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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 4, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri. the headlines at 8pm — the success of the vaccine roll—out makes a rapid recovery in the economy more likely. that's according to the bank of england. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we're also now beginning to see positive benefits of it. and i think, you know, as we move forwards, that should reduce uncertainy. but on the jobs front, with high streets shut down, the unemployment rate is going to hit nearly 8% as the furlough scheme unwinds. government sources confirm the hotel quarantine scheme for uk residents
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returning from coronavirus hotspots will come into force on the 15th of february. the gps working overtime to get the vaccine to those who can't leave their homes. joe biden sets out his vision for america on the world stage in his first foreign policy speech as president. first foreign policy speech as president-— first foreign policy speech as resident. ~ , ~ president. america is back. america is back. diplomacy _ president. america is back. america is back. diplomacy is _ president. america is back. america is back. diplomacy is back _ president. america is back. america is back. diplomacy is back at - president. america is back. america is back. diplomacy is back at the - is back. diplomacy is back at the centre _ is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of— is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of our foreign policy. a green and pleasant land now, but this site in cumbria could soon have a coal mine like this. so, how does that square with the government's promises to go green? must be something in the water — the bristol street where having a baby is becoming something of a trend.
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good evening and welcome to bbc news at eight p:m.. the uk's vaccination programme is not only helping to curb the spread of the coronavirus, it could also give the economy a shot in the arm. that is the view from the bank of england. while we're in lockdown, the bank expects the size of the economy, the gdp, to shrink by 4.2% in the first three months of this year. but it says a successful vaccination roll—out should see a rapid recovery from spring onwards. as far as jobs go, the bank's latest report says the unemployment rate is likely to peak to peak at 7.8% by the middle of the year as the government's furlough scheme winds down. so, some reasons to hope for better times, but predicting the course of the economy is as tough as forecasting the up and downs of the pandemic. here's our economics editor faisal islam. like every town, city and suburb,
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slough high street is currently locked down again. on the latest figures, it had one of the highest proportions of furloughed employees in the country. not all of this will return, but the question is when does the process of reopening begin? it is the bank of england's job to assess these matters every three months. it has been counting not justjobs and prices, but vaccinations, too. as a result, the shape of the economy from last year's extraordinary lockdown and autumn recovery looks a little like this, with right now a further significant fall, but not quite as historic as last year, and then a sharp rebound between april and september, growing 5% a quarter as the economy is able to reopen. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we're also now beginning to see the positive benefits of it, and i think that as we move forwards, that should reduce uncertainty.
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back in slough is the famous century—old industrial estate, the largest in europe. the bank also pointed to a hit, for now, from new trade barriers with the eu after the pm's deal. but here, tenants are accelerating investment in serving customers directly over the internet, but hospitality and aviation have been under pressure. slough as a town in terms of employment is reliant on the airport, and that is certainly seen in the unemployment and the furlough numbers for slough as a town. i think its really encouraging what we're seeing on the vaccination side of things, particularly in the uk. clearly we need to see that similar success rolled out on a global basis as well. but i think that is absolutely driving more business confidence and the hope that actually at some point during 2021, things will return to a normal, whatever the new normal looks like. this lockdown has been quite different from the first one last april. much more of the economy has been kept open, so the overall economic hit will be smaller than last april, and there's also this certainty now
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of a vaccine—fuelled recovery. we and the bank of england just don't know exactly when, and that's led to strong calls for the government to keep its high level of support going for months to come. on the site of slough old library, a surprise. almost to the day of the new lockdown last month, notjust one but two hotels opening here, a sign of more wheels of the economy turning during the current lockdown. there is key workers in this area. i there is a need for constructionl to continue, and our hotel is very well—suited for that. so we decided to open, and we've opened thisl so we decided to open, - and we've opened this and we've opened this week and we've seen a pick—up thatjustifies it. this is a bet on things getting back to normal at some point? yes, i mean we are very hopeful that travel restrictions will be _ eased in due course. i mean, it's slough, _
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who wouldn't want to travel here! right now, it might not look like it, but the bank also pointed to £125 billion in extra savings by households who have not been able to spend it that at some point could be unleashed. another much—needed shot in the arm at a tough moment for the economy. faisal islam, bbc news, in slough. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at10:40pm and 11:30pm. this evening in the papers, our guestsjoining me tonight are the author and journalist mihir bose and former pensions minister ros altman. government sources have confirmed to the bbc that the hotel quarantine scheme for uk residents returning from coronavirus hotspots will come into force on the 15th of february after a meeting in westminster tonight. the bbc has seen a document that sets out the date and estimates that hotels will be asked to provide accommodation for more than 1000 people a day. ministers are expected to confirm full details soon. they had faced criticism from the opposition for failing to introduce the scheme more than a month after the south african variant was detected.
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our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. there has been a lot of pressure for the government to come up with something and quickly.— the government to come up with something and quickly. that's right. we have a date _ something and quickly. that's right. we have a date now _ something and quickly. that's right. we have a date now for _ something and quickly. that's right. we have a date now for when - something and quickly. that's right. we have a date now for when this i we have a date now for when this will be imposed on british residents coming back from coronavirus hotspots. more than 30 countries on a so—called red list which means us residents of those countries cannot get access to the uk. it includes most of africa —— america and sub—saharan africa as well. if british residents returned from their indirectly because direct flights are also banned, they will be expected to go into hotel accommodation for ten days of quarantine from penn were the 15th. but this is i think by the 15th almost two months since the very from of africa first came to light.
