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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 14, 2021 4:00am-4:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: the metropolitan police has responded to criticism of how it handled an unauthorised vigilfor sarah everard in london. we absolutely did not want to be in a position where enforcement action was necessary. but we were placed in this position because of the overriding need to protect people's safety. exactly a year since a young black woman, breonna taylor, was shot dead by police officers — us investigators say they've made significant progress in their probe into the killing. her boyfriend says he needs justice. breonna taylor was murdered so i mean, somebody�*s responsible was up you know. so the only
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question i have now is, you know, what's next? bolivia's former acting presidentjeanine anez has been arrested on terrorism and sedition charges, over an alleged coup against her political rival. russian police break up an opposition conference in moscow and detain 200 people, including high—profile figures. and, the voice of formula 1, murray walker, has died, at the age of 97. police in london have been heavily criticised for breaking up an unauthorised vigil for a woman who was allegedly
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kidnapped and murdered by a police officer. sarah everard's death has become the focus of widespread anger in the uk about male violence against women. groups of women gathered on clapham common in south london, near to where sarah everard was last seen. they held the memorial, despite the official cancellation of the event because of coronavirus rules. the police said the gathering breached restrictions. images on social media show the police forcibly removing people and pinning a woman to the ground. four arrests have been made. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, said the scenes were unacceptable. helena wilkinson reports. not far from where sarah everard went missing 11 days ago, a visible outpouring of grief. hundreds gathered at the bandstand to remember the 33—year—old. they came, they stood in silence and comforted
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each other and they left flowers for sarah, for herfamily. i feel really sad for the family so i just want to tell them that in this time where we can't meet each other and hug each other, the community is behind them. i wanted to be here to stand in solidarity with all women. it'sjust really upset me, what's happened. the vigil here tonight had been cancelled, police had told people not to turn up because of the current lockdown, but many still did. tonight, as some tensions escalated, police called on all those there to go home, saying that the gathering was unsafe. these scenes adding to what has been an already extremely difficult week. it would have been a lot safer if we had the 50 stewards that we had trained and ready to go to keep the crowds silent and distanced. we told the met it was going to be worse if we didn't have the organisation that we already had planned that was covid safe.
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earlier, met police officer pc wayne couzens, believed to be in this police van, was brought before westminster magistrates�* court. the 48—year—old joined the force two years ago. today, he appeared in the dock, charges of kidnap and murder were formally put to him. he will next appear at the old bailey on tuesday. it's 11 days since sarah everard disappeared in south london. her body was found here in woodland, near ashford in kent, inside a builder's bag and identified through her dental records. extensive searches are continuing close to where she was found. 30 miles away, the police officer's house in deal, in kent, is also a focus. and an old garage, in dover, where he used to work is being searched. as the searches continue, tributes were paid in towns and cities up and down the country, reigniting a national conversation about women's safety. it's become a political issue.
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the government is seeking further views on how to tackle violence against women and girls. certainly the messages i've been having from women have been really powerful and important. the message i'm giving back to government is do something, do something meaningful, or my committee will be holding your feet to the fire over why not. for sarah everard's family, they are dealing with the unimaginable. they'll be wanting answers as to what happened to sarah, who they said was bright and beautiful and a shining example. the metropolitan police have now issued a response. they accept that the actions of their officers have been questioned, but say the only responsible thing for them to do at the vigil was to act to ensure public safety. this from assistant commissioner, helen ball. hundred �*s of people were tightly packed together, posing a very real risk of
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transmitting covid—19. a very real risk of transmitting (avid-19. police must act for people's safety. this is the only responsible thing to do. the pandemic is not over and gatherings of hundreds of people from right across london and beyond are still not safe. those who gathered were spoken to by officers on a number of occasions, and over an extended period of time. we repeatedly encourage those who were there to comply with the law and leave. regrettably, a small minority of people began chanting at officers, pushing and throwing items. after speaking with officers, the vast majority of people did quickly leave. four arrests have been made was up for public order offences and breaches of the health protection regulations. part of the reason i'm speaking to you tonight because we accept that the actions of our officers have been questioned. we absolutely did not want to be in a position where enforcement action was necessary. we were
