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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 18, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... most people in the uk in their 40s will have to wait until may to get a a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies. a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the vaccine roll—out will be slightly slower than we might have hoped, but not slower than the target that we had set ourselves, which is, as i say, to get those groups one to nine by the middle of april. and if you have appointments, they will still be honoured. the eu's drugs regulator will give its judgment on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today — several countries have paused the roll—out after blood clots were reported in a small number of people. people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed, under plans for a major overhaurl
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of the immigration system expected to be set out next week. one of the places which has been suggested is gibraltar, we'll be speaking to the territory's chief minister, fabian picardo in the next half an hour. hundreds of patients in england may have had "do not resuscitate" decisions placed on them during the pandemic, without them or theirfamilies knowing. the care regulator calls for urgent action. tanzania mourns the death of it's covid—sceptic president, john magufuli, amid rumours he'd contracted the virus hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk government is facing
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questions over why there's to be a significant reduction in covid vaccine supplies from the end of this month. it is understood a delivery of millions of doses of the oxford—astrazeneca jab, produced by the serum institute of india, has been held up by four weeks. after opening up appointments to all over—50s on wednesday, nhs england says jabs should now not be offered to younger age groups throughout april, meaning healthy people in their 40s will have to wait till may. the health secretary, matt hancock, said there was always going to be ups and downs in availability, but labour has accused him of trying to downplay the issue. at the same time, the european commission president, ursula von der leyen, has threatened to restrict covid vaccine exports to some countries, including the uk, if supplies in the eu don't improve. she said the eu was still waiting for vaccines to be delivered from the uk. also today, the eu's drugs regulator is due to present the findings of its investigation into the safety
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of the astrazeneca covid vaccine. several countries have temporarily stopped using the jab after blood clots were reported in a small number of inoculated people. and the health secretary has confirmed more than 3.7 million vulnerable people in england will no longer have to shield from the coronavirus from april 1st, as cases and hospitalisations continue to fall. more on all these stories to follow. this first report from jim reed. another step closer to normality. afternoon, you all right? at gps like this one in lincolnshire, thousands have been given their vaccines this week. there you go — done. that it? that's it. in total, more than 25 million have now beenjabbed. for the next fortnight, there should be plenty of doses to go round. after that, though, there is more doubt. a letter sent by the nhs to local health services warned of a significant reduction in supply next month, and said no further
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appointments for first doses should be uploaded to booking systems in april. vaccine supply is always lumpy, and we regularly send out technical letters to the nhs to explain the ups and downs of the supply over the future weeks. it's thought the late delivery of batches of the astrazeneca vaccine manufactured at a plant in india are to blame for the shortfall. nobody who has an appointment should lose their slot, but this may delay the roll—out to the next age group down — those in their 40s — by perhaps as much as a month. it comes as the european commission suggested it could block exports of the pfizer vaccine to the uk, unless otherjabs are sent back across the channel in return. meanwhile, 13 eu states have still suspended the use of the astrazeneca shot over concerns about rare blood clots. an investigation into that by the eu medicines agency is due to report
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back this afternoon. keeping up the pace of vaccine supply is crucial if the government is going to stick to its road map out of lockdown. the recent fall in infections means that almost four million vulnerable people in england have now been told they no longer need to shield from next month. the reason we've done that is because the rates of community infection have now dropped a long way and they've been sustained. and we recognise that actually advising people to shield for more than about 12 weeks can be really quite damaging for their mental health. so i think good news for all of them. as for the vaccine programme, the government said supply of the jabs will vary over time, but it remains on track to offer a first dose to all over—50s in england by mid—april, and all adults by the end ofjuly. jim reed, bbc news. the eu's medicines regulator is expected to deliver its findings
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in a few hours�* time on the safety of the astrazeneca vaccine. germany initially dismissed concerns from some european countries — saying there was no evidence to link the vaccine and blood clots — but then, earlier this weekjoined several other governments and suspended its use. our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, explains why the german government took the decision and what the consequences might be. is germany playing it too safe? infection�*s spreading fast here — cases rising in newly reopened kindergartens. nursery workers have been pushed up the vaccination priority list. izabela and her staff were offered the astrazeneca jab. translation: i think it's devastating. - three of us were vaccinated on sunday. two others would have had it today, but that was cancelled. even if they reapprove it, my colleagues don't want to have it now.
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germany dismissed concerns about astrazeneca and blood clotting from other countries — it's used 1.6 million doses. but then it emerged seven people here have developed a rare type of blood clot on the brain within days of receiving the jab. experts say, statistically, they'd expect around one. the cases are deemed so severe — three people died — that the government argues it would be irresponsible not to pause the programme. translation: in my view, it's better if we suspend for a few days, - get a better view of the situation, and talk to our european partners. then we can say with certainty how we will proceed. some in germany weren't keen on astrazeneca in the first place — in part because the government initially blocked its use in older people. but this country, which has given just 8% of its population a first dose of vaccine, is relying on it. "there are always risks," he says.
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"you don't know how many people will die now "because they aren't vaccinated." she says, "they've got to check it. "the government's trying its best." germany is under pressure, in the grip of a third wave. at this night shelter for homeless people, staff were due to start vaccinating their residents yesterday — with astrazeneca. translation: it is very sad | for the people who live here. many of them are at risk, vulnerable. so it would be good if they could be vaccinated as fast as possible, and the same for the staff. we don't know when or if we can start again, so we're uncertain. it's a shame. the german government says this wasn't a political decision, and it's hard to see what the gain would be. more than 200 people are dying every day here from covid, and public dissatisfaction is growing. ministers insist this was about inspiring trust — it may be they've achieved quite the opposite. jenny hill, bbc news, berlin.
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earlier, i spoke to our europe correspondentjean mackenzie who explained more about the scope of the investigation into these cases. and the decision by the european regulator as to whether they will give approval to the astrazeneca vaccine to continue. ..vaccinated reported blood clots. let's talk to our europe correspondent, jean mackenzie, she is outside the ema in amsterdam. tell us about the scope of the investigation that has been going on into these cases. 17 million people so far in the eu and uk have had the astrazeneca vaccine, and there have been fewer than a0 cases reported of blood clots. so what the european drugs regulator has been doing over the past few days is looking at each of those reported cases very carefully to see if it can establish any link between the vaccine
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and the blood clotting. because, at the moment, there is no evidence to suggest the two are linked. it gave out an initial assessment on tuesday when it said that so far there was no indication that the vaccine was causing the clotting. but we will find out later today whether it has found anything, the indication at the moment is that it hasn't. it has urged countries, as has the world health organization, to carry on using the vaccine saying that at the moment, the benefits very clearly outweigh the risks. but for those countries where there has been opposing the use of the astrazeneca jab, if the ema later on today says there is no issue here, do you expect those countries to quickly start using it again? certainly so. a number of countries have already said that if it gets the all clear here today, there are no problems, they will immediately start to use it again. some of these countries of this has been about trust. they say that they know that trust
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is an issue here in europe with people taking the vaccine, they wanted to make absolutely sure, this was a precautionary measure that they could say to people, "this vaccine is safe." and once they get the all clear, if they get the all clear, they will start using it again. but of course, there have been some who have questioned whether they should have pressed the pause before they had that evidence, given that we know every day this vaccine is saving many lives. let's get more on the vaccine row between the eu and uk. peter liese is a german mep who sits on the public health committee in the european parliament. very good to have you with us on bbc news. this has very rapidly become an issue that is causing great difficulty between the relationship of the uk and the eu. give us your take on where the discussions are. yeah, i would wish we were in another situation and we would all have enough vaccine and no doubt
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about the quality of safety of no vaccine. we have to deal with this issue as it stands. and unfortunately the german authorities discovered that the astrazeneca vaccine is linked, if it is the cause, we don't know, but of a higher incidence of a serious disease which is life—threatening. we all have to look at this together and i am convinced that the british authorities will also look at this. who amongst other regulators, the medicines regulator here in the uk and others have said that there is absolutely no higher incidence of people having blood clots who have had this vaccine compared to those who would have a blood clot without having a vaccine. they are saying it is perfectly safe to use. that is a
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secondary issue apart from the row of vaccine supply. a number of countries in the eu have paused using the astrazeneca vaccine. we cannot using the astrazeneca vaccine. - cannot easily set it aside. using the astrazeneca vaccine. we cannot easily set it aside. i - using the astrazeneca vaccine. we cannot easily set it aside. i do - cannot easily set it aside. i do want to come _ cannot easily set it aside. i do want to come back _ cannot easily set it aside. i do want to come back to - cannot easily set it aside. i do want to come back to that. i was primarily expecting to talk to about vaccine supply as opposed to blood clotting. we will come back to that. i'm not setting it aside entirely. i wonder how dependent is the eu on the astrazeneca vaccine specifically? it the astrazeneca vaccine specifically?— the astrazeneca vaccine specifically? the astrazeneca vaccine secificall ? , ., specifically? it is part of the eumpean — specifically? it is part of the european vaccine _ specifically? it is part of the european vaccine strategy l specifically? it is part of the i european vaccine strategy and specifically? it is part of the - european vaccine strategy and that is why this incident and i hope we will see that the vaccine is safe at least for the biggest part of the population, and then we need to
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continue the vaccination. there is the other issue of the dramatic shortage of astrazeneca compared to what they promised in their treaties. and here is another issue we have so—called european german vaccine that was developed in germany with german state money. this has been exported to the world. it is going at a large—scale to the united kingdom but also to canada, mexico and unfortunately in the european union is confronted with export bans by the united states mac a very strange situation would astrazeneca when it comes to the uk. we export vaccine to many european countries outside of the european union, but we don't receive the vaccine in reverse and that is a challenge which we have to address. do you think mistakes have been made in trying to co—ordinate the buying
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of vaccines, ensuring there is a supply chain of vaccine coming into the eu, that mistakes have been made in doing it in a pan eu way and it would have been betterfor individual countries to look after their individual citizens? a, individual countries to look after their individual citizens? a mistake has been made, _ their individual citizens? a mistake has been made, it _ their individual citizens? a mistake has been made, it is _ their individual citizens? a mistake has been made, it is very - their individual citizens? a mistake has been made, it is very clear. . has been made, it is very clear. there are some countries, especially eastern european countries that did not want to invest enough in the bionic tack. we were all reacting to donald trump. in october the us, in december, sorry, the us did a vaccine band. —— a vaccine ban. it is not possible for us to get any
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vaccine from the united states and the european union does not get any vaccine from the uk. the european union and the rest of the world should be much more outspoken in this situation. i am in favour of free trade, of cooperation, but it cannot be possible that there is only trade in one direction. it must be both ways and that is what we expect. the second best option is an export ban by the european union. i hope we can avoid this. it is export ban by the european union. i hope we can avoid this.— hope we can avoid this. it is a dire situation when _ hope we can avoid this. it is a dire situation when you _ hope we can avoid this. it is a dire situation when you are _ hope we can avoid this. it is a dire situation when you are talking - hope we can avoid this. it is a dire l situation when you are talking about an export band in this case being the second best option. the uk government has said it is going to try to get vaccines to other countries. i want to come back to the safety issue around astrazeneca. i was absolutely not setting it aside. the who has said, and the europe director says the benefits of astrazeneca's vaccine out raise any
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risk. it's you should continue to save lives. that is a direct quote. is in a mistake in your opinion considering that we have seen the rise of coronavirus cases in germany to have instituted this pause in the use of the vaccine when there has been a tiny number of people reporting blood clots that would probably have had the blood clots anyway? the probably have had the blood clots an a ? ~ , ., probably have had the blood clots an a ? ~ , . ._ , anyway? the who statement may be correct when — anyway? the who statement may be correct when you _ anyway? the who statement may be correct when you see _ anyway? the who statement may be correct when you see the _ anyway? the who statement may be correct when you see the whole - correct when you see the whole population. i hope we can avoid a situation where vaccinations are completely suspended for a longer time. but when we look at the cases that have been reported in germany and the authorities have been very carefully looking at it, we have use the vaccine a lot in young women which did not happen in other parts of the world. and here there is an
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incident that is higher than is expected in the average population. experts say it is well possible that there is a link. so the conclusion may well be, i am not the expert and i trust the advice of the european medical agency and the national authorities in germany, but the outcome may well be that it is clearly positive for the average population but there is a significant risk for women, especially younger women. it is not only blood clots. it is a serious disease. and it can be life—threatening. this has to be looked at very carefully. i will hope for a positive outcome but we cannot be naive. pare hope for a positive outcome but we cannot be naive.— cannot be naive. are any other ossible cannot be naive. are any other possible connections _ cannot be naive. are any other possible connections or - cannot be naive. are any otherj possible connections or causes cannot be naive. are any other- possible connections or causes being looked at? {iii
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possible connections or causes being looked at? . ., , ., , looked at? of course, that is the task of the _ looked at? of course, that is the task of the experts. _ looked at? of course, that is the task of the experts. it _ looked at? of course, that is the task of the experts. it might - looked at? of course, that is the | task of the experts. it might only be part of the production. there might be another reason for this. but the experts in germany said that it is quite possible that there is a link and that is why one has to look at this carefully. and i would hope really that as fast as possible experts will come out with some more precise analysis and say for this part of the population the benefits are still very high compared to any possible side effects, but may be for a small part of the population, it is the other way around. and then the vaccine strategy in germany may be in the uk and eu might have to be changed. for be in the uk and eu might have to be chanced. ., ,., be in the uk and eu might have to be chanced. ., y., , changed. for everyone else, if the ema sa s changed. for everyone else, if the ema says that _ changed. for everyone else, if the ema says that it _ changed. for everyone else, if the ema says that it is _ changed. for everyone else, if the ema says that it is happy - changed. for everyone else, if the ema says that it is happy with - changed. for everyone else, if the ema says that it is happy with the | ema says that it is happy with the astrazeneca vaccine, do you think the german authority should go
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ahead, other eu countries should go ahead, other eu countries should go ahead and say they will start to use it again? ahead and say they will start to use it auain? , ., ,., ahead and say they will start to use it auain? , . ,.,. ., it again? yes, that is a clear message — it again? yes, that is a clear message from _ it again? yes, that is a clear message from the _ it again? yes, that is a clear message from the german | it again? yes, that is a clear _ message from the german government. if the ema says it is safe or safe for everybody or save for a specific group that we will continue using the vaccination. people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed. it's thought the proposals are part of a major shake—up of the immigration system to be announced by the home secretary, priti patel, next week. similar plans were leaked last year — when labour described them as inhumane and impractical. one of the places being suggested is gibraltar. we can speak to gibraltar�*s chief minister fabian picardo. hejoins me now. very good of you to join us on bbc news today. what is your response to these reports? it is news today. what is your response to these reports?— these reports? it is a pleasure to 'oin ou. these reports? it is a pleasure to join you- i _ these reports? it is a pleasure to join you- i have _
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these reports? it is a pleasure to join you. i have written _ these reports? it is a pleasure to join you. i have written to - these reports? it is a pleasure to join you. i have written to priti i join you. i have written to priti patel this morning having seen the reports which i think are groundless in the uk media to tell her that of course gibraltar is part of the british family of nations, we work with a uk government in all areas where we can, but immigration which is a matter under the gibraltar constitution and it is to be discussed with the ministers. and no one has approached me. our immigration act is not the same as a uk immigration act. bringing people into the small geography of gibraltar is never going to be a practical way of dealing with these things. additionally, gibraltar is negotiating good the uk a treaty for fluidity with the schengen area. apart from being outside of our constitution and laws, would create difficulties in the negotiation. i
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think this is speculation in our contacts and not based in reality. to clarify it has not been proposed to you by anyone in the government and westminster that asylum—seekers should be processed in gibraltar and if it were based on what you just said, it would present some clear difficulties to you?— difficulties to you? indeed. it has not been raised _ difficulties to you? indeed. it has not been raised with _ difficulties to you? indeed. it has not been raised with me - difficulties to you? indeed. it has not been raised with me and - difficulties to you? indeed. it has not been raised with me and if i difficulties to you? indeed. it has not been raised with me and if it| not been raised with me and if it were i would raise these serious concerns and these constitutional issues which i think make it entirely unviable in gibraltar. lats entirely unviable in gibraltar. lots of laces entirely unviable in gibraltar. lots of places have _ entirely unviable in gibraltar. lots of places have been _ entirely unviable in gibraltar. lots of places have been mentioned. do you think someone somewhere is leaking this to gauge reaction and then perhaps to decide what to do as a result to a possible leak? i am not auoin a result to a possible leak? i am not going to _ a result to a possible leak? i am not going to be _ a result to a possible leak? i am not going to be able _ a result to a possible leak? i am not going to be able to -
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a result to a possible leak? i —n not going to be able to speculate on that. i don't know what the highways and byways are of westminster. iadhere and byways are of westminster. where else could this — and byways are of westminster. where else could this have _ and byways are of westminster. where else could this have come _ and byways are of westminster. where else could this have come from? - and byways are of westminster. where else could this have come from? it - else could this have come from? it is clear to me that the reference to gibraltar notjust in one media source, but in a number of known including respected media sources like the bbc, the times, the guardian, etc. obviously there has been consideration of these places, the only thing that the article say is that officials have considered gibraltar and others as places where the processing of a silent seekers could happen. the processing of a silent seekers could happen-— the processing of a silent seekers could happen. the processing of a silent seekers could ha en. ,, . ., .., , . could happen. strange to consider a location without _ could happen. strange to consider a location without first _ could happen. strange to consider a location without first evening - location without first evening having a conversation with someone like yourself in one of these locations about that idea ann the consideration might be whether or not to have the conversation with someone like me. i
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not to have the conversation with someone like me.— someone like me. i have considerations _ someone like me. i have considerations -- - someone like me. i have - considerations -- conversations someone like me. i have _ considerations -- conversations with considerations —— conversations with my wife about where we might take the children on holiday but we have conversations before we book that. it may be of fair report of that consideration. nothing has gone beyond consideration in the context of gibraltar. fiifi beyond consideration in the context of gibraltar-— of gibraltar. 0k, thank you very much for your— of gibraltar. 0k, thank you very much for your time. _ of gibraltar. 0k, thank you very much for your time. we - of gibraltar. 0k, thank you very much for your time. we have i of gibraltar. 0k, thank you very l much for your time. we have also of gibraltar. 0k, thank you very - much for your time. we have also had a statement from a spokesman from the isle of man government saying they are happy to confirm that there is no foundation to the reports that the isle of man is another location being considered for the possible processing of asylum—seekers. the statement says the isle of man is self—governing, the uk would not be able to open any sort of processing centre on the island without consent. the care regulator for england has said hundreds of people may have been subject to "do not resuscitate"
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decisions during the early part of the pandemic — without them or their families knowing. a report by the care quality commission found evidence that the dnr decisions — which restrict potentially life—saving treatment — were applied across particular groups, including people with learning difficulties. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. sonia had an absolute zest for life, loved being with herfamily, you know — always smiling, always laughing. son has got the moves. sonia deleon suffered from schizophrenia and had learning disabilities. but it was only after she died in hospital from a heart attack last april that her family say they discovered her medical notes contained a "do not resuscitate" decision — limiting the treatment that sonia could receive. we'd had no consultation. at no point — at no point — were we told that that had taken place. we would have disputed that and we would have said we don't want that in place. the hospital insists the family consented to the decision —
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including discussing it with sonia's 85—year—old mother. i can't describe the love that my mum has for son. aww! mum's been waiting to hear your voice. i there is no way that she would agree to that being put in place. absolutely no way at all. southend university hospital were responsible for treating sonia deleon. they say the "do not resuscitate" decision was appropriate, and based on assessments by clinicians. today's report makes no reference to sonia's case, but does find that over 500 people — mainly elderly or disabled — had "do not resuscitate" decisions made for them without their consent or that of their relatives. the true scale of the problem could be much greater, however. any decision that's put in in a blanket fashion or in a way that doesn't take into consideration a person's individual needs is never acceptable.