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and the labour opposition to making it very clear they believe the government has acted too slowly. the letter sent to the shadow secretary to the home secretary earlier this evening suggesting that the government was costing lives because of it and it's a lie. the department of it and it's a lie. the department of health making the official announcement and we get the official announcement and we get the official announcement of the quarantine arrangements later tonight. but they will involve setting up hotel accommodation as you say for around 1000 people a day initially. but again government sources are saying to me that sunday because people will have to pay for their own accommodation for ten days, it likely that will act as a disincentive and therefore they expect the numbers quite rapidly to fall from the 15th of february onwards. this is another weapon in the government's armoury to try and at least slow or suppress the spread of the new variants of covid—19. the government is also stressing that
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existing policies are in place which they say include tough border controls, like having to get a test for you coming to the country and also even if you are not from one of the hotspots, you are still expected to self isolated home or it is that it address for a ten day period as well. but also a difference and not just timescale but substance between the government and labour on this. we are the policy should be applied to all who come to the uk and not just from the coronavirus hotspots in the government is saying that is not practical because it could be putting up 20,000 people a day into hotels. . ~ putting up 20,000 people a day into hotels. ., ~' , ., , . we can talk now to the travel editor at the sun, lisa minot. thank you for talking to us. let me ask you first of all logistically how challenging could this be potential equipment is very challenging. potential equipment is very challenging-— potential equipment is very challenauin. ,, , ., challenging. especially we have heard today _ challenging. especially we have heard today from _ challenging. especially we have heard today from the _ challenging. especially we have heard today from the ceo - challenging. especially we have
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heard today from the ceo a - challenging. especially we have l heard today from the ceo a best western — heard today from the ceo a best western hotels they have not yet had any kind _ western hotels they have not yet had any kind of— western hotels they have not yet had any kind of discourse for the government. so hotel chains, they are available and ready and waiting but they— are available and ready and waiting but they are not actually having those _ but they are not actually having those discussionsjust but they are not actually having those discussions just yet. but they are not actually having those discussionsjust yet. and i'm asleep _ those discussionsjust yet. and i'm asleep with— those discussionsjust yet. and i'm asleep with river we are in lock down _ asleep with river we are in lock down a — asleep with river we are in lock down a lot— asleep with river we are in lock down a lot of these hotel chains would _ down a lot of these hotel chains would have for a little out of their workers _ would have for a little out of their workers and probably have only a skeleton — workers and probably have only a skeleton staff and they are going to need time _ skeleton staff and they are going to need time and notice to actually get everything back up and running again — everything back up and running aaain. , again. some might say it is happening _ again. some might say it is happening in _ again. some might say it is happening in new- again. some might say it is happening in new zealandl again. some might say it is i happening in new zealand and happening in new zealand and happening in new zealand and happening in australia and why can it not happen here? i happening in australia and why can it not happen here?— it not happen here? i think 'ust a ruestion it not happen here? i think 'ust a question «i it not happen here? i think 'ust a question of scale. * it not happen here? i think 'ust a question of scale. talking h it not happen here? i thinkjust a question of scale. talking about | it not happen here? i thinkjust a| question of scale. talking about a more _ question of scale. talking about a more manageable number b will now because _ more manageable number b will now because we're only talking about these _ because we're only talking about these 33 — because we're only talking about these 33 countries that are on the red iist~ _ these 33 countries that are on the red list. but we are a global hub. we have — red list. but we are a global hub. we have always been a global hub. therefore — we have always been a global hub. therefore we have four more people actuatiy _ therefore we have four more people actually wanting to travel through our airports and coming into our country — our airports and coming into our country. and the likes of australia and new— country. and the likes of australia and new zealand who have far less number— and new zealand who have far less number of— and new zealand who have far less number of people wanting to go through— number of people wanting to go through their borders. and number of people wanting to go through their borders.—
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through their borders. and the difference _ through their borders. and the difference between _ through their borders. and the difference between interns - through their borders. and the i difference between interns where through their borders. and the - difference between interns where you enter the country, forcible by boat or by train or biplane, will it be different? to be no anymore? taste or by train or biplane, will it be different? to be no anymore? we have 'ust the different? to be no anymore? we have just the bare — different? to be no anymore? we have just the bare facts _ different? to be no anymore? we have just the bare facts here _ different? to be no anymore? we have just the bare facts here and _ different? to be no anymore? we have just the bare facts here and we - different? to be no anymore? we have just the bare facts here and we have i just the bare facts here and we have been told _ just the bare facts here and we have been told anything officially. but i understand there will be ten individual places people can enter the uk _ individual places people can enter the uk and they will be injust those — the uk and they will be injust those ten _ the uk and they will be injust those ten places the hotel accommodation they available to take people _ accommodation they available to take people to _ accommodation they available to take people to a british citizen to come back into — people to a british citizen to come back into the country and have to isolate _ back into the country and have to isolate in — back into the country and have to isolate in the hotel for ten days. i can imagine those ten would involve the likes— can imagine those ten would involve the likes of— can imagine those ten would involve the likes of our biggest airports, manchester, heathrow, and then perhaps— manchester, heathrow, and then perhaps somewhere like central london — perhaps somewhere like central london because you have the euro * so coming _ london because you have the euro * so coming in — london because you have the euro * so coming in on a daily basis. limited — so coming in on a daily basis. limited number of transfer they are coming _ limited number of transfer they are coming in _ limited number of transfer they are coming in and of course ports of call iike — coming in and of course ports of call like dover.— coming in and of course ports of call like dover. having a blow is is auoin to call like dover. having a blow is is going to be _ call like dover. having a blow is is going to be for— call like dover. having a blow is is going to be for the _ call like dover. having a blow is is going to be for the travel - call like dover. having a blow is is going to be for the travel industry | going to be for the travel industry which over the last year has been brought to its knees by the covid—19 pandemic. it’s brought to its knees by the covid-19 andemic. �* , ., , ., . .,
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pandemic. it's a huge blow. we have literally nonexistent _ pandemic. it's a huge blow. we have literally nonexistent inbound - pandemic. it's a huge blow. we have literally nonexistent inbound travel l literally nonexistent inbound travel at the _ literally nonexistent inbound travel at the moment and that's been a huge problem _ at the moment and that's been a huge problem and we have lost billions. inbound _ problem and we have lost billions. inbound travel was a massive source of income _ inbound travel was a massive source of income for the uk. and now another— of income for the uk. and now another level of restrictions and another— another level of restrictions and another level of restrictions and another level of restrictions and another level of really put people off and _ another level of really put people off and everyone wanted to travel out of _ off and everyone wanted to travel out of the — off and everyone wanted to travel out of the country and back again will have — out of the country and back again will have a — out of the country and back again will have a huge impact and i think we are _ will have a huge impact and i think we are going to unfortunately see more _ we are going to unfortunately see more companies in the travel industry— more companies in the travel industry unable to survive. and how lona would industry unable to survive. and how long would a _ industry unable to survive. and how long would a potential _ industry unable to survive. and how long would a potential quarantining| long would a potential quarantining and hotels plan go on for because of its lead lot that is not going to go on forever? could you see potentially going on beyond lockdown or not? would it make any sense of it did? i or not? would it make any sense of it did? ~' or not? would it make any sense of it did? ~ ., , , it did? i think will happen eventually _ it did? i think will happen eventually is _ it did? i think will happen eventually is we - it did? i think will happen eventually is we will - it did? i think will happen l eventually is we will return it did? i think will happen - eventually is we will return and i'm not saying — eventually is we will return and i'm not saying anytime soon but we will return _ not saying anytime soon but we will return to _ not saying anytime soon but we will return to the travel cord or system we had _ return to the travel cord or system we had in — return to the travel cord or system we had in place before. there will still he _ we had in place before. there will still be additional tests, i think the idea — still be additional tests, i think the idea that you have to have a negative — the idea that you have to have a negative coronavirus test to come back into — negative coronavirus test to come back into the country is going to continue — back into the country is going to continue for some time to come. but
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i continue for some time to come. but i would _ continue for some time to come. but i would hope — continue for some time to come. but i would hope that we would go back to the _ i would hope that we would go back to the more managed idea of travel core doors — to the more managed idea of travel core doors with countries we regard as not— core doors with countries we regard as not as _ core doors with countries we regard as not as high risk and then far better— as not as high risk and then far better restrictions for companies that we — better restrictions for companies that we do regard as higher risk with these variants.— that we do regard as higher risk with these variants. thank you very much indeed. _ with these variants. thank you very much indeed, lisa. _ despite the success of the vaccination programme so far, doctors are being urged by nhs england to step up efforts to reach vulnerable elderly people who have not yet been given the jab. many patients are unable to get to drive in centres or other vaccination hubs, so teams of nhs staff are being sent out into the community. our health editor hugh pym has this report. for me, the universal credit extra £20 is a lifeline that allows me to stay in the job that i'm in. £20 a week to me is literally our food spend. just about to set off the 75 miles to work this morning, same as every morning.
