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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 7, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today: gps in england are given extra funding to help vaccinate housebound patients ahead of the government's mid—february deadline. workplace covid testing is to be expanded with more companies offered rapid results kits for staff who can't work from home. snow is forecast for large parts of the uk here today. it's already arrived here in kent, where we could see 30 centimetres comedown.
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some cold days ahead with biting easterly winds. that easterly wind is also going to deliver some pretty heavy snow showers for some. more details on the areas most likely to be affected coming up. and the six nations is back with a bang. scotland beat england to lift the calcutta cup for the first time at twickenham since 1983. that was definitely a smile you could hear they are. i think we'll touch on the rugby a little later. it's sunday the seventh of february. our top story: gps in england are to be paid an extra £10 by the nhs for every housebound person they vaccinate. it's part of government measures to protect everyone aged 70 and over, together with frontline health workers, by february the 15th. it comes as 18 new mass vaccine centres open tomorrow. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh. gp george hobbs is headed out to
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give around 20 of his patients covid jabs at home. they are too ill or vulnerable to come in for a vaccination. first up is diana garfield. ., ., m garfield. one, two, three, go. she has heart problems _ garfield. one, two, three, go. she has heart problems and _ garfield. one, two, three, go. she has heart problems and is - garfield. one, two, three, go. she has heart problems and is also - has heart problems and is also losing her sight.— has heart problems and is also losing her sight. there's still hope in the back — losing her sight. there's still hope in the back of— losing her sight. there's still hope in the back of my _ losing her sight. there's still hope in the back of my mind. _ losing her sight. there's still hope in the back of my mind. however, | losing her sight. there's still hope i in the back of my mind. however, all around _ in the back of my mind. however, all around i_ in the back of my mind. however, all around i still— in the back of my mind. however, all around i still have that hope that something work out. it�*s around i still have that hope that something work out.— something work out. it's great, because i've — something work out. it's great, because i've been _ something work out. it's great, because i've been a _ something work out. it's great, because i've been a gp - something work out. it's great, because i've been a gp here . something work out. it's great, i because i've been a gp here for something work out. it's great, i because i've been a gp here for 27 years, and they know me, so i think when they see someone familiar coming, it makes a real difference to the experience. quite a lot of them are quite nervous, and when they see it someone they know, that's very reassuring.— that's very reassuring. ashtree suru e that's very reassuring. ashtree surgery income _ that's very reassuring. ashtree surgery income for _ that's very reassuring. ashtree surgery income for lancashirel that's very reassuring. ashtree l surgery income for lancashire is that's very reassuring. ashtree - surgery income for lancashire is on track to vaccinate most of its patients by the middle of this month, but that's not the case everywhere. gps will receive an
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additional £10 on top of the standard fee for every housebound person they vaccinate. yes. standard fee for every housebound person they vaccinate.— person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful, _ person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful, as _ person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful, as it— person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful, as it does - person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful, as it does take l will be helpful, as it does take significantly longer to go out and visit someone and attend the necessary precautions on each and every visit, and that takes people away from the vaccination centre, where they could do more next vaccinations in a similar amount of time. it's good they've given this small amount of funding to enable practices to provide vaccinations to this particularly vulnerable group of people as quickly as possible. the latest data shows more than 11.4 million people have received their first dose. that's a rise ofjust over 494,000 on the previous 24—hour reporting period. at this rate of vaccination, the nhs would need to give jabs to an average ofjust under 393,000 people a day in order to meet the government's target of
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15,000,0015t to meet the government's target of 15,000,001st doses by the 15th of february. and the scottish government has set its met its target to vaccinate the over 80s by the fifth of february. there are to be 80 more vaccination sites opening from next week, like the one at blackburn cathedral. the new sites mean that jabs blackburn cathedral. the new sites mean thatjabs are now available for more than 100 large—scale centres, 1000 local gp services, almost 200 pharmacies and over 250 hospitals. businesses in england with more than 50 staff will be given access to rapid coronavirus testing kits. previously the government only offered lateral flow testing to firms with more than 250 staff. the kits provide results in under 30 minutes and will be given to employees who cannot work from home during the pandemic. police are continuing to investigate a series of stabbings that took place in london over the past 48 hours. a 22—year—old man died
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and nine others were injured in five separate incidents in the croydon area on friday night. another man in his 20s died in kilburn in north—west london yesterday evening. police say they aren't connected and have condemned the violence as needless and abhorrent. heavy snow could bring significant disruption to the south—east of england in the coming hours. weather warnings have been issued by the met office for large parts of britain. with the whole of the uk feeling bitterly cold, people are being urged to check in on the elderly and vulnerable. simonjones reports. it's been dubbed the beast from the east two. northern england and scotland have already experienced heavy snow in the past week, but know it's going to be far more widespread. cold air is blowing in from russia. the south—east and east of england are expected to be hardest hit, with an amber weather warning issued, meaning travel problems and power cuts are likely. but much of the uk will be affected,
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with storm darcy bringing strong winds too, while several flood warnings are in place. the grifters are primed, but with a stay message, they've got their work cut out. there will be a lot less traffic out there, so the snow will lay in places, even when we've been salting it, et cetera, so it means people have to take extra care out there, because there will be snow over those roads. because there will be snow over those roads-— those roads. the aim is to keep vaccination _ those roads. the aim is to keep vaccination centre _ those roads. the aim is to keep vaccination centre is _ those roads. the aim is to keep vaccination centre is open, - those roads. the aim is to keep vaccination centre is open, but| those roads. the aim is to keep. vaccination centre is open, but in southend in essex some testing sites are going to be forced to close. it's going to be snowing from sunday into monday, so we took that decision basically to prevent people from coming out in the hazardous conditions. �* from coming out in the hazardous conditions-— conditions. and there will be no cuick conditions. and there will be no quick respite- — conditions. and there will be no quick respite. whether - conditions. and there will be no| quick respite. whether warnings conditions. and there will be no - quick respite. whether warnings are in place until the middle of this week. simon is in lydden near dover, where an amber weather warning is in place. we saw you with your hood up a
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minute ago, but it's not up now. but my goodness, the snow is tumbling down. the snow started falling at around four o'clock this morning. initially it was pretty wet but it is starting to settle. you can see on the road surface there is a layer of snow in that field. 0ver surface there is a layer of snow in that field. over here is the main road between canterbury and over, and i think travel on that will be pretty tricky. we've just seen a few police cars and ambulances go by, so it appears already there could be potential problems. we got a amber weather warning in place for all of today, covering kent and also large parts of the south—east and east anglia. that means potential disruption to travel, potential power cuts too, and we are told there could be up to 30 centimetres of snow in some places in kent — thatis of snow in some places in kent — that is a lot of snow. south—eastern, the railway company, is telling travellers, please don't travel, and they've already suspended services on some of the lines today. but pretty much the
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whole of the east of the uk has a weather warning today for snow and ice, and actually it's notjust the snow that's going to be an issue. here already the wind is whipping up. we've got storm darcy blowing through, which could bring winds of 50 mph to add into the equation. although it is about zero on the thermometer at the moment, it is absolutely freezing, with the wind chill at it in. it's feeling apparently today more like —7, so best to stay indoors if you can. have you got your hat and gloves? gloves in the car. i might put them on! thank you, simon. might it earlier was, when you are on a cold outside broadcast like that — 20 starjumps. get the blood flowing. can't do press ups in those conditions, can you? if you're waking up to a snowy scene this morning we'd love to see your pictures. please do send them in by e—mail or on twitter.
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is it the full thing? no? 0k. is it the full thing? no? ok. note that — take that as a good tip. a 70—year—old grandfather from 0ldham has become the oldest man to complete a solo row across the atlantic. frank rothwell arrived in antigua yesterday, completing his journey in 56 days and a week ahead of schedule. frank has raised more than £600,000 for alzheimer's research uk, and mike has been following his progress. the coral waters of the caribbean, a paradise after the rattle and roll of the atlantic, and the same view of the atlantic, and the same view of sea and sky for nearly two months and 3000 miles. and 70—year—old frank rothwell arrived in nelson dockyard in english haga in antigua is a world record breaker — the oldest person to complete this atlantic challenge and the oldest person to row the ocean so low and unassisted. # well, i am the kind of guy who
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will never settle down # the girls know i'm around. after 55 da s, # the girls know i'm around. after 55 days. two _ # the girls know i'm around. after 55 days, two hours _ # the girls know i'm around. after 55 days, two hours and _ # the girls know i'm around. after 55 days, two hours and 41- # the girls know i'm around. after 55 days, two hours and 41 minutes at sea, you might expect frank to show some signs of tiredness — but not him. the life and soul of any party. now a world champion — is that cool or what? now a world champion — is that cool orwhat? i'm now a world champion — is that cool or what? i'm absolutely overwhelmed. the reception we got here — we came into english harbour in antigua, and all the ships, all these massive millionaires' yachts started hooting their hutus as they came in. it millionaires' yachts started hooting their hutus as they came in.- their hutus as they came in. it was fantastic. after _ their hutus as they came in. it was fantastic. after leading _ their hutus as they came in. it was fantastic. after leading those - fantastic. after leading those allowed to be dockside in a spontaneous bit of karaoke, it was time to be reunited with his wife, judith. after theirfirst time to be reunited with his wife, judith. after their first christmas apart in their 50 years of marriage. after living on freeze—dried food, especially macaroni cheese, for all these weeks, frank is now hoping for
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a fish salad proper bed. but any hardship, he says, has been worth it. he's already raised over £600,000 for alzheimer's research uk. i'm quite partial to a bit of macaroni cheese myself, but i can't sing like that after it, let alone having crossed the atlantic. frank seems like quite a character, but may bejudith savoured one christmas in 50 of quiet... how much energy has he got when he is not completed a row across the atlantic? amazing. we will take a look at the front pages next. the sunday telegraph reports that nearly 30 million people under 50 years old will be vaccinated at work from the spring under proposals being considered by ministers. the paper says frontline emergency service workers, teachers, delivery drivers and supermarket staff would be among those
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at the front of the queue — after all those who are older or vulnerable have been offered a jab. the sunday times reports that online retailers like amazon, which have done well during the pandemic, are facing a double tax raid under plans being drawn up by the government. it also has a picture of a snowboarder in aberdeenshire, with a warning that people in south—east england could be facing similar conditions as storm darcy arrives. the observer has an impressive snow picture too. this one is of a sledger near pitlochry. its lead story is based on figures showing the volume of exports going through british ports to the eu fell by 68% last month compared with january last year — a drop the paper says was mostly a result of problems caused by brexit. the government is disputing that figure. and no prizes for guessing which story features heavily in the scottish papers today.
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scotland on sunday has a large picture of the scottish rugby team celebrating that historic win over england at twickenham yesterday. the paper has produced a 24—page supplement to mark the occasion. good luck to them — why not? absolutely. they're enough, and jane will bring you extensive detail on that, i have absolutely no doubt, coming up in the sport on the half—hour. you start, chris. i don't know if i've ever mentioned i don't know if i've ever mentioned i am from yorkshire. never! this story caught my eye on the observer, which is a real example of 0bserver, which is a real example of a kind of slow burn film which has been made back in 2011, all about the story of a young lad trying to find himself. he built up a friendship with a ranger in the yorkshire dales, and this was the
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project of this particular chap here, who works in the film industry, dan hartley. but it's never really made much money. but of course the joy of the screening area and youtube and amazon is that you don'tjust release the film and it comes and goes, and if it works, it works — it can have a slow burn, and it's now picking up hundreds of thousands of views. while it hasn't made much money, it's clearly really a project of the heart. it's word—of—mouth at the moment, how things are spreading. a very quick one today in the sunday times. chris, i have fallen victim twice over this lockdown to victims that have gone horribly wrong, things missing all the wrong items, so a new service for £15 only means the courier waits outside, you try them on and you have 40 minutes, you hand them back, and you say what you want. personally i would find that pressure really intense, because it takes me a couple of days to ruminate over whether i like clothes
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or not. 40 minutes? iwas or not. 40 minutes? i was feeling for the poor delivery person. nina's been gone 35 minutes — it's only a pair of gloves... also, it's quite a lot to add onto the delivery. absolutely. there's a lot of weather about, and susan is here. what a lovely image. the big story for all the uk is the fact that it is turning colder, that cold sunk south overnight and we are now plumbed into the good old cultic air source, that air from the arctic, down across the baltic and right the way across the baltic and right the way across the baltic and right the way across the uk now. as you have been hearing we also have darcy in the mix. that is ploughing off into the continent but she does trail this weather front behind her and that is the bigger because of our forecast headache for today in terms of snowfall. the met office has an
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amber warning from norfolk down to kent and at the moment it is a little mixture of rain, sleet and snow that we see across some south—eastern countries but progressively through the day things will turn more wintry and perhaps on the coast keeping some rain that inland the snow will start to pile up. i say pile up that drift is more likely because we have such strong winds. all the way across the uk, those numbers in black other dust strength and factor in the wind and that will add to the raw feel. across some parts of the area covered by this amber warning we could see up to 20 centimetres of snow. step outside anywhere today, however, and that will fill subzero. no surprises, we are talking about a widespread frost overnight and further showers streaming across eastern england but also making it further west.
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eastern england but also making it furtherwest. notice eastern england but also making it further west. notice those bands so not all areas will see snow and if you do it could get a snow out of it. same story for parts of northern england and scotland. you may even ca few reaching northern ireland. so yes, darcy will have a big impact today but some of these bands have showers across the uk on that easterly wind could materialise more snow tomorrow then we will see today. western areas will see decent sunshine but again, no matter where you are tomorrow, factor in the cold easterly wind and it will feel subzero. forthe easterly wind and it will feel subzero. for the week ahead, not a lot will change. we are firmly locked into this pressure pattern for the week ahead and we stay in cold air and for the week ahead and we stay in cold airand we for the week ahead and we stay in cold air and we keep the easterly wind. it will ease somewhat on tuesday and wednesday meaning fewer showers but as we look at those five days ahead there is nothing imminently milder on the cards. if anything, perhaps that's no risk will diminish. a reminderfor today that those easternmost counties of
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england that we are concerned about for the risk of disruption but more widespread snow overnight tonight and into tomorrow. thank you, susan. last april, bbc reported some of the very first pictures of coronavirus patients being treated in icu in scotland. , . ., scotland. using a black-and-white film camera _ scotland. using a black-and-white film camera christopher _ scotland. using a black-and-white film camera christopher captured i scotland. using a black-and-white i film camera christopher captured the team across a 12 hour shift. 12 months later he has now returned to the same ward to catch up with the staff. , , ., .,, ., staff. these photos document and overni . ht staff. these photos document and overnight icu shift at _ overnight icu shift at how myers hospital. taken in april 2020 they were meant to capture a fleeting split second. a decisive moment. nine months later it is clear that these images were not momentary at
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all. . ., , ., ., all. having done this now for ten months there _ all. having done this now for ten months there is _ all. having done this now for ten months there is an _ all. having done this now for ten months there is an element - all. having done this now for ten months there is an element of i months there is an element of fatigue but i think we were all anticipating this and we all thought that we would be back in a similar position and certainly in intensive care and the third peak has come. aha, care and the third peak has come. a new wave may be washing through their icu. now their covid treatments are more prone test, studied and standardised. even so, 30% of patients who require a ventilator in this icu have not survived. ~ ventilator in this icu have not survived-— survived. we struggled with results and the amount of oxygen - survived. we struggled with results and the amount of oxygen we - survived. we struggled with results and the amount of oxygen we give | and the amount of oxygen we give them was 100%, the most you could give. but over the last 24—hour that has improved a bit and we are pleased to see that.- has improved a bit and we are pleased to see that. being treated as a covert — pleased to see that. being treated as a covert patient _ pleased to see that. being treated as a covert patient in _ pleased to see that. being treated as a covert patient in this - pleased to see that. being treated as a covert patient in this room . as a covert patient in this room likely means being intubated and put into an induced coma. so a patient
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it does not know that a team of five is lifting in unison to keep air in their lungs. and a patient does not know that someone is holding their hand through it all. the know that someone is holding their hand through it all.— hand through it all. the staff are definitely fatigued, _ hand through it all. the staff are definitely fatigued, physically i hand through it all. the staff are l definitely fatigued, physically and emotionally. i wonder when things settle down finally if that is when it might hit the staff a little more because maybe the staff have not yet handled the loss we have seen. we need to make sure we do the best we can for them. need to make sure we do the best we can for them-— can for them. ryan fernie was in the icu for 67 can for them. ryan fernie was in the w for 67 days. _ can for them. ryan fernie was in the icu for 67 days, the _ can for them. ryan fernie was in the icu for 67 days, the longest - can for them. ryan fernie was in the icu for 67 days, the longest of i can for them. ryan fernie was in the icu for 67 days, the longest of any i icu for 67 days, the longest of any covid patient at the hospital. i got a notification _ covid patient at the hospital. i got a notification to _ covid patient at the hospital. i got a notification to say _ covid patient at the hospital. i grrt a notification to say get down here. and i don't remember anything after that. i woke up and i could not even lift my finger. mr; that. i woke up and i could not even lift my finger-— lift my finger. my muscles were i gone. brian awoke to discover this daughter had been pregnant when he
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entered icu and news she never had time to shower. she entered icu and news she never had time to shower.— time to shower. she never had a chance to _ time to shower. she never had a chance to tell _ time to shower. she never had a chance to tell me _ time to shower. she never had a chance to tell me so _ time to shower. she never had a chance to tell me so i _ time to shower. she never had a chance to tell me so i started i chance to tell me so i started crying and realised.— chance to tell me so i started crying and realised. even at 5am, covid treatments _ crying and realised. even at 5am, covid treatments carry _ crying and realised. even at 5am, covid treatments carry on - crying and realised. even at 5am, covid treatments carry on with i covid treatments carry on with routine. there is no longer a new normal in this icu. this is normal now. ., , ., normal in this icu. this is normal now. ., , , now. for sure there was a dip in morale after _ now. for sure there was a dip in morale after the _ now. for sure there was a dip in morale after the first _ now. for sure there was a dip in morale after the first wave i now. for sure there was a dip in i morale after the first wave subsided and i think any sort of major traumatic event, that kind of thing does happen. but the team is resilient. we have pulled together to try and deliver that and compassionate high—quality care. i think we will continue to do that for as long as we need to. christopher bobbin reporting there. there is something quite arresting about those powerful still images
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and black—and—white, somehow makes such a difference. it is 621. —— 6:21. israel is starting to ease lockdown restrictions after its coronavirus vaccination programme reduced infections and illness in the over—60s. more than a third of the population have now received the first dose and nearly two million people have had both vaccines. let's speak now to dr hagai levine, epidemiologist at the hebrew university—hadassah medical centre. lovely to see you. an exciting morning for you. how much do you know the infection has come down? the infection, the transmission has not come down but what has dropped is the hospitalisation. there is a slump in the number of cases, especially in those in the age above 60 who were first to be vaccinated. when talking about 25, 30% decline
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and in accordance with what was expected it was only early signs but clearly we have results about the impact of vaccination campaigns on the population. impact of vaccination campaigns on the population-— the population. and that is what is important. — the population. and that is what is important. isn't — the population. and that is what is important, isn't it? _ the population. and that is what is important, isn't it? as— the population. and that is what is important, isn't it? as many- the population. and that is what is l important, isn't it? as many people might be getting the virus but fewer people are getting ill and seriously ill. ., . r , ., people are getting ill and seriously ill. ., . r ill. correct. but it is no magic wallet. ill. correct. but it is no magic wallet- we — ill. correct. but it is no magic wallet. we are _ ill. correct. but it is no magic wallet. we are still _ ill. correct. but it is no magic wallet. we are still in - ill. correct. but it is no magic wallet. we are still in the i ill. correct. but it is no magic. wallet. we are still in the middle of a pandemic and we still have wide transmission, ongoing. we now see many people below the age of 60 with severe disease so it means that despite a successful vaccination in terms of getting high vaccination coverage, we still need to get to as many people as possible, especially to the most susceptible and even though we now started to ease the lockdown measures we still need to communicate the message that people still need to keep safe because even
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people who have been vaccinated may be able to transmit the virus, we do not know yet. so, you know, the vaccine is very important that it is only one tool in a complete set of toolbox we need to tackle this pandemic. toolbox we need to tackle this pandemic-— toolbox we need to tackle this andemic. ~ . ., , ., pandemic. with that in mind do you have concerns _ pandemic. with that in mind do you have concerns that _ pandemic. with that in mind do you have concerns that lockdown - have concerns that lockdown restrictions are easing slightly? well... we need to be accurate. in israel we had such a severe lockdown which was not symmetrical. some parts of the country, for example, in the ultraorthodox community, huge funerals with thousands of people while in tel aviv the police hunted people just sitting on a bench without a mask and drinking coffee. that is not the way to progress. the big issue now in israel is how we open the education system. no—one
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knows. the government is not transparent in telling us exactly what is the plan. maybe they do not know what the plan is. and no—one knows what is going on and the vaccine, again, is very encouraging but it is not that we can open everything. it continues to be a very complex public health challenge in israel and elsewhere. we very complex public health challenge in israel and elsewhere.— in israel and elsewhere. we are watchin: in israel and elsewhere. we are watching with _ in israel and elsewhere. we are watching with interest - in israel and elsewhere. we are watching with interest in - in israel and elsewhere. we are watching with interest in the i in israel and elsewhere. we arej watching with interest in the uk because we have adopted the policy of distributing the vaccine to as many people as possible for the first dose before administering the second. you may not be able to extrapolate the data that is there any sign of extensive protection when you have just had a one dose? there are some signs that the first dose can give some protection but it is very complicated and i must tell you, each country needs to find its own road, what is best for them that
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specific setting and population in their country and i think there is a lot to learn from the uk and a lot to learn from israel... we chose... to the people most susceptible and we have done that successfully in the sense that we were able to reach the sense that we were able to reach the same people for the second dose and i hope that you will get to that stage as well. we and i hope that you will get to that stage as well-— stage as well. we hope so as well. thank ou stage as well. we hope so as well. thank you and _ stage as well. we hope so as well. thank you and enjoy _ stage as well. we hope so as well. thank you and enjoy your - stage as well. we hope so as well. thank you and enjoy your new i thank you and enjoy your new freedoms. 26 minutes past six time now for some sport and there is no want to talk about is there this morning? i will find something for you, chris. what could you be talking about? i have waited a long time for this. enjoy it. the 2021 six nations kicked off in style yesterday with an historic win for scotland.