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one of the things we found through the review is that trying to quantify this problem has been very difficult because of the lack of oversight and the lack of record—keeping and data. the cqc say the pressure of the pandemic and rapidly developing guidance were to blame for the problems. they want a group of ministers to come together to fully investigate what happened. nhs england say that throughout the pandemic they had repeatedly told those making dnr decisions that that blanket use was unacceptable. sonia deleon's family want more safeguards put in place to protect those who can't help themselves. today's report suggests many other families would also benefit from such measures. michael buchanan, bbc news. two weeks of national mourning have been declared in tanzania to mark the death of presidentjohn magufuli, who's died at the age of 61.
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the vice—president announced mr magufuli's death on state tv. translation: fellow citizens, i it is with deep regret that i inform you that today on the 17th of march 2021 at 6pm, we lost our brave leader, the president of the republic of tanzania, honourablejohn pombejoseph magufuli, who has died of a heart condition at a hospital in dar es salaam where he was being treated. funeral arrangements are being made and you will be notified. our country shall be in a morning period of ia days and flags will fly at half mast. i'm nowjoined by our correspondent leila nathoo who is in nairobi. rumours were circulating that he had contracted the coronavirus. has this been confirmed? well the short answer is no. but i think that is what makes the
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announcement of his death very significant because presidentjohn pombe magufuli had been absent for public life for up to three weeks now. there had been no official communication about his whereabouts. and he is normally very visible, going to church ceremony, which had been continuing in tanzania. there was very little official communication apart from a very vague reference to him earlier this week by the vice president saying everything was ok. and it was normal for people to be indisposed due to illness. but in this void of official information there was intense speculation that he had fallen ill. and quite serious claims made by an opposition leader who is in exile in belgium that in fact he was told that the president had contracted covid—i9 and had been flown out of the country to nairobi for treatment and was critically ill. these claims have not been
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independently confirmed. mira; ill. these claims have not been independently confirmed. why the secre ? independently confirmed. why the secrecy? why _ independently confirmed. why the secrecy? why no _ independently confirmed. why the secrecy? why no confirmation - independently confirmed. why the secrecy? why no confirmation or. secrecy? why no confirmation or denial? why would that be a controversial diagnosis? what that is because he _ controversial diagnosis? what that is because he has _ controversial diagnosis? what that is because he has been _ controversial diagnosis? what that is because he has been a - controversial diagnosis? what that is because he has been a covid-19| is because he has been a covid—i9 sceptic. he declared tanzania as covid free injune last year. only 20 desk, he shunned a vaccination programme and supported herbal treatments and steam therapies as ways of tackling the virus. at the start of this year there had been increasing concern, story trickling out about people showing up in hospitals with breathing difficulties. and quite senior figures came down with suspected coronavirus, but still no official confirmation. so the idea that he might have contracted covid—i9 is a
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particular explosive claim. the official line is that he has died from heart disease and there is no way of confirming at the moment any diagnosis of covid—i9 especially since testing is not really routine there. that is the claim that has been circulating in these last weeks when no official communication has been put out. and in fact, tanzanian government have been —— have had people arrested for circulating claims on line. they were trying to shut down speculation. it wasn't until very late last night that we got the official confirmation of his death. but reported to be from heart disease. what will his legacy be? how will he be remembered? will this controversy dominate that? he be remembered? will this controversy dominate that?— dominate that? he was elected in 2015 on an _ dominate that? he was elected in 2015 on an anti-corruption - dominate that? he was elected in i 2015 on an anti-corruption platform, 2015 on an anti—corruption platform, his constituency of supporters
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within the country, his critics accused him of becoming increasingly authoritarian, clamping down on opposition parties, on media freedom. he was re—elected at the end of last year for another five year term. end of last year for another five yearterm. some end of last year for another five year term. some critics allege to the election was not fair. but i think there has been a lot of international criticism of his stance on coronavirus in tanzania. there has been pressure from the who for tanzania to start recording cases, start sharing data, it had implications for neighbouring countries as well if coronavirus was allowed to circulate still within tanzania with no vaccination programme on the horizon. officially, what is supposed to happen is his vice president is supposed to take over. for the remainder of his five year term. she hasn't yet been officially sworn in so we could yet see some sort of manoeuvre, power struggle, within the ruling party but i think given the ruling party but i think given
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the lead up to the president �*s death and the intense speculation, as well as the situation with covid—19 in tanzania, i think many people will still feel they haven't quite had the full picture of what's been going on in these last few weeks and perhaps there are still unanswered questions.— weeks and perhaps there are still unanswered questions. the headlines on bbc news... most people in the uk in their 40s will have to wait until may to get a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies — a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the eu's drugs regulator will give itsjudgement on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today — several countries have paused the rollout after blood clots were reported in a small number of people people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed, under a plans for a major overhaul of the immigration system expected to be set out next week. hundreds of patients in england may have had "do not resuscitate" decisions placed on them during the pandemic, without them or theirfamilies knowing —
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the care regulator calls for urgent action tanzania mourns the death of its covid—sceptic president, john magufuli, amid rumours he'd contracted the virus more now on the news that it's understood a shortfall of millions of doses of coronavirus vaccine from india are partly more now on the news that it's understood a shortfall of millions of doses of coronavirus vaccine from india are partly to blame for the reduced availability ofjabs in the uk. nhs england says it will focus on second doses for the most vulnerable next month. speaking a little earlier, the housing secretary robertjenrick says plans to offer a first dose to all adults by the end ofjuly are still on track despite the issue. we are experiencing some supply issues, so it does mean that the vaccine roll—out will be slightly slower than we might have hoped, but not slower than the target that we have set ourselves, which is, as i say, to get those groups one to nine by the middle of april.
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and if you have appointments, they will still be honoured. so we are going to move forward as quickly as we possibly can, but it won't be as fast as we might have hoped for a few weeks. but then, we have every reason to believe that supply will increase in the months of may, june and july. our medical editor fergus walsh says only half of the doses agreed are being delivered. there was a deal to supply 10 million doses. that was announced on the 3rd of march. but only 5 million of those are on their way. they were supposed to be delivered this month. the exact reason for that is unclear. and i suspect and many will suspect, that it may be a domestic political issue in india. about exporting doses, given that the serum institute which is by volume, the world's biggest vaccine manufacturer had pledged to produce a billion doses this year for low and middle—income countries.
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the uk is neither of those. there may have been some eyebrows raised about why are we sending doses to the uk. but i'm told those doses will get here. but that's partly an explanation for why there is this bump in supply at next month. and the other thing is, the vaccine roll—out has been going absolutely amazingly well in the uk. and so many people have now had their first dose, 25 million. that i guess at some point, there had to be a period of where the nhs caught up in terms of doing all the second doses. dr liz breen is a supply chain expert at the university of bradford. and shejoins us now and she joins us now to talk about this. good to have you with us today. give us your take on a flare we are at when the government talks about the supply chain sometimes being lumpy, doesn't it? give us
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your take on where we are at with this news from the institute in india. �* . this news from the institute in india. . . ., ., , this news from the institute in india. . . ., ., india. again, the revelations of last niuht india. again, the revelations of last night have _ india. again, the revelations of last night have shown - india. again, the revelations of last night have shown us i india. again, the revelations of last night have shown us we i india. again, the revelations of last night have shown us we do india. again, the revelations of- last night have shown us we do have quite a fragile supply chain which every now and again seems to come back to bite us with regards to lack of access to these vaccines. it is disappointing that we are not getting the vaccine through that we expected. but i suppose it's a case of now we need to move forward and start planning with regards to if we are getting reduced stock through what does that look like with regards to the greater coverage of the uk population? and certainly, with regards to making sure those who need the second dose definitely get it. it’s who need the second dose definitely netit. �*, , who need the second dose definitely netit. , who need the second dose definitely netit. _., get it. it's become very political very quickly- — get it. it's become very political very quickly. fergus _ get it. it's become very political very quickly. fergus walsh i get it. it's become very political very quickly. fergus walsh was| very quickly. fergus walsh was saying it was his lunch political considerations and indian might be partly the reason why we are getting fewer doses than expected right now. obviously, the row between the eu in the uk is out there for all to see.
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and this demand is always going to outstrip supply, isn't it? yes. and this demand is always going to outstrip supply, isn't it?— outstrip supply, isn't it? yes. on the political _ outstrip supply, isn't it? yes. on the political front, _ outstrip supply, isn't it? yes. on the political front, we _ outstrip supply, isn't it? yes. on the political front, we have i outstrip supply, isn't it? yes. on| the politicalfront, we have heard as of yesterday evening, there was more focus on the political aspect with regards to the eu. and now it has shifted to india with the release of information about the delay of stock coming through from the serum institute. and i think it's the case of both the eu and india will want to do the right thing by their population, therefore there will be an element of trying to protect and preserve the vaccines that they have to be able to deliver to their domestic population. that said, we within the uk will want to have the same approach. we have manufacturing capability already of the astrazeneca did domestically and that feeds our supply chain. and we are still bringing in stock, we are
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still importing stock from the eu as well. i think politics will take a bearing on this but that aside, we just have to work with the stock thatis just have to work with the stock that is available to us.— just have to work with the stock that is available to us. let's look at the stock _ that is available to us. let's look at the stock available. _ that is available to us. let's look at the stock available. the i that is available to us. let's look at the stock available. the focus| that is available to us. let's look. at the stock available. the focus is going to be obviously and getting people who have already had their firstjab, the second jab, within the recommended time frame. and getting everyone 50 plus vaccinated. do you think the government said this morning it can still get all adults vaccinated by the end of july. do you think it is on track to do that? i july. do you think it is on track to do that? ., , july. do you think it is on track to do that? .,, ,., july. do you think it is on track to do that? ., , ,., ., do that? i hope so. i mean, the focus has _ do that? i hope so. i mean, the focus has been _ do that? i hope so. i mean, the focus has been on _ do that? i hope so. i mean, the focus has been on the - do that? i hope so. i mean, the focus has been on the wording l do that? i hope so. i mean, the i focus has been on the wording that has been given to us is a reduction of supply, doesn't say it's stopped so therefore i'm hoping that the pipeline of stock that is coming in and that obviously is the pfizer as well as the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, i'm hoping the pipeline that comes in is sufficient to make sure that coverage offers doses can't be delivered because we still
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have a way to go with regards to all adults in the groups that we want by the deadline of april and certainly byjuly. but also, there have been reservations with regards to access to enough second doses of the pfizer vaccine and some concerns about that running out before the second doses are delivered. i think, given the news, we have work to do to make sure we plan accordingly for both first and second doses. i sure we plan accordingly for both first and second doses.— first and second doses. i want to talk about _ first and second doses. i want to talk about the _ first and second doses. i want to talk about the possibility - first and second doses. i want to talk about the possibility of i first and second doses. i want to| talk about the possibility of other vaccines coming on stream injust talk about the possibility of other vaccines coming on stream in just a second. give us an idea of what that supply chain actually looks like when vaccine arrives, whether it's from domestic manufacturing orfront manufacturing elsewhere. how quickly does it get from a to b, to the vaccination centres, the gp surgeries, allowing those centres to basically offer those vaccinations for people to ring up or get online and make their appointment? ok. for people to ring up or get online and make their appointment? ok, very aood and make their appointment? ok, very good question- — and make their appointment? ok, very good question. and _ and make their appointment? ok, very good question. and i _
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and make their appointment? ok, very good question. and i think, _ and make their appointment? ok, very good question. and i think, i'm - and make their appointment? ok, very good question. and i think, i'm not- good question. and i think, i'm not going to say haphazard but i think the timing varies depending on the volume of stock coming through in the number of sites it's released too. we have to remember we started off initially with our hospital bases, are vaccination sites and then quickly extrapolated out into large vaccination sites and moved into the pharmacies, delivering up to 1000 jobs a week and pharmacies you could also deliver smaller sites, 400 vaccinations a week so therefore we have a lot of different outlets. to be weeded out to sow the timing of that differs accordingly. i think, timing of that differs accordingly. ithink, again, we timing of that differs accordingly. i think, again, we have checks that need to take place within the uk as well with regards to and compliance so i think there may be delays of it coming through and we have heard as well some vaccination sites saying although stock is coming through, it's stop and start, there are not sure how much they are getting, they were told last minute they are getting stock and they do feel they
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have more capacity to deliver vaccines as opposed to the number of vaccines as opposed to the number of vaccines being released to them. but all of that taken into consideration, we are doing a sterling job in delivering the vaccines and i do feel we will continue to do that, even with the restricted doses we are getting. could the lumpiness in the supply chain be smoothed or could the pair should be eased by other vaccines coming on stream becoming available, i'm thinking about modernity in particular, which has been talked about quite a lot at the moment? completely agree and hopefully it will do. modernity is due in spring and that being the case, it will definitely take the pressure off the other vaccine candidates we are using. in the background we have had more success stories with other vaccine candidates such as novavax and johnson &johnson is being used and johnson &johnson is being used and has been proved to be used in other parts of the world. the dharna is being used in europe although
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there were reports as well of shortages coming in the european countries, with the use of that product. i am countries, with the use of that product. iam hoping countries, with the use of that product. i am hoping when we procure that, hopefully it will ease the pressure with regards to the lumpiness in the supply chain, as it currently stands. ii lumpiness in the supply chain, as it currently stands.— currently stands. if there was any exort currently stands. if there was any exoort ban _ currently stands. if there was any export ban coming _ currently stands. if there was any export ban coming from - currently stands. if there was any export ban coming from any i export ban coming from any particular country, can the uk absorbed that sort of shock, if you like, and still deliver the vaccination programme in the way it wants to? me vaccination programme in the way it wants to? ~ . ., ., , vaccination programme in the way it wantsto? ~ . ., ., , . wants to? we are already receiving stock from the _ wants to? we are already receiving stock from the eu, _ wants to? we are already receiving stock from the eu, being _ wants to? we are already receiving stock from the eu, being brought l wants to? we are already receiving| stock from the eu, being brought in to prop stock could be a manufacturing and that being the case, it remains the case oxford astrazeneca can increase their production capacity if we need them to do so. i'm hoping with the numbers... we will have enough stock
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within the uk and the reduced stock coming through, externally we will have enough to keep covered. goad coming through, externally we will have enough to keep covered. good to talk to you- — have enough to keep covered. good to talk to you. some _ have enough to keep covered. good to talk to you. some really _ have enough to keep covered. good to talk to you. some really interesting i talk to you. some really interesting points to consider. a line coming from the university of oxford. existing vaccines may protect against the brazilian coronavirus variant, we do not have any more detail, i wish i had, variant, we do not have any more detail, iwish i had, to variant, we do not have any more detail, i wish i had, to bring you on that. just one line at the moment coming from the university of oxford saying existing vaccines may protect against the brazilian coronavirus variant, no doubt we will get some more information on that and we will bring that to you. the headlines on bbc news... most people in the uk in their 40s will have to wait until may to get a a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame.
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the eu's drugs regulator will give its judgment on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today — several countries have paused the roll—out after blood clots were reported in a small number of people people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed, under a plans for a major overhaurl of the immigration system expected to be set out next week. the former president of afghanistan, hamid karzai, has told the bbc he welcomes us proposals for the creation of a new temporary, power—sharing government in the country — which would include the taliban. it comes as senior delegates from the opposing sides meet in moscow along with american, chinese and pakistani representatives. here's our correspondent secunder kermani in kabul. well, former president hamid karzai has come out as one of the most vocal proponents of this new proposal for this transitional power—sharing government. as you say, what we are seeing at the moment is a renewed diplomatic drive to find a solution to this conflict and that is
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because over the past few months, talks that have been taking, negotiations that have been taking place, between afghan and the taliban officials have yet to make any progress. violence on the ground here has been continuing. so the us is pushing forward a new proposal, the creation of a temporary power—sharing government that would incorporate the taliban. it would rule the country until a new constitution has been drafted by the various different sides and it is hoped that it would lead to a cease—fire. but there are big obstacles to this. the taliban say they are still studying the proposal. the current president, ashraf ghani, is opposed to it. he says he will only hand over power to a government that is formed following fresh elections. no sign that the taliban would agree to that. but this proposal has found the support of a number of senior afghan political figures, including, as i say, hamid karzai, who i have been speaking to. he called on his successor to show more flexibility. he wants an election. if the taliban agree to that,
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it is good enough for us. there doesn't seem to be any sign. but if that does not happen, then what we do? we agree with them that there must be an election, but if that does not happen, then we allow the country to keep staying in this very unfortunate conflict. and no, in that case, it is upon all of us, including president ghani, to think of an alternative. us officials want to see progress of some kind by may 1st. that is a deadline that was set in an agreement signed by the trump administration and the taliban last year, you may remember, for all the remaining foreign forces to be withdrawn from the country. critics see this idea of this transitional government as an attempt to reach a shortcut to peace. they say it is laden with risk. there are still of course major concerns about what the taliban's stance is on democracy, on women's rights, but all the time that talk and negotiations are going on, the conflict continues and every day, more and more
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ordinary people die. this morning here in kabul, at least four people were killed in an attack on a minibus carrying government employees. north korea's revealed the new us administration has made efforts to enter dialogue with pyongyang — but has called it a �*cheap trick�* to buy time, saying there�*ll be no discussions until the us changes its policies. the statement came just hours before a news conference by the us secretary of state, antony blinken and the pentagon chief, lloyd austin, who�*ve been meeting their south korean counterparts. they reaffirmed their commitment to seeing north korea�*s denuclearisation. we are engaged in a comprehensive policy review which we hope to complete in the weeks ahead, but what is significant about that review is it is being done in very close consultation with the republic of korea, with japan and with other allies. we have a shared concern, a shared interest, in having a strong, effective
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and coordinated policy and proceeding together in lockstep. we are focused on reducing the threat to the united states, to our allies, posed by north korea�*s nuclear programme, its missile programmes, and to improving the lives of people. i spoke to our correspondent in seoul, laura bicker, and asked her what can be read into north korea�*s recent statements. you heard there from the vice foreign affairs minister. we�*ve known her before, she�*s been by kim jong—un�*s side at the hanoi summit that he had with donald trump, the north korean leader and the us president. so we know her. and she�*s one of the key voices in north korea. she admitted that the us had been e—mailing, had been calling, had even gone through a third country to try to get in touch. but she said that pyongyang would not respond until the us gave up its hostile policies. we�*ve heard these messages before. it�*s one of these messages
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that you hear from pyongyang regularly. i think what we are seeing is pyongyang waiting to see exactly what the biden administration plans to do. but it�*s also a north korea that is in a dire economic situation, i can�*t emphasise this enough. the borders have been closed. since last january. that�*s over a year now and now trade between china and north korea, its biggest ally, has dropped by over 90%. so there�*s very little getting into the country, some harvests failed after the monsoon season so there is hunger spreading in some circles. so i think when it comes to north korea situation, it is in a dire economic situation but whether or not it�*s prepared to engage with washington, it�*s waiting to see. police in atlanta have said the man responsible for the fatal shooting of eight people, including six women of asian descent, may have had an issue with sexual addiction and had
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"lashed out" at "targets of opportunity". the attacks took place at three massage parlours. robert aaron long has now been charged with eight counts of murder. mark lobel reports. desperate calls for police help during the massage parlour shootings in which eight people were killed. where is the person robbing the stock? i where is the person robbing the stock? ., �* ~ ., where is the person robbing the stock?_ l'm - where is the person robbing the stock?_ i'm hiding. j stock? i don't know. i'm hiding. this is the _ stock? i don't know. i'm hiding. this is the alleged _ stock? i don't know. i'm hiding. this is the alleged gunman, i stock? i don't know. i'm hiding. this is the alleged gunman, as| this is the alleged gunman, as police begin to identify victims. tributes laid after the shooting spree which punctured a moment of serenity. it�*s left a grieving family, a mother, daughter, wife who was having a relaxing massage at the time with her husband, who escaped, unlike her. this time with her husband, who escaped, unlike her. . . time with her husband, who escaped, unlike her. , , ., ,
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unlike her. this is the hardest thing that _ unlike her. this is the hardest thing that i've _ unlike her. this is the hardest thing that i've ever, _ unlike her. this is the hardest thing that i've ever, ever i unlike her. this is the hardest thing that i've ever, ever in i unlike her. this is the hardest | thing that i've ever, ever in my thing that i�*ve ever, ever in my whole life, had to deal with. i�*m not sure i can do this. she was my best friend. and my daughter. fits not sure i can do this. she was my best friend. and my daughter. as the search for answers _ best friend. and my daughter. as the search for answers begins, _ best friend. and my daughter. as the search for answers begins, police i search for answers begins, police say the suspect may have frequented the parlours in the past. he say the suspect may have frequented the parlours in the past.— the parlours in the past. he made indicators that _ the parlours in the past. he made indicators that he _ the parlours in the past. he made indicators that he has _ the parlours in the past. he made indicators that he has some i the parlours in the past. he made i indicators that he has some issues, potentially sexual addiction. but . uestions potentially sexual addiction. but questions remain about the racial motivation this attack, which the suspect denies, as six of the eight victims are asian women. the killings come amid a sharp uptick in crimes against asian americans. it�*s prompted this attempt to reassure from the vice president. i do prompted this attempt to reassure from the vice president.— from the vice president. i do want to sa to from the vice president. i do want to say to our _ from the vice president. i do want to say to our asian _ from the vice president. i do want to say to our asian american i to say to our asian american community that we stand with you and understand how this has frightened and shocked and outraged. that shock
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turnin: to and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger— and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst _ and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst some - and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst some as i and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst some as a i turning to anger amongst some as a perceived reluctance to label this as a hate crime. it�*s perceived reluctance to label this as a hate crime.— as a hate crime. it's extremely heartbreaking _ as a hate crime. it's extremely heartbreaking that _ as a hate crime. it's extremely heartbreaking that we - as a hate crime. it's extremely heartbreaking that we see i as a hate crime. it's extremely heartbreaking that we see the | as a hate crime. it's extremely i heartbreaking that we see the direct result of that dissociation, misogyny, white supremacy, or combining into this one case, that not only dehumanises these women but completely takes away from the centralisation of their stories. the susect centralisation of their stories. the suspect told _ centralisation of their stories. the suspect told investigators he loved god and guns. after his parents helped police track him down. police say he appeared to have been acting alone and are still investigating the motive behind this unforgiving act. the creative chief at the tokyo olympics has resigned after suggesting that a female plus—size comedian could appear as an "olympig". hiroshi sasaki said the entertainer and body—positivity campaigner, naomi watanabe, could wear pig ears at the opening ceremony. the incident comes after another games official was forced to quit
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for making sexist remarks. state tv in myanmar has announced that the military authorities are to file corruption charges against the detained civilian leader, aung san suu kyi. it broadcast claims by a prominent businessman that he had given her over 500 dollars since 2018. ms suu kyi�*s lawyer dismissed the allegations as groundless. from a young age, we�*ve all been warned of the dangers of kidding around but not these goats in south america apparently — who found themselves up a roof without a ladder. that�*s when the local fire brigade stepped in. tanya dendrinos tells the tale. goats grazing. nothing unusual, right? except these ones are tucking in on a roof in the small village of barichara, in northern columbia, known for its cobbled streets and colonial architecture. and now, this.