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here we go. and it's a balmy two degrees. another 5am start for caroline shelton. after being made redundant due to the pandemic, the onlyjob the chemist could find involves a three hour commute. her salary is topped up by universal credit which pays her £54 per month. that £54 is four days fuel. it's a huge help for me. it means the difference between being in debt and not being in debt. that payment comes at a time in the month for me where it isjust before i get paid. the single mother of two from leeds fears any cuts to universal credit as her small benefit payment helps her cope. that peace of mind is priceless. that's my sleep. and my mental health. the increase in universal credit costs the government about £6 billion, but since 2010,
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more than £30 billion has been cut from the benefits of people of working age. even with the extra £20, a single person without children who loses theirjob will see the greatest drop in income of any comparable economy. in luxembourg, those claimants receive 86% of average earnings in benefit payments. in france, it's 68%, a bit lower in the united states and ireland. here, they receive just 17% of average earnings. for rebecca and her daughter, the extra £20 allows her to add fruit and veg to the weekly shop. when already you're scraping for pennies, £20 is masses. £80 a month is huge, you know, that's literally our food spend. rebecca, who works part—time for a charity, says the idea of paying a one—off lump sum, as ministers are considering, rather than keeping the uplift is the wrong approach. i don't need £1000. what i need is long—term security and stability for myself and my daughter.
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that's the only way we're ever going to get our life situation better. a huge range of health and anti—poverty groups are urging the government to keep the £20 payment. a decision is expected next month. ministers say they are committed to supporting the lowest paid families. michael buchanan, bbc news. we apologise as that was not the piece on the vaccine but was instead on universal credit. let's get an update on the latest government coronavirus figures there were 20,631; new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 21,246. those numbers have been falling for a month now. the latest daily figure for the number of people across the uk in hospital with coronavirus is still high at 31,670.
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that includes suspected cases in wales. 915 deaths were reported. that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 1018 deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths so far across the uk is 110,250. now let's look at the vaccination roll—out. 469,016 people have had theirfirst dose of one of the three approved covid—19 vaccines in the latest 24—hour period. that takes the overall number of people who've had their firstjab to almost 10.5 million. the headlines on bbc news — the success of the vaccine roll—out makes a rapid recovery in the economy more likely. that's according to the bank of england.
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government sources confirm the hotel quarantine scheme for uk residents returning from coronavirus hotspots will come into force on the 15th of february. the gps working overtime to get the vaccine to those who can't leave their homes. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. good evening. england's cricketers are in chennai, ready to take on india in the first of four test matches which begins in the early hours of the morning. they recently beat sri lanka 2—0, but this is going to be a much sterner test. india haven't lost on home soilfor 11 years. patrick gearey reports. you cannot escape cricket in india. these dusty beaches are some of the game's most fertile slopes. but if you are english, this round can trip you are english, this round can trip you up. currently slipped before the series even started. two and in
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india, body and mind must be aligned. taste india, body and mind must be aliuned. ~ . india, body and mind must be aliuned. . ., ., , ., , aligned. we are to be mentally resilient in _ aligned. we are to be mentally resilient in these _ aligned. we are to be mentally resilient in these conditions. i aligned. we are to be mentally i resilient in these conditions. that will be a real challenge for us. as it always is. be prepared to play the long game. and to outpace the other side. that will be a really important factor in the four games. england tends to be subordinate on the subcontinent. over the six series in the past 30 years, they've won only once in india. four years ago, they lost 4—0. in this time of course there will be a bubble. england were swabbed up on arrival and then lock down and it six days according before 4.5 weeks of my secure test cricket. to try and release the pressure, england in the likes of ben stokes and john for archer timeout before the tour and others will be rested during the series but not entirely noncontroversial he. �* , ., ., series but not entirely noncontroversial he. �* ., , noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticisinu noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticising it — noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticising it has _ noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticising it has never _ noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticising it has never been - noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticising it has never been in - noncontroversial he. anyone who is criticising it has never been in a - criticising it has never been in a bubble — criticising it has never been in a bubble for— criticising it has never been in a bubble for months. i think we need
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to get— bubble for months. i think we need to get in— bubble for months. i think we need to get in and out because of the end of the _ to get in and out because of the end of the day, — to get in and out because of the end of the day, humans are social people and if— of the day, humans are social people and if you _ of the day, humans are social people and if you are not having a great game _ and if you are not having a great game or— and if you are not having a great game or are not feeling good in your cricket, _ game or are not feeling good in your cricket, there is no escape, nowhere to go _ cricket, there is no escape, nowhere to no. �* cricket, there is no escape, nowhere to no. . , ., ., cricket, there is no escape, nowhere toao. . ., ., cricket, there is no escape, nowhere to no. �* ., ., ., cricket, there is no escape, nowhere toao. . ., ., to go. and you have no need to shake off rustles of — to go. and you have no need to shake off rustles of the _ to go. and you have no need to shake off rustles of the coming _ to go. and you have no need to shake off rustles of the coming of— to go. and you have no need to shake off rustles of the coming of the - off rustles of the coming of the series having just beaten australia away. most without their captain and star. he is back from maternity leave and expects to face england and lead india into the final against new zealand which he try something about. aha, against new zealand which he try something about.