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they beat the reigning champions england at twickenham for the first time in 38 years. austin halewood reports. the calcutta cup, back in scottish hands _ the calcutta cup, back in scottish hands and — the calcutta cup, back in scottish hands and the six nations back with a bang _ hands and the six nations back with a bang. in all 150 years of rugby's oldest _ a bang. in all 150 years of rugby's oldest fixture there has never quite been a _ oldest fixture there has never quite been a calcutta cup light. none of the fans. — been a calcutta cup light. none of the fans, none of the atmosphere but the fans, none of the atmosphere but the rivalry— the fans, none of the atmosphere but the rivalry never in doubt. and it was scotland that is the game into life. was scotland that is the game into life this— was scotland that is the game into life. this man inches away from an opening _ life. this man inches away from an opening try— life. this man inches away from an opening try and an in international sport. _ opening try and an in international sport, inches like that can make all the difference but he was not made to pay _ the difference but he was not made to pay. moments later he was in again— to pay. moments later he was in again and — to pay. moments later he was in again and this time he made sure. scotland _ again and this time he made sure. scotland were off to a flyer but on the stroke — scotland were off to a flyer but on the stroke of half—time their progress _ the stroke of half—time their progress was halted. finn russell was sin— progress was halted. finn russell was sin binned for this trip and i when _ was sin binned for this trip and i when farrell kicked side back into contention. but england could not
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make _ make the man advantage count. instead was scotland who took back control~ _ instead was scotland who took back control. russell was back on the field _ control. russell was back on the field and — control. russell was back on the field and kicking the scots even further — field and kicking the scots even further ahead and for all of england's endeavours theyjust could not break— england's endeavours theyjust could not break through the scottish blue wall. mistakes cost them as they were _ wall. mistakes cost them as they were outplayed on their own patch. we wanted — were outplayed on their own patch. we wanted to treated as history for individuals and a collective and we did exactly that. 50 individuals and a collective and we did exactly that.— did exactly that. so a historic win for scotland. _ did exactly that. so a historic win for scotland, their _ did exactly that. so a historic win for scotland, their first _ did exactly that. so a historic win for scotland, their first at - for scotland, their first at twickenham for 38 years. we will have buildup to wales— ireland later on. england remain in command against india on day three of the first test in chennai. they were finally bowled out for 579. jofra archer has been england's leading man with the ball, dismissing rohit sharma forjust six, caught behind byjos buttler. and archer struck again shortly afterwards — shubman gill the man, with james anderson taking a smart low catch to leave india in a bit of trouble. they're 59 for two at lunch, still 519 behind.
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now to football, and manchester united missed the chance to go level on points with leaders manchester city after a dramatic 3—3 draw with everton at old trafford. united went 2—0 up in the first half, thanks to goals from edison cavani and then this stunnerfrom bruno fernandes. everton drew level after the break, but united thought they had won it after they took the lead again thanks to scott mctominay. however, in the 95th minute, everton snatched a point thanks to dominic calvert lewin with the last kick of the game. so a disappointing end to 0le gunnar solskjaer�*s 100th match in charge at the club. elsewhere, aston villa moved up to eighth in table. a goal after 74 seconds was enough for them to beat arsenal 1—0 at villa park. 0llie watkins with his 10th premier league goal of the season. newcastle also won, while burnley drew with brighton and fulham drew with west ham. celtic won back—to—back games in the scottish premiership
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for the first time since december as they beat motherwell 2—1. 0dsonne edouard scored their second goal. celtic are 20 points behind leaders rangers with a game in hand. rangers are at hamilton in a midday kick off later. british number one dan evans has won his first atp title, he beat canadian felix auger—aliassime in straight sets in the final of the murray river 0pen. it's one of the warm up tournaments for the australian open, which finally gets under way tomorrow. it's perhaps the most ambitious sporting event since the beginning of the covid—19 pandemic — running over two weeks with players from all over the world — in front of hundreds of thousands of fans. this event is only able to happen because australia has controlled the spread of the virus. but not everyone is thrilled that it is happening. 0ur australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne. it's been a bumpy ride for the
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australian open, but the stage is set now. ~ .,, , ., set now. with the most unusual of buildu s, set now. with the most unusual of buildups, it's finally ready - set now. with the most unusual of buildups, it's finally ready to i set now. with the most unusual of buildups, it's finally ready to go. l buildups, it's finally ready to go. even before the grand slam begins, tennis fans have come for the warmup events. with the ongoing travel ban, most spectators this year are locals, and after melbourne going through one of the longest and strictest lockdowns in the world, they are very excited to be here. the safety is the main thing, i think, everyone wanted to happen, but it's been able to go on as it has, and that's pretty awesome. it’s has, and that's pretty awesome. it's unreal really. it feels like a new life _ unreal really. it feels like a new life. ~ , ., , life. melbourne is a huge sporting caital of life. melbourne is a huge sporting capital of the _ life. melbourne is a huge sporting capital of the world. people i life. melbourne is a huge sporting capital of the world. people love i capital of the world. people love their— capital of the world. people love their sport — capital of the world. people love their sport here _ capital of the world. people love their sport here and _ capital of the world. people love their sport here and it _ capital of the world. people love their sport here and it makes i capital of the world. people love i their sport here and it makes them happy _ their sport here and it makes them ha . . _ �* . ., , their sport here and it makes them ha-- . n ., , their sport here and it makes them a.--n . their sport here and it makes them ha.--�*. their sport here and it makes them happy. actually you feel may be more connected with _ happy. actually you feel may be more connected with the _ happy. actually you feel may be more connected with the tennis, _ connected with the tennis, because you don't— connected with the tennis, because you don't have the big crowd — you actually _ you don't have the big crowd — you actually can — you don't have the big crowd — you actually can watch and enjoy the show. _ actually can watch and enjoy the show, literally, because this is what _ show, literally, because this is what it— show, literally, because this is what it is— show, literally, because this is what it is - _ show, literally, because this is what it is — it's a big show. getting _ what it is — it's a big show. getting to _ what it is — it's a big show. getting to this stage has been
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controversial and often dramatic. hundreds of players flew in from around the world. some under tighter quarantine rules than others because of covid—19 cases recorded on their plans. preparing as best they could. and then last week, another setback. more than 500 players and officials were forced to isolate and be tested after a coronavirus case at their hotel. not everyone in melbourne supports the tennis going ahead. some have argued that holding a tournament of that size in the midst of a pandemic isn't worth the risk. melburnian sara lynnjackson won't be out any of the matches. they are stuck in the uk because of limits on arrival. , ,, ., ., arrival. they say there are not enou:h arrival. they say there are not enough quarantine _ arrival. they say there are not enough quarantine pieces, i arrival. they say there are not| enough quarantine pieces, but suddenly when it comes to a sporting event, they can lift those caps. it makes me feel abandoned, as if i don't matter as much as these athletes and celebrities, even though i'm a citizen. for
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athletes and celebrities, even though i'm a citizen.— athletes and celebrities, even though i'm a citizen. for the next two weeks _ though i'm a citizen. for the next two weeks everyone _ though i'm a citizen. for the next two weeks everyone here - though i'm a citizen. for the next two weeks everyone here hopes i though i'm a citizen. for the next i two weeks everyone here hopes the focus will shift from coronavirus to the courts, but it will feel very different. crowds have been capped at half capacity, and covid safety measures are everywhere. many will be watching this closely — notjust for the tennis, but also for what it tells us about the future of holding major sporting events in this very different and difficult time. the australian open gets under way tomorrow, so of course we will have coverage of that tomorrow. thanks, jane. she held down the smug very well, didn't she? on tuesday, we learned the sad news that captain sir tom moore had died. he was 100 years old. so here's another chance to look back and celebrate the life of a man who did so much to raise our spirits — not to mention a cool £40 million for the nhs — during the first lockdown.
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this is captain sir tom — we salute you. music. captain sir tom moore, who raised more than £30 million for nhs charities, will travel to windsor castle today to be knighted by the queen. it will be her first face—to—face engagement since march. it's the only honour to be ordered since the beginning of lockdown. tom moore is now sir tom. the 100—year—old world war ii veteran was knighted - by queen elizabeth for -
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an extraordinaryjob well done. to meet the queen was more than anyone could expect. i mean, it was... never, never, ever did i imagine that i should get so close to the queen and have such a kind message from her. that was really outstanding. it really was truly outstanding. tomorrow will be a good day. that's the way i think i've always looked at it. if we as a country can show the same spirit of optimism and energy shown by captain tom moore, then we will beat it.
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together, we will come through this all the faster. it's wonderful that everyone's been inspired _ by his story and his determination. he's a one—man fundraising machine. god knows what the final total will be. i at the darkest of times, captain sir tom moore was the light that shone into our lives. he won the nation's hearts with the simplest of ideas, to walk 100 laps of his garden for his 100th birthday. it triggered a remarkable fundraising campaign for nhs charities, but it also united the country. captain sir tom was a humble yorkshireman, a second world war veteran,
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but more than anything, a family man. as his daughters hannah and lucy said, "the last year of our father's life was nothing short of remarkable. he was rejuvenated and he experienced things he only ever dreamed of." i was fortunate enough to be a small part of that amazing year and in this special programme, captain sir tom, we salute you. in less than four weeks, captain sir tom moore raised more than £32 million for nhs charities, found himself number one in the charts on his 100th birthday and received tens of thousands of birthday cards. where did you come from? i've been lurking down the bottom of your garden. have you? how are you, sir? fine, thank you. how about you ? i'm really well. marvellous to see you come out of the blue.
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a man who served his country during world war ii was doing his bit for the national effort once more. lovely story coming up — a 99—year—old war veteran has decided to walk 100 lengths of his back garden. he wants to raise money for the nhs. well, i have had such marvellous service from the national health service, particularly the nurses, after i broke my hip. we said, "oh, if you walk 100 times — your 100th birthday's coming up — we'll pay you a pound for every length that you do," and i think i said, "let's raise some money for charity." and he said, "well, let's raise it for covid—19, for the nhs."
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you're doing a good job. carry on, old boy! thank you from myself and from everybody at the royal armoured corps and the nhs for everything you're doing. thanks, captain tom! we were talking earlier to tom moore, who's walking 100 lengths of his back garden before his 100th birthday on 30th april. and he hoped he would raise about £1000. that went up to about £5000. when we spoke to him and his lovely daughter hannah, in the first half of the show, they had just over £200,000.
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well, since we talked to him, another £45,000 has gone into hisjust giving page. the target had gone up to £100,000. let's make it £300,000, can we? can we do that? we then went, i believe, back on bbc breakfast on the bank holiday monday, and i think the rest is charted in history. i'm not sure we'll ever forget it, but it's really hard for us to even rationalise it, to understand what truly happened because, from then, things went crazy. huge congratulations, captain tom — you are absolutely brilliant! - we love you. well done. congratulations on passing the million. you are an inspiration to us
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and to the millions of bbc breakfast viewers who have been supporting you as well. amazing. well done. what you've managed to do just shows how great humans are. the funds that you have managed to raise for the real heroes todayl is simply sensational. you may have heard the name captain tom moore around the world... newscast in german. he's the humble world war ii veteran who's captured the world's hearts. i know you must be - absolutely exhausted, tom. no, i'm not.
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lam! you are! remember, i'm a yorkshireman. hi, this is a message for captain tom moore. thank you so much for all of your efforts and how much money you have raised for the nhs. lots of love from ward 4b at the royal liverpool. thank you! thank you, captain tom, from the nhs! _ applause. in less than a fortnight since captain tom began his challenge, he'd become a global sensation. your generosity meant that, on the morning that he was due to complete his 100th lap, he'd raised more than £11 million. inches to go — and there he is. congratulations. well done!
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applause. absolutely amazing, amazing achievement. captain tom, how do you feel this morning? fine, i mean, yes. i mean, i'm surrounded by the right sort of people. so, yes, ifeel fine. i hope you're all feeling fine, too. applause. it's amazing. what i love also is that he's a 99—year—old vet who's been around a long time, knows everything, and it's wonderful that everyone kind of is being inspired by his story and his determination. no, i think he's a one—man fund—raising machine, and god knows what the final total will be. but good on him, and i hope he keeps going. i think it's absolutely amazing that a super prince can say some things like that. so, how do you top that? you'd think that a message from a future king would be the icing on the cake. but as he finished his walk,
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something happened on bbc breakfast that would mean that he and i would embark on an extraordinary musical journey together. we've got a special guest with us. we've got michael ball with us, who i know whose company you enjoy very much, and michael ball wants to say thank you in his special way. morning, michael. good morning, naga, and good morning, tom and hannah. i go to bed, it's 10 million. i get up, it's 12 million. what's going on? tom, it's an extraordinary achievement, and i've been trying to think of a song that encapsulates what you're doing, how you're inspiring all of us, and... ..i have one, i think. i'm sort of stealing it from the people of liverpool, but it seemed appropriate. is it ok if i sing it for you? michael, i suggest you go ahead and we all, tom i included, will listen. # when you walk through a storm
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# hold your head up high # and don't be afraid of the dark # at the end of the storm # there's a golden sky # and the sweet silver song of a lark...# sing with me. # when you walk through a storm # hold your head up high # and don't be afraid of the dark # at the end of the storm # there's a golden sky # and the sweet silver song of a lark...# ijust need to say congratulations because you are the uk's
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official number one. i that really is truly amazing, isn't it? also, this is another world record because the oldest person - in the world to ever be number one. laughter. that's lovely! it's really hard to say what it is. it's so funny! it really is. that's a special something, isn't it? # you'll never walk alone! # you'll never walk alone.# i think on a personal note, and i can say this for georgia as well, _ he's been our hero since before we were born. we've always loved him and cherished him. i've lived with him since i was three, and her since she was born. he's been a vital part of our life.
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we've had struggling moments where dad has been in hospital and so on, and he's been a real rock in the family. and it shows in interviews when you see him that he is a really good guy, and i'm so glad we can share him with you. everyone's like, "aren't you captain tom moore's granddaughter?" i'm like, "yes." cos everyone's coming up to us. even though we have to social—distance, it's been really fun, everyone coming and saying, "thank you very much for what you've done." we're always saying, thank you. good morning. it's 8am, and this is a very special breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we are saying happy 100th birthday to captain tom moore. just three weeks ago, he set out to raise £1000 for the nhs. almost £30 million later, he's celebrating with a special honour from the queen, as the captain becomes a colonel. i've always been proud to be a duke
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of wellington, and i still am. and i think to get these, really, that's the icing on the cake. happy birthday, captain tom! # happy birthday, captain tom! # happy birthday, to you!# we can talk to the man himself. on behalf of bbc breakfast, and everyone who has celebrated your achievements across the uk, let me wish you a very happy 100th birthday. thank you very much. thank you, naga. how does it feel? 100 years old today! it hardly feels any different than yesterday! i don't know what you're meant to feel like when you get to be 100. i've never been 100 before! i know i speak for the whole country
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when i say we wish you a very happy 100th birthday. your heroic efforts have lifted the spirits of the entire nation, and you've now inspired the most incredible generosity, raising over £29 million supporting the cause closest to all our hearts. it is so well—deserved. what you have done in bringing together a nation and inspiringl so many and helping those i who need it most, honestly, i am in awe of you. good morning, and happy birthday, captain tom. or should i say colonel? and now i can officially call you an honorary member of the england cricket team. plane engines roar over
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radio: ., ., ., over radio: congratulations on your 100th birthday! i i am one of the few people here who've seen hurricanes and spitfires flying past in anger. fortunately, today, they're all flying peacefully. it was fantastic! and thank you very much. thank you. the pleasure's all ours, tom.
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# happy birthday to you # happy birthday, captain tom, daddy, grandpa # happy birthday to you!# applause. captain tom, we meet at last. where did you come from?! i've been lurking down the bottom of your garden! have you?! how are you? i'm fine, thank you, how are you? really well. marvellous to see you. it is so lovely to see you, it really is. it's an absolute surprise. i'd never expect to see you out of the blue. and you just appeared from nowhere. thank you for coming,
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it is my greatest pleasure, and i never, ever expected to see you. it's been a long time coming, this. it has, hasn't it, yes! since then, i mean... it's been so amazing... before you and i was singing that song. i'd known it a few words at a time. i never knew it all. and i didn't know all the words. i could sing them in a various order, but never in the right order. now, i think the whole world knows that song and all the words, thanks to you. no, thanks to you, sir. you did marvellous, and now i can walk up and down here singing that little song to myself. is that what you do now? that's right, yes. can you believe we were the top of the charts?
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absolutely amazing, isn't it? you were top of the charts. i was coming along behind you. no, i'm afraid i have to disagree with you there. this was about you, this was absolutely about you. i've never actually asked you what the music is that you were inspired by when you were growing up, what you listened to and what you like to listen to now. i like to listen to the sort of music that you and i sang. that is the sort of music i like. country and western—type of music, i like. so do i. i always liked western films because the good one always wins. i mean, i don't like watching films where all the baddies come out and the baddies win. i don't believe in that. i think the good ones should always win. so, if you were in a western, you'd be wearing a white hat? that's it, yes. but you do love ken dodd, don't you? yes. the voice of ken dodd.
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he was a great singer. what's that lovely song? # when you're smiling # the whole world smiles with you...# that's exactly right! so, for you, what was the most surprising thing that has happened to you? i think when we started here and we thought, well, if i walk up and down, we might make £1000. yeah. and we did. and then hannah had an idea to go locally. and after that, it went boom! so quickly. yes, it really did, and that was a big surprise. so, day after day, the money kept coming in. and it was unbelievable. as it grew, it grew and it grew, and it went on until that magnificent figure in the end, wasn't it, for the national health service? yeah. over 32 million! that's a lot of money, isn't it?