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translation: we have never seen such cases here before. _ we�*ve rescued snakes, porcupines, possums, other kinds of wild animals here, but we have never rescued goats from a roof before. goats on a roof may sound more like a direct—to—video action thriller, but the rescue scenes are not pretty. some were carried away after their initial performance. bleating. for others, the sight of rescuers butting in seemed to have got their goat, as they milked the crowd and made their own way down. in the end, rescuers reported the frightened animals were all returned to the wild without any injuries. passing tourists capturing this unforgettable scene for us all to see. with the mystery of how they got to be fiddling around on the roof in the first place as yet unsolved. tanya dendrinos, bbc news.
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you�*re watching bbc news. bbc news continues in a moment. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with carol hello again. over the next few days, there will be quite a bit of cloud around. we will see sunshine, equally some of us will see some rain and that�*s the case today. a lot of the rain will be in the east, but not all of it, some of the travelling quite a bit further west. what�*s happening is we have high pressure dominating the weather, you see all this cloud toppling around the top of it. the centre of the high pressure is here and around that, the air moves in a clockwise direction so the breeze coming in from the north sea will either be northerly or north—easterly and we have a weather front sinking south and that is what is bringing in all this rain. rain across eastern england, getting into the midlands, heading in the direction of the south—west of england,
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also crossing east anglia, the south—east and into the channel islands and a lot of cloud associated with this. there will be some sunshine in parts of south—west england, parts of wales, the midlands as well. more sunshine across north—west england, central and southern scotland, but for northern ireland, northern and western scotland, there will be quite thick cloud and at times you will see some drizzle coming out of that. in any prolonged spells of sunshine across central scotland, you could have temperatures getting up to 16 or 17 degrees, quite mild for this time of year. generally we are looking at about 10—13 . through this evening and overnight there will be some rain across england and wales. the heaviest of which will be in the east and south, but the rest of the uk, a lot of cloud, murky conditions, some coastal and hill fog and also some mist. where the cloud remains broken, temperatures fall down as low as 4 degrees around glasgow but generally holding up. tomorrow high pressure still got a grip on our weather, you see this weather front, that is going to be drifting eastward through the day, taking its rain with it and it will brighten up behind it for east anglia, the south—east, the east midlands with some sunshine.
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a north—easterly breeze here means it will feel cool, particularly on the coast, drifting north and west, low cloud, higher temperatures. saturday sees the best of the sunshine across eastern scotland and north—east england, but the rest of us it�*s fairly cloudy, the winds are strengthening across the far north of scotland and northern ireland, pretty gusty, this weather front coming in introducing some patchy rain.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11am — most people in their 40s will have to wait until may to get a a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies. a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the vaccine roll—out will be slightly slower than we might have hoped, but not slower than the target that we had set ourselves, which is, as i say, to get those groups one to nine by the middle of april. and if you have appointments, they will still be honoured. the eu�*s drugs regulator will give its judgment on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today. several countries have paused the roll—out, after blood clots were reported in a small number of people. hundreds of patients may have had "do not resuscitate" decisions placed on them during the pandemic, without them or their families knowing. the care regulator calls for urgent action. people seeking asylum
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in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed, under plans for a major overhaul of the immigration system, expected to be set out next week. and coming up this hour — keeping beauty spots beautiful — why landowners want more people to pay attention to the countryside code. the government is facing questions over why there�*s to be a significant reduction in covid vaccine supplies from the end of this month. it is understood a delivery of millions of doses of the oxford—astrazeneca jab, produced by the serum institute of india, has been held up by four weeks. after opening up appointments to all over—50s on wednesday, nhs england says jabs should now not be offered to younger age groups throughout april,
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meaning healthy people in their 40s will have to wait till may. the health secretary matt hancock said there was always going to be ups and downs in availability, but labour has accused him of trying to downplay the issue. at the same time, the european commission president, ursula von der leyen, has threatened to restrict covid vaccine exports to some countries, including the uk, if supplies in the eu don�*t improve. she said the eu was still waiting for vaccines to be delivered from the uk. also today, the eu�*s drugs regulator is due to present the findings of its investigation into the safety of the astrazeneca covid vaccine. several countries have temporarily stopped using the jab, after blood clots were reported in a small number of inoculated people. and the health secretary has confirmed more than 3.7 million vulnerable people in england will no longer have to shield from the coronavirus from april 1st, as cases and hospitalisations continue to fall. more on all these stories to follow
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— this first report from jim reed. another step closer to normality. afternoon. you all right? at gps, like this one in lincolnshire, thousands have been given their vaccines this week. there you go — done. that it? that�*s it. in total, more than 25 million have now beenjabbed. for the next fortnight, there should be plenty of doses to go round. after that, though, there is more doubt. a letter sent by the nhs to local health services warned of a significant reduction in supply next month, and said no further appointments for first doses should be uploaded to booking systems in april. vaccine supply is always lumpy, and we regularly send out technical letters to the nhs to explain the ups and downs of the supply over the future weeks.
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it�*s thought the late delivery of batches of the astrazeneca vaccine manufactured at a plant in india are to blame for the shortfall. nobody who has an appointment should lose their slot, but this may delay the roll—out to the next age group down — those in their 40s — by perhaps as much as a month. it comes as the european commission suggested it could block exports of the pfizer vaccine to the uk, unless otherjabs are sent back across the channel in return. meanwhile, 13 eu states have still suspended the use of the astrazeneca shot over concerns about rare blood clots. an investigation into that by the eu medicines agency is due to report back this afternoon. keeping up the pace of vaccine supply is crucial if the government is going to stick to its road map out of lockdown. the recent fall in infections means that almost four million vulnerable people in england have now been told they no longer need to shield from next month.
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the reason we�*ve done that is because the rates the reason we've done that is because the rates of community infection have now dropped a long way and they've been sustained. and we recognise that actually advising people to shield for more than about 12 weeks can be really quite damaging for their mental health. so i think good news for all of them. as for the vaccine programme, the government said supply of the jabs will vary over time, but it remains on track to offer a first dose to all over—50s in england by mid—april, and all adults by the end ofjuly. jim reed, bbc news. speaking a little earlier the housing secretary robertjenrick says plans to offer a first dose to all adults by the end ofjuly are still on track despite the issue. we are experiencing some supply issues, so it does mean that the vaccine roll—out will be slightly slower than we might have hoped, but not slower than the target that we have set ourselves, which is, as i say,
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to get those groups one to nine by the middle of april. and if you have appointments, they will still be honoured. so we are going to move forward as quickly as we possibly can, but it won�*t be as fast as we might have hoped for a few weeks. but then, we have every reason to believe that supply will increase in the months of may, june and july. let�*s speak now to our india business correspondent nikhil inamdar, who�*s in mumbai for us. what is the serum institute saying? well, so far we haven�*t really heard anything from them but independent sources here so there was never really a stipulated time of delivery that was agreed upon by the serum institute and the delay is really on demand of a higher demand of domestic supplies. just today the external affairs minister in india
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saying overseas supplies of vaccines will be categorically dependent on adequate availability at home, in some sense indicating that india is now prioritising domestic supply, given the huge surge in cases that we have seen just in the last 24 hours, in fact, we have seen just in the last 24 hours, infact, india has we have seen just in the last 24 hours, in fact, india has seen fresh new positive cases of covid—19, in excess of 35,000 people, and we are seeing a second wave in at least 12 of the provinces here. india already has an immunisation programme that is under way, and we have a target to vaccinate 300 million people by july, so certainly we will need to step it up, given the surge in cases we have seen at this point in time. the ceo of the serum institute spoke not too long ago to the bbc�*s hardtalk programme and he said the company is under unprecedented pressure. in company is under unprecedented ressure. . ., ,, pressure. in all fairness, the indian government _ pressure. in all fairness, the indian government has i pressure. in all fairness, the i indian government has allowed us pressure. in all fairness, the - indian government has allowed us to export— indian government has allowed us to export 50%_ indian government has allowed us to export 50% of our volume so far to other_ export 50% of our volume so far to other nations, and we can see that with the _ other nations, and we can see that with the 51— other nations, and we can see that with the 51 countries, if not more,
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that have — with the 51 countries, if not more, that have already received doses. millions _ that have already received doses. millions of doses. so if you look at the 95— millions of doses. so if you look at the 95 million doses that we have already— the 95 million doses that we have already dispatched, only half of that has— already dispatched, only half of that has gone to india. having said that, _ that has gone to india. having said that, you _ that has gone to india. having said that, you know, the government wanted — that, you know, the government wahted to— that, you know, the government wanted to scale up its vaccination drive, _ wanted to scale up its vaccination drive, and — wanted to scale up its vaccination drive, and because other suppliers both locally and in india were taking — both locally and in india were taking time to scale up, they needed the maximum volumes they could get from us, _ the maximum volumes they could get from us, and that is why i had to send _ from us, and that is why i had to send out — from us, and that is why i had to send out a — from us, and that is why i had to send out a message to all our partners. _ send out a message to all our partners, friends and countries that were expecting more doses in these two to— were expecting more doses in these two to three months only that they would _ two to three months only that they would be _ two to three months only that they would be facing a few delays, because — would be facing a few delays, because we need to take care of our country. _ because we need to take care of our country. you — because we need to take care of our country, you know, as well as serving — country, you know, as well as serving the _ country, you know, as well as serving the needs of other nations. so it was— serving the needs of other nations. so it was with respect to that that we have _ so it was with respect to that that we have to — so it was with respect to that that we have to balance that out, and we are trying _ we have to balance that out, and we are trying our best to equally distribute as many doses as we can. the ceo _ distribute as many doses as we can. the ceo of— distribute as many doses as we can. the ceo of the serum institute in
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india. other countries have been accused of vaccine nationalism when they have protected supplies. what sort of pressure is india coming under? ~ ~ sort of pressure is india coming under? ~ ,, ., , under? well,, like i said, india is cominu under? well,, like i said, india is coming under— under? well,, like i said, india is coming under a _ under? well,, like i said, india is coming under a great _ under? well,, like i said, india is coming under a great deal - under? well,, like i said, india is coming under a great deal of - coming under a great deal of pressure because the targets have been set for ourselves to vaccinate about 300 million people byjuly 21. that is a fairly ambitious target. so far the vaccination drive has been pretty slow. it has been picking up, but despite its domestic needs, india has been actually exporting a great number of vaccines. in fact, exporting a great number of vaccines. infact, i exporting a great number of vaccines. in fact, i think the export number, the last time i saw it, was 65% higher than what india has consumed domestically. but given the second wave we have been talking about, this pressure impact is indeed going to go up in the next few months to procure vaccines
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domestically. for domestic needs. thank you very much. dr sarah shuffling is a senior supply dr sarah schiffling is a senior lecturer in supply chain management at liverpooljohn moores university. thank you forjoining us. what sort of complexities are the supply chains — of complexities are the supply chains having tojuggle? we of complexities are the supply chains having to juggle? chains having to 'uggle? we are deahnu chains having to 'uggle? we are dealing with — chains having to juggle? we are dealing with unprecedented - chains having to juggle? we are - dealing with unprecedented demand, trying to get the same product to everywhere all at the same time, and of course there are supply chains that have very high quality characteristics, so we do want the assignments to be the highest quality out there, there is very strict testing, organisations from the different health authorities, so there are a lot of complexities in these supply chains, and of course that means that the various entries for new suppliers are very high. not just anybody can make these various items that go into vaccine production, whether that is the glass vials, whether it is filters and items we need for the production process, so it is quite difficult to
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scale up quickly, as we had there with the interview of the ceo of the serum institute, it is very difficult to scale up the production as much as we need within the timescales that we need. hour as much as we need within the timescales that we need. how are those supplies _ timescales that we need. how are those supplies affected _ timescales that we need. how are those supplies affected by - those supplies affected by procurement decisions made by different countries, in terms of whether they are defensive, protective or nationalistic even, as some have been accused? irate protective or nationalistic even, as some have been accused?- some have been accused? we are seeinu some have been accused? we are seeing the — some have been accused? we are seeing the same _ some have been accused? we are seeing the same sort _ some have been accused? we are seeing the same sort of _ some have been accused? we are seeing the same sort of idea - some have been accused? we are l seeing the same sort of idea behind the procurement in every country really, everybody is trying to protect their own people first, whether that is the eu, the uk, the us has been doing a lot of work with the us defence procurement act to try and ring fenced supplies first and foremost for american companies, and foremost for american companies, and now with india it is the same problem. of course everybody wants to vaccinate their own populations but in the end we need to consider it is a global pandemic and we do need to vaccinate the world, rather than individual countries. of course thatis than individual countries. of course that is really hard to communicate when you are faced with a second wave, third wave in a country, and
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rising infection numbers and rising death as well.— rising infection numbers and rising death as well. ., , ., , death as well. there have been many calls, death as well. there have been many calls. notably — death as well. there have been many calls, notably from _ death as well. there have been many calls, notably from the _ death as well. there have been many calls, notably from the world - death as well. there have been many calls, notably from the world health | calls, notably from the world health organisation, for cooperation between companies, between countries. what good examples of that heavy scene? irate countries. what good examples of that heavy scene?— countries. what good examples of that heavy scene? we have seen some reall aood that heavy scene? we have seen some really good examples. _ that heavy scene? we have seen some really good examples. for _ that heavy scene? we have seen some really good examples. for example, i really good examples. for example, there are a of vaccine manufacturers cooperating, so french firm sanofi is offering its production capacity to produce a competitor's vaccine because theirs is not ready yet, it is still undergoing testing, so they have empty capacity at the moment until their vaccine is available for widescale production, so we see that, and great efforts across the entire sector, so that is also the suppliers of glass vials, all the little components that go into vaccine production. expanding quite heavily and cooperating across the sector. this is really a global effort, and lots of different companies are investing heavily to try and meet this enormous demand. how concerned should we be by what
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has been said by the european union commissioner, that there are going to be potentially a halt to vaccine exports to the eu if they can't get on top of their own programmes? {lit on top of their own programmes? of course this is again motivated by the very slow going of the vaccination programme within many european countries, and then of course there is the current issue with the astrazeneca vaccine, even though we are expecting that to be resolved within the day really. there remains that public consciousness of, are we still trusting this vaccine after they were so much back and forth there, so there is a much higher demand now for the pfizer vaccine, which is being produced in europe and then being produced in europe and then being shipped outside of europe, among countries to the uk, so there is this very high demand, so it is understandable that there is an underline that is quite keen on ring fencing that for the domestic market really. i don't expect she wants to
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take that nuclear option, but it is also an option to encourage companies and countries to get around the table and discuss what are the options there. of course it is also a threat, and there is a question that has been raised whether that is the right way to go, what if that is discouraging companies from expanding their production capacity, if they are then may be faced with export bans, just saying you can't serve the market that you want to be serving and you might be having contracts with is not very encouraging to actually help companies scale up and situate their production sites within the eu.— situate their production sites within the eu. ., ,, i. ., ., within the eu. thank you for 'oining us. i'm joined by gwenfairjones, a retired nurse who is a volunteer at the deeside vaccination centre in north wales. a busy time for you, gwenfair. you are a retired nurse but you are back in harness. i are a retired nurse but you are back in harness-— in harness. i am, i went back in december. _ in harness. i am, i went back in december, and _ in harness. i am, i went back in december, and it _ in harness. i am, i went back in december, and it is _ in harness. i am, i went back in december, and it is a _ in harness. i am, i went back in december, and it is a very - in harness. i am, i went back in - december, and it is a very enjoyable time as well. it is hard work but it is a good team we have running, the
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mass vaccination centre in deeside. what does a day look like for you at the vaccination centre? i what does a day look like for you at the vaccination centre?— the vaccination centre? i start at eiuht, or the vaccination centre? i start at eight. or today _ the vaccination centre? i start at eight. ortoday l _ the vaccination centre? i start at eight, or today i will _ the vaccination centre? i start at eight, or today i will be - the vaccination centre? i start at eight, or today i will be going i the vaccination centre? i start at eight, or today i will be going on at two o'clock, and i willjust be vaccinating all through my shift, really. vaccinating all through my shift, reall . ., . , vaccinating all through my shift, reall. ., ., , , ., vaccinating all through my shift, reall. ., ., , , really. how many people do you manaue really. how many people do you manage to _ really. how many people do you manage to see _ really. how many people do you manage to see in _ really. how many people do you manage to see in a _ really. how many people do you manage to see in a day - really. how many people do youj manage to see in a day between really. how many people do you - manage to see in a day between your team? �* ., ., team? between the team, we have about 800 coming _ team? between the team, we have about 800 coming through - team? between the team, we have about 800 coming through the - team? between the team, we have| about 800 coming through the door every day, and i think about a700 last week was the target we had. what sort of questions to people ask you about the vaccines? infer? what sort of questions to people ask you about the vaccines?— you about the vaccines? very little, actuall . you about the vaccines? very little, actually- they _ you about the vaccines? very little, actually. they have _ you about the vaccines? very little, actually. they have made _ you about the vaccines? very little, actually. they have made this - actually. they have made this decision to come there, so obviously they have read about it before they have come. we have a few who are nervous about coming, but they are more nervous about being out for the first time, rather than having the vaccine. they are glad to be having it. ~ ~ ., vaccine. they are glad to be having it. . ~ ., ., vaccine. they are glad to be having it. we know of course they have been concerns raised _
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it. we know of course they have been concerns raised in _ it. we know of course they have been concerns raised in other _ it. we know of course they have been concerns raised in other countries - concerns raised in other countries in particular about the safety of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, which is one of the two they are most likely to get. what sort of concerns do they have the people you see, in light of those blood clot worries? , ., , see, in light of those blood clot worries? , . , ~ worries? very little, really. we don't have _ worries? very little, really. we don't have any _ worries? very little, really. we don't have any questions - worries? very little, really. we - don't have any questions regarding that. as i say, they've had the letter, they know what they are getting before they come. it is the pfizer one we have been doing mostly in deeside. very little. i mean, we do tell them they might have a few side effects, flu—like symptoms, a bit of a temperature, and we advise them to take paracetamol and that should pass after a8—hour is. and we are doing the second doses to many now, so they are coming back and they say they have had no side effects at all from the first dose. we do know there are still people in the country who are concerned about having this vaccine. as a retired nurse, what would your advice be to
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come those nerves? i nurse, what would your advice be to come those nerves?— nurse, what would your advice be to come those nerves? i would say come and have it. — come those nerves? i would say come and have it. we _ come those nerves? i would say come and have it, we need _ come those nerves? i would say come and have it, we need to _ come those nerves? i would say come and have it, we need to get _ come those nerves? i would say come and have it, we need to get our- and have it, we need to get our lives back that this is the one step forward that we are all doing to get back to normality, really, and so my advice is come when you get your invitation for the vaccine, come. you are welcome, we have volunteers welcoming you by the door, and they are signposting you to the different areas where you need to wait, and it's a really safe environment to be in. i it's a really safe environment to be in. ., ., ., it's a really safe environment to be in. i get mine tomorrow afternoon, so i shall have _ in. i get mine tomorrow afternoon, so i shall have my _ in. i get mine tomorrow afternoon, so i shall have my paracetamol- in. i get mine tomorrow afternoon, so i shall have my paracetamol at l so i shall have my paracetamol at the ready for the weekend. gwenfair jones, thank you very much for talking to us.— the eu's drugs regulator is to give its verdict on the safety of the astrazeneca vaccine in the next few hours. it follows a chaotic few weeks that have seen several nations suspend its use, overfears of a link to blood clots. as if to underline the urgent need for vaccines, the world healh organisation says that more than 20,000
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people are dying each week in europe from covid—19. our europe correspondent jean mackenzie explained more about the scope of the investigation — after blood clots were reported in a small number of inoculated people. 17 million people so far in the eu and the uk have had the astrazeneca vaccine, and there have been fewer than a0 cases reported of blood clots, so what the european drugs regulator has been doing over the past few days is looking at each of those reported cases very carefully to see if it can establish any link between the vaccine and the blood clotting, because at the moment there isn't any evidence to suggest there isn't any evidence to suggest the two are linked. it gave out an initial assessment on tuesday, when it said that so far there wasn't any indication that the vaccine was causing the clotting, but we will find out later today whether it has found anything. the indication at the moment is that it hasn't. it has urged countries, as has the world health organisation, to carry on using the vaccine, saying that at the moment the benefits very clearly
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outweigh the risks. jun the moment the benefits very clearly outweigh the risks.— outweigh the risks. jun mckenzie, our europe _ outweigh the risks. jun mckenzie, our europe correspondent. - the care regulator for england has said hundreds of people may have been subject to "do not resuscitate" decisions during the early part of the pandemic, without them or their families knowing. a report by the care quality commission found evidence that the dnr decisions, which restrict potentially life—saving treatment, were applied across particular groups, including people with learning difficulties. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. son had an absolute zest for life, loved being with herfamily, you know — always smiling, always laughing. son has got the moves. sonia deleon suffered from schizophrenia and had learning disabilities. but it was only after she died in hospital from a heart attack last april that her family say they discovered her medical notes contained a "do not resuscitate" decision — limiting the treatment that sonia could receive. we'd had no consultation. at no point — at no point — were we told that
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that had taken place. we would have disputed that and we would have said we don't want that in place. the hospital insists the family consented to the decision — including discussing it with sonia's 85—year—old mother. i can't describe the love that my mum has for son. aww! mum's been waiting to hear your voice. there is no way that she would agree to that being put in place. absolutely no way at all. southend university hospital were responsible for treating sonia deleon. they say the "do not resuscitate" decision was appropriate, and based on assessments by clinicians. today's report makes no reference to sonia's case, but does find that over 500 people — mainly elderly or disabled — had "do not resuscitate" decisions made for them without their consent or that of their relatives. the true scale of the problem
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could be much greater, however. any decision that's put _ in in a blanket fashion or in a way that doesn't take into consideration a person's individual needs - is never acceptable. one of the things we found - through the review is that trying to quantify this problem has been very difficult, because of the lack| of oversight and the lack- of record—keeping and data. the cqc say the pressure of the pandemic and rapidly developing guidance were to blame for the problems. they want a group of ministers to come together to fully investigate what happened. nhs england say that, throughout the pandemic, they had repeatedly told those making dnr decisions that that their blanket use was unacceptable. sonia deleon's family want more safeguards put in place to protect those who can't help themselves. today's report suggests many other families would also benefit from such measures. michael buchanan, bbc news.