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placed in this position because of the overriding need to protect people's safety. let's hear a little more from jamie klingler — one of the organisers of the vigil — who also founded the �*reclaim the streets' movement. we went to high court yesterday and police won't allow to blanket say that protests weren't allowed but they didn't give us the parameters for us to do it safely, legally and within covert standards was not we met for two hours last night and didn't get anywhere, saying if you do with 30 people, you are allowed to do it was up we had been given nothing. so that we could be fined and all of the women that had been doing individual satellite vigils could be fined, so we took the decision that we would rather that money go to women's charities. we pivoted online and were going to do a crowd fun for £320,000 which is what we would have had to pay in
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fines. we are very sad not to get together but we think it is a human right to protest but because we can't do it without it was better to keep it about sarah and all of the women and violence against women and reclaiming our streets. doorsteps of candles or a moment of silence online that we will try later to really refocus it on women rather than our disagreement with the met police. let's go to the us now and the latest on the case of breonna taylor — exactly a year on. federal investigators say they've made significant progress in their probe into the killing the young black woman, shot in her home by police officers. police forced their way into her apartment during a botched drug raid. they used a so—called �*no—knock�* arrest warrant that didn't require them to announce themselves. ms taylor's death helped spark black lives matter protests in louisville and across the country over the excessive use of force used by officers. 0ur washington correspondent larry madowo is in louisville
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and has been speaking to lonita baker, an attorney for the taylorfamily, and benjamin crump who's an attorney for the taylor family and also george floyd's family. it isa it is a controversial, no—knock warrants, they are not banned in kentucky. is going to our hopes that the legislators hear our cries and that they ban no—knock warrants. is our cries and that they ban no-knock warrants.- our cries and that they ban no-knock warrants. is not 'ust about protecting i no-knock warrants. is not 'ust about protecting us, �* no-knock warrants. is not 'ust about protecting us, the h about protecting us, the everyday civilians, but it is also — everyday civilians, but it is also to _ everyday civilians, but it is also to detect police officers little — also to detect police officers little bit is proven that these are inherently dangerous and have — are inherently dangerous and have no business being in policing _ have no business being in policing. 2? have no business being in policing-— have no business being in olicinu. ., ., policing. 27 million for the georae policing. 27 million for the george floyd _ policing. 27 million for the george floyd family, - policing. 27 million for the george floyd family, 70 l policing. 27 million for the - george floyd family, 70 million for the breonna taylor family. what other reforms necessary? the reform efforts here in louisville, _ the reform efforts here in louisville, the _ the reform efforts here in louisville, the legal- the reform efforts here in louisville, the legal team| the reform efforts here in. louisville, the legal team for breonna _ louisville, the legal team for breonna taylor. _ louisville, the legal team for breonna taylor. it _ louisville, the legal team for breonna taylor. it was - louisville, the legal team for breonna taylor. it was just . breonna taylor. it was just precedent—setting. - breonna taylor. it was just precedent—setting. it-
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breonna taylor. it was just. precedent—setting. it talked about— precedent—setting. it talked about having _ precedent—setting. it talked about having a _ precedent—setting. it talked about having a sentence - precedent—setting. it talked about having a sentence for| about having a sentence for police — about having a sentence for police to _ about having a sentence for police to deliver _ about having a sentence for police to deliver the - police to deliver the neighbourhoods - police to deliver the | neighbourhoods that police to deliver the - neighbourhoods that they police to deliver the _ neighbourhoods that they patrol so they hopefully don't shoot first and ask questions later. first and ask questions later because _ first and ask questions later because they _ first and ask questions later because they know- first and ask questions later because they know who - first and ask questions laterl because they know who their neighbours— because they know who their neighbours are. _ because they know who their neighbours are. number- because they know who theiri neighbours are. numbertwo, because they know who their. neighbours are. numbertwo, it talked _ neighbours are. numbertwo, it talked about _ neighbours are. numbertwo, it talked about having _ neighbours are. numbertwo, it talked about having social- talked about having social workers _ talked about having social workers being _ talked about having social workers being hired - talked about having social workers being hired so. talked about having social. workers being hired so when they— workers being hired so when they get— workers being hired so when they get those _ workers being hired so when they get those calls - workers being hired so when they get those calls that - workers being hired so whenl they get