— against new zealand which he try something about. against new zealand which he try somethinuabout. �* , . ., something about. a by-product of you doin: well something about. a by-product of you doing well as — something about. a by-product of you doing well as a — something about. a by-product of you doing well as a team _ something about. a by-product of you doing well as a team anyway. - something about. a by-product of you doing well as a team anyway. no - doing well as a team anyway. no point _ doing well as a team anyway. no point adding _ doing well as a team anyway. no point adding after— doing well as a team anyway. no point adding after pressure - doing well as a team anyway. no point adding after pressure as i doing well as a team anyway. no point adding after pressure as a i point adding after pressure as a team _ point adding after pressure as a team for— point adding after pressure as a team for us— point adding after pressure as a team. for us to _ point adding after pressure as a team. for us to remains - point adding after pressure as a team. for us to remains him i point adding after pressure as a - team. for us to remains him cricket one at— team. for us to remains him cricket one at a _ team. for us to remains him cricket one at a time — team. for us to remains him cricket one at a time and _ team. for us to remains him cricket one at a time and one _ team. for us to remains him cricket one at a time and one session- team. for us to remains him cricket one at a time and one session at. team. for us to remains him cricket one at a time and one session at a i one at a time and one session at a time _ one at a time and one session at a time in _ one at a time and one session at a time in one — one at a time and one session at a time in one hour— one at a time and one session at a time in one hour at _ one at a time and one session at a time in one hour at a _ one at a time and one session at a time in one hour at a time - one at a time and one session at a time in one hour at a time and - time in one hour at a time and that's— time in one hour at a time and that's how— time in one hour at a time and that's how the _ time in one hour at a time and that's how the success - time in one hour at a time and that's how the success is- time in one hour at a time and - that's how the success is achieved and the _ that's how the success is achieved and the longest _ that's how the success is achieved and the longest format _ that's how the success is achieved and the longest format of- that's how the success is achieved and the longest format of the - that's how the success is achieved . and the longest format of the game. no point _ and the longest format of the game. no point in _ and the longest format of the game. no point in thing _ and the longest format of the game. no point in thing about— and the longest format of the game. no point in thing about something i no point in thing about something that is— no point in thing about something that is still— no point in thing about something that is still months _ no point in thing about something that is still months away. - no point in thing about something that is still months away. this - that is still months away. this series sporting _ that is still months away. series sporting theatre will that is still months away.- series sporting theatre will be british daytime television. channel 4 will show every match in the first test free to air in 15 years. so
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children will have plenty watching him when his 100th gap and plenty hoping his centuries don't stop there. under way at 4am our time. next to tonight's premier league football, just one game being played. thomas tuchel is unbeaten after two games in charge of chelsea. his side are at spurs, who have lost their last two league games. they're about a quarter of an hour into the match. latest 0—0. german authorities say liverpool won't be allowed into the country to play their champions league game in leipzig on 16th february. it's because of border restrictions imposed over new variants of coronavirus. leipzig could now ask uefa to move the game to a neutral venue. switching the order of the legs so that liverpool play at home first could also be an option. uefa have marked the 2nd of april as the latest possible date to finish last—16 games. and some rugby union news to bring you before we go, as we get closer to the start
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of the six nations on saturday, ollie lawrence will make his first start for england in their opening match against scotland at twickenham. eddiejones has dropped george ford to the bench and moved owen farrell to number ten. and lawrence will line up against another debutant, cameron redpath, who played with him at youth level for england, but chose to switch to scotland. his dad bryan redpath is a former international captain. that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. thank you so much as always. despite the success of the vaccination programme so far, doctors are being urged by nhs england to step up efforts to reach vulnerable elderly people who have not yet been given the jab. many patients are unable to get to drive in centres or other vaccination hubs, so teams of nhs staff are being sent out into the community. our health editor hugh pym has this report. out of the fridge and off into the community. this gp—led team is preparing doses of the astrazeneca vaccine to take out to immunise those in priority
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groups who find it difficult to leave their homes. either they're clinically unwell, physically unable to get out, or they may have shielding reasons where they're not able to leave their house. the team arrive at the home of cynthia, aged 84, who's with her son, tim. is it all right for us to come in? yeah, sure. tim filmed cynthia having herjab. there you go. she has health issues which made it difficult to get to a vaccination centre. originally, she was offered an appointment miles away from her north london home. yes, they gave me birmingham! how do you feel now you've had your vaccination? 0k. touch wood. touch wood, yeah! these vaccinators have been recruited from a range of local health staff. it's about taking what is essentially a vaccination hub into somebody�*s house.
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myself and my physiotherapy colleagues and the nurses as well, we're all absolutely delighted to be part of it. it feels historical. the team here are confident they can get through all their housebound patients in priority groups by the middle of this month, but in other areas, it seems to be proving more difficult. the thing is, she can't walk... antonia hasn't had herjab yet, and her home care provider says there are several examples of people who've so far missed out. i think, in many cases, - the people that we're looking after who haven't been vaccinated just yet, - but are above the age _ of 70 and 80, they have received a request and a form which they can use to become vaccinated, - but travelling to a vaccination centre is very difficult. - the latest figures show that in england, the south west had the highest proportion of those aged 80 and over to have received a first dose, nearly 93%. this was followed by the north east and yorkshire.
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the lowest region was london, atjust under 75%. scotland's figure was just over 80%, and in wales, it was around 77% of those aged 80 and over. figures for northern ireland are not yet available. the target is to offer all aged 80 and over a firstjab by the middle of this month. progress has been made, but there's still a little way to go. hugh pym, bbc news. from greenpeace and friends of the earth to the cumbria wildlife trust, dozens of environmental groups have written to borisjohnson calling on him to block plans for a new coal mine in whitehaven. they say they're mystified that the government has not intervened to stop the proposal when it's due to host a global climate summit in glasgow later this year. downing street insists the government is a world leader in climate policy, but wouldn't reverse the decision. here's our chief environment correspondentjustin rowlatt.