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we can speak now to dan scorer, head of policy at mencap. dan, what is your reaction to these findings? dan, what is your reaction to these findinus? ~ , , ., findings? well, these findings are extremely shocking, _ findings? well, these findings are extremely shocking, but - findings? well, these findings are extremely shocking, but these . extremely shocking, but these unfortunately are not issues that are new. people with disability and their families are new. people with disability and theirfamilies before are new. people with disability and their families before the are new. people with disability and theirfamilies before the pandemic were already experiencing this kind of discrimination, where people were having do not resuscitate orders placed on them just because they had a learning disability, and doctors were making negativejudgments about their quality of life, and potentially denying them life—saving treatment, based on unfounded assumptions about them. so today's report is extremely important, and highlighting the increase in this that has happened during the pandemic and calling on the government to take action across the country, to address this, so we have better training for doctors, people
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and theirfamilies better training for doctors, people and their families know about their rights, and if we improve practice and make sure people in this position are not consulted about it. in your experience what are the assumptions that get made about people with learning disabilities and their health? {lillie people with learning disabilities and their health?— people with learning disabilities and their health? one of the first assumptions _ and their health? one of the first assumptions would _ and their health? one of the first assumptions would be _ and their health? one of the first assumptions would be that - and their health? one of the first | assumptions would be that people can't actually take part in discussions around the treatment they would want to have. for some people that may be true and in that case, family members, loved ones and others around them should be involved in those conversations about end—of—life care and treatment that a person may want and if not it is potentially unlawful and discriminatory. a lot of the dn acp are used that has been reported to us has been uncovered after someone has died in sin —— as in sonia's case, and it is only then that a
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dnacpr decision has been put on a family that they have never been odd about. filth family that they have never been odd about. . ., , , family that they have never been odd about. .., , , ., , about. of course it is tragically too late, about. of course it is tragically too late. so — about. of course it is tragically too late, so what _ about. of course it is tragically too late, so what is _ about. of course it is tragically too late, so what is your - about. of course it is tragically | too late, so what is your advice about. of course it is tragically i too late, so what is your advice to families of people with learning disabilities who may need extra understanding? it disabilities who may need extra understanding?— disabilities who may need extra understandinu? . , ., understanding? if anyone is worried the ma understanding? if anyone is worried they may have _ understanding? if anyone is worried they may have a _ understanding? if anyone is worried they may have a dnacpr _ understanding? if anyone is worried they may have a dnacpr on - understanding? if anyone is worried they may have a dnacpr on their . they may have a dnacpr on their file, they should talk to their gp about that, and the really important thing that comes out of the report todayis thing that comes out of the report today is that talking about end—of—life care and people's wishes around treatment needs to happen in an audit way with good time, not at an audit way with good time, not at a time of crisis, so it is really important that people have these conversations and make their wishes known, so that when they do go into hospital it is very clear what treatment they would or wouldn't want to have. ids, treatment they would or wouldn't want to have-— want to have. a lot of people will be shocked _ want to have. a lot of people will be shocked that _ want to have. a lot of people will be shocked that this _ want to have. a lot of people will be shocked that this could - want to have. a lot of people will i be shocked that this could happen, that a dnr could be put on your notes without you or your next having any involvement with that. what sort of statutory arrangement perhaps needs to exist to prevent it
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happening? in perhaps needs to exist to prevent it ha enin: ? ., perhaps needs to exist to prevent it haueninu? . , . ., perhaps needs to exist to prevent it ha ntenin ? ., , ., ., ., happening? in that situation where a erson or happening? in that situation where a person or their— happening? in that situation where a person or their family _ happening? in that situation where a person or their family is _ happening? in that situation where a person or their family is not - person or theirfamily is not consulted, that would be a breach of their human rights, so the report todayis their human rights, so the report today is important on calling on ministers to take leadership in developing a programme of action, to set out clear national guidance and training for professionals, and to make people and families aware of their rights, so that everyone is clear about how this process should be working and their involvement within it. . , be working and their involvement within it. ., , ., ., . within it. certainly more vigilance reuuired within it. certainly more vigilance required by _ within it. certainly more vigilance required by all— within it. certainly more vigilance required by all of _ within it. certainly more vigilance required by all of us _ within it. certainly more vigilance required by all of us it _ within it. certainly more vigilance required by all of us it would - within it. certainly more vigilance l required by all of us it would seem. thank you very much. an inquest into the death of sarah everard opens today. the 33—year—old's body was found in kent, a week after she went missing while walking home in south london. wayne couzens, who was a serving officer with the metropolitan police, is charged with kidnap and murder. with lockdown beginning to ease, a lot of us are looking forward to visiting our beaches, national parks and beauty spots in the coming months. as we saw last year, however, more visitors means more litter, damage and anti—social behaviour. landowners want to tackle those issues with a new "countryside code", but time is running out, as our environment and rural affairs
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correspondent claire marshall reports. this was the end of last year's lockdown — people wanted to party — but from to the yorkshire dales to bournemouth beach, and across britain, it was often left to armies of volunteers to pick up the pieces. many were drawn to dartmoor national park. on one occasion, we had up to 70 tents in just this small area of common land. they dug fire pits, there were burn marks where they had barbecues, there was litter left all over this area and they were using this area as a human toilet. and i came down one sunday, and it almost brought me to tears. you may not know it, but there is actually a government code on how to behave. the thing i enjoy about the countryside the most is the peace.
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among the rules — don't have barbecues, keep dogs under control and leave no trace. i think you should treat the countryside as you i would treat your home. but this was the last major publicity campaign — it's17 years old. this website doesn't exist any more. can i go now? author guy shrubsole discovered the government has only spent around £2,000 a year since 2010 promoting the code. i think the government have really neglected their duty to promote the countryside code and the principles of protecting the countryside. they really, really need to start developing a better culture of greater access to nature, but more responsible access to nature. if we don't have the government promoting the countryside code, i don't think we can have politicians turning around and going, "people shouldn't be accessing these places because they don't know how to behave," because the government aren't doing their part in promoting the right behaviours. we've all been cooped up for months, and this is just the kind of place you might want to come — durdle door on england's south
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coast — but last year after lockdown there was a real litter problem here. and it's notjust that it looks awful — it's the impact on the wildlife. the tide comes in, and it can be washed out to sea and ingested by fish, and also birds come down and feed on it, and the owner is really worried. years ago, we used to have this keep britain tidy- campaign, which banged i on and on and on about it. we see nothing at the moment — absolutely nothing. _ and the impact and the damage — the impact it's having _ on the countryside and the damage it's causing to our environment - is considerable, so it must be worth doing something. - the government says it does have plans to refresh and publicise the code, but in just a few weeks we will be given a lot more freedom. great for us — but it may not be so good for the natural world. claire marshall, bbc news, dorset. time for a look at the weather with
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tomas. fairly quiet on the weather front right now, broadly speaking, not an awful lot of change expected over the next few days. for many of us, fairly cloudy, a bit of sunshine, may be one or two spots of rain and also pretty chilly. the clouds are coming in from the north, a fairly chilly direction, so hence it is not particularly warm, but where the clouds break, and a bit of sunshine develops, it can actually feel pleasant enough. you can see some rain through this evening and overnight when some of that thick clouds drifting off the north sea, thatis clouds drifting off the north sea, that is anywhere from say eastern parts of england down towards central southern england. frost—free tonight, around three degrees in glasgow, 8 degrees in london, and then tomorrow we do it all over again. again, some spots of rain where the cloud is thicker, however notice it turns sunnier in east midlands and the south—east in the afternoon, slightly drier air coming off off the continent. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: most people in their a0s will have to wait until may to get a covid vaccine after a significant drop in supplies — a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the eu's drugs regulator will give its judgment on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today — several countries have paused the roll—out after blood clots were reported in a small number of people. hundreds of patients may have had "do not resuscitate" decisions placed on them during the pandemic,
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without them or their families knowing — the care regulator calls for urgent action. people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed, under a plans for a major overhaurl of the immigration system expected to be set out next week. and keeping beauty—spots beautiful — why landowners want more people to pay attention to the countryside code. sport and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. good morning. lock adam beard is back in the side for wales's bid to complete a six nations grand slam on saturday. they face france in paris. he was rested for last weekend's win over italy, after starting for their three previous victories. he'll partner captain alun wynjones in the second row. that's coach wayne pivac�*s only change to the line—up. just one change for england too, for their match
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against ireland in dublin — elliot daly will start at outside—centre for the first time in almost five years, replacing the injured henry slade. daly returns after he was relegated to the bench for the win over france last weekend, with max malins starting at number 15. there are four british clubs in europa league action later, including arsenal, who have a 3—1 first leg lead against olympiakos. manager mikel arteta says pierre—emerick aubameyang is in contention, after being dropped for sunday's league win over tottenham for what he calls a "breach of pre—match protocol". arteta also says he has no intention of resting players ahead of the international break. our priority now is to win the next two games and then whatever happens with international. if anything, they will have to adapt to what we want. there's no way around it because we are the ones that... if anybody has to adapt as a national team, it's not us.
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england could seal a t20 series win against india today. they lead 2—1 going into the fourth match which begins in a couple of hours. again it could all come down, to who wins the toss in ahmedabad. the side electing to bat second has won every match of the series so far. england's record wicket—taker in testsjimmy anderson, has told the bbc�*s tail—enders podcast, he doesn't think that should be the case. a lot�*s been talked about the wicket at this ground and i don't want to bang on about it but it clearly wasn't great, the two that they produced for these two games weren't great and the toss was massive and i don't think, t20 cricket, the toss shouldn't have an effect on the result. no way. it should be two teams batting it out for a0 overs and the best one comes out on top. the icc�*s player of the decade, australia all—rounder ellyse perry, is the latest recuit for this summers hundred competition, which starts on the 21st ofjuly after a year—long delay because of covid—19. she's joined birmingham phoenix. perry's won five t20 world cups and says she's looking forward to the challenge
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of a brand new competition. it's always a special moment in time in a sport when something like this comes along. to have the opportunity to be a part of it and experience it when it first starts, i think it's a little bit similar to when attempt -- wbl little bit similar to when attempt —— wbl started in australia and it should be great for all of us. the all—england open — is the wimbledon for the sport of badminton, but it was affected by coronavirus on the opening day. the entire indonesian contingent, has been withdrawn, and told to self—isolate for ten days by the nhs track and trace team. it's after a fellow—passenger on their flight to the uk tested positive for covid—19. indonesian players were expected to win titles in birmingham — among those forced to pull out are the top seeds and current world champions in the men's doubles. another member of the tokyo olympics organising team has resigned
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after making derogatory comments about women. creative director hiroshi sasaki suggested a comedian — who is a plus—size model — should wear pig ears at the opening ceremony. he later apologised, admitting it was "a huge insult". last month, yoshiro mori was forced to quit as president of the organising committee, after his sexist remarks caused outrage. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed. it's thought the proposals are part of a major shake—up of the immigration system to be announced by the home secretary, priti patel, next week. similar plans were leaked last year when labour described them as inhumane and impractical. many newspapers have been speculating where they could be sent. our chief political correspondent,
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adam fleming, said we wouldn't know what the government was hoping to do until their plans are announced next week. i think that is just a bit of speculation. we'll have to wait until this proposal we get next week to get a bit more detail and even then we might not get that much more detail because i think they are saving all of that for the sovereign borders bill which will be the giant, monster piece of legislation that will reform the asylum system which i'm told is going to be a centrepiece of the queen's speech which we are expecting in may, so this will be a big, huge dominating issue for the next session of parliament and i think it will be one of the big stories for the next few years. you talk about how it's been speculated upon since last year. actually it was tony blair that first proposed this 18 years ago, which gives you a bit of an idea about how long changes of this magnitude actually take to introduce. one of the places being suggested is gibraltar. gibraltar�*s chief minister fabian picardo told us that the uk government had not been
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in touch with him. i'v e i've written this morning to priti patel having seen the reports which i think are groundless in the uk media to tell her that gibraltar is part of the british family of nations, it will work with the uk government in all areas where we can, but immigration is a matter which is under the gibraltar constitution, the responsibility of gibraltar ministers. nobody has spoken to me or approached me about these issues. gibraltar has its own distinct immigration and asylum regime and our immigration act which is not the uk immigration act as geographically gibraltar finds itself in the very difficult position because bringing people into the small geography of gibraltar is never going to be a practical way of dealing with these things. additionally, as your viewers may know, gibraltar is negotiating with the united kingdom a treaty for fluidity with the schengen area which will be on bringing asylum seekers to the uk to gibraltar, apart from being outside gibraltar�*s constitution and laws,
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would make difficulty in the negotiation of a treaty so i think this is speculation in the context of gibraltar are not anything which is based in any reality. satbir singh is the chief executive of the joint council for the welfare of immigrants. hejoins me now from northwest london. would this work? as a deterrent to stop people making perilousjourneys to the uk? has stop people making perilous 'ourneys to the uk? a stop people making perilous 'ourneys totheuk? . to the uk? as your correspondence have pointed _ to the uk? as your correspondence have pointed out, _ to the uk? as your correspondence have pointed out, nothing - to the uk? as your correspondence have pointed out, nothing about. have pointed out, nothing about these proposals that have been floated for nearly 20 years, they are dug up again from time to time, they are quite fanciful and unworkable. nobody accepts smugglers want to see people making dangerous journeys crossing the channel but these proposals will do nothing to stop that, they will make these journeys more difficult, they will empower more smugglers. what we need to see is a safe way that people can
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get to the uk and claim asylum and have their claim heard over here rather than forcing them into the hands of people who will ferry them across the channel. but hands of people who will ferry them across the channel.— across the channel. but this is surely the _ across the channel. but this is surely the point, _ across the channel. but this is surely the point, that - across the channel. but this is surely the point, that the - surely the point, that the government here wants to deter people, they don't want people coming here to claim asylum. these actions are to prevent people making thatjourney. the actions are to prevent people making that journey-— actions are to prevent people making thatjourney— that 'ourney. the uk is a signatory to that journey. the uk is a signatory to the refugee _ that journey. the uk is a signatory to the refugee convention, - that journey. the uk is a signatory to the refugee convention, we - that journey. the uk is a signatory to the refugee convention, we are | to the refugee convention, we are one of the architects of that convention, the right to claim asylum is enshrined notjust in uk law but in international law. the numbers of people that try to claim asylum in the uk each year are incredibly small when you look at the total percentage of people in the total percentage of people in the world who are displaced and looking for a place of safety. this is an issue that gets pulled up and stirred up in some ways by government from time to time and it's no coincidence that today, when
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the government is facing difficult questions around tens of thousands of excess deaths over the winter period in the pandemic, that this story, which has actually been circulating for the last few months, is now right out there at the front of the government's communications agenda. what the government needs to do is make sure that there are safe ways for people to claim asylum. there is absolutely no serious figure anywhere in the country, including the home office, who thinks these proposals will work and fix the problems in the asylum system. fix the problems in the asylum s stem. �* , ., , ., system. but the questions often asked, if people _ system. but the questions often asked, if people are _ system. but the questions often asked, if people are trying - system. but the questions often asked, if people are trying to i system. but the questions often i asked, if people are trying to leave the country which they are not safe and facing persecution, why do they travel through many safe countries where they could claim asylum, on mainland europe for example, because if it's about being safe, they don't need to come all the way to the uk. it's a question that gets asked a lot and there are two bits to the answer. first, most of the people
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that cross into europe by land or by sea to end up claiming asylum in countries along the way. it's a very, very small number of people that make it to the french coast and try to make it across to the uk. those people are typically trying to enter the uk because this is where they've got family, there may be a dyas for a community here and they will be safe here, or they may speak english and so this is the country they are most likely to be able to rebuild their lives —— there may be a diaspora. after year in which we've expressed frustration about not being able to go where we feel we need to go, if somebody has lost everything, family members, their home, their possessions, livelihood, who are any of us to question where they feel that they will be safe and worth the will be able to rebuild a safe life for their families?