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that's a lot of money. we never, ever anticipated that sort of money. i think you became almost a symbol and a focal point that people wanted to do their bit, and they could do that through you. the thing that i always believed when i said, "tomorrow's a good day," i think people, a lot of people, took on to that. and, yes, it is because tomorrow could be a good day. the fact it never comes is another story. laughter. you can't say that! tomorrow will be a better day. yes, tomorrow is a good day, it really is. one of the things that i think people admired, and why they listened to your message, is because you're from that generation that went through the biggest trauma in world history with world war ii. and do you think there were lessons that you learnt during that time when you fought
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that related to today? i think one of the things — we were all comrades throughout the war, wherever you came from, whatever part of life, you were all comrades and we remained comrades, and we were all friends together wherever you came from. and i think that it is it. everybody here, we are comrades in a battle against this nasty virus. the other thing i haven't heard anybody ask you about yet, and has always fascinated me, what do you think your late wife would've made of all of this? she would've thoroughly enjoyed it, but she probably wouldn't. .. she was a rather shy person. she would've thoroughly enjoyed it, but she would've stood back a little
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bit and would've been standing by me and saying, "you're lovely." that's what she would've done, enjoyed it but quietly. yeah, yeah, she would've been very proud, i'm sure. that's right. very, very proud. by now a national treasure, the work for captain sir tom continued. a visit from david beckham saw him honoured as leader of the lionhearts. i'm very excited about meeting you and it's a real pleasure for me to be down here to personally say thank you, and also to present you with a little present from the england team. very kind of you. i'm delighted to receive that honour from you, especially from you. thank you very much indeed. a squad made up from the public who had helped during the year. applause. then, in december, we reunited for a performance in the royal variety show.
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we'd hoped that captain sir tom was going to be there live, but restrictions meant he couldn't, butjoined us virtually for the most emotional and powerful performance. it was such a thrill. i came across captain tom at a time when i needed him, i needed an inspiration, i needed a light at the end of the tunnel, and i saw tom, and i've been privileged to get to know him, as we all have, and he has provided that. he has shown us the strength, the dignity, the determination, the spirit that makes this country so special. he epitomises it. and, sir tom, i salute you, and i thank you from the bottom of my heart. applause. and even at the end of the year, he never slowed down. with magazine covers and setting up his legacy, the captain tom foundation,
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a charity which aims to help the lonely and people with mental health problems. so, tom, i think there is one last thing to do. i think we should sing a little bit of our song together. are you happy to do that? yes. # when you walk through a storm # hold your head up high # and don't be afraid of the dark # at the end of the storm # there's a golden sky # and the sweet silver song of the lark # walk on, walk on # with hope in your heart! # and you'll never walk alone! # you'll never walk alone!
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# and you'll never walk alone # you'll never walk alone! # you'll never walk alone...#
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. 0ur headlines today: gps in england are given extra funding to vaccinate housebound patients ahead of the government's mid—february deadline. workplace covid testing is to be expanded with more companies offered rapid results kits for staff who can't work from home. snow is forecast for much of the uk today. it's already arrived here in kent, where in places we could see up kent, where in places we could see up to 30 centimetres come down. we have some cold days ahead with biting easterly winds. that easterly wind is also going to deliver some pretty heavy snow showers for some. more detail on the areas most likely to be affected coming up. under historic win for scotland the six nations. scotland beat england to lift the calcutta cup
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for the first time at twickenham since 1983. it's sunday the seventh of february. our top story: gps in england are to be paid an extra ten pounds by the nhs for every housebound person they vaccinate. it's part of government measures to protect everyone aged 70 and over, together with frontline health workers, by february the fifteenth. it comes as 18 new mass vaccine centres open tomorrow. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh gp george hobbs is headed out to give around 20 of his patients covid jabs at home. they are too ill or vulnerable to come in for a vaccination. first up is diana garfield. one, two, three, go. she has heart problems and is also losing her sight. there's still hope in the back of my mind, however — all around i still have that hope that something work out.
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it's great, because i've been a gp here for 27 years, and they know me, so i think when they see someone familiar coming, it makes a real difference to the experience. quite a lot of them are quite nervous, and when they see it it is someone they know, that's very reassuring. ashtree surgery in carnforth in lancashire is on track to vaccinate its most vulnerable patients by the middle of this month, but that's not the case everywhere. gps will receive an additional £10 on top of the standard fee for every housebound person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful. it does take significantly longer to go out and visit someone and attend to the necessary precautions on each and every visit, and that takes people away from the vaccination centre, where they could do more next vaccinations in a similar amount of time. so we do need to recognise that.
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it's good they've given this small amount of funding to enable practices to provide vaccinations to this particularly vulnerable group of people as quickly as possible. the latest data shows more than 11.4 million people have received their first dose. that's a rise ofjust over 494,000 on the previous 24—hour reporting period. at this rate of vaccination, the nhs would need to give jabs to an average ofjust under 393,000 people a day in order to meet the government's target of 15,000,000 first doses by the 15th of february. and the scottish government has said it's met its target to vaccinate the over 80s by the fifth of february. there are to be 80 more vaccination sites opening from next week, like the one at blackburn cathedral. the new sites mean thatjabs are now available from more than 100
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large—scale centres, 1000 local gp services, almost 200 pharmacies and over 250 hospitals. businesses in england with more than 50 staff will be given access to rapid coronavirus testing kits. previously the government only offered lateral flow testing to firms with more than 250 staff. the kits provide results in under 30 minutes and will be given to employees who cannot work from home during the pandemic. the oxford astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine offers only limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant — that's according to a new small trial. but the firm said it believed the vaccine could still protect against severe disease. we're joined now by our health reporterjim reed for more on this. jim, is this a concerning development? how concerned should we be about this development? yes, this news is out overnight from the team developing this vaccine at that and astrazeneca. they've been
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running trials in south africa to see how well the vaccine is going to protect against the mutation first discovered there last year. no, this is a small study, only 2000 people. we won't get the full results till tomorrow. the more reassuring news is that the companies says there is some evidence the vaccine would protect against severe disease, but some other news that there could be more limited protection against the more limited protection against the more mild and moderate forms. so in reality what would that mean? if the results were repeated in real life, it might for example stop someone needing hospital treatment, but it would not necessarily stop someone catching this new variant and passing it on others. crucially, tests on other vaccines have shown a similar effect. also this south african variant is not widespread in the uk. only around 100 cases have been confirmed so far. there's a travel ban in place and has been in place since christmas eve to stop people coming in from that part of
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the world. last week as well the team said there vaccine would protect against the variant first discovered in kent in the south—east at least as well as the older version of the virus, so some more reassuring news they are, and the teams say they have already started adapting their vaccine and tweaking it so it does work against the south african variant, or should do. that tweaked, that difference, should be there by the autumn. police are continuing to investigate a series of stabbings that took place in london over the past 48 hours. a 22—year—old man died and nine others were injured in five separate incidents in the croydon area on friday night. another man in his 20s died in kilburn in north—west london yesterday evening. police say they aren't connected and have condemned the violence as "needless and abhorrent". heavy snow could bring significant disruption to the south—east of england in the coming hours. simon is in lydden near dover,
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where an amber weather warning is in place. my my goodness, that coat has taken quite a pounding already. we were talking to you an hour ago when the snow was tumbling down, and it looks like it's tumbled a bit more in the hours since. it's been coming down for about three hours now. initially it was that wet snow that wasn't really settling, but that's changed. it's settling, but that's changed. it's settling on the footpath here. this field has got the blanketing of snow, and just over here is the a2, the main road between dover and canterbury, and pretty difficult conditions on that already. we got a number weather warning in place for all of the day into tomorrow for much of the south—east and for east anglia. that's where the snow is expected to be worst. in parts of kent we could see up to 30 centimetres of snow, and pretty much across the whole of the east of the uk there are warnings for snow and ice from now until wednesday. so
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this is going to be a prolonged cold period. but it's notjust for snow — we are also having to cope with storm darcy, bringing strong gusts of wind, potentially up to 50 mph, in this part of the country. so you've got the snow, the wind and also potential flooding you've got the snow, the wind and also potentialflooding problems too, so all the weather being thrown into this. it's causing some issues — for example in southend in essex, today they've decided in some places that they are going to have to shut coronavirus testing centres. they are hoping to keep the vaccination centres open. but an example of the challenges that lie ahead today — south—eastern in kent are warning people not to travel. potential power cuts and all in all the advice is it's probably best to stay at home. you are almost a walking snowman. you are almost a walking snowman. you certainly will be by eight o'clock, at the rate it's coming down. it's quite a look, isn't it?
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this question might fall into the file marked stupid question, but how nippy is it? well, ijust looked in my car, and it told me it was actually 0 degrees, but when you add in the windchill factor, i'm told today it's going to feel more like —7. so probably don't do like i do and be out here — probably bestjust to watch the snow if it's in your area from the comfort of your own home. did you take my advice and do style jumps? iput jumps? i put the gloves on that chris advised, but maybe i'll do some style jumps to keep warm. but potentially when the camera's turned off... taking my advice and ignoring nina's — that's sound advice. he just wants to get in his warm car, chris. let's leave him to it! if you're waking up to a snowy scene this morning, we'd love to see your pictures. please do send them
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in by email or on twitter. from the comfort of your warm home! a 70—year—old grandfather from old ham has become the oldest man to complete a solo row across the atlantic. frank rothwell arrived in antigua yesterday, completing his journey in 56 days and a week ahead of schedule. frank has raised more than £600,000 for alzheimer's research uk and mike has been following his progress. the coral waters of the caribbean, a paradise after the rattle and roll of the atlantic, and the same view of sea and sky for nearly two months and 3000 miles. and 70—year—old frank rothwell arrived in nelson dockyard in english harbour in antigua as a world record breaker — the oldest person to complete this atlantic challenge and the oldest person to row the ocean solo and unassisted. # well, i am the kind of guy who will never settle down
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#cos where the girls are you know i'm around. after 55 days, two hours and 41 minutes at sea, you might expect frank to show some signs of tiredness. but not him — the life and soul of any party. a lad from 0ldham is now a world champion — is that cool or what? i'm absolutely overwhelmed. the reception we got here — we came into english harbour in antigua, and all the ships, all these massive millionaires' yachts, started hooting their hooters as they came in. it was fantastic. after leading those allowed to be dockside in a spontaneous bit of karaoke, it was time to be reunited with his wife, judith, after their first christmas apart in their 50 years of marriage. after living on freeze—dried food, especially macaroni cheese, for all these weeks, frank is now hoping for a fish salad and a proper bed. but any hardship, he says, has been worth it — he's already raised over £600,000
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for alzheimer's research uk. frank is unstoppable, isn't he? kieran, our cameraman on the floor this morning, said it was that level of energy for four hours. well, frank, there's the pacific next, i suppose. that's what his wife is hoping, i imagine. take on the big one, maybe. as well as offering coronavirus vaccinations at their practices, gps in england will now be paid an additional £10 for every housebound patient they immunise against covid—19. we'rejoined now by gp dr 0llie hart and dr andrea collins, a lecturer in respiratory medicine at the liverpool school of tropical medicine. we've spoken to you before about
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getting out to homebound patients. it must be great to get out there and see them and now have this news from the government that financially it can work for the practices as well. . , �*, ., , well. yeah, absolutely. it's lovely to connect — well. yeah, absolutely. it's lovely to connect with _ well. yeah, absolutely. it's lovely to connect with people _ well. yeah, absolutely. it's lovely to connect with people - - well. yeah, absolutely. it's lovely i to connect with people - people have to connect with people — people have been very isolated. we were very happy to immunise people at home before this announcement, but it's always lovely to have it resourced as well, so we appreciate that. talk us throu . h as well, so we appreciate that. talk us through what _ as well, so we appreciate that. talk us through what the challenges of the home immunisation, because it's very time—consuming, isn't it? obviously we are very grateful for when people get down to the vaccination centres, because it makes it easier to us, but we are used to visiting people at home, our most ill, elderly and disabled people. it's something we are used to. if you take flu vaccines in the winter, we often do that. it's not completely out of the realm of stuff we do, but it certainly more challenging than seeing people in a centre. �* . challenging than seeing people in a centre. . . , ., , centre. andrea, just to bring you centre. andrea, 'ust to bring you
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in, wh centre. andrea, 'ust to bring you an, why is it — centre. andrea, just to bring you in, why is it important in - centre. andrea, just to bring you in, why is it important in terms i centre. andrea, just to bring you | in, why is it important in terms of the spread of the disease to make sure that people who are in their homes are immunised? some would argue — should they be lower down the list? argue - should they be lower down the list? . �* , , the list? that's why the most vulnerable — the list? that's why the most vulnerable also _ the list? that's why the most vulnerable also important i the list? that's why the most vulnerable also important to | vulnerable also important to protect. _ vulnerable also important to protect, because many of them will be having _ protect, because many of them will be having carers, either paid or unpaid — be having carers, either paid or unpaid informal carers, on a daily basis, _ unpaid informal carers, on a daily basis, may— unpaid informal carers, on a daily basis, may be multiple times. so they are — basis, may be multiple times. so they are actually really, really important to protect, because they are some _ important to protect, because they are some of the people at highest risk from — are some of the people at highest risk from death occurring, coronavirus or ending up in hospital~ _ coronavirus or ending up in hospital-— coronavirus or ending up in hosital. �* . �* ,. ., , hospital. andrea, i'm conscious i said london _ hospital. andrea, i'm conscious i said london rather— hospital. andrea, i'm conscious i said london rather than - hospital. andrea, i'm conscious i j said london rather than liveable, for which i apologise. let me talk to you about another element of your work which is fascinating and could prove crucial, this idea about potentially mixing vaccines — so perhaps having a jab of one and however many weeks later another, and whether that's a good thing or a bad thing. tell me about the work you are doing in that field. we 'ust started recruiting i you are doing in that field. we 'ust started recruiting to i you are doing in that field. we 'ust started recruiting to a i you are doing in that field. we 'ust started recruiting to a place i
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you are doing in that field. we just started recruiting to a place called | started recruiting to a place called comcov, _ started recruiting to a place called comcov, run by oxford, a follow—up from _ comcov, run by oxford, a follow—up from the _ comcov, run by oxford, a follow—up from the previous study, mixing the pfiler— from the previous study, mixing the pfizer vaccine and another, called the prime — pfizer vaccine and another, called the prime and the boost, and it may be that— the prime and the boost, and it may be that in— the prime and the boost, and it may be that in the future we will be able _ be that in the future we will be able to— be that in the future we will be able to get further licensed vaccines into that, because what we need _ vaccines into that, because what we need to— vaccines into that, because what we need to do— vaccines into that, because what we need to do obviously for the uk and globally— need to do obviously for the uk and globally is _ need to do obviously for the uk and globally is workout — is it possibly to have _ globally is workout — is it possibly to have one — globally is workout — is it possibly to have one of one brand and one of another? _ to have one of one brand and one of another? is— to have one of one brand and one of another? is that better for the disease — another? is that better for the disease and length of protection as well - _ disease and length of protection as well — does it protect you longer and better— well — does it protect you longer and better against different strains? 50 and better against different strains? ., , _ strains? so potentially by mixing and matching — strains? so potentially by mixing and matching there _ strains? so potentially by mixing and matching there could - strains? so potentially by mixing and matching there could be i strains? so potentially by mixing i and matching there could be stronger protection than using the same one twice. �* , ,., ., twice. there's the potential - we don't know _ twice. there's the potential - we don't know yet. _ twice. there's the potential - we don't know yet, but _ twice. there's the potential - we don't know yet, but there - twice. there's the potential - we don't know yet, but there is - twice. there's the potential - we don't know yet, but there is the | don't know yet, but there is the potential— don't know yet, but there is the potential that it might be better. but it _ potential that it might be better. but it will definitely, almost definitely, be better for supply issues — definitely, be better for supply issues. you could rock up to have your— issues. you could rock up to have your vaccination done, and had pfizer— your vaccination done, and had pfizer last _ your vaccination done, and had pfizer last time and there may be a supply— pfizer last time and there may be a supply issue this time and you might need oxford is the second. so it
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really— need oxford is the second. so it really is — need oxford is the second. so it really is much better for supply and rolling _ really is much better for supply and rolling out — really is much better for supply and rolling out vaccines as well. it may have _ rolling out vaccines as well. it may have that — rolling out vaccines as well. it may have that added benefit as well. just coming back to you, doc are hard, we heara hard, we hear a lot of positive headlines about vaccine rollout after months of rather negative headlines. from your point of view on the front live, how you reflect on the front live, how you reflect on it is going and the challenges that lie ahead. it on it is going and the challenges that lie ahead.— on it is going and the challenges that lie ahead. it has been really restorative _ that lie ahead. it has been really restorative in _ that lie ahead. it has been really restorative in many _ that lie ahead. it has been really restorative in many ways, - that lie ahead. it has been really restorative in many ways, the i that lie ahead. it has been really - restorative in many ways, the chance to do something positive back after having so much despair up to now. that has been fantastic. in general practice is all about relationships and connecting with people so the chance to go into people's homes and re—establish connection. isolation is such a dehumanising thing, isn't it? so it is important. there is a challenge to maintain that. there are huge numbers of people we need to do but we are up for it. this is what general practice does best and
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we are ready for this.— we are ready for this. presumably, the work that _ we are ready for this. presumably, the work that andrea _ we are ready for this. presumably, the work that andrea is _ we are ready for this. presumably, the work that andrea is doing - we are ready for this. presumably, l the work that andrea is doing would be significant for your work if the type of vaccine you are receiving and putting up for the second dose, especially for the elderly and vulnerable, that would be a breakthrough for you, it would make things easier. this breakthrough for you, it would make things easier-— things easier. this is a classic sort of example _ things easier. this is a classic sort of example of— things easier. this is a classic sort of example of great - things easier. this is a classic - sort of example of great healthcare. when you have the science and we are grateful for that, when you have the science and we are gratefulfor that, the when you have the science and we are grateful for that, the speed and the pace of science and getting the vaccines to us and then we do our bit of making sure that people can safely have the vaccine and people feel that they are not just a number and that they are valued and we do this in a collective community of way. it combines the best of what we are good at in the nhs, i think. indie are good at in the nhs, i think. we are good at in the nhs, i think. we are grateful to both of you for your time. and doctor hart clearly really enjoying getting out there on his bike and meeting patients, some of whom will not have seen many people at all for almost a year and receiving that vaccine will be major for them.