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newsreel: and beneath this land lie more than 200 - million tonnes of coal... it's more than half a century since the last deep coal mine opened in the uk. the plan is to burrow under the irish sea to access a vast deposit of high—quality coal. the local mayor is delighted. i think the project is absolutely fantastic. you know, it'll bring huge amounts ofjobs and prosperity into the area. it's been broadly welcomed right across copeland, i've never known a project that's carried so much public support. the coal produced here won't be used to generate power, but to make steel, he says, and means less will need to be imported in future. but the decision comes as britain prepares to host a crucial international climate conference here in glasgow in november. if it goes ahead as planned, it will be the biggest gathering of world leaders in uk history. that's why all these environmental organisations wrote to the prime minister today. the conservative environmental
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network, a group of 100 tory mps and peers, also opposes it. it's a massive mistake in public relations, that's for sure. how can we ask other countries to bring in their climate change reduction programmes when we are now reopening the whole coal argument here in britain? the government defends the decision to allow the mine to open, saying the uk is cutting emissions faster than any other country. and it's true — when it comes to decarbonisation, britain is a world leader. our coal consumption has fallen 90% in just the last five years. only four power stations still burn the stuff, and look what that has done to britain's carbon emissions. now, some european countries are doing pretty well, too, but in most big economies, look at this. emissions are still rising. critics say opening a new coal mine here threatens to undermine not only the uk's green reputation,
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but also its ability to demand other countries to make ambitious carbon cuts. now, if that makes it less likely that the big climate conference in glasgow leads to meaningful action on climate change, it will have consequences for us all. justin rowlatt, bbc news. joe biden has been sitting out the us foreign policy goals and will reverse donald trump's foreign policy. his main message is america is back. , , ., policy. his main message is america isback. , ,., is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of our _ is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of our foreign _ is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of our foreign policy. - is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of our foreign policy. as | is back. diplomacy is back at the centre of our foreign policy. as i | centre of ourforeign policy. as i said in my inaugural address, we will repair our alliances, engage with the world once again, not to me yesterday's challenges, but today's
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and tomorrow's. american leadership must be this new moment of combating authoritarianism including the growing ambitions of china to rival the other states and the determination of rest to damage and disrupt our democracy. we must meet in a moment exhilarating global challenges from the pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation. challenging though it will only to be solved by nations working together and in common. we cannot do alone.— cannot do alone. barbara is in washington — cannot do alone. barbara is in washington now. _ cannot do alone. barbara is in washington now. america - cannot do alone. barbara is in washington now. america is. cannot do alone. barbara is in - washington now. america is back and running a very different tone to america first.— running a very different tone to america first. yes. that's true it is brinus america first. yes. that's true it is brings a _ america first. yes. that's true it is brings a different _ america first. yes. that's true it is brings a different tone - america first. yes. that's true it is brings a different tone to - is brings a different tone to america _ is brings a different tone to america first. this administration has spoken— america first. this administration has spoken by mr biden is very much emphasising alliances, saying that he is going to repair the damage by president _ he is going to repair the damage by president trump and focus on them and rely— president trump and focus on them and rely on — president trump and focus on them and rely on them to have america and
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whatever— and rely on them to have america and whatever american leadership there will be _ whatever american leadership there will be in _ whatever american leadership there will be in the world. and we hear that refrain — will be in the world. and we hear that refrain quite a lot even though they have — that refrain quite a lot even though they have onlyjust taken over and we were _ they have onlyjust taken over and we were together with our allies and partners _ we were together with our allies and partners also this is why. he also talked _ partners also this is why. he also talked a — partners also this is why. he also talked a lot— partners also this is why. he also talked a lot about values and promoting human rights and democracy and i promoting human rights and democracy and i have _ promoting human rights and democracy and i have to _ promoting human rights and democracy and i have to the two previous secretaries of state under mr trump also have _ secretaries of state under mr trump also have their own take on what they saw — also have their own take on what they saw as core values with the white _ they saw as core values with the white house and i really thought about— white house and i really thought about them. mrtrump white house and i really thought about them. mr trump did not and here mr— about them. mr trump did not and here mr biden is that is very much will be _ here mr biden is that is very much will be part— here mr biden is that is very much will be part of what we are about. and we _ will be part of what we are about. and we are — will be part of what we are about. and we are going to focus on diplomacy and building up diplomats. many did _ diplomacy and building up diplomats. many did strike a very strong contrast— many did strike a very strong contrast to his predecessor in his tone _ contrast to his predecessor in his tone towards russia. these are the days of— tone towards russia. these are the days of rolling over to aggression are over — days of rolling over to aggression are over. there will be a cost. and he also _ are over. there will be a cost. and he also though did talk about america _ he also though did talk about america first in his own way. he said _ america first in his own way. he said foreign _ america first in his own way. he said foreign policy has to benefit americans and there he was most talking _ americans and there he was most talking about trade really. they are priority— talking about trade really. they are priority or — talking about trade really. they are priority or us priority should be to protect—
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priority or us priority should be to protect workers wages and workers 'obs protect workers wages and workers jobs and _ protect workers wages and workers jobs and not allow goldman sachs to -et a jobs and not allow goldman sachs to get a good _ jobs and not allow goldman sachs to get a good investment in china for example — get a good investment in china for example. so we had his own take on what he _ example. so we had his own take on what he thought america first meant so it is— what he thought america first meant so it is a _ what he thought america first meant so it is a different tone from the previous— so it is a different tone from the previous four years.— so it is a different tone from the previous four years. very different obviously on _ previous four years. very different obviously on his _ previous four years. very different obviously on his vision _ previous four years. very different obviously on his vision of- previous four years. very different obviously on his vision of where i previous four years. very different obviously on his vision of where to go in terms of immigration and refugees in america as well. yes. he made a number _ refugees in america as well. yes. he made a number of _ refugees in america as well. yes. he made a number of policy _ made a number of policy announcements and refugees were a key one~ _ announcements and refugees were a key one he _ announcements and refugees were a key one. he wants and basically said he was _ key one. he wants and basically said he was going to sign an executive order— he was going to sign an executive order to _ he was going to sign an executive order to try— he was going to sign an executive order to try to restore the admissions programme for refugees was that— admissions programme for refugees was that there is a whole never a bureaucracy here that works to get refugees— bureaucracy here that works to get refugees admitted and then settled and that— refugees admitted and then settled and that has really atrophied over the past _ and that has really atrophied over the past four years and he said by the past four years and he said by the time — the past four years and he said by the time you get to the budget year that is— the time you get to the budget year that is for— the time you get to the budget year that is for his term which would be not this— that is for his term which would be not this year but the next, he wants to raise _ not this year but the next, he wants to raise the — not this year but the next, he wants to raise the limits to 125,000 a year— to raise the limits to 125,000 a year and — to raise the limits to 125,000 a year and the to raise the limits to 125,000 a yearand the limit to raise the limits to 125,000 a year and the limit that mr trump had put on _ year and the limit that mr trump had put on it— year and the limit that mr trump had put on it was— year and the limit that mr trump had put on it was 15,000 a year. that's a significant —