those calls that deal with for _ they get those calls that deal with non— criminal— they get those calls that deal with non— criminal matters, i with non— criminal matters, that— with non— criminal matters, that you _ with non— criminal matters, that you can— with non— criminal matters, that you can have _ with non— criminal matters, i that you can have somebody actually _ that you can have somebody actually come _ that you can have somebody actually come and _ that you can have somebody actually come and try- that you can have somebody actually come and try to - actually come and try to de—escalate _ actually come and try to de—escalate the - actually come and try to i de—escalate the situation versus— de—escalate the situation versus making _ de—escalate the situation versus making it- de—escalate the situation versus making it a - de—escalate the situation versus making it a life i de—escalate the situation versus making it a life or| versus making it a life or death— versus making it a life or death situation. - versus making it a life or death situation. and - versus making it a life or| death situation. and also versus making it a life or- death situation. and also the citizens— death situation. and also the citizens review, _ death situation. and also the citizens review, that- death situation. and also the citizens review, that they - death situation. and also the citizens review, that they are working _ citizens review, that they are working on. _ citizens review, that they are working on. is— citizens review, that they are working on, is something - citizens review, that they are . working on, is something other cities _ working on, is something other cities cah— working on, is something other cities can use _ working on, is something other cities can use to _ working on, is something other cities can use to monitor- cities can use to monitor themselves— cities can use to monitor themselves and - cities can use to monitor themselves and in - cities can use to monitor themselves and in fact, i cities can use to monitor- themselves and in fact, george floyd _ themselves and in fact, george floyd in— themselves and in fact, george floyd in minneapolis _ themselves and in fact, george floyd in minneapolis mirrored i themselves and in fact, george| floyd in minneapolis mirrored a lot of— floyd in minneapolis mirrored a lot of the — floyd in minneapolis mirrored a lot of the things _ floyd in minneapolis mirrored a lot of the things that _ floyd in minneapolis mirrored a lot of the things that they - floyd in minneapolis mirrored a lot of the things that they did . lot of the things that they did in breohha _ lot of the things that they did in breonna taylor. _ lot of the things that they did in breonna taylor. and - lot of the things that they did in breonna taylor. and i- in breonna taylor. and i believe _ in breonna taylor. and i believe george - in breonna taylor. and i believe george floyd i in breonna taylor. and ii believe george floyd and breohha _ believe george floyd and breonna taylor— believe george floyd and breonna taylor will- believe george floyd and - breonna taylor will be forever| linked because they were both killed — linked because they were both killed by— linked because they were both killed by the _ linked because they were both killed by the police _ linked because they were both killed by the police in- linked because they were both killed by the police in 2020, l killed by the police in 2020, at the — killed by the police in 2020, at the height _ killed by the police in 2020, at the height of— killed by the police in 2020, at the height of the - killed by the police in 2020, at the height of the covid i
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at the height of the covid pandemic— at the height of the covid pandemic where - at the height of the covid . pandemic where everything at the height of the covid - pandemic where everything has shut down— pandemic where everything has shut down in— pandemic where everything has shutdown in america _ pandemic where everything has shutdown in america except i shutdown in america except implicit _ shut down in america except implicit bias— shutdown in america except implicit bias and _ shutdown in america except implicit bias and police - implicit bias and police brutality. _ implicit bias and police brutality, and - implicit bias and police brutality, and that's i implicit bias and police i brutality, and that's why implicit bias and police - brutality, and that's why when we say — brutality, and that's why when we say his— brutality, and that's why when we say his name, _ brutality, and that's why when we say his name, george - brutality, and that's why when i we say his name, george floyd, we say his name, george floyd, we also — we say his name, george floyd, we also will— we say his name, george floyd, we also will be _ we say his name, george floyd, we also will be saying _ we say his name, george floyd, we also will be saying her- we also will be saying her name. _ we also will be saying her name, breonna _ we also will be saying her name, breonna taylor, . we also will be saying herl name, breonna taylor, for we also will be saying her- name, breonna taylor, for the rest _ name, breonna taylor, for the rest of— name, breonna taylor, for the rest of history. _ name, breonna taylor, for the rest of history.— rest of history. after the summer _ rest of history. after the summer of _ rest of history. after the summer of protests - rest of history. after the summer of protests and | rest of history. after the - summer of protests and black lives matter, do you think something has changed in america? it something has changed in america?