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johnny depp's application for permission to appeal against a damning high court ruling that he assaulted his ex—wife amber heard and put her in fear for her life has begun at the court of appeal. mr depp's barrister told the court that an application is being made to rely on "fresh" evidence "as a result of documents becoming available through some subpoenas in the us and through ms heard's own disclosure in a virginia defamation action. police officers dispersed a crowd of more than 1,000 people yesterday after crowds gathered in a park in liverpool to celebrate st patrick's day. merseyside police made one arrest and issued more than a0 fixed—penalty notices to people who refused to leave the area. abbiejones reports. ta ken late yesterday afternoon by passers—by, video show huge crowds at sefton park during lockdown. police say over a thousand people were at the popular south liverpool beauty spot — some apparently to celebrate st patrick's day.
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merseyside police condemned the gathering as reckless behaviour. many of those there are believed to be students. people congregated together, drinking and basicallyjust having st patrick's day celebrations that were there. olivia lever is a student herself and filmed the gathering. she's worried it will give all students a bad name. as much as i have sympathy for students, i think it's so close — you know, you don't need to go and recreate woodstock on the park. you can just celebrate with a few friends. a0 police officers broke up the crowds, including the national police air service. merseyside police have issued a dispersal order for sefton park and the area around it. criticising those who gathered, chief inspector karl baldwin said... extra police officers were on patrol
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around sefton park overnight. abbie jones, bbc news. detectives in atlanta say the man responsible for the fatal shooting of eight people, including six women of asian descent, may have had an issue with sexual addiction and had "lashed out" at "targets of opportunity". the attacks took place at three massage parlours. robert aaron long has now been charged with eight counts of murder. mark lobel reports. desperate calls for police help during the massage parlour shootings in which eight people were killed. where is the person who is robbing the spa? i where is the person who is robbing the sa? ., �* ,, ., �* the spa? i don't know, i'm hiding riaht the spa? i don't know, i'm hiding right now- _ the spa? i don't know, i'm hiding right now. this _ the spa? i don't know, i'm hiding right now. this is _ the spa? i don't know, i'm hiding right now. this is the _ the spa? i don't know, i'm hiding right now. this is the alleged - right now. this is the alleged cunman right now. this is the alleged gunman as — right now. this is the alleged gunman as police _ right now. this is the alleged gunman as police begin - right now. this is the alleged gunman as police begin to i right now. this is the alleged - gunman as police begin to identify victims. tributes laid after the shooting spree which punctured a moment of serenity. it has left a
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grieving family of ashley yaun who was having a relaxing massage at the time with her husband, who escaped, unlike her. this time with her husband, who escaped, unlike her. , , ., , unlike her. this is the hardest thing i've _ unlike her. this is the hardest thing i've ever, _ unlike her. this is the hardest thing i've ever, ever- unlike her. this is the hardest thing i've ever, ever in - unlike her. this is the hardest thing i've ever, ever in my - unlike her. this is the hardest i thing i've ever, ever in my whole life had to deal with. i'm not sure i can do this. she was my best friend and my daughter. is i can do this. she was my best friend and my daughter.- friend and my daughter. is the search for— friend and my daughter. is the search for answers _ friend and my daughter. is the search for answers begins, - friend and my daughter. is the i search for answers begins, police say the suspect may have frequented the parlours in the past. he say the suspect may have frequented the parlours in the past.— the parlours in the past. he made indicators that _ the parlours in the past. he made indicators that he _ the parlours in the past. he made indicators that he has _ the parlours in the past. he made indicators that he has some i the parlours in the past. he made i indicators that he has some issues, potentially — indicators that he has some issues, potentially sexual addiction. but . uestions potentially sexual addiction. emit questions remain about the racial motivation of this attack, which the suspect denies, as are six of the eight victims are asian women. the killings, amid a sharp uptick in crimes against asian—americans. it
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has prompted this attempt to reassure from the vice president. i reassure from the vice president. i do want to say to our asian american community that we stand with you and understand how this has frightened and shocked and outraged. that shock turnin: to and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger— and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst _ and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst some i and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst some at i and shocked and outraged. that shock turning to anger amongst some at a l turning to anger amongst some at a perceived reluctance to label this a hate crime. 115 perceived reluctance to label this a hate crime-— hate crime. is 'ust externally heartbreaking i hate crime. isjust externally heartbreaking that _ hate crime. isjust externally heartbreaking that we i hate crime. isjust externally heartbreaking that we see i hate crime. isjust externally| heartbreaking that we see the hate crime. isjust externally - heartbreaking that we see the direct results _ heartbreaking that we see the direct results of— heartbreaking that we see the direct results of fetishisation, of misogyny, of white supremacy combining into this one case that not only— combining into this one case that not only dehumanises these women but also completely takes away from the centralisation of the stories. the susect centralisation of the stories. the suspect told _ centralisation of the stories. the: suspect told investigators he loved god and guns. after his parents help police track him down. police say he appears to have been acting alone and are still investigating the motive behind this unforgiving act. the headlines on bbc news: most people in their a0s will have to wait until may
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to get a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies — a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the eu's drugs regulator will give itsjudgement on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today — several countries have paused the rollout after blood clots were reported in a small number of people. hundreds of patients may have had "do not resuscitate" decisions placed on them during the pandemic, without them or their families knowing — the care regulator calls for urgent action. the former president of afghanistan, hamid karzai, has told the bbc he welcomes us proposals for the creation of a new temporary, power—sharing government in the country, which would include the taliban. senior delegates from the opposing sides are meeting in moscow along with american, chinese and pakistani representatives. here's our correspondent secunder kermani. former president hamid karzai has come out as one of the most vocal
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proponents of this new proposal for this transitional power—sharing government and as you say, what we're seeing at the moment is a renewed diplomatic drive to find solution to this conflict and that's because over the past few months, talks that have been taking place, negotiations taking place between afghan and taliban officials have yet to make any progress while violence on the ground is continuing so the us is pushing forward a new proposal, the creation of a temporary power—sharing government that would incorporate the taliban, it would rule the country until a new constitution has been drafted by the various different sides and it's hoped it would lead to a ceasefire but there are big obstacles to this. the taliban say they are still studying the proposal. the current president is opposed to it and says he will only hand over power to a government that is formed following fresh elections. no sign that the taliban would agree to but these proposals have found the support of
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senior afghan political figures including hamid karzai, who i've been speaking to. he called on his successor to show more flexibility. if he wants an election, if the taliban— if he wants an election, if the taliban agree to that, it's good enough — taliban agree to that, it's good enough for us.— taliban agree to that, it's good enough for us. taliban agree to that, it's good enouahforus. , �* , :,, enough for us. doesn't seem to be an sin. enough for us. doesn't seem to be any sign- if — enough for us. doesn't seem to be any sign- if that — enough for us. doesn't seem to be any sign. if that doesn't _ enough for us. doesn't seem to be any sign. if that doesn't happen, i any sign. if that doesn't happen, what we do? _ any sign. if that doesn't happen, what we do? then _ any sign. if that doesn't happen, what we do? then we _ any sign. if that doesn't happen, what we do? then we allow- any sign. if that doesn't happen, what we do? then we allow the l what we do? then we allow the country — what we do? then we allow the country to — what we do? then we allow the country to keep staying in this very unfortunate conflict. in that case, it's a _ unfortunate conflict. in that case, it's a problem for all of us including _ it's a problem for all of us including hamid karzai to think of an alternative. us including hamid karzai to think of an alternative.— including hamid karzai to think of an alternative. us officials want to see progress _ an alternative. us officials want to see progress of— an alternative. us officials want to see progress of some _ an alternative. us officials want to see progress of some kind - an alternative. us officials want to see progress of some kind by i an alternative. us officials want to see progress of some kind by may| an alternative. us officials want to i see progress of some kind by may the 1st, that's a deadline that was set in an agreement signed by the trump administration and the taliban last year. you may remember. for all remaining foreign forces to be withdrawn from the country. critics see this idea of a transitional government as an attempt to reach a short to peace, and say it is laden
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with risks. there are still major concerns about what the taliban stance is on democracy, on women's rights, but all the time that talk and negotiations are going on, the conflict continues and every day more and more ordinary people die. this morning here in campbell, more people were killed on a minibus carrying government employees —— in kabul. bt has said it will "build like fury" to roll out full—fibre internet connections after new rules announced by the uk's telecoms regulator. ofcom has decided not to impose price caps on full—fibre connections provided by the firm's openreach subsidiary. this gives the company the certainty it had been looking for ahead of a planned £12 billion investment. we can speak now to our business correspondent vishala sri—pathma. first of all, what is full fibre internet connection? it first of all, what is full fibre internet connection? it sounds very impressive. — internet connection? it sounds very impressive, doesn't _ internet connection? it sounds very impressive, doesn't it? _ internet connection? it sounds very impressive, doesn't it? it's- impressive, doesn't it? it's essentiallyjust impressive, doesn't it? it's essentially just very fast broadband
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internet and something the uk needs to do. we currently don't have the infrastructure to operate at the level we need to operate and the government and these companies and ofcom are looking at the internet in ten years time... so it's very, very important that we get this sorted and get this done and that's probably why ofcom have removed these price caps because they want bt and companies like bt to be able to get the return on the investment that they are putting into the roll—out of this very, very fast broadband. roll-out of this very, very fast broadband-— roll-out of this very, very fast broadband. �* :, :, , : , broadband. but without a price cap, ofcom could — broadband. but without a price cap, ofcom could be _ broadband. but without a price cap, ofcom could be accused _ broadband. but without a price cap, ofcom could be accused of - broadband. but without a price cap, ofcom could be accused of unfairlyl ofcom could be accused of unfairly favouring bt, surely.— ofcom could be accused of unfairly favouring bt, surely. absolutely and that's the concern, _ favouring bt, surely. absolutely and that's the concern, that _ favouring bt, surely. absolutely and that's the concern, that it _ favouring bt, surely. absolutely and that's the concern, that it is - that's the concern, that it is creating a monopoly here, and also higher prices, probably for the consumer like you and i, the public, so it is very clear where the prices are going to rise and who's going to pay them. it obviously seems like that of, and also other agents
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within this industry are looking at the need and the speed at which they need to get everything together, technology, and also get to the areas that need it most. traditionally, cities like london, manchester, birmingham, we have pretty good broadband but when you go to rural areas, there have been years of people complaining that the broadband is very good and for the last sort of year during the pandemic, we will be working from home and it has really impacted people's lives so perhaps they are looking at the kind of broader impact there rather than the price but clearly consumers are going to be worried and concerned about this. what might other internet providers do, then, to challenge this? i what might other internet providers do, then, to challenge this?- do, then, to challenge this? i think it will be a — do, then, to challenge this? i think it will be a sense _ do, then, to challenge this? i think it will be a sense of _ do, then, to challenge this? i think it will be a sense of there - do, then, to challenge this? i think it will be a sense of there are i it will be a sense of there are other players in the market so they will go through the sort of processes to challenge ofcom through this but presumably if this has been offered to bt, a similar arrangement might be offered, and analysts are
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expecting, to other types of companies as well but we are yet to find out those details at the moment. but broadly, you want other providers to work towards one goal together, you don't want to create any kind of negativity within that arena, so i'd be surprised if there wasn't some sort of unison as a result of any kind of challenges that are going to come forward. two weeks of national mourning have been declared in tanzania to mark the death of presidentjohn magufuli, who's died at the age of 61. the vice—president announced mr magufuli's death on state tv. translation: fellow citizens, it is with deep regret — translation: fellow citizens, it is with deep regret that _ translation: fellow citizens, it is with deep regret that i _ translation: fellow citizens, it is with deep regret that i inform i translation: fellow citizens, it is with deep regret that i inform you i with deep regret that i inform you that today, on the 17th of march 2021 at 6pm, we lost our brave leader, the president of the republic of tanzania, honourable
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john magufuli, who has died of a heart condition at a hospital in dar es salaam where he was being treated. funeral arrangements have been made. our country shall be in a mourning period of 1a days and flags will fly at half mast. our correspondent leila nathoo is in nairobi. she explains that given the lead up to his death, people feel there are still perhaps unanswered questions. he was elected in 2015 is a very popular leader, stood on an anti—corruption platform and anti—corru ption platform and certainly anti—corruption platform and certainly has his constituency of supporters within the country but his critics accused him of becoming increasingly authoritarian, clamping down on opposition parties, on media freedom too. he was re—elected at the end of last year for another five year term but some critics alleged that the election was not fair, but i think there has been a lot of international criticism of his stance on coronavirus in
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tanzania, there has been pressure from the who for tanzania to start recording cases, sharing data because, of course, it has implications for neighbouring countries if coronavirus was allowed to circulate within tanzania with no vaccination programme on the horizon. officially, what is supposed to happen is his vice president is supposed to take over for the remainder of his five year term. she hasn't yet been officially sworn in so we could yet see some sort of manoeuvres or power struggle within the ruling party, but i think given the lead up to presidentjohn magufuli's death and the intense speculation as well as the situation with covid—19 in tanzania, many people will feel they haven't yet had the full picture of what's been going on in these last few weeks and perhaps there are still unanswered questions.
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now let's have a look at something you don't see every day — some goats in columbia who found themselves up a roof without a ladder these ones were tucking in on a roof in the small village of barichara in northern colombia known for its cobbled streets and colonial architecture. some were carried away after their initial performance. for others, the sight of rescuers butting in seemed to have got their goat as they milked the crowd and made their own way down. in the end, rescuers reported the frightened animals were all returned to the wild without any injuries. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomaz.
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hello, there's very little happening on the weather front across the uk in the coming days. it's going to essentially stay more or less the same from day today. there will be a little bit of sunshine developing, but on the whole, pretty cloudy. on the satellite picture you can see where the clouds are coming from. they are drifting in from the norwegian sea, riding around this area of high pressure which is to the west, southwest of ireland and this is where the high pressure is more or less going to stay over the next few days. you can see the air currents, the wind blowing around the higher, hence the cloud is coming in from the north but it tends to break up in a few areas but in other areas it is thick enough to produce rain. we've had rain in the last day or so, there could be more damp weather anywhere from eastern of england, through the east midlands and into the southeast as well, but frost—free for most of us, perhaps a touch of frost where the sky is clear in the coming days. notice tomorrow there is a very definitive edge between drier,
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sunnier weather coming in out of the continent and the sticker cloud across the rest of the country. the thinking is from hull to london and southampton there will be sunshine developing on friday afternoon, somewhat drier air heading our way, evaporating the clouds. the high pressure still with us on saturday, which is the first day of astronomical spring, the vernal equinox, so we well and truly are into spring, but the weather isn't changing much. we'll see the wind still blowing out of north across scotland, perhaps a spot of rain for stornoway. forthe scotland, perhaps a spot of rain for stornoway. for the rest of the country, it's a case of variable amounts of cloud and this high pressure is still with us through the weekend into next week. thejet stream is way to the north of us, sending the unsettled weather in the direction of iceland and also around the mediterranean, but we are closer to that high. so little change and take a look at this outlook for the next few days. the weather icons
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indicating clouds are variable amounts of cloud, very difficult to indicate on a symbol, with temperatures hovering between 11 and 13 celsius stop the weather will change but not until later next week. that's it from me. bye—bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines — most people in their a0s will have to wait until may to get a a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies, a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the vaccine roll—out will be slightly slower than we might have hoped, but not slower than the target that we had set ourselves, which is, as i say, to get those groups one to nine by the middle of april, and if you have appointments, they will still be honoured. the eu's drugs regulator will give its judgment on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today. several countries have paused the roll—out, after blood clots were reported in a small number of people. drayton manor theme park has been fined £1 million over safety failings, after 11—year—old ehva jannath died on a ride there in 2017.
