, nice one, _ are saying to me, well—done, nice one henry, — are saying to me, well—done, nice one, henry, welcome to the club, and i'm saying _ one, henry, welcome to the club, and i'm saying done anything. what about all those _ i'm saying done anything. what about all those people out there trying to help us, _ all those people out there trying to help us, all i did was bear my children— help us, all i did was bear my children take the vaccine from and one member of my family has been called _ one member of my family has been called four— one member of my family has been called four times and he hasn't responded, and i said to him shortly after i _ responded, and i said to him shortly after i received myjab, look, i responded, and i said to him shortly after i received myjab, look, lam still here — after i received myjab, look, lam still here, our mum is still here, she's— still here, our mum is still here, she's 80 — still here, our mum is still here, she's 80 years old, and she had the vaccine _ she's 80 years old, and she had the vaccine a _ she's 80 years old, and she had the vaccine a problem whatsoever, so i think— vaccine a problem whatsoever, so i think he _ vaccine a problem whatsoever, so i think he is— vaccine a problem whatsoever, so i think he is not going to get it next
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week _ think he is not going to get it next week. . . , . , | think he is not going to get it next week-_ i am - think he is not going to get it next| week._ i am thrilled week. fantastic news. i am thrilled to bits to hear— week. fantastic news. i am thrilled to bits to hear that, _ week. fantastic news. i am thrilled to bits to hear that, because - week. fantastic news. i am thrilled to bits to hear that, because i- week. fantastic news. i am thrilled to bits to hear that, because i wasl to bits to hear that, because i was hearing today that there are certain parts of the country and parts of cities that are not being vaccinated in niss commend you did refer commend you are so right, which is the ability of this vaccination to get herd immunity, so that the virus dies with us on the vine and therefore it's can grow commit can mutate into can develop, maybe the vaccine is less potent to the outcome and therefore, we need to get so many of these parts of cities that say, oh, yeah, we are not doing it, for loads of reasons, and we have got to get through to those people. we have got to get that, because it is pointless, if we are all going to be protected and then you have got certain cities, you know, where, frankly, they are all still going to have it, and some of them will die, and it would be a tragedy, he really would. listen, it's fantastic _
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tragedy, he really would. listen, it's fantastic news _ tragedy, he really would. listen, it's fantastic news and _ tragedy, he really would. listen, it's fantastic news and great - tragedy, he really would. listen, i it's fantastic news and great public service broadcasting there from both

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