— something has changed in america? �* . ., , america? it hasn't changed yet but i america? it hasn't changed yet but i don't _ america? it hasn't changed yet but i don't think _ america? it hasn't changed yet but i don't think the _ america? it hasn't changed yet but i don't think the protester l but i don't think the protester going — but i don't think the protester going to — but i don't think the protester going to end until we have the change — going to end until we have the change that we deserve sol going to end until we have the change that we deserve so i do think— change that we deserve so i do think the — change that we deserve so i do think the protests are working was up — think the protests are working was up i'm going to tell those that are out here in the streets to keep it up. we can't wait _ streets to keep it up. we can't wait until— streets to keep it up. we can't wait until we have another victim _ wait until we have another victim to _ wait until we have another victim to resume protests. but is what — victim to resume protests. but is what they have been, out here — is what they have been, out here through snow, rain, keep it up — here through snow, rain, keep it u. ., here through snow, rain, keep itu. .,~ ~ , here through snow, rain, keep it up. for african-americans to see this every _ it up. for african-americans to see this every day _ it up. for african-americans to see this every day in _ it up. for african-americans to see this every day in the - it up. for african-americans to see this every day in the news, every day is another case, another time was up do you feel there is an exhaustion that
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comes with it?— there is an exhaustion that comes with it? certainly i feel there is a _ comes with it? certainly i feel there is a measure _ comes with it? certainly i feel there is a measure of- there is a measure of post—traumatic- there is a measure of. post—traumatic stress, there is a measure of- post—traumatic stress, we call it racial— post—traumatic stress, we call it racial cattle _ post—traumatic stress, we call it racial cattle fatigue, - post—traumatic stress, we call it racial cattle fatigue, that. it racial cattle fatigue, that a lot — it racial cattle fatigue, that a lot of— it racial cattle fatigue, that a lot of the _ it racial cattle fatigue, that a lot of the —— _ it racial cattle fatigue, that a lot of the —— racial- it racial cattle fatigue, that a lot of the —— racial battle j a lot of the —— racial battle fatigue _ a lot of the —— racial battle fatigue a— a lot of the —— racial battle fatigue. a lot _ a lot of the —— racial battle fatigue. a lot of— a lot of the —— racial battle fatigue. a lot of the - a lot of the —— racial battle fatigue. a lot of the sociall fatigue. a lot of the social scientists— fatigue. a lot of the social scientists are _ fatigue. a lot of the social scientists are trying - scientists are trying —— starting to— scientists are trying —— starting to turn - scientists are trying —— starting to turn it. - starting to turn it. i see our brothers— starting to turn it. i see our brothers and _ starting to turn it. i see our brothers and sisters - starting to turn it. i see our brothers and sisters over. starting to turn it. i see our brothers and sisters over inj brothers and sisters over in the — brothers and sisters over in the uk, _ brothers and sisters over in the uk, we _ brothers and sisters over in the uk, we are _ brothers and sisters over in the uk, we are so- brothers and sisters over in the uk, we are so sure - brothers and sisters over inj the uk, we are so sure that brothers and sisters over in - the uk, we are so sure that we will win— the uk, we are so sure that we will win this _ the uk, we are so sure that we will win this war— the uk, we are so sure that we will win this war that _ the uk, we are so sure that we will win this war that we - the uk, we are so sure that we will win this war that we have i will win this war that we have no doubt _ will win this war that we have no doubt in _ will win this war that we have no doubt in our— will win this war that we have no doubt in our heart - will win this war that we have| no doubt in our heart because based — no doubt in our heart because based on _ no doubt in our heart because based on our— no doubt in our heart because based on our ancestors, - no doubt in our heart because based on our ancestors, what| based on our ancestors, what they— based on our ancestors, what they overcame _ based on our ancestors, what they overcame. black- based on our ancestors, what they overcame. black people | based on our ancestors, what. they overcame. black people in america — they overcame. black people in america overcame _ they overcame. black people in america overcame slavery. - they overcame. black people in america overcame slavery. we| america overcame slavery. we overcame _ america overcame slavery. we overcame the _ america overcame slavery. we overcame the reconstruction, i america overcame slavery. we . overcame the reconstruction, we overcame — overcame the reconstruction, we overcame the _ overcame the reconstruction, we overcame the decision _ overcame the reconstruction, we overcame the decision by- overcame the reconstruction, we overcame the decision by the - overcame the decision by the supreme _ overcame the decision by the supreme court— overcame the decision by the supreme court that - overcame the decision by the supreme court that said - overcame the decision by thel supreme court that said there were — supreme court that said there were no— supreme court that said there were no rights— supreme court that said there were no rights that _ supreme court that said there were no rights that a - supreme court that said there were no rights that a black- were no rights that a black person _ were no rights that a black person had _ were no rights that a black person had that _ were no rights that a black person had that a - were no rights that a black person had that a white i were no rights that a black- person had that a white person was bound _ person had that a white person