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hundreds of patients may have had "do not resuscitate" decisions placed on them during the pandemic, without them or their families knowing. the care regulator calls for urgent action. people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed, under a plans for a major overhaurl of the immigration system expected to be set out next week. and coming up this hour — keeping beauty spots beautiful — why landowners want more people to pay attention to the countryside code. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. the government is facing questions over why there's to be a significant reduction in covid vaccine supplies from the end of this month. it is understood a delivery of millions of doses
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of the oxford—astrazeneca jab, produced by the serum institute of india, has been held up by four weeks. after opening up appointments to all over—50s on wednesday, nhs england says jabs should now not be offered to younger age groups throughout april, meaning healthy people in their a0s will have to wait till may. the health secretary, matt hancock, said there was always going to be ups and downs in availability, but labour has accused him of trying to downplay the issue. at the same time, the european commission president, ursula von der leyen, has threatened to restrict covid vaccine exports to some countries, including the uk, if supplies in the eu don't improve. she said the eu was still waiting for vaccines to be delivered from the uk. also today, the eu's drugs regulator is due to present the findings of its investigation into the safety of the astrazeneca covid vaccine. several countries have temporarily stopped using the jab, after blood clots were reported in a small number of inoculated people. and the health secretary has confirmed more than 3.7 million vulnerable people in england will no longer have to shield from the coronavirus from april 1st, as cases and hospitalisations continue to fall. later today, the prime minister
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will lead a news conference at downing street. jim reed reports. another step closer to normality. afternoon. you all right? at gps, like this one in lincolnshire, thousands have been given their vaccines this week. there you go — done. that it? that's it. in total, more than 25 million have now beenjabbed. for the next fortnight, there should be plenty of doses to go round. after that, though, there is more doubt. a letter sent by the nhs to local health services warned of a significant reduction in supply next month, and said no further appointments for first doses should be uploaded to booking systems in april. vaccine supply is always lumpy,
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and we regularly send out technical letters to the nhs to explain the ups and downs of the supply over the future weeks. it is thought part of the shortfall could be due to the later than expected delivery of astrazeneca vaccine produced in india. nobody who has an appointment should lose their slot, but this may delay the roll—out to the next age group down — those in their a0s — perhaps by as much as a month. it comes as the european commission suggested it could block exports of the pfizer vaccine to the uk, unless otherjabs are sent back across the channel in return. across the channel in return. meanwhile, 13 european states have still suspended the use of the astrazeneca shot over concerns about rare blood clots. an investigation into that by the eu medicines agency is due to report back this afternoon. keeping up the pace of vaccine supply is crucial, if the government is going to stick to its road map out of lockdown. the recent fall in infections means
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that almost four million vulnerable people in england have now been told they no longer need to shield from next month. the reason we've done that is because the rates of community infection have now dropped a long way and they've been sustained. and we recognise that actually advising people to shield for more than about 12 weeks can be really quite damaging for their mental health. so i think good news for all of them. as for the vaccine programme, the government said supply of the jabs will vary over time, but it remains on track to offer a first dose to all over—50s in england by mid—april, and all adults by the end ofjuly. jim reed, bbc news. speaking a little earlier the housing secretary robertjenrick said plans to offer a first dose to all adults by the end ofjuly are still on track despite the issue. we are experiencing some supply issues, so it does mean that the vaccine roll—out will be slightly slower than we might have hoped, but not slower
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than the target that we have set ourselves, which is, as i say, to get those groups one to nine by the middle of april. and if you have appointments, they will still be honoured. so we are going to move forward as quickly as we possibly can, but it won't be as fast as we might have hoped for a few weeks. but then, we have every reason to believe that supply will increase in the months of may, june and july. the supply of vaccine to the uk will fall in april, partly due to a delay in a delivery from india's serum institute, of five million oxford—astrazeneca doses. earlier, i spoke to our india business correspondent nikhil inamdar, who's in mumbai for us, and i asked him what the serum institute of india are saying at this time. well, so far we haven't really heard anything from them but independent
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sources here are indicating there was never really a stipulated time of delivery that was agreed upon by the serum institute and the delay is really on demand of a higher demand of domestic supplies. just today the external affairs minister in india saying overseas supplies of vaccines will be categorically dependent on adequate availability at home, in some sense indicating that india is now prioritising domestic supply, given the huge surge in cases that we have seen just in the last 2a hours, in fact, india has seen fresh new positive cases of covid—19 in excess of 35,000 people, and we are seeing a second wave in at least 12 of the provinces here. india already has an immunisation programme that is under way, and we have a target to vaccinate 300 million people byjuly, so certainly we will need to step it up, given the surge in cases we have seen at this point in time. the operator of drayton manor theme
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park in staffordshire has been fined £1 million over safety failings, which led to the death of an 11—year—old girl in 2017. evha jannath died on a school trip after being thrown into the water on the park's water rapids ride. our correspondent phil mackie has more on this — and hejoins me now. just remind us of this terrible accident. , , accident. yes, i remember it well, i was sent to — accident. yes, i remember it well, i was sent to cover _ accident. yes, i remember it well, i was sent to cover this _ accident. yes, i remember it well, i was sent to cover this almost i accident. yes, i remember it well, i was sent to cover this almost as i was sent to cover this almost as soon as news emerged on that day in may 2017 that the little girl had drowned, and this was on the splash canyon water ride at drayton manor park, one of the most popular rides in the park, people got on it, they were spun around and bumped on a rapids, got very wet, but one of the things they were told to do when you got on it is not to stand up. but there was no real enforcement of that, and people often did. they reckoned, as we heard during the two—day hearing at stafford crown court, that probably somewhere between one in seven and one in 11 people who got on it stood up. the
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danger then was that when there was a collision they might get bumped off and into the water, and that is what happened to evha jannath on that particular day. she was there on an end of year school trip with other girls from the academy in leicester. and she drowned. other things that emerged from this hearing about the health and safety breaches there were that this had happened on a number of occasions before, and although people had raised concerns, not enough was done to ensure the safety. other people had been knocked into the water and pulled out, but in this case this hadn't happened, and evha jannath sadly drowned. but the operators, as you say, have now been fined £1 million, but they no longer exist. they went into administration last year and the park went into new ownership, so there is little sign of that fine being repaid, however thejudge said he of that fine being repaid, however the judge said he felt it was appropriate to issue a fine that was the right one, whatever the case, even though he admitted, as i said,
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that the chances are that that £1 million will never be paid. thank ou ve million will never be paid. thank you very much. _ million will never be paid. thank you very much, phil— million will never be paid. thank you very much, phil mackie. i the care regulator for england has said hundreds of people may have been subject to "do not resuscitate" decisions during the early part of the pandemic, without them or their families knowing. a report by the care quality commission found evidence that the dnr decisions, which restrict potentially life—saving treatment, were applied across particular groups, including people with learning difficulties. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. son had an absolute zest for life, loved being with herfamily, you know, always smiling, always laughing. son has got the moves! sonia deleon suffered from schizophrenia and had learning disabilities. but it was only after she died in hospital from a heart attack last april that her family say they discovered her medical notes contained a "do not resuscitate" decision, limiting the treatment that sonia could receive. we'd had no consultation. at no point — at no point —
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were we told that that had taken place. we would have disputed that and we would have said we don't want that in place. the hospital insists the family consented to the decision, including discussing it with sonia's 85—year—old mother. i can't describe the love that my mum has for son. hello, everybody! aww! mum's been waiting to hear your voice. there is no way that she would agree to that being put in place. absolutely no way at all. southend university hospital were responsible for treating sonia deleon. they say the "do not resuscitate" decision was appropriate, and based on assessments by clinicians. today's report makes no reference to sonia's case, but does find that over 500 people — mainly elderly or disabled — had "do not resuscitate" decisions made for them without their consent or that of their relatives. the true scale of the problem
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could be much greater, however. any decision that's put _ in in a blanket fashion or in a way that doesn't take into consideration a person's individual needs - is never acceptable. one of the things we found through the review is that trying one of the things we found i through the review is that trying to quantify this problem has been very difficult, because of the lack| of oversight and the lack- of record—keeping and data. the cqc say the pressure of the pandemic and rapidly developing guidance were to blame for the problems. they want a group of ministers to come together to fully investigate what happened. nhs england say that, throughout the pandemic, they had repeatedly told those making dnr decisions that that their blanket use was unacceptable. sonia deleon's family want more safeguards put in place to protect those who can't help themselves. today's report suggests many other families would also benefit from such measures. michael buchanan, bbc news.
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an inquest into the death of sarah everard is opening today. the 33—year—old's body was found in kent, a week after she went missing while walking home in south london. wayne couzens, who was a serving officer with the metropolitan police, is charged with kidnap and murder. the bbc has announced plans to "better reflect" all parts of the uk. it will shift away from london over the next six years, in what it has called its "biggest transformation in decades". the bbc director—general, tim davie, says the corporation will move more of its news, television and radio operations to the regions and countries of the united kingdom, to better reflect its audiences, resulting in a00 jobs relocating from the capital. news and current affairs programmes, like newsnight, will be presented from different uk bases throughout the year. labour says a fully independent, public inquiry into the coronavirus pandemic should start injune, when most restrictions are due to end. ministers insist the focus should be
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on the vaccine roll—out. deputy chief medical officer jonathan van—tam said that he thought launching one imminently would be "an extra burden that wasn't necessary". you're watching bbc news. the headlines on bbc news — most people in their a0s will have to wait until may to get a a covid vaccine, after a significant drop in supplies, a delay in deliveries from india is partly to blame. the eu's drugs regulator will give its judgment on the safety of the astrazeneca jab today — several countries have paused the roll—out after blood clots were reported in a small number of people. drayton manor theme park has been fined £1 million over safety failings, after 11—year—old ehva jannath died on a ride there in 2017.
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sport now, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. lock adam beard is back in the side for wales's bid to complete a six nations grand slam on saturday. they face france in paris. he was rested for last weekend's win over italy, after starting for their three previous victories. he'll partner captain alun wynjones in the second row. that's coach wayne pivac�*s only change to the line—up. just one change for england, too, for their match against ireland in dublin — elliot daly will start at outside—centre for the first time in almost five years, replacing the injured henry slade. daly returns after he was relegated to the bench for the win over france last weekend, with max malins starting at number 15. moving to football, and paddy mcnair has been included in the northern ireland squad for next week's world cup qualifiers, despite concerns over his fitness. he was forced off with a knee problem in middlesbrough's win over preston in the championship on tuesday night but he still makes the 26—strong international party. they're at home to italy on the 25th, and at home to bulgaria six days later.
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there are four british clubs in europa league action later, including arsenal, who have a 3—1 first leg lead against olympiakos. manager mikel arteta says pierre—emerick aubameyang is in contention, after being dropped for sunday's league win over tottenham for what he calls a "breach of pre—match protocol". arteta also says he has no intention of resting players ahead of the international break. our priority now is to win these next two games, and then whatever happens with international, if anything, they will have to adapt to what we want. we are not going to do at the opposite way around, because we are the ones that have to look after our players here every day, but at the end ones that pay our players, so if anyone has to adapt, it is the national teams, not us. and another member of the tokyo olympics organising team has resigned, after making derogatory comments about women.
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creative director, hiroshi sasaki, suggested comedian naomi watanabe — who is a plus—size model — should wear pig ears at the opening ceremony. he later apologised, admitting it was "a huge insult". last month, yoshiro mori, was forced to quit as president of the organising committee, after his sexist remarks caused outrage. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. people seeking asylum in the uk could be sent abroad while their cases are being processed. it's thought the proposals are part of a major shake—up of the immigration system to be announced by the home secretary, priti patel, next week. similar plans were leaked last year, when labour described them as inhumane and impractical. many newspapers have been speculating where they could be sent. our chief political correspondent adam fleming said we wouldn't know what the government was hoping to do until their plans are announced next week. oh, i think that isjust a bit of speculation. we'll have to wait until this proposal we get next week to get a bit more detail, and even then,
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we might not get that much more detail, because i think they are saving all of that for the sovereign borders bill, which will be the giant, monster piece of legislation that will reform the asylum system, which i'm told is going to be a centrepiece of the queen's speech, which we are expecting in may, so this will be a big, huge dominating issue for the next session of parliament and i think it will be one of the big stories for the next few years. you talk about how it's been speculated upon since last year. actually, it was tony blair that first proposed this, 18 years ago, which gives you a bit of an idea about how long changes of this magnitude actually take to introduce. one of the places being suggested is gibraltar. gibraltar�*s chief minister fabian picardo told us that the uk government had not been in touch with him. i have written this morning to priti patel. _ i have written this morning to priti patel, having seen the report, which ithink— patel, having seen the report, which i think are _ patel, having seen the report, which i think are groundless in the uk media, — i think are groundless in the uk media, to — i think are groundless in the uk media, to tell her that of course gibraltar— media, to tell her that of course gibraltar as part of the british family— gibraltar as part of the british family of— gibraltar as part of the british family of nations, we want to work
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with the _ family of nations, we want to work with the uk— family of nations, we want to work with the uk government in all areas where _ with the uk government in all areas where we _ with the uk government in all areas where we can, but immigration is a matter— where we can, but immigration is a matter under the gibraltar constitution, the responsibility of gibraltar— constitution, the responsibility of gibraltar ministers. no one has spoken— gibraltar ministers. no one has spoken to — gibraltar ministers. no one has spoken to me or approached me about these _ spoken to me or approached me about these issues. gibraltar has its own distinct— these issues. gibraltar has its own distinct immigration and asylum regime, — distinct immigration and asylum regime, and our immigration act, which _ regime, and our immigration act, which is _ regime, and our immigration act, which is not — regime, and our immigration act, which is not the uk immigration act, and of— which is not the uk immigration act, and of course geographically gibraltar finds itself in a very difficult _ gibraltar finds itself in a very difficult position, because bringing people _ difficult position, because bringing people into the small geography of gibraltar— people into the small geography of gibraltar is never going to be a practical— gibraltar is never going to be a practical way of dealing with these things _ practical way of dealing with these things. additionally, as your viewers _ things. additionally, as your viewers may know, gibraltar is negotiating with the united kingdom a treaty— negotiating with the united kingdom a treaty for fluidity with the schengen area, which would mean that bringing _ schengen area, which would mean that bringing asylum areas to the uk to gibraltar. — bringing asylum areas to the uk to gibraltar, apart from being outside gibraltar's— gibraltar, apart from being outside gibraltar's constitution and our laws. _ gibraltar's constitution and our laws, would create difficulties in the negotiation of that treaty also. so i the negotiation of that treaty also. so i really— the negotiation of that treaty also. so i really do think this is speculation in the context of gibraltar— speculation in the context of gibraltar are not anything which is based _ gibraltar are not anything which is based on — gibraltar are not anything which is based on any reality. two weeks of national mourning have been declared in tanzania, to mark the death
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of presidentjohn magufuli, who's died at the age of 61. the vice—president announced mr magufuli's death on state tv. translation: fellow citizens, i it is with deep regret that i inform you that today on the 17th of march 2021 at 6pm, we lost our brave leader, the president of the republic of tanzania, honourablejohn pombejoseph magufuli, who has died of a heart condition at a hospital in dar es salaam where he was being treated. funeral arrangements are being made and you will be notified. our country shall be in a mourning period of 1a days and flags will fly at half mast. officials say mr magufuli, who was a vehement coronavirus sceptic, died from heart disease, but there is widespread speculation that he had contracted covid—19. our correspondent leila nathoo is in nairobi. she explains that given the lead up to his death, there remain unanswered questions.
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he was elected in 2015 as a very popular leader, stood on an anti—corruption platform and certainly has his constituency of supporters within the country. but his critics accused him of becoming increasingly authoritarian, clamping down on opposition parties, on media freedom too. he was re—elected at the end of last year for another five year term, but some critics alleged the election was not fair. but i think there has been a lot of international criticism on his stance of coronavirus in tanzania, there has been pressure from the who for tanzania to start sharing data, recording cases, because of course it had implications for neighbouring countries too if coronavirus was allowed to circulate in tanzania with no vaccination programme on the horizon. now, officially what is supposed to happen is is vice president is supposed to take over for the remainder of his five year
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term. she hasn't yet been officially sworn in, so we could yet see some manoeuvres or power struggle within the ruling party, but i think given the ruling party, but i think given the lead up to president magafuli's death and the intense speculation, as well as the situation with covid—19 in tanzania, i think many people still feel they haven't quite had the full picture of what has been going on in these last few weeks, and perhaps there are still unanswered questions. johnny depp's application for permission to appeal against a damning high court ruling that he assaulted his ex—wife amber heard and put her in fearfor her assaulted his ex—wife amber heard and put her in fear for her life has begun at the court of appeal. mr depp's barrister was told an application had been made, and as a result of some documents coming through some subpoenas in the us and through some subpoenas in the us and through amber heard's own disclosure in a virginia defamation action. with lockdown beginning to ease, a lot of us are looking forward
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to visiting our beaches, national parks and beauty spots in the coming months. as we saw last year, however, more visitors means more litter, damage and anti—social behaviour. landowners want to tackle those issues with a new "countryside code", but time is running out, as our environment and rural affairs correspondent claire marshall this was the end of last year's lockdown. people wanted the party, but from the yorkshire dales to bournemouth beach and across britain, it was often left to armies of volunteers to pick up the pieces. many were drawn to dartmoor national park. , : ~ many were drawn to dartmoor national park. , : ,, , , many were drawn to dartmoor national park. , : ~ . . , park. they duck fire pits, they were burn marks — park. they duck fire pits, they were burn marks where _ park. they duck fire pits, they were burn marks where they _ park. they duck fire pits, they were burn marks where they had - park. they duck fire pits, they were i burn marks where they had barbecues, there was little left all over this area, and they were using this area as a human toilet, and i came down one sunday and it almost brought me to tears. :, :, one sunday and it almost brought me to tears. :, :_ :, one sunday and it almost brought me to tears. :, .y :, 4' :, one sunday and it almost brought me to tears. :, :_ :, ,, :, ,
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to tears. you may not know it but there is actually _ to tears. you may not know it but there is actually a _ to tears. you may not know it but there is actually a government i to tears. you may not know it but i there is actually a government code on how to behave. the there is actually a government code on how to behave.— on how to behave. the thing i en'oy about the countryside i on how to behave. the thing i en'oy about the countryside the i on how to behave. the thing i en'oy about the countryside the most. i about the countryside the most. among — about the countryside the most. among the rules, don't have barbecues, keep dogs under control and leave no trace. you barbecues, keep dogs under control and leave no trace.— barbecues, keep dogs under control and leave no trace. you should treat the countryside _ and leave no trace. you should treat the countryside as _ and leave no trace. you should treat the countryside as you _ and leave no trace. you should treat the countryside as you retreat i and leave no trace. you should treat the countryside as you retreat your i the countryside as you retreat your home. �* . :. . the countryside as you retreat your home. �* , :, , :, , the countryside as you retreat your home. �* , :,, :,, :, :, home. but this was the last ma'or ublici home. but this was the last ma'or publicity campaign. it i home. but this was the last ma'or publicity campaign. it is i home. but this was the last ma'or publicity campaign. it is 17 i home. but this was the last major publicity campaign. it is 17 years l publicity campaign. it is 17 years old. its website doesn't exist any more. author guy shrubsole discovers a garment has only spent around £2000 a year since 2010 promoting the code. i £2000 a year since 2010 promoting the code. ~' ., the code. i think the government have really _ the code. i think the government have really neglected _ the code. i think the government have really neglected their - the code. i think the government have really neglected their duty i the code. i think the government. have really neglected their duty to promote the countryside code and principles of protecting the countryside. they really need to start developing a better culture of greater access to nature, but more responsible access to nature. we are auoin over responsible access to nature. we are going over to — responsible access to nature. we are going over to the _ responsible access to nature. we are going over to the house _ responsible access to nature. we are going over to the house of— responsible access to nature. we are going over to the house of commons now want to hear the health secretary matt hancock give a statement about the expected reductions in covid vaccine supply in april.
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set out the facts, given some of the speculation we have seen overnight. let me set out the position absolutely straightforward here. throughout the vaccination programme, the pace of roll—out has always been determined by the availability of supplies. as i said in this house many times, supply is the great limiting factor. the process of manufacturing vaccines is complicated and subject to unpredictability, and because we get supplies out into the field so fast, and run a highly lean delivery system, changes in future supply schedules impact on the weekly availability of vaccine. this has been true throughout. we make public commitments to the goals we can reach, according to our best estimates of future supply. that supply goes up and down. we are currently right now in the middle of some bumper weeks of supply. we have now reached the milestone of 25 million vaccinations within the first 100 days of roll—out, and we have therefore been able to open out
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invitations to all people aged 50 and above. and yesterday, for example, we delivered over half a million vaccines, and we will do so again today. in april, supply is tighter than this month, and we have a huge number of second doses to deliver. during april, madam deputy speaker, around 12 million people, including many colleagues in this house, will receive their second dose. these second doses cannot be delayed, as they have to be delivered within12 weeks of the first dose. in the last week, we've had a batch of 1.7 million doses delayed because of the need to retest its stability. events like this are to be expected in a manufacturing endeavour of this complexity, and this shows the rigour of our safety checks. and we have a delay in the scheduled arrival from the serum institute of india. now, iwant to
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arrival from the serum institute of india. now, i want to put on the record my gratitude to the serum institute of india for the incredible work they are doing producing the vaccine, notjust for us in the uk, but for the whole world. their technology and capability, which has been approved by the mr ha —— capability, which has been approved by the mr ha -- mhra is capability, which has been approved by the mr ha —— mhra is remarkable. the serum institute of india are producing a billion doses of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine this year. it truly is a partnership that we can be proud of. i also want to put on the record my thanks to both astrazeneca and pfizer, who have been remarkable partners in this historic endeavour. we have committed to targets on which it is vital to say that those targets to offer the vaccine to everyone aged 50 and over by the 15th of april, and to all adults by the end of july. i can confirm that we are on track to meet both of these targets.