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put on it was 15,000 a year. that's a significant difference. the other policy— a significant difference. the other policy change that he mentioned was stopping _ policy change that he mentioned was stopping support for offensive support— stopping support for offensive support for the war in yemen because the american has a the saudi led war there _ the american has a the saudi led war there and _ the american has a the saudi led war there and the key part of that would be to— there and the key part of that would be to withhold weapons that are used in the _ be to withhold weapons that are used in the war. _ be to withhold weapons that are used in the war, precision guided missiles _ in the war, precision guided missiles. that's quite a big moment, and he _ missiles. that's quite a big moment, and he also _ missiles. that's quite a big moment, and he also said there will be a review— and he also said there will be a review of— and he also said there will be a review of forces around the world and until— review of forces around the world and until that was determined and until that — and until that was determined and until that review was done, there will be _ until that review was done, there will be no — until that review was done, there will be no withdrawal of us troops from _ will be no withdrawal of us troops from germany as had been ordered by mr trump _ from germany as had been ordered by mr trum -. ., �* from germany as had been ordered by mrtrum. j from germany as had been ordered by mrtrum. .,�* ,., mr trump. you've covered diplomacy in the us for— mr trump. you've covered diplomacy in the us for many _ mr trump. you've covered diplomacy in the us for many years, _ mr trump. you've covered diplomacy in the us for many years, how- in the us for many years, how difficult do you think it is going to be to get america back to being that leading force for good in the world that president biden wanted to be given ?@ ? @ thing to will be 7 @ thing to will be easy in some ? @ thing to will be easy in some wa s and ? @ thing to will be easy in some ways and difficult _ ? @ thing to will be easy in some ways and difficult in _ ? @ thing to will be easy in some ways and difficult in others. - ? @ thing to will be easy in some ways and difficult in others. i - ways and difficult in others. i think— ways and difficult in others. i think there is a real appetite from allies— think there is a real appetite from allies to _ think there is a real appetite from allies to have the united states back in— allies to have the united states back in full force at the table
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because _ back in full force at the table because when they engage in multilateral actions or when they stand _ multilateral actions or when they stand up— multilateral actions or when they stand up to mutual adversaries, it does _ stand up to mutual adversaries, it does help— stand up to mutual adversaries, it does help to be allied with the united — does help to be allied with the united states and not to have the president— united states and not to have the president throwing spanners in the works— president throwing spanners in the works and — president throwing spanners in the works and doing his own thing. so in that sense, — works and doing his own thing. so in that sense, i— works and doing his own thing. so in that sense, i think the us will be welcomed — that sense, i think the us will be welcomed. on the other hand, there will be _ welcomed. on the other hand, there will be some suspicion because you don't _ will be some suspicion because you don't know— will be some suspicion because you don't know in four years, whether the election will return the presidents from even mr trump himself. — presidents from even mr trump himself, or someone with similar policies. — himself, or someone with similar policies. so— himself, or someone with similar policies, so i think the four years of him _ policies, so i think the four years of him have _ policies, so i think the four years of him have made people wary about how long _ of him have made people wary about how long term or how reliable the us is as a _ how long term or how reliable the us is as a partner. then you also had that riot— is as a partner. then you also had that riot here against the b hill building — that riot here against the b hill building a couple of weeks ago and mr biden _ building a couple of weeks ago and mr biden mentioned it because that also brings into question how the americans— also brings into question how the americans like to see themselves as purveyors— americans like to see themselves as purveyors of democracy around the world _ purveyors of democracy around the world he — purveyors of democracy around the world. he said, look, we will be able _ world. he said, look, we will be able to— world. he said, look, we will be able to fight for democracy around the world, — able to fight for democracy around the world, because we fight for it here _ the world, because we fight for it here but — the world, because we fight for it here. but he does acknowledge that here. but he does acknowledge that he has _ here. but he does acknowledge that he has to— here. but he does acknowledge that he has to clean up, americans need to clean— he has to clean up, americans need to clean up— he has to clean up, americans need to clean up their own house in order to clean up their own house in order to be _ to clean up their own house in order to be effective overseas. and that
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is something that this administration has talked about. it is a factor — administration has talked about. it is a factor. 1, ., ., , administration has talked about. it isafactor. ., ., is a factor. barbara, as always, thank you _ is a factor. barbara, as always, thank you very _ is a factor. barbara, as always, thank you very much _ is a factor. barbara, as always, thank you very much for - is a factor. barbara, as always, thank you very much for your i thank you very much for your analysis. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas hello. we have got some colder wintry weather on the cards through the course of the weekend. quite widely, things are going to get much colder. but for the here and now, the most disruptive wintry weather is across parts of scotland. in fact, we have an amber warning in first, 20—30 cm over the higher ground, perhaps as much as 50 cm over the highest hills. for the next couple of days, that is valid. so, heavy hill snow tonight across parts of central and northern scotland. elsewhere, it's mild air and we have got plenty of rain showers around, particularly parts of northern ireland, northeast england as well. some of these heavy showers falling on saturated ground, so there could be a few flooding issues over the next 24 hours or so. some mist and fog patches tonight across southern parts of england and wales slowly clearing away on friday. more showers to come for northern ireland, western parts of england and wales, northeast england as well, and further hill snow which could be disruptive across parts of central and northern scotland. temperature is about 3—10 celsius
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on friday, but it will turn colder for all of us through the course of the weekend. there could be some disruptive snowfall, particularly in the east. bye for now. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the success of the vaccine rollout makes a rapid recovery in the economy more likely — that's according to the bank of england. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we're also now beginning to see positive benefits of it. and i think, you know, as we move forwards, that should reduce uncertainy. but on the jobs front, with high streets shut down, the unemployment rate is going to hit nearly eight per the unemployment rate is going to hit nearly 8% as the furlough scheme unwinds. the gps working overtime to get the vaccine to those government sources confirm the hotel quarantine scheme for uk residents returning from coronavirus hotspots will come into force on the 15th of february.
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a green and pleasant land now — but this site in cumbria could soon have a coal mine like this — so how does that square with the government's promises to go green? joe biden has set out his vision for america on the world stage in his first foreign policy speech as president. america is back. america is back. diplomacy is back at the center of ourforeign policy. a green and pleasant land now — but this site in cumbria could soon have a coal mine like this — so how does that square with the government's promises to go green? must be something in the water — the bristol street where having a baby is becoming something of a trend. there has been international condemnation after the bbc reported allegations of systematic rape and
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torture of women in so—called re—education camps for the muslim minority in china. the us government says it's deeply disturbed by the report, adding, "these atrocities shock the conscience and must be met with serious consequences." australia's government demanded the un be given immediate access to these sites. uk ministers said the report showed, "clearly evil acts." the bbc investigation broadcast harrowing first hand testimony, from a female detainee, a former camp guard and those forced to help. china's foreign ministry has denied the allegations and accused the bbc of making a false report. just a warning, matthew hill's report contains distressing accounts of rape and torture from the start. two days ago, we broadcast the story of tursunay ziawudun. she described how she was held in this re—education camp in xinjiang for months and was the victim of repeated rape. translation: they were three men. not one, but three.
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they did whatever evil their mind could think of. and they did not spare any part of my body, biting it to the extent that it was disgusting to look at. they didn'tjust rape. they were barbaric. they had bitten all over my body. we also heard from gulzira, now living in the relative safety of istanbul, having fled china. she's a khazak who says she was forced to be complicit in the rape that goes on in the camps. translation: my job is to remove | their clothes completely and then | handcuff them on their beds so they cannot move. reaction to our story has been global. the australian foreign minister says the united nations should be given immediate access to the region. the uk foreign office minister told
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lawmakers in parliament that the bbc�*s report was chilling, and said china needed to be open about what is happening in xinjiang province. the evidence of the scale and the severity of these violations is now far—reaching. it paints a truly harrowing picture. if china wishes to dispute this evidence, then it must allow unfettered access to the region for the un high commissioner for human rights or another independent fact—finding body. and there has been this from the us state department. "these atrocities shock with conscience and must be met it is estimated that a million uighurs and other muslim minorities are held in camps in xinjiang. china has responded to our report insisting that their camps are vocational training centres, designed to stop muslims living in the region from turning to extremism. and it denounced the bbc report as lies and misinformation. translation: there is no so-called systemic sexual assault _ and abuse against women.