was bound to _ person had that a white person was bound to respect - person had that a white person was bound to respect was - person had that a white person was bound to respect was not. person had that a white person . was bound to respect was not we overcame — was bound to respect was not we overcamejim_ was bound to respect was not we overcame jim crow. _ was bound to respect was not we overcame jim crow. we - was bound to respect was not we i overcame jim crow. we overcame jim crow's— overcame jim crow. we overcame jim crow's son, — overcame jim crow. we overcame jim crow's son, junior. _ overcame jim crow. we overcame jim crow's son, junior. and - jim crow's son, junior. and based _ jim crow's son, junior. and based on _ jim crow's son, junior. and based on those _ jim crow's son, junior. andj based on those presidents, black— based on those presidents, black people _ based on those presidents, black people in _ based on those presidents, black people in america, i. based on those presidents, - black people in america, i know that we —
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black people in america, i know that we will— black people in america, i know that we will overcome. that - that we will overcome. that is why— that we will overcome. that is why we will continue to say i why we will continue to say donatella's _ why we will continue to say donatella's life _ why we will continue to say donatella's life matters, i donatella's life matters, george _ donatella's life matters, george floyd's - donatella's life matters, george floyd's life - donatella's life matters, . george floyd's life matters donatella's life matters, - george floyd's life matters and lacquer— george floyd's life matters and lacquer lives _ george floyd's life matters and lacquer lives matter. _ george floyd's life matters and lacquer lives matter. —— - george floyd's life matters and lacquer lives matter. —— black. lacquer lives matter. —— black lives— lacquer lives matter. —— black lives matter. _ a huge car bomb in herat — western afghanistan has killed at least eight people and injured around 50 more. the united nations has condemned what it called an alarming increase in attacks deliberately targeting civilians, despite peace talks taking place between the taliban and the afghan government. anti—mining protesters in argentina's patagonia region have attacked a minibus carrying president alberto fernandez. the president was visiting an area devastated by forest fires, which have killed one person and destroyed at least 200 homes. mr fernandez had to seek refuge behind a wall as the crowd pelted his bus with stones. bitcoin has risen above $60,000 for the first time. the cryptocurrency has more than tripled in value
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since the end of last year. some analysts think the latest surge is partly down to the huge us stimulus package approved this week. the former interim president of bolivia, as well as several former ministers, have been arrested. prosecutors say they took part in a coup against the then president evo morales, almost two years ago. the bbc�*s will grant reports. it has been a precipitous fall from grace. from living in the presidential palace to being held on terrorism charges in a matter of months. former bolivian presidentjeanine anez claims the charges against her, which include terrorism, sedition and conspiracy, are nothing more than political intimidation. that her arrest had been a regular —— irregular, motivated by revenge was not her supporters agree. translation: the public
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prosecutor's offers most of the trial will not succeed which is why they make these legal tricks and carry out illegal detention without citing absolutely anything. but the wounds of — absolutely anything. but the wounds of november - absolutely anything. but the wounds of november 2019 l absolutely anything. but the l wounds of november 2019 are still raw in bolivia. the country's long—standing left—wing president evo morales stood for an unprecedented fourth term in office, despite losing a referendum to be allowed to do so. the controversial vote led to riots and he eventually resigned after the military demanded he stand down. after president moraless fed into exile, there were violent lashes between his supporters and the security forces, and now those who have backed mr moraless wantjeanine anez to answer to what happened. anez to answer to what ha ened. ~ ,, �* anez to answer to what hauened. �* ,, �* ~ anez to answer to what hauened. �* ,, �* . ., happened. translation: we are askinu happened. translation: we are askin: for happened. translation: we are asking forjustice _ happened. translation: we are asking forjustice was _ happened. translation: we are asking forjustice was not - happened. translation: we are asking forjustice was not we - asking forjustice was not we want to maximum —— maximum penalty. they have been deaths, people are injured and still
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suffering in hospitals. recently, evo morales's allies... he has been able to return to his beloved bolivia and remains a crucial political force in the andean nation. jeanine anez may claim she had nothing to do with the ousting of power of mr moraless two years ago she faces the battle of are like trying to prove that. —— morales. this is bbc news, our top story: confrontations in london as police break up an unauthorised vigilfor sarah everard. a serving police officer is charged with her murder. exactly one year since a young black woman, breonna taylor, was fatally shot by police officers — us investigators say they've made significant progress in their probe into the killing. to myanmar, and the leader of a shadow civilian government is urging protesters to continue their fight against the military, which seized power last month.