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i also want to clear up some rumours that have been circulating and give people reassurance. there will be no weeks in april with no first doses. there will be no cancelled appointments as a result of supply issues. second doses will go ahead as planned. most importantly, the vaccine data published yesterday show the life—saving impact of this vaccine. it is notjust that the vaccines are safe, it's that they make you say. you are much safer having had one. and shortly the mhra will be staying more on this matter, which they of course keep under constant review. madam deputy speaker, i know the house will also want to hear some good news from gibraltar. throughout the crisis, we have provided gibraltar with ppe, testing and a sovereign guarantee for their covert spending. we have also provided gibraltar vaccines, as we have with all other british overseas territories, and i'm delighted to be able to tell the house that yesterday gibraltar
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became the first nation in the world to complete its entire adult vaccination programme. i want to pay tribute to all gibraltarians for their fortitude tribute to all gibraltarians for theirfortitude during tribute to all gibraltarians for their fortitude during this crisis, and the kind words of first minister fabian picardo who said yesterday, the united kingdom has played a blinder on vaccinations, and we are among the beneficiaries in the british family of nations. i agree. the vaccination programme has been a success, thanks to a team spirit across the british family of nations. it hasn't always been easy. 0f nations. it hasn't always been easy. of course there are challenges thrown at us in what is the biggest civilian undertaking in history, and it affects every single one of us. the whole house pays tribute to those who helped to make it happen, including emily lawson and kate bingham, maddy mctiernan, ruth todd, nikki kidd nani, professorjonathan van tam, sir chris whitty, sir patrick vallance, wei shen limb, sarah gilbert, andy pollard, my
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officials in the department, colleagues across this house, and so many others who have made this a success. with 25 million people vaccinated, and a clear road map out of lockdown, we are taking careful steps out of this pandemic. there are over 7000 people in hospital across the uk with covid down from 40,000 few weeks ago. it has halved in the past 16 days and the rate which people are dying has fallen by a third in the last week. as a result, i can tell the house that we are, from today, writing to all those clinically extremely vulnerable people to let them know that shielding will come to an end on the 31st of march. i want to thank all of those who have shown such fortitude and all of those who have done so much to look after the
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most vulnerable. the shielding programme truly has been written at its best, pulling together to help those most in need. i know that colleagues in the nhs and social care are beginning cautiously to look to the recovery ahead. i know everyone in this house is proud of the life—saving work we have seen in hospitals across the country yet we also know that our battles against covid—i9 have meant there are things that we've not been able to do like routine treatments and operations, and the challenges of covid are still with us. we must continue to treat patients with the disease, bolster our vital mission of infection control while also laying the groundwork for a recovery that gets us back to where we need to be. we have backed the nhs at every point in this pandemic so that they can treat patients, stay safe and save lives, and i'm delighted to inform the house that we are backing them again today with a further £6.6
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billion of funding for the first half of this coming financial year. this money is in addition to the 3 billion committed at the spending review last november to help the nhs meet the additional costs of covid while critically starting to work on the elective recovery ahead. due to the elective recovery ahead. due to the pandemic, the waiting list for elective treatment injanuary the pandemic, the waiting list for elective treatment in january was almost a 4.6 million and 304,000 people are waiting more than a year for an operation or diagnostic. before the pandemic, we reduced the number of 52 week weights, people waiting more than a year, from 20,020 ten to 1600 and we were, in fact, on track to get that number to zero before the pandemic hit. this backlog of elective work is an inevitable consequence of the pandemic and i know how nhs colleagues are as determined as i am to put it right. we also putting 594
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million towards safe hospital discharge. over the last year, the nhs's discharge. over the last year, the nhs�*s existing discharge programme freed up over 6000 beds and with the valuable time of 11,000 staff. we are grateful that we are seeing so many people leave hospital and that our discharge programme has shown the way forward, ensuring people can get the very best of care outside of our hospitals, helping them off the words and into the right settings with the right support at the right time. our500 million mental with the right support at the right time. our 500 million mental health recovery package will help tackle the challenges that the pandemic has wrought in access to mental health services and i can also confirm that we will be extending enhanced discharge arrangements for mental health patients, getting patients safely from hospital into healthy community settings, providing better care and freeing up thousands of beds. this challenge of mental ill health is so important, we all need
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to keep looking out for each other and doing all we can to strengthen our mental health. tackling mental ill health is a core objective for our nhs long—term plan and this government is committed to seeing mental health treated on a par with physical health and deliver on the long needed reforms that we set out. madam deputy speaker, i am equally committed to supporting the vital work of our colleagues in adult social care. last monday we reopened care homes to visitors with a careful policy of a single regular visitor who will be tested and where ppe —— wear. i know colleagues will be cheered by the important stories we hear each day of more residency for reunited with people they love. it means everything to them. i can today announce a further 341 million today announce a further 341 million to support adult social care with the costs of infection prevention control and testing that will make sure visits safe for everyone. this takes the total infection control
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fund and testing support to more than £1.6 billion alongside the free ppe that care homes receive. madam deputy speaker, the pandemic has tested our nhs and our social care system like never before. that they have risen to meet the challenges of the past year is down to the incredible dedication and hard work of colleagues. they have our thanks. we will deliver on our commitments. we will deliver on our commitments. we will deliver on our commitments. we will build 40 new hospitals, we will hire 50,000 more nurses, we will hire 50,000 more nurses, we will vaccinate this country ahead of almost all others. we will back our nhs and social care as we build back betterfor nhs and social care as we build back better for everyone and nhs and social care as we build back betterfor everyone and i commend this statement to the house. i will this statement to the house. i call the shadow _ this statement to the house. i call the shadow secretary _ this statement to the house. i call the shadow secretary of _ this statement to the house. i call the shadow secretary of state. this statement to the house. i call. the shadow secretary of state. thank ou, the shadow secretary of state. thank you. madam — the shadow secretary of state. thank you. madam deputy _ the shadow secretary of state. thank you, madam deputy speaker, - the shadow secretary of state. t�*ua�*ua; you, madam deputy speaker, and i thank the secretary of state for his statement. our constituents will be worried and anxious and disappointed at the news and vaccination. it has
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been an unspeakably horrific year. we've got one of the worst death rates in the world, our economy has taken a massive hit. many key workers under the age of 50 like teachers and police officers who, through the nature of their work, are not at home, they are going out, they are more exposed to risk, have been hoping that the vaccination for them was not far away so we understand why there will be delays in supply but this is not fantastic news and nor, frankly, is it expected news. on saturday, the government's sources were briefing the daily telegraph for the bumper proves that everyone over 40 would be offered the vaccine by easter. last week, the business secretary was hinting that all adults could be vaccinated byjune, saying there is no reason why we can't be optimistic. on monday, nottingham and nottinghamshire ccg began
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inviting those in their 40s were vaccination. there was a similar invite from bury ccg. we are grateful but it will have been a surprise to many. i understand that supplies of modern will begin in april. is there any prospect that if moderna supplies come on stream, new appointments can be made? many received theirfirst appointments can be made? many received their first dose between january and february. can he clarify, is he offering them an absolute guarantee that all of those will get their second dose within the 12 weeks throughout april? our constituents will be keen to get that clarified. the vaccination programme will need to ramp up to about 3.5 million doses a week from may to ensure that everyone under 50 is vaccinated by mid—july. it is he confident that the supply issues
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will be fixed by may and is there any prospect of doing more than 3.5 millionjabs a week any prospect of doing more than 3.5 million jabs a week from may? for example, we are today from adam finn example, we are today from adam firm of the jcvi that infection example, we are today from adam firm of thejcvi that infection rates may rise as a result of the delays. does he anticipate that any stages in the road map easing out of lockdown, any of those dates will be pushed back, given that we are quite rightly judging that road map by data, not dates? can i also on behalf of the official opposition, madam deputy speaker, take this opportunity to support the astrazeneca vaccine. where people are worried and have concerns, those worries and concerns must be addressed and not dismissed, but this is a concern at the moment and yesterday i was told that hundreds of people failed to show for appointments at the excel centre and we think that's because of concerns and misinformation circulating online and there are parts of the country where infection
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rates remain relatively high and vaccination rates relatively low, i've seen it on my own constituency, so will he pull together a cross—party task force of community and local leaders to look at tackling these vaccine hesitancy issues? i offer again to work with him on that across party. children make up around 21% of the population so that is a large segment of the population who will be lacking immunity. obviously research and trials are ongoing but does he have a timeline for when he hopes to vaccinate children? does he anticipate being able to vaccinate children this autumn, as anthony faucihas children this autumn, as anthony fauci has suggested might happen in the us? because as the vaccination rolls out, the virus continues to circulate, and new vaccine evading variants could emerge and we might need boosterjabs in the autumn and winter will be challenging. driving up winter will be challenging. driving
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up vaccinations across the whole of the population is so important. on those budget allocations for the next six months, i welcome extra funding, of course. can he guarantee the nhs will continue to get additionalfunding the nhs will continue to get additional funding after the six months if needed for covid care? people how waiting longerfor treatment, over300,000 people how waiting longerfor treatment, over 300,000 people waiting longer than a year, risking permanent disability and loss of livelihood, thousands waiting too long for cancer treatment, risking loss of life, but we shouldn't have to choose between cancer care and covid care. we also facing a mental health epidemic as a consequence of this crisis, but crucially, when we entered this pandemic, because of years of underfunding, bed cuts and understaffing, we have growing waiting lists. we were missing cancer targets, so can he tell us when he expects to bring down these waiting lists and meet the various cancer targets again? finally,
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waiting lists and meet the various cancertargets again? finally, he didn't mention nhs pay today. he claps nhs workers, he claps nurses, but he is introducing a real term pay cut for our nhs staff. can you tell us whether he will implement any recommendations of the independent pay review body and if they recommend an increase above 1%, can he insurers the funding will be additional to what he has announced today? but in truth, madam deputy speaker, if he wants to value nhs staff he should withdraw this pay cut now. ,, . ., , ., ,, ., staff he should withdraw this pay i cut now._ thank cut now. secretary of state. thank ou ve cut now. secretary of state. thank you very much. — cut now. secretary of state. thank you very much, madam _ cut now. secretary of state. thank you very much, madam deputy - cut now. secretary of state. thank - you very much, madam deputy speaker. i welcome the gent—mac's support for the vaccine roll—out and the clinically led approach that we have taken in this country —— the right honourable gentleman. i mean that is more than a polite gesture. i think
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it is vital and important in this country that we have such a cross—party consensus. we should have all parties represented in this house behind the vaccine programme and behind the science, and the science means, of course, that we shoot and we do publish any side effects and we are open and transparent about that, but we also make an assessment as to the benefits and how those benefits weigh against side effects, and it's absolutely clear from the data that we've seen so far that the vaccines are both safe and they make you safer than not getting vaccinated, and that is an absolutely critical fact, and the mhra will be setting out more details shortly, probably for the independent regulator for the —— to set out those details. he asked about supplies from moderna. we expect supplies from moderna in
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the coming weeks and i'm very grateful to moderna for the work that they have done. of course, we've always been cautious about setting out future supply details, and the experience of the last 24 hours makes me even clearer that it is far better for us to set out clear commitments to the public in terms of when people can be vaccinated, which means all over 50s now can come forward and we are committed to and on target to offer to all over 50s and groups one to nine by the 15th of april. but we know that supply figures move up and down, and we've seen that throughout the roll—out, and that is part of the roll—out, and that is part of the normal management of this roll—out. the commitment i can give him is that those who are coming forward for seconds doses, those appointments will not be delayed because of these supply issues and
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also appointments that are already made will not be cancelled because of supply issues. therefore, to anybody, any member of the public watching, what i would say very clearly is that the vaccination programme is on track to meet the targets we set out. if you get the call from the nhs, whether you get it through a letter, text or telephone call or even these days an e—mail, take up the offer and get the jab. he asks rightly about the road map and we are on track for the dates in the road map and there is no impact on the road map from the changes to vaccine supply that we've been detailing in the last 24 hours. he asks about the vaccination of children and the autumn vaccination programme. neither of these are certain. the vaccination of certain is currently being assessed in a
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number of different clinical trials and it's very important that we consider the results of those before making any decision. it is likely that we will need a vaccination booster programme in the autumn, not least to deal with new variants, but thatis, least to deal with new variants, but that is, again, not yet certain. finally, i'm very glad that he welcomed the extra funding that we are putting into the nhs. he asked whether six months there will be more funding if needed for covid purposes. the chancellor has been absolutely clear from the start of this crisis that the nhs will get what it needs to deal with covid which is very important, as is the work to restart the nhs where it has had to be paused and worked at the nhs colleagues will be doing to recover the backlog of elective work and make sure that everybody can get their appointments and their operations in a timely way on the nhs once more. that is the work of
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the months ahead and i look forward to supporting nhs colleagues in delivering on each. we to supporting nhs colleagues in delivering on each.— to supporting nhs colleagues in delivering on each. we now go to the chair of the — delivering on each. we now go to the chair of the health _ delivering on each. we now go to the chair of the health select _ chair of the health select committee, jeremy hunt. was the health secretary _ committee, jeremy hunt. was the health secretary is _ committee, jeremy hunt. was the health secretary is concerned - committee, jeremy hunt. was the health secretary is concerned as l committee, jeremy hunt. was the health secretary is concerned as i | health secretary is concerned as i was by— health secretary is concerned as i was by comments _ health secretary is concerned as i was by comments by _ health secretary is concerned as i was by comments by former- health secretary is concerned as ll was by comments by former prime minister_ was by comments by former prime minister on — was by comments by former prime minister on the _ was by comments by former prime minister on the today— was by comments by former prime minister on the today programmel was by comments by former prime - minister on the today programme this morning _ minister on the today programme this morning about — minister on the today programme this morning about the _ minister on the today programme this morning about the threat _ minister on the today programme this morning about the threat to _ minister on the today programme this morning about the threat to block- morning about the threat to block exports _ morning about the threat to block exports to — morning about the threat to block exports to countries? _ morning about the threat to block exports to countries? he - morning about the threat to block exports to countries? he said - morning about the threat to block| exports to countries? he said that was a _ exports to countries? he said that was a reality— exports to countries? he said that was a reality in _ exports to countries? he said that was a reality in respect _ exports to countries? he said that was a reality in respect of- was a reality in respect of contracts— was a reality in respect of contracts it _ was a reality in respect of contracts it might- was a reality in respect ofi contracts it might breach. was a reality in respect of- contracts it might breach. does he not agree — contracts it might breach. does he not agree it — contracts it might breach. does he not agree it is _ contracts it might breach. does he not agree it is dangerous- contracts it might breach. does he not agree it is dangerous to - contracts it might breach. does he not agree it is dangerous to block| not agree it is dangerous to block vaccines— not agree it is dangerous to block vaccines as — not agree it is dangerous to block vaccines as well— not agree it is dangerous to block vaccines as well as _ not agree it is dangerous to block vaccines as well as casting - vaccines as well as casting aspersions _ vaccines as well as casting aspersions on _ vaccines as well as casting aspersions on their- vaccines as well as casting i aspersions on their safety? vaccines as well as casting - aspersions on their safety? at the moment— aspersions on their safety? at the moment especially— aspersions on their safety? at the moment especially when - aspersions on their safety? at the moment especially when vaccines | aspersions on their safety? at the . moment especially when vaccines are the only— moment especially when vaccines are the only way— moment especially when vaccines are the only way that _ moment especially when vaccines are the only way that vaccines _ moment especially when vaccines are the only way that vaccines are - moment especially when vaccines are the only way that vaccines are the - the only way that vaccines are the only way— the only way that vaccines are the only way to — the only way that vaccines are the only way to get _ the only way that vaccines are the only way to get out _ the only way that vaccines are the only way to get out of _ the only way that vaccines are the only way to get out of covid. - the only way that vaccines are the
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only way to get out of covid. [- only way to get out of covid. agree, i think it is vital that only way to get out of covid]. agree, i think it is vital that we all work together. these supply chains for the manufacture of these vaccines cross borders. they are often global supply chains and it is vital that we work together to deliver them. there is a need for that cooperation and there is, of course, a need for all countries to respect contract law. that is the basis for international trade and i'm sure that the european union will live up to the commitments and statements that it has made including ursula von der leyen her said who has said there should not be restrictions on companies when they are fulfilling contractual responsibilities. we fully expect those contracts to be delivered on because there are very significant consequences to breaking contract law. there is one further point,
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which is that the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine was developed because of uk taxpayers putting the funding in to the science, to the development, to the science, to the development, to the clinical trials and because of astrazeneca, with an incredibly bold and generous decision, which we fully support, but was their decision, to offer this vaccine around the world at cost. working with institutes like in india, oxford and astrazeneca are providing a vaccine for the whole world. they are not taking a profit from it. we are not taking a profit from it. we are very proud of that fact and that makes this materially different to other vaccines which have been developed for commercial advantage. i'm not against that at all, but let's celebrate what astrazeneca have done and it only underlines how important it is for everybody to work together in order to keep their
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populations safe. hate work together in order to keep their populations safe.— populations safe. we now go to the snp spokesperson _ populations safe. we now go to the snp spokesperson martyn - populations safe. we now go to the snp spokesperson martyn day. - populations safe. we now go to the snp spokesperson martyn day. i'm| snp spokesperson martyn day. ["m .rateful snp spokesperson martyn day. i'm grateful to the secretary of state for advance — grateful to the secretary of state for advance sight _ grateful to the secretary of state for advance sight of _ grateful to the secretary of state for advance sight of his- grateful to the secretary of state i for advance sight of his statement and any— for advance sight of his statement and any additional— for advance sight of his statement and any additional funding - for advance sight of his statement and any additional funding for- and any additional funding for health— and any additional funding for health is— and any additional funding for health is always _ and any additional funding for health is always welcome, . and any additional funding for- health is always welcome, especially during _ health is always welcome, especially during this _ health is always welcome, especially during this pandemic, _ health is always welcome, especially during this pandemic, but— health is always welcome, especially during this pandemic, but we - health is always welcome, especially during this pandemic, but we must. during this pandemic, but we must ensure _ during this pandemic, but we must ensure it _ during this pandemic, but we must ensure it delivers _ during this pandemic, but we must ensure it delivers results. - during this pandemic, but we must ensure it delivers results. public. ensure it delivers results. public accounts— ensure it delivers results. public accounts committee _ ensure it delivers results. public accounts committee report - ensure it delivers results. public accounts committee report hasi ensure it delivers results. public- accounts committee report has found that 22 _ accounts committee report has found that 22 billion — accounts committee report has found that 22 billion uk _ accounts committee report has found that 22 billion uk government's - accounts committee report has found that 22 billion uk government's test i that 22 billion uk government's test and trace _ that 22 billion uk government's test and trace system _ that 22 billion uk government's test and trace system has— that 22 billion uk government's test and trace system has had _ that 22 billion uk government's test and trace system has had no- that 22 billion uk government's test and trace system has had no clear. and trace system has had no clear impact _ and trace system has had no clear impact on — and trace system has had no clear impact on coronavirus _ and trace system has had no clear impact on coronavirus rates - and trace system has had no clear impact on coronavirus rates in- impact on coronavirus rates in england _ impact on coronavirus rates in england will— impact on coronavirus rates in england. will the _ impact on coronavirus rates in england. will the minister- impact on coronavirus rates in. england. will the minister accept that nhs— england. will the minister accept that nhs lead _ england. will the minister accept that nhs lead track— england. will the minister accept that nhs lead track and - england. will the minister accept that nhs lead track and trace - england. will the minister acceptl that nhs lead track and trace was the correct — that nhs lead track and trace was the correct option, _ that nhs lead track and trace was the correct option, not— that nhs lead track and trace was the correct option, not privatisingi the correct option, not privatising public— the correct option, not privatising public health? _ the correct option, not privatising public health? can _ the correct option, not privatising public health? can the _ the correct option, not privatising public health? can the minister. the correct option, not privatising i public health? can the minister tell us if he _ public health? can the minister tell us if he believes— public health? can the minister tell us if he believes that _ public health? can the minister tell us if he believes that the _ public health? can the minister tell us if he believes that the reasons l us if he believes that the reasons the track— us if he believes that the reasons the track and _ us if he believes that the reasons the track and trace _ us if he believes that the reasons the track and trace did _ us if he believes that the reasons the track and trace did not - us if he believes that the reasons the track and trace did not have i us if he believes that the reasonsi the track and trace did not have a clear— the track and trace did not have a clear impact _ the track and trace did not have a clear impact was _ the track and trace did not have a clear impact was due _ the track and trace did not have a clear impact was due to - the track and trace did not have a clear impact was due to the - the track and trace did not have a i clear impact was due to the feelings of the _ clear impact was due to the feelings of the system — clear impact was due to the feelings of the system or— clear impact was due to the feelings of the system or was _ clear impact was due to the feelings of the system or was it _ clear impact was due to the feelings of the system or was it because - clear impact was due to the feelings of the system or was it because the| of the system or was it because the uk's pitiful— of the system or was it because the uk's pitiful statutory— of the system or was it because the uk's pitiful statutory sick— of the system or was it because the uk's pitiful statutory sick pay- of the system or was it because the uk's pitiful statutory sick pay is - uk's pitiful statutory sick pay is not sufficient _ uk's pitiful statutory sick pay is not sufficient to _ uk's pitiful statutory sick pay is