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receiving that vaccine will be ma'or for them. �* , receiving that vaccine will be ma'or for them. �*, . .~' receiving that vaccine will be ma'or for them. �*, . a ., for them. let's check in now with susan for — for them. let's check in now with susan for a _ for them. let's check in now with susan for a look _ for them. let's check in now with susan for a look at _ for them. let's check in now with susan for a look at the _ for them. let's check in now with susan for a look at the weather l for them. let's check in now with i susan for a look at the weather this morning because there is a lot of it happening. morning because there is a lot of it ha eninu. ., ., morning because there is a lot of it haueninu. ., ., morning because there is a lot of it haueninu. ., . ., happening. how are you? i am well. it is not actually _ happening. how are you? i am well. it is not actually that _ happening. how are you? i am well. it is not actually that great - happening. how are you? i am well. it is not actually that great for - it is not actually that great for getting out and about today and there will be some nice sunshine for some parts of the uk as the day shapes but it is icy out there at the moment and for some there will be heavy snow to contend with. let's see what is happening in kent already. but i will show this cold cold air dragging down from the at dig on easterly wind. you'll notice that that blue is a bit lighter to the far south of uk at the moment. really cold air is still digging southwards so if you are underneath this tail end of darcy at the moment across eastern england you may well see more rain and sleet and snow but it is likely to increasingly turn to snow in the hours ahead. the met office has put a marker in the sand without ample warning suggesting there be a significant disruption and you can see blue on the chart for the hero now but we anticipate as it turns to snow, up to 20
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centimetres in some area and the wind on the tail as well blows the snow around blizzards drifting as an additional hazard. that strong easterly streaming showers across northern england and into scotland once again. significant totals are possible here but everyone will have a cold wind. those of the gusts you saw there and those black circles. these are the temperatures on the thermometer but you need to combine thermometer but you need to combine the two today to think about how it will really feel if you step outside and even in some of the best of the sunshine towards the west of the uk it will feel sub zero, more like morning —— —3 or —1i. through the evening and overnight as darcy pulls away, the easterly wind remains strong and what that may do is bring a greater risk of lines of heavy showers further west across towards the midlands, maybe even east of wales across more of northern england and scotland, perhaps a few for northern ireland. that is frost overnight and that snow will settle and if it falls ice is a risk again on monday because we have so much
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surface water hanging around. still through monday, notice these lines of showers streaming in. if you fall between the lines you will probably just have a cold day was sunny spells and if you were in one of the lines of showers you could actually see a bit of snow piling up. again, like today, you must combine those low temperatures with the strength of the wind and it will feel more like minus four —5. the isobars do not really shift as we go through the week ahead. they open up a little bit so we keep it cold easterly wind on into midweek made just for a little lighter. that should also result in fewer showers but we are family parked in this cold air now as we look at the week ahead. a lot of wide spread frost by night, chilly days and still some snowfall for eastern counties as well but the biggest threat, as we talked about, is for the county stretching from norfolk down to kent through today. these are the pictures at the moment
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in lid and in kent where simon was earlier with this big code. simon is saying that this is setting in now for a good few days, potentially all the way through to wednesday so the advice is, as ever, to check in on those around you if you can. the elderly and vulnerable in your community to make sure that they are keeping warm and well. send community to make sure that they are keeping warm and well.— keeping warm and well. send us a icture if keeping warm and well. send us a picture if you _ keeping warm and well. send us a picture if you have _ keeping warm and well. send us a picture if you have a _ keeping warm and well. send us a picture if you have a spot - keeping warm and well. send us a picture if you have a spot of- keeping warm and well. send us a picture if you have a spot of white| picture if you have a spot of white stuff out the window and it is a dig coat day, that is right. that is the technical term. _ many livestock markets and agricultural shows have been cancelled during the pandemic — leaving farmers and those who work in the countryside even more isolated. this has raised concerns about the mental health of those working in agriculture. our environment and rural affairs correspondent claire marshall has been speaking to farmers about the struggles they face. i don't think i will be here if it wasn't for my daughter.- i don't think i will be here if it wasn't for my daughter. andy and this daughter _ wasn't for my daughter. andy and this daughter are _ wasn't for my daughter. andy and this daughter are a _ wasn't for my daughter. andy and this daughter are a team, - wasn't for my daughter. andy and j this daughter are a team, running the family farm in leicestershire. i
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lost some friends through suicide and that sort of hit home. tz�*icki lost some friends through suicide and that sort of hit home. vicki was once a beautician. _ and that sort of hit home. vicki was once a beautician. she _ and that sort of hit home. vicki was once a beautician. she joined - and that sort of hit home. vicki was once a beautician. she joined him i once a beautician. shejoined him when he felt he could not cope anymore. they have both struggled with their mental hills. indie anymore. they have both struggled with their mental hills.— with their mental hills. we have this image _ with their mental hills. we have this image of — with their mental hills. we have this image of big _ with their mental hills. we have this image of big butch - with their mental hills. we have this image of big butch rugby i with their mental hills. we have i this image of big butch rugby place or big men but mental hills does not discriminate, it can affect anybody at any time. it is hard to take advice when you were in a dark place. advice when you were in a dark lace. ~ , advice when you were in a dark lace. . , . , place. we still have bad days, it is just coping through the bad days l place. we still have bad days, it is i just coping through the bad days and at least _ just coping through the bad days and at least now we have more of an understanding of each other mentally healthwise. the understanding of each other mentally healthwise. . ., ., ., , understanding of each other mentally healthwise. ., ., , . healthwise. the coronavirus pandemic is havin: a healthwise. the coronavirus pandemic is having a huge _ healthwise. the coronavirus pandemic is having a huge impact. _ healthwise. the coronavirus pandemic is having a huge impact. it _ healthwise. the coronavirus pandemic is having a huge impact. it was - is having a huge impact. it was shows like this, key events in the countryside calendar that would help to keep the agricultural community together. most were cancelled. livestock markets eliminated. on top of that, the weather. climate change is altering the seasons. it has been the coldest january for over a decade and this after a wet summer
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when crops did not grow well. most of us are distanced _ when crops did not grow well. what of us are distanced from where our food comes from and we do not understand the amount of work that goes into it, even though there is talk about the subsidies farmers get they make very little muggy. most of them subsist on a level that you and i would not be willing to accept. you are not listening to me! i cannot— you are not listening to me! i cannot stand it when you do not listen _ cannot stand it when you do not listen. , , ., ., listen. this is a mental hills awareness campaign. - listen. this is a mental hills awareness campaign. at. listen. this is a mental hills i awareness campaign. at long listen. this is a mental hills - awareness campaign. at long last it is no longer a taboo subject. is no longer a taboo sub'ect. mental ill-health is no longer a taboo sub'ect. mental ill-hearth is — is no longer a taboo sub'ect. mental ill-health is the h is no longer a taboo sub'ect. mental ill-health is the biggest_ is no longer a taboo subject. mental ill-health is the biggest hidden - ill—health is the biggest hidden problem in farming today. and we also know that 98% of them agree that talking about it will remove any stigma attached. the largest survey ever _ any stigma attached. the largest survey ever undertaken - any stigma attached. the largest survey ever undertaken into - any stigma attached. the largest survey ever undertaken into the l survey ever undertaken into the mental hills of those in agriculture hasjust been mental hills of those in agriculture has just been launched. bad mental hills of those in agriculture hasjust been launched.— mental hills of those in agriculture hasjust been launched. has 'ust been launched. bad days are not hasjust been launched. bad days are not the end of— hasjust been launched. bad days are not the end of the _ hasjust been launched. bad days are not the end of the world. _ hasjust been launched. bad days are not the end of the world. everybody. not the end of the world. everybody has them. . ~ not the end of the world. everybody has them. a .,, , , has them. vicki hopes she -- her in her father's — has them. vicki hopes she -- her in her father's story _ has them. vicki hopes she -- her in her father's story will _ has them. vicki hopes she -- her in her father's story will help - has them. vicki hopes she -- her in her father's story will help others i her father's story will help others see there can be a bright future in
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farming. see there can be a bright future in farmina. , , , ., see there can be a bright future in farmin.g , , ., farming. just remember that the bad da s do farming. just remember that the bad days do end — farming. just remember that the bad days do end and _ farming. just remember that the bad days do end and tomorrow _ farming. just remember that the bad days do end and tomorrow is - farming. just remember that the bad days do end and tomorrow is a - farming. just remember that the bad days do end and tomorrow is a new. days do end and tomorrow is a new day. days do end and tomorrow is a new da . ., ~ days do end and tomorrow is a new da . . ~' . , ., , days do end and tomorrow is a new da. .«r day. talking about it is always a aood day. talking about it is always a good start- _ we're joined now by dairy sales specialist, james hosking and countryfile presenter tom heap. he has been reporting on this issue and we will talk about that a little later. starting with you, james. what has been your experience of mental hills in farming? i know you have had trouble in the past. what is specific do you think to agriculture that makes it difficult to talk about?— to talk about? good morning. it comes down _ to talk about? good morning. it comes down to _ to talk about? good morning. it comes down to the _ to talk about? good morning. it comes down to the rural- to talk about? good morning. it. comes down to the rural isolation and, as we were saying, farmers are cried —— quite rough and tough rugby tykes. always strong and unfortunately mental hills can be overlooked because they feel they cannot take down the stigma attached to it. �* , ., . cannot take down the stigma attached to it. �* ., cannot take down the stigma attached toit.�* ., , , to it. and you had some problems with the farm _ to it. and you had some problems with the farm that _ to it. and you had some problems with the farm that had _ to it. and you had some problems with the farm that had been - to it. and you had some problems with the farm that had been in -
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to it. and you had some problems. with the farm that had been in your family for many generations. that is typical. how much did that financial rollercoasters add to the pressure? massively, really because quite often your mortgage is relying on you paying the farm bills or, for rented farmers, their rain. they require that income from the sale of their milk and my lung milk was not making a lot of muggy at that point and they get deeper and deeper into debt. fight! and they get deeper and deeper into debt. �* ,., ., . i. debt. and the point at which your family decided _ debt. and the point at which your family decided it _ debt. and the point at which your family decided it was _ debt. and the point at which your family decided it was time - debt. and the point at which your family decided it was time to - debt. and the point at which your family decided it was time to sell| family decided it was time to sell the cowles, what sort of impact that have on you? it the cowles, what sort of impact that have on you?— have on you? it had a very strange im act have on you? it had a very strange impact on — have on you? it had a very strange impact on me _ have on you? it had a very strange impact on me because _ have on you? it had a very strange impact on me because i _ have on you? it had a very strange impact on me because i had - have on you? it had a very strange impact on me because i had three| impact on me because i had three years of various issues in the family at which point i had always gone to work and it distracted me from what was going on around me. but once we sold the cows i went out into the yard the next morning and there was silence. there was no work to do and there was nothing to throw myself into. you to do and there was nothing to throw myself into-— to do and there was nothing to throw m self into. ., .., i. , .., myself into. you come -- you become incredibly close _ myself into. you come -- you become incredibly close to _ myself into. you come -- you become
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incredibly close to them. _ myself into. you come -- you become incredibly close to them. the - myself into. you come -- you become incredibly close to them. the cows - incredibly close to them. the cows are like family, _ incredibly close to them. the cows are like family, you _ incredibly close to them. the cows are like family, you know - incredibly close to them. the cows are like family, you know most - incredibly close to them. the cows are like family, you know most of| are like family, you know most of them by name and number. tom, let's brina ou them by name and number. tom, let's bring you win- — them by name and number. tom, let's bring you win- it _ them by name and number. tom, let's bring you win. it is _ them by name and number. tom, let's bring you win. it is powerful— bring you win. it is powerful hearing that from james about the importance of identity and if your identity is taken away because of circumstance, that is bound to have an implication for your mental health and then add to that the isolation for many farmers working alone and you can see why this is such a big issue. ithink such a big issue. i think even more than many careers, the self in farming is identified with yourjob. you identify as a farmer. so if that is you identify as a farmer. so if that i ., you identify as a farmer. so if that i . ., you identify as a farmer. so if that is threatened or undermined or you feel it suffer. _ is threatened or undermined or you feel it suffer, that _ is threatened or undermined or you feel it suffer, that suffering - is threatened or undermined or you feel it suffer, that suffering comes| feel it suffer, that suffering comes to you _ feel it suffer, that suffering comes to you as— feel it suffer, that suffering comes to you as an individual, at least that— to you as an individual, at least that is— to you as an individual, at least that is how— to you as an individual, at least that is how you perceive it. and then, _ that is how you perceive it. and then, as — that is how you perceive it. and then, as you mention, the other thing _ then, as you mention, the other thing often _ then, as you mention, the other thing often talked about is the ancestral burden, if you like, the feeling _ ancestral burden, if you like, the feeling that my father, my parents, my mother— feeling that my father, my parents, my mother before me manage this farm all the _ my mother before me manage this farm all the way— my mother before me manage this farm
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all the way back generations, why can't _ all the way back generations, why can't i? _ all the way back generations, why can't i? that adds to it. and then the isolation gives you both time to dwell— the isolation gives you both time to dwell on— the isolation gives you both time to dwell on things and an opportunity in some _ dwell on things and an opportunity in some ways for farmers who really do reach _ in some ways for farmers who really do reach the — in some ways for farmers who really do reach the end. find in some ways for farmers who really do reach the end.— do reach the end. and also many of us are experiencing that difficulty between separating home life from work life and many people are working from home at the moment but thatis working from home at the moment but that is quite normal for you. drawing that distinction between i am working and not working must be quite hard. i am working and not working must be uuite hard. ., �* ~' am working and not working must be uuite hard. ., �* ,, ., quite hard. i don't think in farming ou ever quite hard. i don't think in farming you ever really _ quite hard. i don't think in farming you ever really do _ quite hard. i don't think in farming you ever really do draw _ quite hard. i don't think in farming you ever really do draw that - you ever really do draw that distinction because regardless of whether it is your child's birthday or christmas day, if your have a car —— if you have a cow with an issue you will put 100% into that animal sometimes at the expense of your family. to what extent are we breaking down barriers in the farming industry, in rural communities as far as a health concerns are concerned? particularly, i guess, the central
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themes. those of starting the conversation. without those conversations and people being willing to share a personal pain, there is no real way of addressing thing and this conversation does seem to be starting.— seem to be starting. definitely. that is the _ seem to be starting. definitely. that is the one _ seem to be starting. definitely. that is the one bright _ seem to be starting. definitely. that is the one bright spot - seem to be starting. definitely. that is the one bright spot in i seem to be starting. definitely. that is the one bright spot in a| that is the one bright spot in a dark— that is the one bright spot in a dark picture. sadly, the overall figures — dark picture. sadly, the overall figures for— dark picture. sadly, the overall figures for mental health and even farmers— figures for mental health and even farmers taking their own lives has not changed much in the last ten years— not changed much in the last ten years or— not changed much in the last ten years or so — not changed much in the last ten years or so but while we are beginning to see, certainly outside in the _ beginning to see, certainly outside in the last— beginning to see, certainly outside in the last three or five years is a much _ in the last three or five years is a much more — in the last three or five years is a much more open conversation. it is definitely— much more open conversation. it is definitely happening within society in generaland perhaps definitely happening within society in general and perhaps it takes a little _ in general and perhaps it takes a little longer to reach the most the weekend — little longer to reach the most the weekend of the spectrum that we heard about. but there are so many organisations out there. people like mind your— organisations out there. people like mind your head campaign that has been _ mind your head campaign that has been launched today, there are many different— been launched today, there are many different ways you can now reach out for help _ different ways you can now reach out for help and — different ways you can now reach out for help and people can talk about
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it. for help and people can talk about it there _ for help and people can talk about it. there are many different well-run _ it. there are many different well—run and subtly organised organisations where you can just start— organisations where you can just start with — organisations where you can just start with a chat. it is not heavy from _ start with a chat. it is not heavy from the — start with a chat. it is not heavy from the beginning. and then if you want to— from the beginning. and then if you want to take it in a more personal direction — want to take it in a more personal direction you can. i really do think that this _ direction you can. i really do think that this has been the change. young farmers— that this has been the change. young farmers in— that this has been the change. young farmers in particular, now list mentai— farmers in particular, now list mental health as nearly 90% of them listed _ mental health as nearly 90% of them listed as— mental health as nearly 90% of them listed as the biggest single hidden problem facing farming so they really _ problem facing farming so they really are aware now, certainly among — really are aware now, certainly among the younger generation. it may take time _ among the younger generation. it may take time to _ among the younger generation. it may take time to trickle up to the older folks _ take time to trickle up to the older folks. ., ~' take time to trickle up to the older folks. . ~ , ., take time to trickle up to the older folks. . ~ i. ., i. ., folks. thank you to you both for shafinu folks. thank you to you both for sharing your _ folks. thank you to you both for sharing your experiences - folks. thank you to you both for sharing your experiences this i sharing your experiences this morning. we appreciated. raising awareness. _ morning. we appreciated. raising awareness, increased _ morning. we appreciated. raising awareness, increased awarenessl morning. we appreciated. raising - awareness, increased awareness with the younger generation are so important. you can hear more about this report on country file tonight on bbc one. fishd this report on country file tonight on bbc one-— on bbc one. and if you require details of _ on bbc one. and if you require details of organisations - on bbc one. and if you require details of organisations that i on bbc one. and if you require i details of organisations that offer advice and support for mental health
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you can go online. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at nine o'clock. andrew, what do you have on today's programme? here is what i think — there's only one really important question this morning. how well do these vaccines work against the new variant? i have a lineup designed to get us to the answer. i have the minister in charge of the vaccine rollouts which have been so successful. i have professor sarah gilbert, in charge of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, and i'm also talking to ed miliband, former leader of the labor party, and sian berry, leader of the green party, so a very busy and interesting over at 9am. stay with us, plenty more still to come on breakfast.
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hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. more than 1000 gp practices in england have been helping to vaccinate the elderly and vulnerble against coronavirus. they'll now be paid an additional £10 for immunising housebound patients. it comes as 18 new mass vaccination centres are due to open in england tomorrow, bringing the total to more than 100. we'rejoined now by dr nikki kanani, medical director of primary care at nhs england.