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china is a country ruled by law. our constitution guarantees and protects human rights and it is embodied in our legal system and the government's work. now we can show you new testimony. a former inmate who describes how regular rape was in the camp she was in, and how it was used as punishment. translation: one day, they assembled many people in a large hall. _ then they brought a young girl, 20 or 21 years old. she was forced to confess a bogus crime in front of everyone. she pleaded guilty to the made up crime in a flood of tears in her speech, in which she was forced to confess. after that, in front of so many people, the police raped her in turns. despite the huge international outcry that these women's testimonies have provoked,
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it is unlikely that china will act and allow independent scrutiny of what is going on inside their re—education camps. responding to accusations by the chinese government that the report was false, the bbc issued a statement, saying... the statement went on to say... scientists have begun a trial to see whether— scientists have begun a trial to see whether giving people different covid _ whether giving people different covid vaccines for their first and second — covid vaccines for their first and second dose covid vaccines for their first and second dos— covid vaccines for their first and second dose works as well as the current approach _ second dose works as well as the current approach using _ second dose works as well as the current approach using the - second dose works as well as the current approach using the same | second dose works as well as the - current approach using the same jab. it's thought the move could give more flexibility if there is any
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disruption to supplies and may even offer better protection against the virus. the results from the study won't be available until the summer. the government says there is no change to the vaccine programme yet. here is dominic hughes. this fire station in hampshire is the latest venue to become part of the vaccination roll—out, one of thousands of sites now operating across the uk. more than ten million people have now had theirfirstjabs, but a new study aims to find out if mixing doses of the oxford astrazeneca and pfizer—biontech vaccines could offer the body even more chances to develop defences against the virus. what we're doing is seeing how well people's immune systems respond if you give the first dose of one covid vaccine and the second dose with another. the reason to do that is to build flexibility into the uk immunisation schedule for covid vaccines. and even globally, it makes it much easier to administer the vaccines if we don't have to worry too much about always giving the second dose the same as the first dose. the trial will mix doses from the two vaccines
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currently being used. but others could be added as they're approved. the study will involve 820 volunteers, none of whom have yet had the vaccine. all will be aged 50 or older, part of the group to be vaccinated in the next priority wave. the trial will run initially at eight sites across england. tackling a brakes of ebola —— tackling outbreaks of ebola is one reason why researchers believe this approach may work. mixing vaccine doses was used successfully against this highly infectious virus. a second boosterjab that utilises a different way to prompt an immune response can sometimes be more effective than two jabs from the same vaccine, and it is already in use for many inoculations we are familiar with. it is something that is done historically with vaccines for hepatitis, children's vaccines, polio, measles, mumps and rubella. it will hopefully maintain the uk at the forefront of research into covid vaccines. we are proud of our record on the vaccines taskforce
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and the deployment programme. but this is another part of the armoury. given the erratic nature of vaccine supply, described by ministers as lumpy, a degree of flexibility in the vaccination programme could be a real help in the months to come. but perhaps the biggest benefit will be for those developing countries that have yet to get vaccination programmes up and running. being able to mix and match supplies could make all the difference. the first results of this trial should be known by the early summer. the impact of the pandemic, and of lockdown, has been particularly acute for those with a disability. despite the government exemption allowing outdoor disability sport to continue, most facilities across the uk are closed. the charity riding for the disabled say only five out of 500 of their groups are open. its president, princess anne, has been speaking to laura scott.
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that's it. over you go. well done you! it fetches tears to my eyes because he is so happy. the power of a mother's words, and a hint too of the mounting strain of being a carer in a pandemic. michael is autistic and has cerebral palsy and riding is his outlet, and for half an hour a week, it represents a rare break for his mother, joyce. once this lesson is finished, he will talk about it all day. karen has been brilliant to allow us to come to her arena so that michael can continue riding, and have a little bit of normality in his life, as everything outside is changed. joyce feels grateful but michael is one ofjust a handful of people able to continue with his riding sessions at a time when thousands of disability sports facilities throughout the uk are closed. just five of 500 riding for the disabled association groups
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are currently operating and the charity's president says support is needed to help them bounce back. our ability to maintain the funds to keep particularly the bigger groups going, which can have a real impact, will be a bit of a struggle. some of them will be, what, nearly a year since they functioned. i am hoping that is not so long that they will have forgotten the benefits, indeed for those who took part, but i think there will need to be good support from the highest levels. even once facilities can reopen, it is expected there will be challenges in rebuilding confidence levels. i think there is a concern but that is because it is very easy for people to get out of the habit, and if you have taken a long time to build up partnerships and networks of people and places to go that provide that level of support, the danger is you lose those connections.
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to some this is a sport, to others it is vital therapy. to this family it is a lifeline that so many others have lost. some may view this as sport, others mayjust as easily see it as therapy. for this family, it is a lifeline. laura scott, bbc news. the singer rihanna has been making headlines in india, and it's not for her songs. she's one of several high profile people, including the activist greta thunberg, who've come out in support of protesting farmers in the country. the demonstrations led to violent clashes with the police last week. the farmers say they will be left worse off under prime minister narendra modhi's plans to give the private sector a greater say in agriculture. rajini vaidyanathan has the story. fighting for their future. the people who help feed this nation. more than half of indians are farmers. tens of thousands have been camped here for months. a busy road into the capital,
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now a place of resistance. as they protest new laws they fear will destroy their livelihoods. as this site has grown, so too the police presence. farmers accuse the government of trying to silence them. for two months, this man has been sleeping on the back of this truck with seven others. translation: we are fighting for our land, we are _ fighting for our rights. we will not go back until these laws are repealed, even if we have to give our lives for the cause. and he believes those new laws will drive him out of business. he took me to his farm to explain why. at 30 years old, he is the future of indian farming but the government says that for farming to have a future, the industry needs to be reformed. it says its new laws will benefit farmers by allowing them to sell
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directly to supermarkets and online retailers. we get a fixed price from the government for our crops. i'm worried once the big corporations enter the market, we will have to sell at a price they want. passions are running high. last week hundreds of police and protesters were injured after a march into delhi turned violent. demonstrators scaled the city's iconic red fort, leaving many wondering whether the country's prime minister has lost control on this issue. known as india's strongman, he has weakened his resolve, offering to suspend the laws for 18 months. what started here at the end of last year has now grown into a mass movement, one that has become about more than just the agricultural laws. many farmers i have spoken to him who voted for prime minister modi say they are now increasingly concerned about his government's handling of other issues, including freedom of speech, high unemployment and the right to protest.