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not sufficient to support - uk's pitiful statutory sick pay is not sufficient to support those i uk's pitiful statutory sick pay is i not sufficient to support those and save lives? — not sufficient to support those and save lives? l— not sufficient to support those and save lives? ~ , ., , not sufficient to support those and save lives?— save lives? i think people across scotland listening _ save lives? i think people across scotland listening to _ save lives? i think people across scotland listening to that - save lives? i think people across scotland listening to that will - scotland listening to that will recognise that political point scoring is the opposite of what is needed right now and what instead the uk government is delivering for people across scotland is the benefits of this united kingdom working together. instead of making arguments for constitutional meddling and separation, we are delivering for people, we are delivering for people, we are delivering vaccines into arms, we are delivering a testing system that works for people across the whole of the united kingdom, and crucially we are also delivering that enormous economic support package to businesses and individuals alike. all of this is only possible because of our great united kingdom and i'm glad that the people of scotland increasingly recognise that. i
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welcome my right honourable friend's statement _ welcome my right honourable friend's statement and — welcome my right honourable friend's statement and pay— welcome my right honourable friend's statement and pay tribute _ welcome my right honourable friend's statement and pay tribute to - welcome my right honourable friend's statement and pay tribute to him - welcome my right honourable friend's statement and pay tribute to him for. statement and pay tribute to him for the vaccine — statement and pay tribute to him for the vaccine programme _ statement and pay tribute to him for the vaccine programme along - statement and pay tribute to him for the vaccine programme along with l the vaccine programme along with everyone — the vaccine programme along with everyone else _ the vaccine programme along with everyone else in _ the vaccine programme along with everyone else in the _ the vaccine programme along with everyone else in the nhs. - the vaccine programme along with everyone else in the nhs. can - the vaccine programme along with everyone else in the nhs. can i i the vaccine programme along withi everyone else in the nhs. can i ask my right _ everyone else in the nhs. can i ask my right honourable _ everyone else in the nhs. can i ask my right honourable friend, - everyone else in the nhs. can i ask my right honourable friend, given l my right honourable friend, given the £200 — my right honourable friend, given the £200 million _ my right honourable friend, given the £200 million already- my right honourable friend, given the £200 million already spent i my right honourable friend, given| the £200 million already spent on the £200 million already spent on the move — the £200 million already spent on the move of— the £200 million already spent on the move of public— the £200 million already spent on the move of public health - the £200 million already spent on| the move of public health england the £200 million already spent on i the move of public health england to hartow— the move of public health england to harlow first _ the move of public health england to harlow first announced _ the move of public health england to harlow first announced by _ the move of public health england to harlow first announced by the - harlow first announced by the government— harlow first announced by the government in— harlow first announced by the government in 2015— harlow first announced by the government in 2015 and - harlow first announced by the government in 2015 and the l government in 2015 and the additional— government in 2015 and the additional £120 _ government in 2015 and the additional £120 million - government in 2015 and the| additional £120 million given government in 2015 and the - additional £120 million given this year to— additional £120 million given this year to facilitate _ additional £120 million given this year to facilitate the _ additional £120 million given this year to facilitate the move, - additional £120 million given this year to facilitate the move, can i additional £120 million given this . year to facilitate the move, can my i’i l ht year to facilitate the move, can my right honourable _ year to facilitate the move, can my right honourable friend _ year to facilitate the move, can my right honourable friend set - year to facilitate the move, can my right honourable friend set out - year to facilitate the move, can my right honourable friend set out the| right honourable friend set out the progress _ right honourable friend set out the progress and — right honourable friend set out the progress and timings _ right honourable friend set out the progress and timings of— right honourable friend set out the progress and timings of public - progress and timings of public health — progress and timings of public health england _ progress and timings of public health england or— progress and timings of public health england or its - progress and timings of publicl health england or its successor body? — health england or its successor body? the _ health england or its successor body? the move _ health england or its successor body? the move to _ health england or its successor body? the move to harlow- health england or its successor body? the move to harlow andi health england or its successor- body? the move to harlow and the next step. — body? the move to harlow and the next step. the _ body? the move to harlow and the next step, the completion- body? the move to harlow and the next step, the completion of- body? the move to harlow and the next step, the completion of the l next step, the completion of the hartow— next step, the completion of the harlow campus, _ next step, the completion of the harlow campus, as _ next step, the completion of the harlow campus, as part - next step, the completion of the harlow campus, as part of- next step, the completion of the harlow campus, as part of the l harlow campus, as part of the country's _ harlow campus, as part of the country's programme - harlow campus, as part of the country's programme to - harlow campus, as part of the - country's programme to modernise our public— country's programme to modernise our public health — country's programme to modernise our public health science. _ country's programme to modernise our public health science. i— country's programme to modernise our public health science.— public health science. i want to reiterate there _ public health science. i want to reiterate there is _ public health science. i want to reiterate there is a _ public health science. i want to reiterate there is a dress - public health science. i want to reiterate there is a dress code | public health science. i want to i reiterate there is a dress code for when _ reiterate there is a dress code for when people are participating by video— when people are participating by video link. we expect them to be dressed — video link. we expect them to be dressed in — video link. we expect them to be dressed in the same way as if they were _ dressed in the same way as if they were in— dressed in the same way as if they were in the — dressed in the same way as if they were in the chamber, with a jacket.
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i think— were in the chamber, with a jacket. i think my— were in the chamber, with a jacket. i think my friend would wear that tie if he was in the chamber as well! he makes a very important point about the future of investment in public health, he's a great champion for harlow. he and i have spoken about the harlow project many times. as he knows, we are reforming the way that we deliver public health to make sure that the delivery of health security, especially against contagious diseases, gets its own special focus as well as the vital work of health improvement to improve public health amongst non—contagious diseases like tackling obesity. the harlow project is something that has been worked on for some time. i look forward to working with him on the next steps of that programme. the
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working with him on the next steps of that programme.— working with him on the next steps of that programme. the secretary of state rightly — of that programme. the secretary of state rightly paid _ of that programme. the secretary of state rightly paid tribute _ of that programme. the secretary of state rightly paid tribute to - of that programme. the secretary of state rightly paid tribute to the - state rightly paid tribute to the service — state rightly paid tribute to the service and _ state rightly paid tribute to the service and sacrifice _ state rightly paid tribute to the service and sacrifice of - state rightly paid tribute to the service and sacrifice of nhs - state rightly paid tribute to the i service and sacrifice of nhs staff over the — service and sacrifice of nhs staff over the past— service and sacrifice of nhs staff over the past year. _ service and sacrifice of nhs staff over the past year. several- over the past year. several honourable _ over the past year. several honourable members - over the past year. several honourable members from over the past year. several. honourable members from his over the past year. several- honourable members from his own ventures _ honourable members from his own ventures joined _ honourable members from his own venturesjoined me _ honourable members from his own venturesjoined me in— honourable members from his own venturesjoined me in speaking - honourable members from his own venturesjoined me in speaking to. venturesjoined me in speaking to nurses— venturesjoined me in speaking to nurses and — venturesjoined me in speaking to nurses and representatives - venturesjoined me in speaking to nurses and representatives from i nurses and representatives from across _ nurses and representatives from across southwest _ nurses and representatives from across southwest london - nurses and representatives from across southwest london last. nurses and representatives from - across southwest london last week. the message — across southwest london last week. the message to _ across southwest london last week. the message to us _ across southwest london last week. the message to us was _ across southwest london last week. the message to us was clear, - across southwest london last week. the message to us was clear, theyi the message to us was clear, they are traumatised _ the message to us was clear, they are traumatised and _ the message to us was clear, they are traumatised and exhausted - the message to us was clear, they i are traumatised and exhausted after treating _ are traumatised and exhausted after treating thousands— are traumatised and exhausted after treating thousands of— are traumatised and exhausted after treating thousands of severely- are traumatised and exhausted after treating thousands of severely ill - treating thousands of severely ill covid _ treating thousands of severely ill covid patients— treating thousands of severely ill covid patients and _ treating thousands of severely ill covid patients and they - treating thousands of severely ill covid patients and they are - treating thousands of severely ill i covid patients and they are insulted by the _ covid patients and they are insulted by the proposed _ covid patients and they are insulted by the proposed 1%_ covid patients and they are insulted by the proposed 1% pay— covid patients and they are insulted by the proposed 1% pay rise, - covid patients and they are insulted by the proposed 1% pay rise, so - covid patients and they are insulted by the proposed 1% pay rise, so will he follow _ by the proposed 1% pay rise, so will he follow the — by the proposed 1% pay rise, so will he follow the example _ by the proposed 1% pay rise, so will he follow the example of— by the proposed 1% pay rise, so will he follow the example of the - by the proposed 1% pay rise, so will he follow the example of the welshi he follow the example of the welsh government — he follow the example of the welsh government and _ he follow the example of the welsh government and offer— he follow the example of the welsh government and offer nhs - he follow the example of the welsh government and offer nhs workers| he follow the example of the welsh - government and offer nhs workers are £500 tax-free — government and offer nhs workers are £500 tax—free bonus _ government and offer nhs workers are £500 tax—free bonus as _ government and offer nhs workers are £500 tax—free bonus as well— government and offer nhs workers are £500 tax—free bonus as well as - government and offer nhs workers are £500 tax—free bonus as well as a - £500 tax—free bonus as well as a real terms— £500 tax—free bonus as well as a real terms pay— £500 tax—free bonus as well as a real terms pay increase? - £500 tax—free bonus as well as a real terms pay increase? is - £500 tax-free bonus as well as a real terms pay increase?- real terms pay increase? as the honourable _ real terms pay increase? as the honourable lady _ real terms pay increase? as the honourable lady knows, - real terms pay increase? as the honourable lady knows, we - real terms pay increase? as the honourable lady knows, we are | real terms pay increase? as the i honourable lady knows, we are in real terms pay increase? as the . honourable lady knows, we are in a difficult economic situation due to the pandemic and around 700,000 people have lost theirjobs. as a result, we've implemented a public sector pay freeze across the public sector pay freeze across the public sector for all but the lowest paid
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workers and nhs staff. as she knows, the independent pay review body is looking at this point but i bow to no one in my admiration, like her, for the work of staff across the nhs who have worked incredibly hard and have done a huge amount in order to help people through this pandemic, and she's absolutely right that we must support them, especially in getting r&r after this latest peak because we also have work ahead of us to make sure we can deal with the consequences of covid including the backlogs that i announced of financial support to crack through today. financial support to crack through toda . ., ., ~ , today. can i thank my right honourable _ today. can i thank my right honourable friend - today. can i thank my right honourable friend for - today. can i thank my right honourable friend for his i today. can i thank my right - honourable friend for his statement. roll-out _ honourable friend for his statement. roll-out of— honourable friend for his statement. roll-out of the — honourable friend for his statement. roll—out of the vaccine _ honourable friend for his statement. roll—out of the vaccine been - honourable friend for his statement. roll—out of the vaccine been truly. roll—out of the vaccine been truly impressive — roll—out of the vaccine been truly impressive and _ roll—out of the vaccine been truly impressive and has _ roll—out of the vaccine been truly impressive and has led _ roll—out of the vaccine been truly impressive and has led to- roll—out of the vaccine been truly- impressive and has led to heightened expectations — impressive and has led to heightened expectations i— impressive and has led to heightened expectations. i recognise _ impressive and has led to heightened expectations. i recognise the - impressive and has led to heightened expectations. i recognise the supply. expectations. i recognise the supply letter— expectations. i recognise the supply letter from — expectations. i recognise the supply letter from nhs _ expectations. i recognise the supply letter from nhs england _ expectations. i recognise the supply letter from nhs england to - expectations. i recognise the supply
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letter from nhs england to the - letter from nhs england to the system — letter from nhs england to the system was _ letter from nhs england to the system was not _ letter from nhs england to the system was not actually - letter from nhs england to the . system was not actually unusual. does _ system was not actually unusual. does my— system was not actually unusual. does my right _ system was not actually unusual. does my right honourable - system was not actually unusual. does my right honourable friend i system was not actually unusual. | does my right honourable friend i agree _ does my right honourable friend i agree there — does my right honourable friend i agree there is _ does my right honourable friend i agree there is a _ does my right honourable friend i agree there is a possibility- does my right honourable friend i agree there is a possibility that l agree there is a possibility that the legally_ agree there is a possibility that the legally appropriate - agree there is a possibility that the legally appropriate phrase i agree there is a possibility that l the legally appropriate phrase for the legally appropriate phrase for the current— the legally appropriate phrase for the current supply _ the legally appropriate phrase for the current supply fluctuation - the legally appropriate phrase for. the current supply fluctuation might be expected — the current supply fluctuation might be expected level, _ the current supply fluctuation might be expected level, rather— the current supply fluctuation might be expected level, rather than - be expected level, rather than constrain. _ be expected level, rather than constrain, and _ be expected level, rather than constrain, and carry— be expected level, rather than constrain, and carry asking - be expected level, rather than constrain, and carry asking to| be expected level, rather than - constrain, and carry asking to allay the fears— constrain, and carry asking to allay the fears of— constrain, and carry asking to allay the fears of the _ constrain, and carry asking to allay the fears of the people _ constrain, and carry asking to allay the fears of the people of - constrain, and carry asking to allay . the fears of the people of wimbledon and the _ the fears of the people of wimbledon and the uk _ the fears of the people of wimbledon and the uk who— the fears of the people of wimbledon and the uk who think _ the fears of the people of wimbledon and the uk who think he _ the fears of the people of wimbledon and the uk who think he expect - and the uk who think he expect supply— and the uk who think he expect supply levels _ and the uk who think he expect supply levels to _ and the uk who think he expect supply levels to be _ and the uk who think he expect supply levels to be in _ and the uk who think he expect supply levels to be in line - and the uk who think he expect supply levels to be in line withi supply levels to be in line with expectation _ supply levels to be in line with expectation of— supply levels to be in line with expectation of the _ supply levels to be in line with expectation of the next - supply levels to be in line with expectation of the next few. supply levels to be in line with - expectation of the next few months and that— expectation of the next few months and that no— expectation of the next few months and that no target _ expectation of the next few months and that no target dates _ expectation of the next few months and that no target dates for - and that no target dates for vaccinations— and that no target dates for vaccinations will— and that no target dates for vaccinations will be - and that no target dates fori vaccinations will be missed? and that no target dates for . vaccinations will be missed? i and that no target dates for - vaccinations will be missed? i can absolutely give — vaccinations will be missed? i can absolutely give that _ vaccinations will be missed? absolutely give that assurance vaccinations will be missed?m absolutely give that assurance and he's quite right and he brings his experience as an incredibly impressive health minister to bear. it is absolutely standard to tell the system what our future expectations are, but they are expectations are, but they are expectations and we are always clear that supply is lumpy. we have set out clear commitments to the public and those commitments which come eitherfrom myself and those commitments which come either from myself or from the prime minister are the ones that we will meet and we of course manage this enormous programme in order to deliver them as best we can. flan
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enormous programme in order to deliver them as best we can. can i also thank — deliver them as best we can. can i also thank the _ deliver them as best we can. can i also thank the secretary _ deliver them as best we can. can i also thank the secretary of - deliver them as best we can. can i also thank the secretary of state for his— also thank the secretary of state for his continued _ also thank the secretary of state for his continued updates. - also thank the secretary of state for his continued updates. as - also thank the secretary of state for his continued updates. as a i also thank the secretary of state i for his continued updates. as a type two diabetic— for his continued updates. as a type two diabetic lost— for his continued updates. as a type two diabetic lost four— for his continued updates. as a type two diabetic lost four stone - for his continued updates. as a type two diabetic lost four stone in - two diabetic lost four stone in weight— two diabetic lost four stone in weight when— two diabetic lost four stone in weight when i— two diabetic lost four stone in weight when i was— two diabetic lost four stone in weight when i was diagnosedl two diabetic lost four stone in i weight when i was diagnosed 13 two diabetic lost four stone in - weight when i was diagnosed 13 years a-o, weight when i was diagnosed 13 years ago. we _ weight when i was diagnosed 13 years ago. we come — weight when i was diagnosed 13 years ago. we come to _ weight when i was diagnosed 13 years ago, i've come to understand... - studio: let's leave the house of commons. wejust heard studio: let's leave the house of commons. we just heard from the health secretary matt hancock that they are still on track with the aduu they are still on track with the adult vaccination programme despite the delay in supplies from india and he did confirm that no second dose appointments will be cancelled. jane hill will be with you in a moment, but first it's time for the weather forecast. hello. there's very little happening on the weather front across the uk in the coming days. it's going to essentially stay more or less the same from day today. there will be a little bit of sunshine developing, but on the whole, pretty cloudy. on the satellite picture, you can see where the
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clouds are coming from. they are drifting in from the norwegian sea, riding around this area of high pressure which is to the west, southwest of ireland and this is where the high pressure is more or less going to stay over the next few days. you can see the air currents, the wind blowing around the higher, hence the cloud is coming in from the north, but it tends to break up in a few areas. but in other areas, it is thick enough to produce rain. we've had rain in the last day or so. there could be more damp weather anywhere from eastern of england, through the east midlands and into the southeast as well, but frost—free for most of us, perhaps a touch of frost where the sky is clear in the coming days. notice tomorrow there is a very definitive edge between drier, sunnier weather coming in out of the continent and the stickier cloud across the rest of the country. the thinking is from hull to london and southampton there will be sunshine developing on friday afternoon, somewhat drier air heading our way, evaporating the clouds. the high pressure still with us on saturday, which is the first day
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of astronomical spring, the vernal equinox, so we well and truly are into spring, but the weather isn't changing much. we'll see the wind still blowing out of north across scotland, perhaps a spot of rain for stornoway. for the rest of the country, it's a case of variable amounts of cloud and this high pressure is still with us through the weekend into next week. the jet stream is way to the north of us, sending the unsettled weather in the direction of iceland and also around the mediterranean, but we are closer to that high. so little change and take a look at this outlook for the next few days. the weather icons indicating clouds are variable amounts of cloud, very difficult to indicate on a symbol, with temperatures hovering between 11—13 celsius. the weather will change, but not until later next week. that's it from me. bye— bye.
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jab by the end ofjuly. matt hancock says vaccination targets will still be met for the nine priority groups, despite a drop in vaccine supply in april. there will be no weeks in april with no first doses. there will be no cancelled appointments as a result of supply issues. second doses will go ahead as planned. matt hancock has just been speaking in the commons. we'll have the very latest from our medical editor. also this lunchtime... the european medicines agency prepares to deliver its decision about the safety of the astrazeneca jab, after many eu countries paused its roll—out. the care regulator says hundreds of patients had "do not resuscitate" notices put on them the start of the pandemic without their knowledge.

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