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good morning to you. thanks for talking to us. how significant a moment do you see this as, trying to ultimately make it easier for gps to get out and about to some of their most hard to reach patients? thank ou. i most hard to reach patients? thank you- i have — most hard to reach patients? thank you- i have to _ most hard to reach patients? thank you. i have to first _ most hard to reach patients? thank you. i have to first of— most hard to reach patients? thank you. i have to first of all— most hard to reach patients? thank you. i have to first of all pay - you. i have to first of all pay tribute to my general practice colleagues. it is gps, but it's not just gps — its nurses, community nurses, admin staff, who have been incredible. we had farmers it's coming out in the snow, and it has been a really energising effort. nothing is stopping our colleagues to make sure our most vulnerable patients get the vaccine —— we have had pharmacists. you will have heard some of the story, notjust the snow. but we expect more of that. the quite terrible wet conditions. i
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know doctor azim last week did more than 100 housebound patients in a day, and this funding isjust something to support them, so whether it's to get extra staff or to protect their teams back during the dayjob, because remember, they are doing the dayjob as well — i'm looking after people with covid in the community, so there's a lot of pressure on general practices at the moment, and this is to make sure we are getting out and supporting our vulnerable people. what are getting out and supporting our vulnerable people.— are getting out and supporting our vulnerable people. what do you say to our viewer _ vulnerable people. what do you say to our viewer who _ vulnerable people. what do you say to our viewer who says, _ vulnerable people. what do you say to our viewer who says, why - vulnerable people. what do you say to our viewer who says, why do i vulnerable people. what do you say to our viewer who says, why do gps need an extra £10 incentive to do this? and why are people who are housebound not vaccinated much earlier, given there is a likelihood they are particularly vulnerable presumably because of underlying conditions? i understand, and i wouldn't consider this an incentive — this isjust wouldn't consider this an incentive — this is just to wouldn't consider this an incentive — this isjust to make it wouldn't consider this an incentive — this is just to make it work. practices have been vaccinating the housebound, let's be clear about that. but we had to start when we
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had the oxford astrazeneca vaccine, because it's much more transportable and comes in smaller doses you can take into a house, vaccinate somebody and go to another house and vaccinate somebody else. with the pfizer, you are not able to do that. it took a little while to get going, but the moment people are able to use the oxford astrazeneca vaccine in the way that i mentioned, people were out there and delivering the vaccine. remember, they've also been really behind the drive to make sure all other care homes have been offered the vaccine, and that was by the 31st of january. that's over 10,000 care homes that our teams have been going into to make sure they've been protected. so i promise you, every day of the week our teams are doing everything they can to protect those who need to be protected, so those priority care cohorts want to fall, as soon as possible. cohorts want to fall, as soon as ossible. ., a cohorts want to fall, as soon as ossible. ., ,~' , ., cohorts want to fall, as soon as ossible. ., ., , possible. let me ask you about this news this morning _ possible. let me ask you about this news this morning about _ possible. let me ask you about this
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news this morning about the - possible. let me ask you about this| news this morning about the oxford astrazeneca vaccine small trial — and i appreciate it is still early stages and trying to understand the consequences of these trials — which suggests the vaccine may only offer limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant. how worried if at all should we be about that? last variant. how worried if at all should we be about that? at the moment i want _ should we be about that? at the moment i want to _ should we be about that? at the moment i want to reassure i should we be about that? at the l moment i want to reassure people that all the evidence and all the research that the vaccine teams have done shows that the vaccine is very protective, and particularly against hospitalisation and death from covid, and that is what is key. so when you get off at the vaccine, please say yes — please take your vaccine. however, we do know that a little bit like flu, people who design vaccines, who create vaccines, do have to keep looking at what that vaccine contains, because we often have two, like the flu, offer the vaccine on a yearly basis to reflect any changes in strains of the virus. so that is something that
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we are thinking about, and we are working very closely with scientists to understand what we will need to do after we have vaccinated other country in this first phase of the vaccination programme. share country in this first phase of the vaccination programme. are you confident that _ vaccination programme. are you confident that by _ vaccination programme. are you confident that by mate - vaccination programme. are you confident that by mate all- vaccination programme. are you confident that by mate all over l vaccination programme. are you i confident that by mate all over 50s will be vaccinated, as the government is promising? —— by may? i've never seen anything quite as incredible as the vaccine programme — teams working across the nhs, behind—the—scenes, military teams — everyone working together to do this. as i said, ourfirst commitment was offering to or lower care homes by the 31st of january are really confident promise we will make progress with those cohorts want to four by the 15th of february, and just keep going, so as long as supply allows, we will keep prioritising people and making sure they get there vaccine. a, prioritising people and making sure they get there vaccine.— prioritising people and making sure they get there vaccine. a quick word about testing _ they get there vaccine. a quick word about testing it. _ they get there vaccine. a quick word about testing it. we _ they get there vaccine. a quick word about testing it. we were _ they get there vaccine. a quick word
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about testing it. we were reporting l about testing it. we were reporting about testing it. we were reporting about this plan to expand the number of workplaces for people who have to go into a workplace at the moment to be able to have these rapid turnaround tests. how accurate are they, these lateral flow tests? can people be confident in them? the lateral flow _ people be confident in them? tue: lateral flow tests — we will take them, because part of our roles in them, because part of our roles in the nhs are to keep us and our teams safe. they are very helpful tests and give a good understanding of whether you are carrying the coronavirus. but they are not everything. we still have to rely on the pcr, the swab testing, and we still have to rely on really basic things — if you have symptoms, you stay at home, you isolate, you have a proper pcr test. and we still have to rely on our really cool guidance, which is washing our hands, wearing masks and maintaining social distancing. —— call guidance. irate distancing. -- call guidance. we appreciate _ distancing. —— call guidance. we appreciate your time this morning. thank you very much, have a good
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day. i loved it when she said it was just incredible, she's never seen anything like it. after all of the negative headlines of the last year — yes, quite. and smiles! how are you doing? i think you are referring to the rugby, which was the scotland wind — was that what you were talking about, the scotland win over england? not heard much about it this morning. my morning. my english husband did tell me i had to be more gracious in victory. you've done well so far. but you shouldn't be dancing on the kitchen table. anyway, we'll come to the rugby in a moment, because we will start with the cricket. england are playing currently in india. after england's batsmen dominated india over the opening two days of the first test in chennai, it's now down to the bowlers to keep joe root�*s side on top. and that's
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exactly what they're doing. afterfinally being bowled out for 579 in theirfirst innings, things got even better for england aas jofra archer took two early wickets. shubman gill the second man to go here with james anderson taking a low catch. that brought india's star man virat kohli to the crease. one of the biggest names in world cricket, but he could only make 11, falling to dom bess to leave the home side up against it. and in the last few moments bess has taken another wicket, so that leaves them 72 44. now to football, and manchester united missed the chance to go level on points with leaders manchester city after a dramatic 3—3 draw with everton at old trafford. united went 2—0 up in the first half, thanks to goals from edison cavani and then this stunner from bruno fernandes. everton drew level after the break, but united thought they had won it after they took the lead again thanks to scott mctominay. however, in the 95th minute, everton snatched a point thanks to dominic calvert lewin with the last kick of the game. so a disappointing end to ole gunnar solskjaer�*s 100th
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match in charge at the club. celtic won back—to—back games in the scottish premiership for the first time since december as they beat motherwell 2—1. 0dsonne edouard scored their second goal. celtic are 20 points behind leaders rangers with a game in hand. rangers are at hamilton in a midday kick off later. well, scotland achieved an historic victory yesterday, winning at twickenham for the first time since 1983. england's world cup winning scrum half matt dawson described the 11—6 victory as a defining point in scottish rugby. elsewhere france announced their six nations credentials by thrashing italy and today wales and ireland play in cardiff. i'm joined now by former scotland international john beattie and rugby reporter laurenjenkins.
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thanks forjoining us this morning — john, great hat by the way. how did it feel watching that victory yesterday, and did you manage to get any sort of celebration? it feels like the wrong day _ any sort of celebration? it feels like the wrong day to _ any sort of celebration? it feels like the wrong day to give i any sort of celebration? it feels like the wrong day to give up i like the wrong day to give up drinking, to be perfectly honest. way back when we won in 83, it was kind of against the grain. we signed the rooms to the english team captains — the drinks to the english team captain's room, and watching that game, i was so pleased for the boys. fantastic. you that game, i was so pleased for the boys. fantastic.— that game, i was so pleased for the boys. fantastic. you mentioned, 38 ears a . o boys. fantastic. you mentioned, 38 years ago you _ boys. fantastic. you mentioned, 38 years ago you were _ boys. fantastic. you mentioned, 38 years ago you were a _ boys. fantastic. you mentioned, 38 years ago you were a 25-year-old i years ago you were a 25—year—old playing and outside the last time scotland won at twickenham. are you quite glad that's been put to bed? in some bizarre way, it's quite selfish, isn't it, thinking — i am on the record books? we were texting each other, and we all said the same thing — let's hope they win today, get rid of this record. it was about record. it's a little bit
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embarrassing, because i am in the broadcast business like you, when people say to you — you played back then, john, and it's nice that they've done it. so yeah, it's good that it's gone. they've done it. so yeah, it's good that it's gone-— that it's gone. yeah, i think there miaht be that it's gone. yeah, i think there might be a _ that it's gone. yeah, i think there might be a few — that it's gone. yeah, i think there might be a few sore _ that it's gone. yeah, i think there might be a few sore heads - that it's gone. yeah, i think there might be a few sore heads in i might be a few sore heads in scotland this morning. lauren, if we can come to you now, as we've seen, anything can happen, can't it? but whales have been struggling of late, and wayne pivac�*s honeymoon period is over. and wayne pivac's honeymoon period is over. , . ,., and wayne pivac's honeymoon period isover. , . . is over. very much so. wayne pivac is over. very much so. wayne pivac is under a — is over. very much so. wayne pivac is under a lot _ is over. very much so. wayne pivac is under a lot of— is over. very much so. wayne pivac is under a lot of pressure, - is over. very much so. wayne pivac is under a lot of pressure, and i is under a lot of pressure, and there's— is under a lot of pressure, and there's a — is under a lot of pressure, and there's a break clause after two years— there's a break clause after two years of— there's a break clause after two years of his contract, so he was always— years of his contract, so he was always going to be judged on this six nations. wales have won two tests— six nations. wales have won two tests in— six nations. wales have won two tests in the last 12, and those have come _ tests in the last 12, and those have come against italy and georgia. before — come against italy and georgia. before that they were in a world cup semi-final — before that they were in a world cup semi—final. so they haven't achieved in the _ semi—final. so they haven't achieved in the last— semi—final. so they haven't achieved in the last 12 — semi—final. so they haven't achieved in the last 12 months. that said, they— in the last 12 months. that said, they picked a pretty experienced
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squad _ they picked a pretty experienced squad to— they picked a pretty experienced squad to go up ireland today, and experienced pack in particular, the likes of— experienced pack in particular, the likes of kevin owens, alan wynne jones _ likes of kevin owens, alan wynne jones back. those are the sorts of players _ jones back. those are the sorts of players that are going to be fuelled by emotion to beat ireland today, and the _ by emotion to beat ireland today, and the sort of players that are informed — and the sort of players that are informed to do it hopefully. as you mentioned. _ informed to do it hopefully. as you mentioned, alun _ informed to do it hopefully. as you mentioned, alun wyn _ informed to do it hopefully. as you mentioned, alun wyn jones - informed to do it hopefully. as you mentioned, alun wyn jones back l informed to do it hopefully. as you i mentioned, alun wyn jones back from mentioned, alun wynjones back from injury, which is a boost. but ireland has made a few surprised picks. would you say they are favourites in cardiff? i’d picks. would you say they are favourites in cardiff?— picks. would you say they are favourites in cardiff? i'd say they are favourites, _ favourites in cardiff? i'd say they are favourites, but _ favourites in cardiff? i'd say they are favourites, but that - favourites in cardiff? i'd say they are favourites, but that target i are favourites, but that target doesn't — are favourites, but that target doesn't always _ are favourites, but that target doesn't always help _ are favourites, but that target doesn't always help teams. i are favourites, but that target - doesn't always help teams. sometimes it's the _ doesn't always help teams. sometimes it's the teams _ doesn't always help teams. sometimes it's the teams under— doesn't always help teams. sometimes it's the teams under less _ doesn't always help teams. sometimes it's the teams under less pressure i it's the teams under less pressure that perform _ it's the teams under less pressure that perform. but _ it's the teams under less pressure that perform. but he's _ it's the teams under less pressure that perform. but he's been - it's the teams under less pressure | that perform. but he's been forced into some — that perform. but he's been forced into some of— that perform. but he's been forced into some of those _ that perform. but he's been forced into some of those changes. - that perform. but he's been forcedl into some of those changes. caelyn doris _ into some of those changes. caelyn doris is _ into some of those changes. caelyn doris is out — into some of those changes. caelyn doris is out. some _ into some of those changes. caelyn doris is out. some players - into some of those changes. caelyn doris is out. some players need i into some of those changes. caelyn doris is out. some players need a l doris is out. some players need a bil doris is out. some players need a big game — doris is out. some players need a big game today _ doris is out. some players need a big game today. the _ doris is out. some players need a big game today. the likes - doris is out. some players need a big game today. the likes of- doris is out. some players need a i big game today. the likes ofjohnny sexton, _ big game today. the likes ofjohnny sexton, james _ big game today. the likes ofjohnny sexton, james ryan, _ big game today. the likes ofjohnny sexton, james ryan, who _ big game today. the likes ofjohnny sexton, james ryan, who was i big game today. the likes ofjohnny sexton, james ryan, who was a i big game today. the likes ofjohnny. sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for— sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for the _ sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for the lions— sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for the lions a _ sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for the lions a few _ sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for the lions a few months - sexton, james ryan, who was a shoe in for the lions a few months ago, i in for the lions a few months ago, hasn't _ in for the lions a few months ago, hasn't perhaps— in for the lions a few months ago, hasn't perhaps performed - in for the lions a few months ago, hasn't perhaps performed to - in for the lions a few months ago, | hasn't perhaps performed to those
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standards — hasn't perhaps performed to those standards over _ hasn't perhaps performed to those standards over the _ hasn't perhaps performed to those standards over the last _ hasn't perhaps performed to those standards over the last few - hasn't perhaps performed to those i standards over the last few months. it's standards over the last few months. it's an— standards over the last few months. it's an interesting _ standards over the last few months. it's an interesting battle _ standards over the last few months. it's an interesting battle between. it's an interesting battle between the coaches — it's an interesting battle between the coaches as _ it's an interesting battle between the coaches as well, _ it's an interesting battle between the coaches as well, andy- it's an interesting battle between the coaches as well, andy farrellj the coaches as well, andy farrell under— the coaches as well, andy farrell under pressure, _ the coaches as well, andy farrell under pressure, perhaps- the coaches as well, andy farrell under pressure, perhaps not- the coaches as well, andy farrell i under pressure, perhaps not having put his— under pressure, perhaps not having put his stamp— under pressure, perhaps not having put his stamp on— under pressure, perhaps not having put his stamp on the _ under pressure, perhaps not having put his stamp on the irish _ under pressure, perhaps not having put his stamp on the irish team. i put his stamp on the irish team. that— put his stamp on the irish team. that said. — put his stamp on the irish team. that said. he _ put his stamp on the irish team. that said, he has _ put his stamp on the irish team. that said, he has a _ put his stamp on the irish team. that said, he has a four- put his stamp on the irish team. that said, he has a four year- that said, he has a four year contract _ that said, he has a four year contract. wayne _ that said, he has a four year contract. wayne pivac- that said, he has a four year contract. wayne pivac needs that said, he has a four year. contract. wayne pivac needs a that said, he has a four year- contract. wayne pivac needs a strong six nations — contract. wayne pivac needs a strong six nations-— six nations. john, obviously scotland will _ six nations. john, obviously scotland will have _ six nations. john, obviously| scotland will have confidence six nations. john, obviously i scotland will have confidence after that win, but one swallow doesn't make summer. where do you feel they have to improve if they are to go in and win their potential first six nations? i and win their potential first six nations? ~ f and win their potential first six nations? ~' j , ., nations? i think they've improved. the 've nations? ! think they've improved. they've now— nations? i think they've improved. they've now won _ nations? i think they've improved. they've now won 46 _ nations? i think they've improved. they've now won 46 nations i nations? i think they've improved. | they've now won 46 nations games on the trot. they beat wales away for the trot. they beat wales away for the first time in 18 years in the autumn. it's a good side and they all understand what they are trying to do —— won four six nations games. they got a lot of young players coming through, townsend is a good coach. my real hope is that the scots get more lions places, because i've always thought we do well, and because we don't win these things like this six nations, we don't get
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our numbers through these last few tours, and i hope on the backs of this the likes of hogg, russell and moore will get on the tour. this team is doing well. it's a really strong team. it has none of the traditional scottish weaknesses of lack of confidence, and i love the way they are so confident. i think they could do something special. a, they could do something special. a few records broken already — you never know. thank you so much, john beatty and laurenjenkins, for joining us. that's your sport. you enjoyed that, didn't you? indulge me. i think it's very enough after all these years. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. our weather watchers are up now, and no surprises we are getting sent some wintry images. images of falling snow in kent. this is canterbury. suddenly i can't show you that many pictures, but we are
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also getting some images from other parts of the uk where snow has fallen overnight. there is some heavy snow across the north midlands in derbyshire, so ice can be a risk everywhere today. it can be a cold day with boating winds and heavy snow to fall for some. the cold out that we are sitting in streaming down from the arctic on a boating easterly wind. it's a little bit slower than perhaps we anticipated to dig underneath this tale of storm darcy. around the thames history, of rain, sleet and snow this morning — you saw the snow already in canterbury, but the met office is confident this amber shaded area behind me will see significant disruption today. as we go through the coming hours we will lose that blue and it will become solidly white as the cold air digs further south. the warning sits from norfolk down to kent. further north, the winds are carrying a few showers on buns across scotland and northern
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england, a few getting into the wells is melton's later in the day, a few to the south of northern ireland too. —— welsh mountains. cold with gusts of wind over there, gale force for many, and also hear in mind the temperatures are hovering around freezing themselves. factor in the wind and step outside, it's going to feel closer more widely to —4, minus five degrees. through the evening and overnight, if anything the showers across southern reaches of the uk will push further westwards. still some more consistent ones to come for northern england and scotland, so in some areas we may get the equivalent snowfall to what we are forecasting for darcy out of those buns of showers. whiteford frost, so the snow will lie. —— widespread frost. there's a lot of surface water still standing, and on monday, they cover a good part of england and wales, those showers. less so for northern ireland in western scotland and perhaps the north—west of england,
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but another cold day across the board, and still that easterly wind, very noticeable when you step outside, so across southern areas, feeling like —54 —6. through the week ahead we will be staying in the cold air. one thing that will change slightly is the easterly wind will start to ease off, so it will feel perhaps just a little less cold, to be generous, as we go through the week ahead. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. iam i am still getting overjohn beattie wearing his hat in his kitchen. we are carrying on on the bbc news channel. time now for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review
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with me, mark kermode, reminding you that while cinemas may be closed, there is still plenty of new movies to enjoy in the comfort and safety of your own home. in grimur hakonarson's deadpan 2015 gem rams, two feuding sheep farming brothers in a secluded icelandic valley are forced into common enterprise when scrapie threatens their ancestral stock. look at you, my dearies. you are beautiful. but you're the best. now in directorjeremy sims' antipodean remake of ram, which is available on a range of digital platforms, the chilly vistas of iceland are replaced by the sunshine of western australia with sam neill and michael caton playing colin and les, neighbouring sibling rivals who haven't exchanged much more than a grunt in years. clicks tongue.
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when a cull of their prize stock is ordered to prevent infection, colin decides to bend the rules and hide a few of his sheep in his house. sheep bleating. but when the authorities come calling, can the estranged brothers bury their differences? bring her in... get behind, get behind! dog barks. good dog. there you go. bring her in, yeah, good, good dog. oh, come on, stop mucking around! this is a much warmer, jollier and ultimately frothier film than its predecessor, replacing the sometimes piercing truthfulness of the sublimely morose star with a more amiable but less memorable feel—good factor. dog whines. miranda richardson and wayne blair make the most of broadly written supporting roles while neill and caton last of the challenge of characters whose beardy silence often speaks louder than words. it's all entertaining enough,
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but if you want the real deal, check out hakonarson's original, along with his follow—up, the county, both of which are available on disc and streaming services. now, for viewers of a certain vintage, the name robert lloyd holds special significance. the front man ofjohn peel favourites the prefect and the nightingales, lloyd is something of a folk hero — a musician whose lengthy career has been untroubled by fame and fortune but still touched by greatness. so this pub, the eagle, in balsall heath, that was the offices of vindaloo records... it was, yeah. so you had an office above it or in the back? no, it wasjust — the back bar was where... you mean, you were in there a lot? in director michael cummings' documentary king rocker, comedian and fan stewart lee draws a parallel between lloyd and nicholas monro's giant statue of king kong, both of which were rejected and then later reclaimed by the city of birmingham and the wider world. i thought, "right, i'll make a song
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out of that," which i did... capturing lloyd in his natural surroundings — be it a pub, a curry house, ora gig, king rocker does a brilliantjob of exploring what makes lloyd so special and why his music is beloved by die—hard fans while still remaining unknown to so many. but i begin to worry that what if i peg it and they still don't buy the record! now, i have said many times that the true test of a documentary is whether it engages you in a subject in which you had no previous interest. but for me, the idea of a documentary about rob lloyd presented by stewart lee was always going to be a slam dunk. but the real triumph of cummings' anti—rockumentary is that even if you've never heard of lloyd, i guarantee you'll come out of this wanting to track down his back catalogue. eschewing the talking heads clips and interviews format, king rocker is closer to an andrew cotting—style collage, finding moments of truth and apparently chaotic happenstance making connections that are more intuitive and emotional than factual and historical.
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then you go, "no, that's not true! "who told you that?" you did at an earlier date. it helps that both lloyd and lee are masters of witheringly self—deprecating humour. neither seem set on winning any popularity contests, a quality that simply makes this doc all the more likeable. like the real—life tragi—comedy anvil: the story of anvil, king rocker has its spinal tap moments, not least when lee takes his subject to visit some standing stones with which lloyd is impressively unimpressed. you seem to want the nightingales to be remembered in some way — maybe not unlike this! i hope they're remembered more fondly than this! like that statue of a giant cinema ape, king rockerfinds beauty, heroism and even a whiff of transcendence in the most unlikely places. i loved it. king rocker premieres on sky arts on saturday at 9pm with subsequent screenings and catch—up options and even hopes for a cinema release later in the year.