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in his first public address, mahn win khaing than said this was the nation's darkest moment. the worst of the violence took place in the city of mandalay, where once again, police opened fire on peaceful protestors. jonathan head reports. the days in myanmar�*s towns and cities are punctuated by protests, by lethal volleys of gunfire from the army and police... ..and by the funerals of those who have been killed. the death toll in this elemental battle between unarmed people and the military regime, whose authority they still refuse to accept, keeps climbing. today was another terrible day in mandalay, where opposition to the military coup runs very high. the police started, they showed up at 10am. by then the rally was already over. as i said, they were there to kill.
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they didn't have to kill, they didn't have to shoot a single shot. people were about to go back, people were about to disperse, but they did anyway. this woman has just lost her husband. he had volunteered as a neighbourhood guard, and joined a protest at a police station near his home in yangon last night, demanding the release of detainees. the police responded by opening fire. after five weeks of this, and around 80 deaths, people have still not given up. everyday they rebuild the barricades that shout their defiance at the soldiers. every day, the soldiers pull them down. firing abuse, and shots, back at the people. jonathan head, bbc news, bangkok. the us secretary of state,
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antony blinken, has condemned the arrests of 200 opposition politicians and activists in russia. he called for an end to the persecution of independent voices. russian police made the arrests at a hotel, where delegates were meeting to prepare for municipal elections. aruna iyengar has this report. the weekend forum, a gathering of municipal deputies from all over the country had just begun and a moscow hotel, when police burst in. this man wasjust and a moscow hotel, when police burst in. this man was just one of nearly 200 detained by police. they are accused of taking part in an event organised by open russia, based in the uk and band in russia undera in the uk and band in russia under a law against undesirable organisations and foreign interference. open russia was set up by prominent kremlin
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critic mikhail khodorkovsky, who now lives abroad. police say the event broke covid—i9 prevention rules. those detained are likely to face a fine or a spell in police detention. organisers say the forum was actually convened by a different group, the united democrats project. among those arrested are some of russia's most prominent opposition oysters who had come together. —— prominent opposition voices. last month, alexei navalny, president vladimir putin's most prominent critic, was jailed for two and a half years. has arrest sparked mass protests and a tough response from police. on friday, dozens of countries called on russia to
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release alexei navalny, saying actions by russia against the opposition leader were unacceptable and politically motivated. activists say laws on undesirable organisations and foreign agent are being used to suppress dissent, but russia says the laws are needed to protect it national security from outside meddling. the number of new coronavirus cases is increasing in many european countries as a third wave of the pandemic gathers momentum. italy has reported 26,000 new coronavirus cases — and it's not the only european country seeing high numbers of infections. poland's 21,000 new coronavirus cases reported on saturday, is the highest figure since november. germany too has seen a big daily rise — the number there is up by more than 12,500 in the past 2a hours. new coronavirus cases in the netherlands have reached their highest
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level since mid—january, with nearly 7,000 on saturday. france is also seeing a resurgence of covid cases. in paris, intensive care wards are almost full and the government says it's considering stricter restrictions. but, any move could meet some resistance. 25 theatres across france are currently being occupied by protesters who are demanding that the venues reopen. the former boxing world champion, marvin hagler, has died at his home in new hampshire — aged 66. the american, known to fans as marvellous marvin, became the undisputed middleweight world champion in 1980, and dominated the division through most of the decade. the broadcaster murray walker, described as "the voice of formula i," has died. he was 97. his distintive commentary style and passion for motor sport, won him fans around the world. andy swiss looks back at his life. so, it's ready. it... ..is... ..go, go, go, go!