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the farmers remained defiant, even after officials suspended internet net access at protest sites, social media accounts were blocked and journalists were detained. the farmer to say they are not going anywhere until the laws are scrapped. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, delhi. the government is to update the law so that the attorney general the irish government has warned that a key part of the brexit deal will not be scrapped despite its problems with goods being moved between britain and northern ireland. physical inspections and paperwork are required under what's called the northern ireland protocol. but businesses complain its added costs and red tape as reports. all these beds, they are sitting empty. this time of year, we have them coming in from england and europe, and we don't know what we're going to do. haifa europe, and we don't know what we're going to do-— going to do. how does your garden crow? going to do. how does your garden grow? welcome — going to do. how does your garden grow? welcome in _ going to do. how does your garden grow? welcome in northern - going to do. how does your garden | grow? welcome in northern ireland right now, it might be suffering of
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few bare patches because some horticultural businesses and great britain have stopped sending plants over the irish sea. a gardener with lettuce, cabbage, tomatoes, they are banned from coming in the country. so we try to look in europe, see if we can get something similar. it’s look in europe, see if we can get something similar. it's happening, because in order _ something similar. it's happening, because in order to _ something similar. it's happening, because in order to avoid - something similar. it's happening, because in order to avoid checks i something similar. it's happening, | because in order to avoid checks on the island of ireland, the brexit agreement with the eu included a compromise which means northern ireland continues to follow some eu rules unlike the rest of the uk. plants are just one of many types of goods that now need new documentation in order to be sent from britain to northern ireland. borisjohnson previously played down the idea that there would ever be a new —— new trade border in the i receive. another the rules are reality, it's affecting lots of everyday products, especially shipments of food. in the red tape is set to increase in april when a grace period comes to an end. the government is asking that you to push back the deadline by nearly two
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years. sinn fein and the irish government believe the problems could be worked out. but northern ireland's democratic unionists want the arrangement scrapped entirely. it's an absolute disgrace and disaster _ it's an absolute disgrace and disaster. i think the british government have a duty to protect the taxpaying citizens of the united kingdom _ the taxpaying citizens of the united kingdom who live in northern ireland~ — kingdom who live in northern ireland. , , , ireland. the issues divide communities _ ireland. the issues divide communities here. - ireland. the issues divide communities here. it - ireland. the issues divide - communities here. it continues to ireland. the issues divide _ communities here. it continues to be one of the most difficult issues over brexit to resolve. emma vardy, bbc news. now, imagine if everyone was —— now, imagine if everyone was as passionate about the environment as they are about football. a new project aims to use the energy of football fans to encourage sustainable habits. in planet super league, the greener the fans are, the more points their club gets. a pilot scheme hasjust finished, and joe wilson has been keeping score. our planet is football—shaped. well, the world's certainly shaped by football. it matters to millions. the english premier league could still be won by various contenders. it remains a race. but there is one title that's
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been decided already. ok, it's not quite that trophy again. but leicester city have won planet super league, the tournament that rewards sustainable achievements. well, supporters at home won points for their clubs by carrying out various covid—friendly tasks with an environmental angle. for example, make a goalkeeper from the things you find on a walk. make a family meal which is meat—free. or make a football stadium for worms. well, my players were left looking in vain for a ball. so i spoke to the experts, the adatiya family. the pilot scheme involved 11 different clubs, and their efforts in particular helped win the league for leicester. we baked gingerbread men, and we did the vegan meals. you do get drawn into the competitive aspect of the tournament.
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so, you know, we were very much vying for leicester city to finish top and watching the league tables of the scores every day. my wife wouldn't allow us to eat a single meal without taking a picture of it and sending it in. so we did at one point get quite obsessed with it. and it worked! yes. football to save the planet. well, it's never quite that simple. but if the environment begins at home, my worms, you'll be relieved to learn, are safely back on earth. joe wilson, bbc news. well done putting those worms back. that's good. when households hunkered down during the first lockdown last year, many were asking whether that would prompt a baby we don't have the official data yet, but all the signs suggest the lockdown actually had the reverse effect. one street in bristol, however, is bucking the trend,
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and it's about to get very noisy with the sound of newborns, as jon kay reports. first it was jenny. then catherine. then caroline. followed by victoria, then ellie, and now ailey. it started with just a couple and then we found out we were due and then i was speaking tojenny... maybe i started a trend. every time i speak to someone else, it was like, the number basically increased. there is something in the water! four and then five and then six. there are just women popping up every day it felt like. it's been fantastic. my jaw hit the floor! really? yeah, iwas, like, i can't believe it. this street, this little street. notjust on the same street but all on the same side of the street. i dared to ask how many are pregnant on the other side, if it matches this side! because we are all friends as well. everybody is feeling i a bit nervous i think, all the people who are pregnant.
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the first lockdown, lots of people went out and got dogs! um... you didn't want a dog! we've been going running, we've been baking bread. and we've been making babies. you can't go out, you can't reallyl see people as much so maybe it's time to settle down. we are kind of supporting one another. ailey set up a yoga class which is fantastic. it is so nice to connect with other women who are going through a similar experience at the same time. | particularly as a first—time mum, | not having any of the kind of baby groups and things that - would normally be happening. but so much for the rule of six. i can't give you any names, but they don't want to go public yet. but there will be more announcements on this street very soon. we have babies arriving all the way
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through to august. it feels like an exciting positive time. but hang on — five? where'sjenny? tonight, some breaking news. jenny and rick have a baby daughter, summer. born this afternoon. they have a new lockdown baby boom is under way. john k, bbc news, bristol. what a lovely story to end the programme with. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. we have got some colder wintry weather on the cards through the course of the weekend. quite widely, things are going to get much colder. but for the here and now, the most disruptive wintry weather is across parts of scotland. in fact, we have an amber warning in first, 20—30 cm over the higher ground, perhaps as much as 50 cm over the highest hills. for the next couple of days, that is valid. so, heavy hill snow tonight across parts of central and northern scotland.
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elsewhere, it's mild air and we have got plenty of rain showers around, particularly parts of northern ireland, northeast england as well. some of these heavy showers falling on saturated ground, so there could be a few flooding issues over the next 24 hours or so. some mist and fog patches tonight across southern parts of england and wales slowly clearing away on friday. more showers to come for northern ireland, western parts of england and wales, northeast england as well, and further hill snow which could be disruptive across parts of central and northern scotland. temperature is about 3—10 celsius on friday, but it will turn colder for all of us through the course of the weekend. there could be some disruptive snowfall, particularly in the east. bye for now.
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this is bbc news. it's goodbye america first, hello american leadership, as president biden makes his first major intervention on foreign policy. in a speech to the state deparment, the president said the united states will no longer roll over for russia. "we will deal with china," he said, "from a position of strength and only when it is in our interests." america's new president wants to rebuild its global alliances by renewing us diplomacy. the united states will again lead, notjust by the example of our power, but the power of our example. meanwhile, the us state department says it's concerned by the content of a bbc report alleging the systematic rape and abuse
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of uighur women in chinese camps. also in the programme — former president donald trump refuses to tesify under oath

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