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in french: no. laetitia dosch was the mesmerising star ofjeune femme, aka montparnasse bienvenue, a portrait of a young parisian struggling with the fractured shards of her personality. dosch is equally impressive, although dramatically less well served, in simple passion, aka passion simple. she plays helene, a literary scholar and single mother involved in an obsessive and somewhat self—destructive affair with a married russian embassy official played by ballet bad boy sergei polunin. what are you doing? i'm just filming you so i can remember you when you're gone. their relationship is almost entirely physical with aleksandr, who has a wife and family in moscow, giving little of himself other than his heavily—tattooed body,
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while helene wants more, even travelling to moscowjust to be able to breathe the same air as the object of her obsession. adapted from an early 90s novel by annie ernaux and directed by french—lebanese film—maker danielle arbid, this is heartfelt but also rather hackneyed fare, a film that requires us to care about a doomed relationship between two people who have apparently nothing in common and neither of whom does anything of interest other than behave badly — to themselves, to each other, to their families and ultimately to us the audience. while dosch, who carries the movie, can breathe inventive life into any character she takes on, polunin just seems to be playing himself as a boringly mono—dimensional, heavily tattooed, macho putin fan. what helene sees in him other than his pert backside is a mystery. add to this a soundtrack full of perky pop covers that might be
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ironic but mayjust be plain bad, and simple passion — or passion simple — left me longing for this dreary relationship to be over. you canjudge it for yourself on curzon home cinema. for something altogether more invigorating, let me point you in the direction of greenland. no, not the country, but the apocalyptic disaster movie which pits gerard butler against an approaching comet that threatens to wipe out life on earth. on radio: this is | an emergency alert. small molten debris expected to fall in upstate new york... _ isn't that where we are? yeah. seek shelter immediately. do not stand in the open. explosion. oh, my god! butler isjohn garrity, an atlanta—based structural engineer attempting to rebuild his broken marriage to estranged wife allison, played by deadpool�*s morena baccarin. the couple's young son nathan is thrilled by news stories
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of clark, a cluster comet due to make the closest flyby in history. but whenjohn receives a presidential alert on his phone announcing that his family have been chosen for shelter, it becomes clear that bits of clark are headed straight for earth. while fans of butler's action movies may be expecting him to just punch the comet out of existence, greenland instead casts him asjust another ordinaryjoe caught up in the same chaos as everybody else — trying to save his family whilst facing trafficjams, angry neighbours, and failing phone signals with surprisingly nail—biting results. despite the spectacular scenes of destruction you'd expect from a film that looks like a relative of deep impact or armageddon, what makes greenland special is the degree to which it trades on tension, anxiety and a really palpable sense of rising panic. yes, the fire falling from the sky is scary, but not as scary as the sight of terrified crowds running riot, or ofjohn getting separated from his wife and child,
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leaving them to fend for themselves in a hostile world. i'm going to get my family into that bunker. based on a sharp script by chris sparling, who wrote the stripped down horrorfilm buried, and directed by angel has fallen helmer ric roman waugh, greenland is a real treat. a grippingly—executed genre pic that punches well above its mid—budget weight to deliver top drawer popcorn thrills. it's available now on amazon prime. i'll leave you with news of a glitch in the matrix, the new documentary from director rodney ascher, whose room 237 took a deep dive into the mysteries of stanley kubrick's the shining. there are fundamental metaphors about reality waking up from a dream. we have this cognitive experience of shifting between realities. there's another world behind this world. ok, so, this is going to set the tenor for everything. investigating simulation theory
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and its relationship to the wachowskis' hit movie franchise, ascher�*s latest asks whether we are all living in a computer—generated reality, with clips of writer philip k dick who asserted that reality was an illusion back in the 705, and elon musk, who argues that the speed of technological progress makes simulation theory much more than a fantasy. if you assume any rate of improvement at all, then the games will become indistinguishable from reality. we also hear from professor nick bostrom, author of the 2003 essay "are you living in a computer simulation?", along with a collection of gamers and internet philosophers who appear as 3d fantasy avatars. for the most part, this is breezily conceptual fare — an engaging riff on modern what—if theories illustrated with clips from movies and minecraft. but there's a darker side, too, asjoshua cook recounts how his own obsession with simulation theories played into his ongoing mental health
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problems with fatal consequences. at the heart of a glitch in the matrix is a simple question. even if you do believe that reality is simulated, which i don't, would that actually change the way that you behave? and if so, how and why? you can ponder the answers to those philosophical questions at dogwoof.com and on other streaming platforms. that's it for this week. thanks for watching the film review. stay safe, and i'll see you next week. whistling: fine ram, all right. he's going to be a busy boy, i reckon! what do you mean? good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today: gps in england are given extra funding to vaccinate housebound
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patients ahead of the government's mid—february deadline. workplace covid testing is to be expanded with more companies offered rapid results kits for staff who can't work from home. large who can't work from home. parts of the uk could s today. large parts of the uk could see snow today. it has already arrived here in kent. the wind is whipping up as well, and it is absolutely freezing. good morning. we have some cold days ahead, with biting easterly winds stop that easterly wind is also going to deliver some pretty heavy snow showers folsom. more details on the areas most likely to be affected coming up. and the six nations is back with a bang. scotland beat england to lift the calcutta cup for the first time at twickenham since 1983. i actually did spot the broadest smile on our studiojust
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i actually did spot the broadest smile on our studio just there from jane. it is 8:02am. good morning to you. it's sunday 7th february. our top story. gps in england are to be paid an extra £10 by the nhs for every housebound person they vaccinate. it's part of government measures to protect everyone aged 70 and over, together with front line health workers, by february 15th. it comes as 18 new mass vaccine centres open tomorrow. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh. gp george hobbs is headed out to give around 20 of his patients covid jabs at home. they're too ill or vulnerable to come in a for a vaccination. first up is diana garfield, right, ok. who has heart problems— right, ok. who has heart problems and _ right, ok. who has heart problems and is _ right, ok. who has heart problems and is also - right, ok. who has heart problems and is also losing l right, ok. who has heart i problems and is also losing her sight. problems and is also losing her si . ht. , , problems and is also losing her siuht. , , ., ., , sight. there still is a hope in the back of my _ sight. there still is a hope in the back of my mind, _ sight. there still is a hope in the back of my mind, however- sight. there still is a hope in the back of my mind, however old i l sight. there still is a hope in the i back of my mind, however old i am, i still have _ back of my mind, however old i am, i still have that — back of my mind, however old i am, i still have that hope that... something will work out. wright, cheerio, bye-bye! _ something will work out. wright, cheerio, bye-bye! it's— something will work out. wright, cheerio, bye-bye! it's great i something will work out. wright, i cheerio, bye-bye! it's great because cheerio, bye—bye! it's great because i have been a gp for over 27 years
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and they know me, so i think when they see some familiar coming it makes a will difference to the experience. but quite a lot of them are quite nervous and then when they see someone they know, that is very reassuring. see someone they know, that is very reassurinu. ., ., .., see someone they know, that is very reassurinu. ., ., .. ., reassuring. hello, i am calling from ash tree surgery. _ reassuring. hello, i am calling from ash tree surgery. ash _ reassuring. hello, i am calling from ash tree surgery. ash tree - reassuring. hello, i am calling from ash tree surgery. ash tree surgeryl ash tree surgery. ash tree surgery in carnforth _ ash tree surgery. ash tree surgery in carnforth in _ ash tree surgery. ash tree surgery in carnforth in lancashire - ash tree surgery. ash tree surgery in carnforth in lancashire is i ash tree surgery. ash tree surgery in carnforth in lancashire is on i in carnforth in lancashire is on course to von vaccinate its most vulnerable patients by the middle of this month, but that is not the case everywhere. so gps will receive an additional £10 on top of the standard fee for every house person to vaccinate. standard fee for every house person to vaccinate-— to vaccinate. yes, this will be hel ful. to vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful- it — to vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful. it does _ to vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful. it does take - to vaccinate. yes, this will be i helpful. it does take significantly longer to go out and visit someone and to attain the necessary time and precautions in each and every visit, that takes people away from a vaccination centre, where they can do more vaccinations in a similar amount of time. so we do need to recognise that and it is good that nhs england have done that and have provided this additional small amount of funding to enable practices to provide vaccinations to
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this particularly vulnerable group of people as quickly as possible. the latest data shows that more than 11.4 million people have received their first dose. that is a rise of just over 494,000 on the previous 24—hour reporting period. at this rate of vaccination, the nhs would need to give jabs to an average of just under 393,000 people per day in order to meet the government's target of 15,000,001st doses by the 15th of february. and the scottish government has said that it has met its target to vaccinate the over 80s by the 5th of february. there are to be 18 or more vaccination sites opening from next week, like the one at blackburn cathedral. the new sites mean the jabs are now available from more than 100 large—scale centres, 1000 local gp services, almost 200s pharmacies and over 250 hospitals. pallab ghosh,
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bbc news. the oxford astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine may offer only limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant — that's according to a new small trial. but the firm said it believed the vaccine could still protect against severe disease. we're joined now by our health reporter, jim reed, for more on this. jim, is this a concerning development? it is so tricky, isn't it, and trying to weigh up how much significance we should attach to these current developments, when often we are seeing research much earlier than we would do normally because people want to put it out there, but there is a danger of us panicking unnecessarily. what is your assessment?— panicking unnecessarily. what is your assessment? panicking unnecessarily. what is ourassessment? ., , , your assessment? good morning, yes, this is news — your assessment? good morning, yes, this is news out — your assessment? good morning, yes, this is news out overnight _ your assessment? good morning, yes, this is news out overnight from - your assessment? good morning, yes, this is news out overnight from the i this is news out overnight from the team at oxford university and the drugs company, astrazeneca, which have developed this particular vaccine. they have been running trials in south africa to see how well their vaccine protects against this variant first discovered there last year. it is one that scientists are particularly concerned about. i should point out is a very small
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study, about 2000 people. we won't get the full results until tomorrow. the more reassuring news of the company said this morning they do believe this vaccine will still protect against this severe form of the disease related to that south african variant, but as i say, in these trials did only show limited protection against mild and moderate forms, so what does that mean? if these results were repeated in real life, it could mean that someone would not need to maybe go into hospital if they caught this variant of coronavirus, but it might not necessarily stop them actually catching it and then crucially potentially being able to pass it onto others. these are not unexpected, tests on other vaccines have shown a very similar pattern with the south african variant. the important thing, though, is all vaccine manufacturers say they should be able to tweak their products to better protect against the south african dream. the medical director of primary care for nhs england was asked about that on the
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last hour on breakfast. irate england was asked about that on the last hour on breakfast.— last hour on breakfast. we do know that a little — last hour on breakfast. we do know that a little bit — last hour on breakfast. we do know that a little bit like _ last hour on breakfast. we do know that a little bit like flu _ last hour on breakfast. we do know that a little bit like flu people i that a little bit like flu people who design and create vaccines do have _ who design and create vaccines do have to _ who design and create vaccines do have to keep looking at what that vaccine _ have to keep looking at what that vaccine contains because we often have _ vaccine contains because we often have to _ vaccine contains because we often have to like the flu offer the vaccine _ have to like the flu offer the vaccine on a yearly basis to reflect any changes in strains of the virus, so that— any changes in strains of the virus, so that is— any changes in strains of the virus, so that is something that we are inking _ so that is something that we are inking about and we are working very closely _ inking about and we are working very closely with — inking about and we are working very closely with scientists to understand what we will need to do after we _ understand what we will need to do after we have vaccinated our country in this— after we have vaccinated our country in this first _ after we have vaccinated our country in this first phase of the vaccination programme. also worth ointinu vaccination programme. also worth pointing out — vaccination programme. also worth pointing out that _ vaccination programme. also worth pointing out that astrazeneca i vaccination programme. also worth pointing out that astrazeneca have | pointing out that astrazeneca have said this morning they will be able to tweak this vaccine, they think, if necessary and we should get that updated version that does better protect against this south african variant by the autumn, if needed. we are saying that —— were saying this south african variant is not bright red in the uk, there have only been around around 100 cases so far confirmed and there has been a travel ban from south africa from
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christmas eve.— police are continuing to investigate a series of stabbings that took place in london over the past 48 hours. a 22—year—old man died and nine others were injured, in five separate incidents in the croydon area on friday night. another man in his 20s died in kilburn in north—west london yesterday evening. police say they aren't connected and have condemned the violence as "needless and abhorrent". let's talk about the weather next. heavy snow could bring significant disruption to the south—east of england in the coming hours. simon is in lydden near dover, where an amber weather warning is in place. simon, what are conditions like there this morning? well, i can tell you it is very, very cold. it is wet and windy and the snow has been coming down for around four hours now. it is certainly settling, it is pretty icy and treacherous on the roads and pavements, but creating some picture perfect scenes over there, a bit of a winter wonderland. but there is an
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amber weather warning in place for all of today covering kent, large parts of the south—east and also east anglia and we are told in certain places there could be up to 30 centimetres of snow. it is not just the snow that is going to be an issue, we have got storm darcy blowing through, we are told they could be gusts of up to 50 mph and add into that the wind chill, although the temperature is probably around freezing, it feels more like about —7 out here. potentially there could be problems on the roads, rail disruption to the south—east and here in kent. they have decided to cancel some services already and they are saying to people, please don't travel at all. stay indoors, don't travel at all. stay indoors, don't try and go out. now, in terms of what we are expecting i have been conducted by some people a little disappointed actually, saying, where is the snow? it is certainly snowing
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here, but in areas nearby they have largely had rain. we are told potentially that rain is going to turn to snow, so if you haven't got it yet you may well have it in the coming hours. it yet you may well have it in the coming hours-— it yet you may well have it in the coming hours. yes, and as simon said, coming hours. yes, and as simon said. there _ coming hours. yes, and as simon said, there are _ coming hours. yes, and as simon said, there are nice _ coming hours. yes, and as simon said, there are nice to _ coming hours. yes, and as simon said, there are nice to look- coming hours. yes, and as simon said, there are nice to look at, i said, there are nice to look at, less pleasant to get stuck in is, so do take care out there. i love the fact that simon is getting blamed for the lack of snow! it is your fault! this is rain, not snow! it is 8:11am. a 70—year—old grandfather from oldham, has become the oldest man to complete a solo row across the atlantic. frank rothwell arrived in antigua yesterday, completing hisjourney in 56 days and a week ahead of schedule. frank has raised more than £600,000 for alzheimer's research uk and mike has been following his progress. the coral waters of the caribbean. a paradise after the atlantic. in the same view of sea and sky for two months are nearly 3000 miles. applause and 70—year—old frank rothwell
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arrived in nelson's dockyard in english harbour in antigua as a world record holder, the oldest person to complete this atlantic challenge and oldest person to row that ocean solo and unassisted. # i'm the kind of guy who will never settle down! because you know that i'm around! # and after 55 days, two hours and 41 minutes at sea, you might expect frank to show some signs of tiredness. but not him. the life and soul of any party. i tiredness. but not him. the life and soul of any party-— soul of any party. i am now a world champion- — soul of any party. i am now a world champion- how _ soul of any party. i am now a world champion. how about _ soul of any party. i am now a world champion. how about that? - soul of any party. i am now a world champion. how about that? i i soul of any party. i am now a world champion. how about that? i am i champion. how about that? i am absolutely overwhelmed! you know, the reception we got here. we came into the english harbour in antigua and all the ships, all these massive millionaires' yachts, all sounded their hooters as i came over the line. it was fantastic! # walking down the street... # walking down the street... # after leading those allowed to be
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dockside in a spontaneous bit of karaoke, it was time to be reunited with his wifejudith, after their first christmas apart and 50 years of marriage. after living on freeze—dried food, especially macaroni, after all these weeks, frank is now hoping for a fish salad and a proper bed. but any hardship, he says, has been worth it. he has already raised over £600,000 for alzheimer's research uk. mike bushell, bbc news. i wonder what his singing and dancing is like when he hasn't read the atlantic! i know! do you think he carried on in the plane on his way home? limitless energy! yeah. it is 8:13am. rapid coronavirus tests, which provide a result in less than 30 minutes, are to be made available to more employees who are still travelling into work during the pandemic. supply of lateral flow tests will now to offered to businesses in england with more than 50 employees. we're joined now by hannah essex from the british chambers of commerce. good morning to you. just explain,
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hannah, how this will open up workplaces for many businesses. 50 workplaces for many businesses. ’sr this is workplaces for many businesses. sr this is welcome news. the chamber network has been asking government for answers around workplace setting since the end of the first lockdown, so it is great news that more businesses will be able to access these tests. what it means is if employees are tested regularly, anyone who is asymptomatic, so doesn't know they are carrying coronavirus and isn't self isolating will get that test result and be able to take themselves out of circulation as quickly as possible, which means it will stop the spread in those instances where, at the moment, it is not possible to work from home so you do have people working closely side by side and businesses have taken really good steps to make sure those workplaces are safe, but having me testing as well will give that extra layer of protection to make sure that people who do have coronavirus can stay at home. �* , ., home. and it widens the net to businesses _ home. and it widens the net to businesses with _ home. and it widens the net to businesses with 50 _ home. and it widens the net to businesses with 50 or - home. and it widens the net to businesses with 50 or more i businesses with 50 or more employees. would you have liked to have seen that go further?