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and schumacher leads, brilliant start... exuberant, excitable and utterly unmistakable. the austrian driver in the black sauber... murray walker was the high—octane voice behind a high—octane sport. it was once said that even in his quieter moments, he sounded like his trousers were on fire. that's it, bang, bang, and off! his passion came from his father, graham walker, who raced motorcycles and was himself a commentator, often sharing the duties with young murray. the sensation is that tommy wood went through, not on time, not after time, but ahead of time. and after commentating on his first british grand prix in 1919, murray walker became an integral part of formula i. but in a sport of inevitable risk, he was faced with tragedy, too. world motor racing champion ayrton senna has been pronounced clinically dead. when the great ayrton senna
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died in a crash in 1994, walker's shock was only too clear. this is the blackest day for grand prix racing that i can remember in the many, many years that i've been covering the sport. walker never hid his emotions. most famously when his friend damon hill won the world title in 1996. damon hill exits the chicane and wins the japanese grand prix! i've got to stop because i've got a lump in my throat. because he really genuinely loved motorsport and was fascinated by formula 1 and all things with an engine, he communicated that enthusiasm and people were drawn in by that and they recognised that, as well. for real spectacular driving, watch this! his frenetic style wasn't without its gaffes... looks through a completely clean windscreen and that's the big
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advantage, of course, of being in front. his energy and enthusiasm endeared him to millions and when he covered his final british grand prix in 2001, the affection was plain to see. one of sport's most—imitated voices, but there'll only ever be one murray walker. murray walker, who's died, at the age of 97. a reminder of our top story. the metropolitan police has responded to criticism on how it handled and unauthorised visual for sarah everard. images showed one woman being appended to the ground and another handcuffed. the home secretary has ordered a full report from police. that's it
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from me for the sour. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @lvaughanjones. i'm lewis vaughanjones and this is bbc news. goodbye. hello. well, the weather on sunday morning isn't looking too bad for most of us — bright, even sunny skies on the way but it's not going to last. clouds are expected to increase and rain is in the forecast. in fact quite early in the morning it will already start to rain across some western areas of the uk. and as one weather system pulls away, a bit of a gap here through the early hours and then this next weather front pushes in and that's going to bring the rainfall on sunday. so, the forecast through the early hours shows the clear skies there across most of the uk. a few scattered showers here and there, the winds are light as well and by early on sunday morning, temperatures are close to freezing in some of the northern
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towns and cities. in the south of the country, it's closer to around four celsius for example in plymouth and in cardiff. so here is that bright or even sunny morning across many parts of the country with the clouds quickly increasing there from the west, so rain for belfast, rain reaching the north—west of england, certainly the lake district. liverpool in for some rain. probably rain reaching birmingham sometime early in the afternoon. but not the extreme south—east of england or the north or the east of scotland. in fact in aberdeen, it may well stay sunny all through the day. but i think as far as southern england's concerned and east anglia, you will get rain later on on sunday. now, the forecast into monday shows high pressure building very close to the uk. there are weather fronts approaching us and they will be brushing the far north—west of the country but i think that high pressure is eventually going to win. so, here's monday morning and we've got lots of fine, again bright or sunny weather, but clouds increasing here in the north—west. so, skies i think are a little
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hazy both in the morning and the afternoon for places like belfast and glasgow but sunshine for norwich and london. and the temperatures, 13 celsius with lighter winds and sunshine, shouldn't feel too bad at all. tuesday into wednesday, that high pressure establishes itself across the uk but notice there's a weather front riding around its edge. so at times, it may be cloudy. but on balance, i think it's the high pressure that will win and the weather will be settled. so, here's the outlook for the week ahead. you can see mostly settled weather across the majority of the uk. temperatures rising a little bit but then it looks as though it's going to turn a little bit colder again towards the end of the week.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: police in london have been heavily criticised for breaking up an unauthorised vigil for a woman who was allegedly kidnapped and killed. sarah everard's death has become the focus of widespread anger in the uk about male violence against women. a serving police officer has been charged with murder. exactly one year since a young black woman, breonna taylor, was fatally shot by police officers — us investigators say they've made significant progress in their probe into the killing. ms taylor's death helped spark black lives matter protests across the country. bolivia's former acting presidentjeanine anez has been arrested on terrorism charges, along with a number of former ministers. prosecutors say they took part in a coup against the then president evo morales in 2019. mr morales returned to bolivia from exile after a fresh election victory last october. now on bbc news, click.

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