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absolutely, we would like this to be extended to all businesses, where they can't work from home at the moment. so even if you think about sole traders who are going round people's homes, doing essential maintenance work, for example, i think it would be reassuring for them to know they can have a test before they go into peoples mccombes. so there are some community places where you can go along and get a test, but actually workplace testing and employers being able to access those tests and have them available, as they have done with schools and other workplaces, would be really positive. workplaces, would be really ositive. �* , ., positive. and in terms of the financial pressure _ positive. and in terms of the financial pressure could i positive. and in terms of the financial pressure could put| positive. and in terms of the i financial pressure could put on businesses, we know the government has ring fenced funding for this until the end of march. that is not a long time if you are planning ahead, particularly if you have a small team and tight margins. absolutely, and we have asked government for a plan around reopening the economy, so which businesses are going to be able to open and under which circumstances and what is the phasing of that? and some of the questions around that is what will be necessary around workplace testing? how can
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government support the cost of that by bulk buying tests and selling them on to businesses at a low cost? and what will be the requirements around other adaptations that they might need to make sure their workplaces to make sure they are safe? lots of visitors worked really hard over the course of the last 12 months to make sure they do have so—called covid—secure workplaces, but given the new variants and what we have learned about the virus if there's anything else businesses need to do they need to know now so that they have the time to plan for reopening, which we hope will happen from march or april onwards. i}i(. from march or april onwards. ok, hannah essex _ from march or april onwards. ok, hannah essex from the british chamber of commerce, many thanks. there is plenty of whether about this morning. we have got storm darcy in the mix and the beast from the east as well, i see, is how some of the papers describing the snow we saw simon battling with in kent a bit early on. let's talk to susan. what a lovely image you have got there. at least some people have attempted to get down that road behind you. good morning. i know, but pass with caution, i think. you are right about kent, they are taking possibly the worst of the
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battering at the moment and we're also seeing a band of heavy snow just advancing right now towards parts of essex and it will move into sussex in the next couple of hours. it has been a tricky mix testing of rain, sleet and snow, the colder air now sinking properly south across the uk, converting anything falling as rain increasingly to snow. strong winds as well across kent, gusts of 35 mph recorded just recently. you can see a slightly less intense blue initially to the uk, but a sunday goes on that cold air, sourced from the arctic, has all the way south. he was storm darcy and she is pulling off towards the continent, but it is this trailing weather front and the winds around that are causing us concern in terms of the amount of snow set to fall across counties of eastern england. the met office has an amber warning enforce, meaning there is a risk of disruption here. you can still see a bit of blue in the mixture as we start our look at the morning, but if we run the clock you will see
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that turns increasingly to white as the colder air drag itself then on that easterly or north—easterly wind. snow elsewhere, though, there has been some snow overnight, so ice is a risk anywhere first thing this morning, standing water as well, but likely again across northern scotland, driven through on that easterly wind, perhaps a few snow showers to the south of northern ireland and into mid wales as well. it is cold, temperatures 3 or 4 degrees at best, but we do have to factor in the wind, which is particularly raw and nagging, throughout the day, some areas probably not seeing temperatures above freezing on the thermometer, feeling closer to —5. this evening and overnight, it is interesting how the snow showers extend further westward, so notjust the areas covered by that amber warning that are likely to be affected or could see some disruption. do bear that in mind, some snow stretching towards wales first thing on monday and it will settle with a frosty night and some snow showers across parts of northern england and scotland, tending to come in these bands,
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northern england and scotland, tending to come in these hands, so some areas could see quite a lot, some areas could see quite a lot, some may miss the snow altogether and that will be the same scenario on monday. but still quite a focus on monday. but still quite a focus on eastern counties of england, the showers been quite consistent here. another cold day on monday, still he went particularly cold, and if anything it may feel cold air out and about and it will do today. on into the week ahead, we keep the same pressure pattern, so the easterly wind, and you mayjust notice those isobars opening up a little bit, so the wind strength. to ease back, so it may not feel quite as penetrating, the cold, but it will definitely remain cold and some snow showers in the short term for eastern coastal counties. we will keep you up—to—date. thanks very much and we will speak to you later. yes, you know we said earlier that some people are feeling disappointed, max has been in touch from planet and he says, we are one of those where is the snow areas. nothing more the flakes floating
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around. he is disappointed. but it could be coming in until wednesday, so patients. yes, patients. many charities have lost out on vital fundraising during the pandemic, and air ambulance services are just one of those struggling financially. the team in the north west have lost 20% of the £10 million a year they need to keep flying. the charity's fundraising director sarah naismithjoins us now, alongside east anglian air ambulance doctor, patricia mills. good morning to you both. thank you for your time. good morning to you both. thank you foryourtime. sarahfirst. good morning to you both. thank you for your time. sarah first. there is an oddity here, which is that none of us would expect to have to throw money in a pot to keep ambulances with wheels ongoing, and yet for those that fly there's that expectation that they demand need public support in order to keep on going. i guess at the moment that is very tricky when you can't do your usual fundraising? that very tricky when you can't do your usual fundraising?— usual fundraising? that is absolutely _ usual fundraising? that is absolutely right. - usual fundraising? that is absolutely right. i - usual fundraising? that is absolutely right. i mean, | usual fundraising? that is. absolutely right. i mean, it usual fundraising? that is i absolutely right. i mean, it is a popular misconception that we aren't reliant on donations from the
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public, but we absolutely are. here in the north—west we have been flying for 21 years now, thanks to the generosity of the north—west community and that is why we have launched our appeal now because we really do need them to rally and support us because we are a charity. and i think people aren't aware of that until you actually need us, at the time of need.— the time of need. patricia mills, let's bring _ the time of need. patricia mills, let's bring you _ the time of need. patricia mills, let's bring you into _ the time of need. patricia mills, let's bring you into the - let's bring you into the conversation and thanks for talking to us, you havejust conversation and thanks for talking to us, you have just come off shift after a night shift. and you have seen the importance of an air ambulance from both sides, as a doctor, but also i think it was last year, as a patient?— doctor, but also i think it was last year, as a patient? yes, so it was a ear year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today — year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today that _ year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today that i — year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today that i was _ year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today that i was involved - year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today that i was involved in - year, as a patient? yes, so it was a year today that i was involved in a l year today that i was involved in a traffic_ year today that i was involved in a traffic accident. i was hit by a van in a country— traffic accident. i was hit by a van in a country lane while i was walking _ in a country lane while i was walking my dog and a sustained really— walking my dog and a sustained really severe injuries. sol walking my dog and a sustained really severe injuries. so i was attended — really severe injuries. so i was attended by the east anglian air ambulance and crew that i knew, both pilots. _ ambulance and crew that i knew, both pilots, paramedics and doctors and
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they were — pilots, paramedics and doctors and they were absolutely vital in saving my life _ they were absolutely vital in saving my life and getting me the urgent care i_ my life and getting me the urgent care i needed. they were is as quick as possible. — care i needed. they were is as quick as possible, so yes, i have seen it from _ as possible, so yes, i have seen it from both— as possible, so yes, i have seen it from both sides and east anglian air ambulance. — from both sides and east anglian air ambulance, we have flown throughout the pandemic and similarly to the north—west, we have experienced challenges with fundraising, huge areas _ challenges with fundraising, huge areas of— challenges with fundraising, huge areas of our community and event -based _ areas of our community and event —based fundraising have been lost and in _ —based fundraising have been lost and in addition to that we have had additional— and in addition to that we have had additional costs due to the pandemic, so ppe equipment and also equipment— pandemic, so ppe equipment and also equipment to enable us to decontaminate the equipment that we carry on_ decontaminate the equipment that we carry on board with the helicopter and the _ carry on board with the helicopter and the rapid response car. and how are ou and the rapid response car. and how are you now? _ and the rapid response car. and how are you now? are _ and the rapid response car. and how are you now? are you _ and the rapid response car. and how are you now? are you fully - are you now? are you fully recovered? so i do still get some aches and pains at the end of a long day labour and i am also an intensive care doctor, so i find i have long days on my feet and then my back aches, but really i'm pretty much back to a nearby baseline. mat
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much back to a nearby baseline. not uuite as fit much back to a nearby baseline. not quite as fit as i was. and _ much back to a nearby baseline. not quite as fit as i was. and from - much back to a nearby baseline. not quite as fit as i was. and from your. quite as fit as i was. and from your perspective. _ quite as fit as i was. and from your perspective, patricia, _ quite as fit as i was. and from your perspective, patricia, going - quite as fit as i was. and from your perspective, patricia, going back. quite as fit as i was. and from your| perspective, patricia, going back to the central argument at the soul of this conversation that i was touching on was sarah, clearly there are vast demands on the public purse, on taxpayers' money at the moment, but how odd is it to you that i ambulances require public donations, whereas lots of other aspects of health are paid for by the taxpayer? aspects of health are paid for by the taxoayer?— aspects of health are paid for by the taxa er? , ., ., ~ the taxpayer? yes, so again i think a lot of people _ the taxpayer? yes, so again i think a lot of people don't _ the taxpayer? yes, so again i think a lot of people don't realise - the taxpayer? yes, so again i think a lot of people don't realise that i a lot of people don't realise that we are _ a lot of people don't realise that we are charity funded and it is something we get asked about a lot. but we _ something we get asked about a lot. but we are _ something we get asked about a lot. but we are entirely reliant on the public— but we are entirely reliant on the public and — but we are entirely reliant on the public and we are extremely grateful to everyone who does supporters and has continued to support us throughout the pandemic. i would say that being _ throughout the pandemic. i would say that being a charity we are independent, we are able to provide services _ independent, we are able to provide services right for our particular regions, — services right for our particular regions, so _ services right for our particular regions, so some of the geography in east anglia _ regions, so some of the geography in east anglia is challenging, as i have _ east anglia is challenging, as i have assume is the same in the
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north—west. we can quickly adapt to the needs— north—west. we can quickly adapt to the needs of our community and i think— the needs of our community and i think that — the needs of our community and i think that is demonstrated by the fact that — think that is demonstrated by the fact that during the pandemic we were _ fact that during the pandemic we were very— fact that during the pandemic we were very flexible, able to assist in transferring critical care patients _ in transferring critical care patients between intensive care units _ patients between intensive care units 50 — patients between intensive care units. so we are able to help those units _ units. so we are able to help those units under— units. so we are able to help those units under extreme pressure by providing — units under extreme pressure by providing a critical care team to move _ providing a critical care team to move patients, so we weren't depriving — move patients, so we weren't depriving the hospital self resource. so we do have that flexibility. resource. so we do have that flexibility-— resource. so we do have that flexibili . ., ., ., , flexibility. sarah, how important is the ablett in _ flexibility. sarah, how important is the ablett in the _ flexibility. sarah, how important is the ablett in the north-west - flexibility. sarah, how important is the ablett in the north-west of - the ablett in the north—west of england been in the pandemic? is at a similar experience to the one we're hearing from east anglia? absolutely, i mean, in the last year alone we had 2570 missions. our work didn't stop. we work 365 days a year and we work in partnership with the nhs to make sure that we are able to bring the hospital to the scene to improve outcomes for our patients. our work hasn't stopped, our crews haven't stopped. it has been relentless, obviously, with the
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pressures they are under, so we an essential service, pressures they are under, so we an essentialservice, but pressures they are under, so we an essential service, but we are a charity and we do rely on donations from the public.— from the public. given the importance _ from the public. given the importance of _ from the public. given the importance of the - from the public. given the | importance of the nations, from the public. given the i importance of the nations, to from the public. given the - importance of the nations, to put it bluntly, how close are you to not being able to fly? irate bluntly, how close are you to not being able to fly?— bluntly, how close are you to not being able to fly? we are not in a osition being able to fly? we are not in a position yet. _ being able to fly? we are not in a position yet, but _ being able to fly? we are not in a position yet, but our— being able to fly? we are not in a position yet, but our fundraising l position yet, but our fundraising has been decimated. as you said, 20% has been decimated. as you said, 20% has been decimated. as you said, 20% has been lost, so it is essential that we are able to appeal to the great community in the north—west to give what they can, to visit our website, nwaa.net, and do whatever they can in terms of fundraising for us, whether that be virtual or making a donation.— us, whether that be virtual or making a donation. thank you both for talkin: making a donation. thank you both for talking to _ making a donation. thank you both for talking to us. _ making a donation. thank you both for talking to us. patricia, - making a donation. thank you both for talking to us. patricia, final - for talking to us. patricia, final thought. was it a busy night shift? no, it wasn't busy. we were expecting some snow, but as you have 'ust expecting some snow, but as you have just seen— expecting some snow, but as you have just seen it _ expecting some snow, but as you have just seen it hasn't arrived yet. i am on — just seen it hasn't arrived yet. i am on again tonight, so i have a feeling — am on again tonight, so i have a feeling it— am on again tonight, so i have a feeling it might be busier. | am on again tonight, so i have a feeling it might be busier. i wish ou a feeling it might be busier. i wish you a good _ feeling it might be busier. i wish you a good days _ feeling it might be busier. i wish you a good day's sleep _ feeling it might be busier. i wish
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you a good day's sleep and - feeling it might be busier. i wish you a good day's sleep and we . you a good day's sleep and we appreciate your time. thank you both for talking to us.— appreciate your time. thank you both for talking to us._ thank. for talking to us. thank you. thank ou. it is for talking to us. thank you. thank you- it isiust_ for talking to us. thank you. thank you- it isiust as — for talking to us. thank you. thank you. it isjust as important - for talking to us. thank you. thank you. it isjust as important when i for talking to us. thank you. thank you. it isjust as important when it| you. it isjust as important when it doesn't snow as when it is. we must remember that. doesn't snow as when it is. we must rememberthat. it doesn't snow as when it is. we must remember that. it is 8:25am. after going viral with their rendition of one day more from les miserables last year, the marsh family have become something of an internet sensation, gaining fans across the world. now they're back, with their latest take on a classic. let's have a listen.
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it's funny because it is true! we are joined it's funny because it is true! we arejoined now... we'rejoined now by dad ben, mum danielle and two of the marsh children — thomas and alfie. i really wanted eller and tess to be there because that for me is the finest performance. they really shine in that, don't they? yeah, they were good in this man, they really enjoyed doing this one. two things, it is snowing in kent, which obviously you have been talking about and that is very exciting here and the girls were a little bit bleary eyed this morning, in fact they we all are, but they were a little bit slower to move than the rest of us. we were a little bit slower to move than the rest of us._ were a little bit slower to move than the rest of us. we get it, we are not offended. _ than the rest of us. we get it, we are not offended. there - than the rest of us. we get it, we are not offended. there is - than the rest of us. we get it, we are not offended. there is a - are not offended. there is a slightly different tone to this one, isn't there, in the fact that we have all just isn't there, in the fact that we have alljust ran out of steam? the novelty is over, we can't even be
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bothered going to the park any more and it is a humorous take on that, isn't it? i and it is a humorous take on that, isn't it? ~ ,., and it is a humorous take on that, isn't it? ~ , , ., ., isn't it? i think so, yes, and also the idea that _ isn't it? i think so, yes, and also the idea that it _ isn't it? i think so, yes, and also the idea that it is _ isn't it? i think so, yes, and also the idea that it is ok _ isn't it? i think so, yes, and also the idea that it is ok to - isn't it? i think so, yes, and also the idea that it is ok to say - isn't it? i think so, yes, and alsoj the idea that it is ok to say that. the one — the idea that it is ok to say that. the one that happened last year which _ the one that happened last year which caught us completely by surprise, — which caught us completely by surprise, it was kind of lifting spirits— surprise, it was kind of lifting spirits up— surprise, it was kind of lifting spirits up and getting stuck in again— spirits up and getting stuck in again like lots of people around the country— again like lots of people around the country and all over the world, it is a real— country and all over the world, it is a real drag now and it is ok to feel a _ is a real drag now and it is ok to feel a bit— is a real drag now and it is ok to feel a bit disheartened about it, but we — feel a bit disheartened about it, but we wanted to try and again make a few— but we wanted to try and again make a few people smile about it, so say it out— a few people smile about it, so say it out loud — a few people smile about it, so say it out loud and find a way to make it out loud and find a way to make it humorous— it out loud and find a way to make it humorous is the best approach. confession— it humorous is the best approach. confession time, boys. which one view is the main xbox player? i noticed that lyric!— view is the main xbox player? i noticed that lyric! well, probably me. noticed that lyric! well, probably me- yeah. _ noticed that lyric! well, probably me- yeah. l _ noticed that lyric! well, probably me. yeah, i think— noticed that lyric! well, probably me. yeah, i think we _ noticed that lyric! well, probably me. yeah, i think we will- noticed that lyric! well, probably me. yeah, i think we will have i noticed that lyric! well, probablyj me. yeah, i think we will have to noticed that lyric! well, probably i me. yeah, i think we will have to go with alfie- — me. yeah, i think we will have to go with alfie- he _ me. yeah, i think we will have to go with alfie. he is _ me. yeah, i think we will have to go with alfie. he is very _ me. yeah, i think we will have to go with alfie. he is very into _ me. yeah, i think we will have to go with alfie. he is very into that i with alfie. he is very into that kind _ with alfie. he is very into that kind of— with alfie. he is very into that kind of stuff. normally we play together, but in the long run he decides — together, but in the long run he decides what we play. talk together, but in the long run he decides what we play.— together, but in the long run he decides what we play. talk to us about the writing _ decides what we play. talk to us about the writing process - decides what we play. talk to us i about the writing process because it is wonderful writing. how long do you play with the lyrics and making things rhyme or fit or work and then
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obviously fitting it to what you have experienced around the house? well, this man was a strange one because — well, this man was a strange one because often we think about what will work— because often we think about what will work singing together or what is musical, — will work singing together or what is musical, what has got nice harmonies, but i wasjust listening to the _ harmonies, but i wasjust listening to the bonnie tyler song on the radio— to the bonnie tyler song on the radio and — to the bonnie tyler song on the radio and it was that massive line about— radio and it was that massive line about giving off sparks it my head it just _ about giving off sparks it my head it just cropped about giving off sparks it my head itjust cropped up about giving off sparks it my head it just cropped up with these line, singing _ it just cropped up with these line, singing and dressing gowns, giving off arts. _ singing and dressing gowns, giving off arts, and when that fitted, i thought. — off arts, and when that fitted, i thought. i— off arts, and when that fitted, i thought, i would just work back from that and _ thought, i would just work back from that and it _ thought, i would just work back from that and it took a few days, but it was worth— that and it took a few days, but it was worth it. that and it took a few days, but it was worth it— that and it took a few days, but it was worth it. ., ., ., ., , was worth it. yeah, and he normally a- ears was worth it. yeah, and he normally appears with — was worth it. yeah, and he normally appears with laid — was worth it. yeah, and he normally appears with laid out _ was worth it. yeah, and he normally appears with laid out lyrics - was worth it. yeah, and he normally appears with laid out lyrics and i was worth it. yeah, and he normally appears with laid out lyrics and we l appears with laid out lyrics and we sit there and go, i'm not saying that one and ella said, i'm not saying that line, so she got sitting in pyjamas and making catty remarks, which was incredibly apt, i have to say! and then ben doesn't arrive and say, this is the song and who is singing what, wejust say, this is the song and who is singing what, we just sit and play with it for a little while. we probably only played with singing this one for about two days and then on tuesday evening i came through and said there are a seriously to
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everybody, is it worth moving this over? because if we go at this and we move the sofa and then the desk we move the sofa and then the desk we have got behind for a low, that has to be worth doing. that is a laugh! it really was. hand has to be worth doing. that is a laugh! it really was. and speaking of sarks laugh! it really was. and speaking of sparks flying. _ laugh! it really was. and speaking of sparks flying. a _ laugh! it really was. and speaking of sparks flying, a standout i laugh! it really was. and speaking of sparks flying, a standout line . of sparks flying, a standout line from this version of the song was the printer being in a state. how is it with four kids permanently printing her? i it with four kids permanently printing her?— it with four kids permanently rintin: her? ., , ., printing her? i really feelfor it, it is a massive _ printing her? i really feelfor it, it is a massive struggle - printing her? i really feelfor it, it is a massive struggle and i printing her? i really feelfor it, i it is a massive struggle and nothing annoys— it is a massive struggle and nothing annoys me — it is a massive struggle and nothing annoys me more and i love the comments _ annoys me more and i love the comments we get back on the small things— comments we get back on the small things like _ comments we get back on the small things like the printer, people feeling — things like the printer, people feeling those kind of weird small things. _ feeling those kind of weird small things, but i am often teaching in here, _ things, but i am often teaching in here, teaching university students and the _ here, teaching university students and the kids creep in and then all this stuff— and the kids creep in and then all this stuff is — and the kids creep in and then all this stuff is printing out, for page printout— this stuff is printing out, for page printout by tess of the backend of a horse _ printout by tess of the backend of a horse that _ printout by tess of the backend of a horse that she has two colour in and i horse that she has two colour in and i watching _ horse that she has two colour in and i watching this stuff coming out in the ! watching this stuff coming out in the printer— i watching this stuff coming out in the printer not working and she is interrupting lectures, so yeah, that was a _ interrupting lectures, so yeah, that was a personal one. i interrupting lectures, so yeah, that was a personal one.— was a personal one. i am admiring our was a personal one. i am admiring your emotional _ was a personal one. i am admiring your emotional connection - was a personal one. i am admiring your emotional connection to i was a personal one. i am admiring your emotional connection to the i your emotional connection to the printer. i have neverfelt a walk towards a printer. perhaps you have
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not got four kids, chris. that is true. i've got to ask you about that whiteboard, is that a lecturing thing or a home—schooling thing? looks quite intense. it is supposed to be _ looks quite intense. it is supposed to be a _ looks quite intense. it is supposed to be a lecturer thing, but often ends _ to be a lecturer thing, but often ends up — to be a lecturer thing, but often ends up as— to be a lecturer thing, but often ends up as a home—schooling thing because _ ends up as a home—schooling thing because the kids... and ends up as a home-schooling thing because the kids. . .— because the kids... and he doesn't notice that — because the kids... and he doesn't notice that tess _ because the kids... and he doesn't notice that tess has _ because the kids... and he doesn't notice that tess has been - because the kids... and he doesn't notice that tess has been writing i because the kids... and he doesn't notice that tess has been writing a| notice that tess has been writing a potion or something on the back of the board and then the students have a laugh. so yes, we brought it back at the beginning of the first lockdown, that moved out of work, so this is the room where ben hides and then i have to feel everyone while i'm working at the kitchen table. l i'm working at the kitchen table. i think we have talked about the impact context, language, tone, style and connections within this chat, really. yes, we have checked them all off now. thanks so very much. you have cheered us up. we are grateful to you. yes, thank the girls for us, they were excellent. we will, take care. thank you. you gotta wonder, they started whitley les miserables, they are on bonnie tyler and what is next? we fail to ask the key question! yes, we will
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find out. stay with us, plenty to come. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. early trials suggest the oxford—astrazeneca covid vaccine offers limited protection against mild disease caused by the south africa variant. but the firm said it believed the vaccine could protect against severe disease caused by the more transmissible coronavirus variant. we can speak now to professor robin shattock, who is the lead professor for one of the teams developing
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vaccines at imperial college london. alarm bells will be ringing but how concerned should we be? it is alarm bells will be ringing but how concerned should we be?— concerned should we be? it is a stud of concerned should we be? it is a study ofjust — concerned should we be? it is a study ofjust over _ concerned should we be? it is a study ofjust over 2000 - concerned should we be? it is a study ofjust over 2000 people | concerned should we be? it is a i study ofjust over 2000 people but it is concerning to some people and seeing it is not effective against certain diseases. this study was donein certain diseases. this study was done in individuals with a mean age of about 31 so we do not know how effective it is in elderly subjects. the other thing that is a clear right now is a line in the text that says most individuals have at least one dose so we don't know with two vaccinations and the optimised regime of getting it 12 weeks later. it has not been peer reviewed fully and oxford are seeing the neutralising antibodies that come
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with the vaccine will be i think ithink again i think again we need to be a little bit cautious because we know with the oxford vaccine it works really well after the delayed second dose so i think in the uk it emphasises individuals have had theirfirst dose given the south african variant and also at the kent variant that has this mutation should behave as if they have no protection in order to make sure it is not transmittable because this means this virus could because this means this virus could be transmitted to other people even if you have been vaccinated. all vaccines are works in progress and there will be tweaks and they will evolve just as the illness does. oxford as well as other groups are already working on vaccines against these gradients and we will need to keep updating the vaccines to keep ahead of the virus. in keep updating the vaccines to keep ahead of the virus.— ahead of the virus. in the sunday times this _ ahead of the virus. in the sunday times this morning _
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ahead of the virus. in the sunday times this morning reporting i ahead of the virus. in the sunday times this morning reporting it l ahead of the virus. in the sunday| times this morning reporting it is official, delaying the second dose saves lives. there was some controversy in the early days about handing out the vaccines. is the widespread belief that could be beneficial? i think the oxford astrazeneca vaccine is good evidence it would be better by giving that longer delay because it makes that second dose much better. we haven't yet seen enough information on that further pfizer vaccine and everyone is keeping their fingers crossed. further pfizer vaccine and everyone is keeping theirfingers crossed. —— for the pfizer vaccine. some of the newspapers pointing out people under 50 could expect vaccinations come springtime. how would you sum up its progress so far?— progress so far? there has been extraordinary — progress so far? there has been extraordinary good _ progress so far? there has been extraordinary good progress i progress so far? there has been | extraordinary good progress than progress so far? there has been i extraordinary good progress than to the nhs in pharmacies in gp surgeries. we have been one of the fastest in the world to roll this vaccine out so i would applaud
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everyone who is taking part in the roll—out scheme. everyone who is taking part in the roll-out scheme.— everyone who is taking part in the roll-out scheme. ~ ., , , roll-out scheme. what about problems around working — roll-out scheme. what about problems around working with _ roll-out scheme. what about problems around working with different - around working with different variants? what would you say to reassure them? i variants? what would you say to reassure them?— variants? what would you say to reassure them? i think everybody should remember _ reassure them? i think everybody should remember that _ reassure them? i think everybody should remember that having i reassure them? i think everybody should remember that having a i should remember that having a vaccine is going to prevent you getting ending up in hospital with these current strains. we also need to be cautious that even though you will get some protection from a single dose, behaving as you don't, in order to maximise your chances of getting total protection when you getting total protection when you get that second dose and minimise the chances of contracting it later on if you get one of these variant strains. ~ , ,., ~' on if you get one of these variant strains. ~ , ,., ~ ., , strains. we spoke earlier this mornin: strains. we spoke earlier this morning to — strains. we spoke earlier this morning to an _ strains. we spoke earlier this morning to an expert - strains. we spoke earlier this morning to an expert initial l strains. we spoke earlier this i morning to an expert initial where we know they have had the widest roll—out of the vaccine and said transmission rates have not reduced significantly but hospitalisation has. that is a stark reminder. it is
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has. that is a stark reminder. it is one of these _ has. that is a stark reminder. it is one of these things _ has. that is a stark reminder. lit 3 one of these things we will have to keep monitoring the impact of the vaccine on a week by week basis. it's much more likely we will see it reduce hospitalisation rates which are so critically important. the transmission thesis is much more open and we will have to see how that falls out over the coming months. ~ . , that falls out over the coming months. n, , ., for weeks now gps have been vaccinating people at their practices, but many have also been visiting patients to provide jabs to vulnerable people who cannot leave their homes.today its been announced they'll now receive an additional £10 from the nhs for every housebound patient they vaccinate. we'rejoined now by gp, dr mohit mandiratta. good morning to you. thank you very much for having _ good morning to you. thank you very much for having me _ good morning to you. thank you very much for having me again. _ good morning to you. thank you very much for having me again. how i much for having me again. how significant _ much for having me again. how significant is — much for having me again. how significant is this _ much for having me again. how significant is this announcement from the nhs in england around this additionalfinancial support for additional financial support for gps? l additional financial support for gps? “ additional financial support for gps? ~ . additional financial support for gps? 4' ., ., additional financial support for gps? ~ ., ., ., ,, . , gps? i think there are two aspects, it is very important _ gps? i think there are two aspects, it is very important to _ gps? i think there are two aspects, it is very important to make - gps? i think there are two aspects, it is very important to make clear i it is very important to make clear this is something we've been doing
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for weeks now since we've had the astrazeneca oxford vaccine it is saved as the transport and safer to store and easier to store so we are able to take it out to other communities to our nurses and doctors and health assistants to deliver the vaccine. it is also important to recognise that taking it out into peoples homes is more difficult and complex, and equipment involved, it has to be transported and drawn up so it takes more time. our practice is over the small footprint but some gp practices in other areas are over a really big footprint so with the time involved i think it is only appropriate gp practices were illuminated appropriately for it. —— re—enumerated. —— renunmerated. it has gone on for
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some time. i -- renunmerated. it has gone on for some time-— -- renunmerated. it has gone on for some time. , , ., ., , ., ., some time. i suppose normally one of the 'o s some time. i suppose normally one of the joys was — some time. i suppose normally one of the joys was the _ some time. i suppose normally one of the joys was the face-to-face - the joys was the face—to—face contact which you have not been able to do recently. it is notjust the jab, it's the face—to—face contact. there is a realfeeling of hope jab, it's the face—to—face contact. there is a real feeling of hope and the days are getting longer and are case numbers are coming down. it is so important people continue to follow the guidelines and we have seen how many people are still in hospital and although case numbers are much down in the community they are much down in the community they are still incredibly high so it is still very important people followed the guidelines but it is that contacts, that happy emotion we are seeing in patients when we come to give them the vaccine. irate seeing in patients when we come to give them the vaccine.— seeing in patients when we come to give them the vaccine. we see these hu . e give them the vaccine. we see these huge numbers _ give them the vaccine. we see these huge numbers of— give them the vaccine. we see these huge numbers of the _ give them the vaccine. we see these huge numbers of the number- give them the vaccine. we see these huge numbers of the number of- give them the vaccine. we see these i huge numbers of the number of people have had their first huge numbers of the number of people have had theirfirstjab but huge numbers of the number of people have had their firstjab but let's talk about vaccine hesitancy, those
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who might not be inclined to take it or at least need quite a bit of persuasion. i think you have spotted that in some people in black and minority ethnic communities. laiial’ith that in some people in black and minority ethnic communities. with so many vaccines. _ minority ethnic communities. with so many vaccines, probably _ minority ethnic communities. with so many vaccines, probably around i minority ethnic communities. with so many vaccines, probably around 12 i many vaccines, probably around 12 million that had been done across the country, we are able to analyse the country, we are able to analyse the data are a bit more now and we do know uptake in the bame community is a little less than other community. that is a lot of misinformation and myths out there and i think it is about a trusted person having those conversations with patients and saying we know the vaccine has been had by millions of people and there have been minimal reactions to it. there are no animal products on it and it does not contain covid and it has been approved by faith leaders and communities. i would again reiterate to the vast majority of people are incredibly happy to have it and it is addressing those few people who
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have concerns and we want them to come forward. have concerns and we want them to come forward-— come forward. from all things vaccine still _ come forward. from all things vaccine still thinks _ come forward. from all things vaccine still thinks testing, i come forward. from all thingsj vaccine still thinks testing, we were reporting on the programme this morning this expansion of testing for people who are having to physically go into a workplace during this lockdown, they are going to be offered these lateral flow test. ., ., , ., y to be offered these lateral flow test. ., ., , ., j , test. how reliable are they? it is something _ test. how reliable are they? it is something that _ test. how reliable are they? it is something that health _ test. how reliable are they? it is something that health care i something that health care professionals have been doing for some time. i've got some as well and have been doing them. not the most pleasant thing to do but in the big scheme of things it is a minor inconvenience. they are thought to be around 70% sensitive so 70% of the time they will pick up cases. no testis the time they will pick up cases. no test is perfect. i would say that evenif test is perfect. i would say that even if one person is picked up as being potentially positive for covid from the stairs, the isolating debtor proper test done and then i'd seen people and their bubble and going to workplace that would help event transmission and protect the nhs and potentially help save lives so i think it is a good thing these
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things have been rolled out across industries and businesses.- industries and businesses. thanks for our time. hopefully this will galvanised gps to get out there. i think you'll find i'm impartial doing the sport this morning. i might have done that on my own on the living room floor. the 2021 six nations kicked off in style with an historic win for scotland, they beat a sluggish
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england at twickenham for the first time in 38 years. after a slow start to the game it was scotland who finally siezed the momentum. winger duhan van der merwe crossing in the corner for the only try of the game. and scotland never looked back from there, playmaker finn russell back in the team for scotland. he kicked two penalties to keep his side ahead and seal a famous 11 points to 6 win for the scots. back in the team for scotland. he kicked two penalties to keep his side ahead and seal a famous 11 points to 6 win for the scots. it's been a good morning for england who remain on top against india on day three of the first test in chennai, with the bowlers stepping up afterfinally being bowled out for 578. jofra archer had already taken two wickets before dom bess dismissed india's key man and captain, virat kohli for only 11. another wicket followed, again for bess, and just look at this catch from joe root. what a 100th test match he's having after scoring a double century,
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you just can't keep him out of the action. india are now 154—4 at tea. now to football and manchester united missed the chance to go level on points with leaders manchester city after a dramatic 3—all draw with everton at old trafford. united went 2—0 up in the first half, thanks to goals from edison cavani and then this stunner from bruno fernandes. everton drew level after the break, but united thought they had won it after they took the lead again thanks to scott mctominay. however, in the 95th minute, everton snatched a point thanks to dominic calvert—lewin with the last kick of the game. so a disappointing end to ole gunnarsolskjaer�*s100th match in charge at the club.
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british number one dan evans has won his first atp title, he beat canadian felix auger—aliassime in straight sets in the final of the murray river open. it's one of the warm—up tournaments for the australian open, which finally gets under way tomorrow. it's perhaps the most ambitious sporting event since the beginning of the covid—19 pandemic — running over two weeks with players from all over the world — in front of hundreds of thousands of fans. this event is only able to happen because australia has controlled the spread of the virus. but not everyone is thrilled that it is happening. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne. it has been a bumpy ride for the australian open. but the stage is set now. with the most unusual of build—ups, it is finally ready to go. even before the grand slam begins, tennis fans have come for the warm—up events, with the ongoing travel ban most spectators this year are locals and after melbourne going through one of the longest and strictest lockdowns in the world,
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they are very excited to be here. the safety is the main thing i think everyone really wanted it to happen, but that it is able to go on like it has and, you know, like we are here, at melbourne park, it is pretty awesome. it's unreal, really. it feels like a new life. melbourne is a huge i sporting capital of the world and people love the sport here, it makes them happy. i actually you feel maybe more connected with the tennis because you don't have the big crowd. you actually can watch and enjoy the show. literally because this is what it is, it is a big show! getting to the stage has been controversial and often dramatic. controversial and often hundreds of players flew in from around the world, some under tighter quarantine rules
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and others because of covid—19 cases recorded. on their planes. preparing as best they could. and then last week, another setback. more than 500 players and officials. had to isolate and be tested after a coronavirus case at their hotel. not everyone in melbourne supports the tennis going ahead. some have argued that holding a tournament of that size in the midst of a pandemic isn't worth the risk. melburnians sarah and jackson won't be at any of the matches. they are stuck in the uk because of limits on international arrivals. they say there's not enough quarantine places, but then when it comes to sporting events, suddenly they can find more spaces and they can lift those caps. it makes me feel abandoned. it makes me feel as if i don't matter as much as these athletes or celebrities, even though i am a citizen. for the next two weeks, everyone here hopes the focus
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will shift from coronavirus to the courts. but it will feel very different. crowds have been kept at half capacity and covid safety measures are everywhere. many will be watching this closely. notjust for the tennis, but also what it tells us about the future of holding major sporting events in this very different and difficult time. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, melbourne. tokyo looking very closely at how a stroller copes with this tournament ahead of the olympics. this is where we say goodbye to chris who is going to read the news for the andrew marr show.susan's here though with a look at this morning's weather looking at some live pictures here. plenty of snow for plenty of people to come. i know you've had some people male n
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and say they're disappointed at what they have seen so far. this is why most of us will properly see at least a little snowfall in the course of the next 48 hours if you have not already. earlier on it was a mixture of rain and sleet and snow across essex but properly cold it is cut underneath the band of rain and we have seen some snow. this is clacton. this is kent. it is really beginning to start to pile in here. much colder they are right away across the uk today. even if you don't see falling snow it is going to feel particularly cold. he does the call they are, originated from the call they are, originated from the arctic and come down across the baltic and pushing into the uk from the east. you will see it takes a little while for the darker blue to push into the far south—east. it is as we cut underneath what is the tail end of storm darcy and we set
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“p tail end of storm darcy and we set up more persistent snort for eastern counties of england sought still a few hours to come for this snow to pile up. parts of norfolk all away down into kent the amber warning stands on the possibility of 20 centimetres of snow in some areas. it is the snow blowing around and drifting that could be an additional hazard because that is quite a keen wind gusting already across the south—eastern quarter of the uk. further north st nor also most wall street men on the easterly wind —— further north snow showers will stream in an easterly wind and into scotland. some sunny spells but gusty winds affecting all parts of the uk and temperatures are set at three or 4 degrees but factor in the wind and it will feel sub zero. although we have not seen any snow and perhaps want in association with darcy when that system tools further away towards the continent we allow away towards the continent we allow a direct easterly to strengthen more
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and get these bands of showers that overnight stream westwards, perhaps into wales so covering the midlands and north and eastern england and scotland and northern ireland and perhaps a few for northern ireland, i should say and across northern england. a greater risk of seeing those snow showers pushing westwards so notjust about those snow showers pushing westwards so not just about that area covered by the amber warning today. it will again be cold on monday and if anything perhaps colder than today and the wind perhaps howling a little stronger, perhaps —4 —5 when we step outside so some challenging conditions to be had in the next 48 hours in terms of falling snow and it will stay cold right away across the week ahead. there is more than one way for the snow to come in when we get this really called here.
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you've been sending in your snowy pictures this morning. tudor sent us this, it was taken in wootton in kent. this is also kent this morning looking down on devon — sent in by trevor. our bbc weather watchers have also been in touch. this is peak forest in derbyshire. victor sent this one in from burgh in suffolk. and scotland of course have had heavy snow for days. this is the wintry scene in aberdeenshire this morning, sent in by weather watcher leslie. since last summer, a duo of classically—trained guitarists have been putting on gigs in the gardens of different key workers every friday night. their performances have also been streamed live for thousands of fans worldwide.
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let's take a look at them in action. will cashel and ben
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bruantjoin us now. idid i did classical guitar at school and got two but failed when i needed to. you should have kept practising. l you should have kept practising. i was left handed but talk to the right way round. i will go back to it, i promise. congratulations on your success and the album coming out. talk us through how it started. last year everybody went into a nationwide lockdown. ben and i started doing friday night gates which was a way for us to live stream to our fans every week. soon after this friend of mine working for a charity for a homeless shelter got really ill with covid and we thought it would be a good idea to cheer her up and do a live stream from the garden and from that gig in
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your garden was born and every week we would go to our key workers garden and give a free show. people were nominated _ garden and give a free show. people were nominated each _ garden and give a free show. people were nominated each week - garden and give a free show. people were nominated each week so i garden and give a free show. people l were nominated each week so anyone doing _ were nominated each week so anyone doing any— were nominated each week so anyone doing any work during the lockdown were nominated by a friend or family member— were nominated by a friend or family member and we would sift through it and then— member and we would sift through it and then select them and play them again— and then select them and play them again in— and then select them and play them again in their garden. you must miss performing so much. of course we miss performing and everybody loves live music so everybody loves live music so everybody was really happy to see some _ everybody was really happy to see some live — everybody was really happy to see some live music and we had neighbours enjoying from their gardens— neighbours enjoying from their gardens are perhaps their balconies. they were _ gardens are perhaps their balconies. they were great times. but gardens are perhaps their balconies. they were great times.— they were great times. but the lockdown intensified _ they were great times. but the lockdown intensified as - they were great times. but the lockdown intensified as the i they were great times. but the | lockdown intensified as the year went on and there were ebbs and flows in terms of restrictions so you went on to do performances online?
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you went on to do performances oane? ~,,. , you went on to do performances online? ~ , , .,, .., �* online? absolutely, as we couldn't auoin into online? absolutely, as we couldn't going into peoples _ online? absolutely, as we couldn't going into peoples gardens - online? absolutely, as we couldn't going into peoples gardens any i online? absolutely, as we couldn't i going into peoples gardens any more were doing weekly gigs. we are doing it at a bend is flat at the moment and we have been in a bubble so we have been keeping up the gates and they are still going on every friday at eight o'clock. if you go to our website or facebook and find us there. . ~ website or facebook and find us there. ., ~ ., ., ., , there. talk to me about the album ou're there. talk to me about the album you're leasing. _ there. talk to me about the album you're leasing, you'll— there. talk to me about the album you're leasing, you'll be _ there. talk to me about the album you're leasing, you'll be -- - there. talk to me about the album you're leasing, you'll be -- you i you're leasing, you'll be —— you will be releasing and sharing some of the money. last will be releasing and sharing some of the money-— will be releasing and sharing some of the money. last time we were on our show of the money. last time we were on your show seven _ of the money. last time we were on your show seven months _ of the money. last time we were on your show seven months ago - of the money. last time we were on your show seven months ago we i of the money. last time we were on i your show seven months ago we were approached by a producer, several producers and we signed with a label and made an album and it has a selection of tracks. we chose the cd from various gigs we have done and 50p from every sale will be going to the florence nightingale foundation and 10% from every single download. it has been such a difficult time for musicians and the wider creative industries. how do you feel about the future? l industries. how do you feel about the future?—
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the future? i think you've got to feel, we the future? i think you've got to feel. we are _ the future? i think you've got to feel, we are positive _ the future? i think you've got to feel, we are positive and - the future? i think you've got to feel, we are positive and it i the future? i think you've got to feel, we are positive and it has| feel, we are positive and it has been hard for absolutely everybody everywhere so we have just got to keep going and will still be doing a weekly gigs and as soon as locked finishes we hope to be able to get back into peoples gardens and continue doing these live gigs. l continue doing these live gigs. i would like to book un. let's have a live audition now. would you mind to play us a quick minute or so to end the programme?— play us a quick minute or so to end the programme? thank you very much for havin: the programme? thank you very much for having us- — the programme? thank you very much for having us. we _ the programme? thank you very much for having us. we will _ the programme? thank you very much for having us. we will play _ the programme? thank you very much for having us. we will play a _ the programme? thank you very much for having us. we will play a little i for having us. we will play a little bit of one of our disney medleys. they play bare necessities.
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the best of luck with your album. that is the message. stick to the bare necessities.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. our top stories... the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine offers limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant of covid—19, according to early trials. tens of thousands of protestors gather for a second day in myanmar�*s main city to condemn the military coup and demand the release of leader aung sann suu kyi. because of this military dictatorship, many of our lives have been destroyed. we cannot let our future generation meet the same fate. doctors in england are to be paid an additional £10 for each housebound patient they vaccinate against coronavirus. and covid testing is being offered to more companies in england, for staff who can't work from home during lockdown.

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