Skip to main content

tv   Outside Source  BBC News  February 3, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

7:00 pm
7:01 pm
let's start with the military coup in myanmar. police have filed several charges against the elected leader aung san suu kyi. she hasn't been seen since her arrest on monday and remains in custody. the charges she faces are unexpected. first, she's charged with breaching the country's strict import and export laws. she's also accused of possessing unlawful communications devices, and we know that is related to six walky talkies used by her security guards and which the authorities say were found in aung san suu kyi's residence. here's our south east asia correspondentjonathan head. any walkie—talkies in her home would
7:02 pm
have been used by security guards. everyone will know that is a device. it's a way of trying to neutralise. just think about this. the military lots there too because she has one every election by really significant margins. if the military is to fulfil its promise on holding another election, it has to find a way to get out of the election. that's what they will use to do that. all of the world. she won the nobel peace prize and she duly won elections too. the tactics she's facing now will be familiar. here is jonathan had again. they they did before the 2010 election when she
7:03 pm
didn't want to try to run for office. �* . . �* office. and charge her then. after an american _ office. and charge her then. after an american man _ office. and charge her then. after an american man had _ office. and charge her then. after an american man had swam - office. and charge her then. afterl an american man had swam across office. and charge her then. after i an american man had swam across a link to our home was she was then being held under house arrest. they managed to get her on breaking house arrest for the top they jailed managed to get her on breaking house arrest for the top theyjailed her, kept her in her home for 18 months and had sentence finishes after the election took place. the military is also targeting myanmar�*s now ousted president win myint. he's been charged with violating laws that ban gatherings during the covid pandemic. and just as with aung san suu kyi — a guilty verdict could mean he's barred from running for office. something that becomes very relevant if the military go for swift elections. now neither aung san suu kyi or president win myint have been heard from since the military seized power on monday morning. hundreds of mps were also detained but were told on tuesday they could leave their guest houses in the capital. among them is zin mar aung. she previously spent 11 years in jail on political charges under the earlier military dictatorship. she's been speaking to the bbc.
7:04 pm
its current situation is very tough, its current situation is very tough, i challenged situation. everybody who voted for us very upset and are feelings and our hearts are with you. then we will stand for their rights and their hopes. the aun san suu kyi's national league for democracy won a huge majority in the november election. and although there haven't been street protests — we have seen some acts of defiance against the coup. these pictures came in earlier. these are doctors and nurses chanting outside their hospital. and health workers across the country have launched a �*red ribbon�* campaign of civil disobedience against the coup. also — for the second night in a row, people in yangon have done this.
7:05 pm
also — because of the crackdown on the streets — activists are moving their activities online. we are protesting since day one. since the first hour, actually. we are protesting in our own way and 2021— are protesting in our own way and 2021 we _ are protesting in our own way and 2021 we are — are protesting in our own way and 2021 we are in 2091 things have changed — 2021 we are in 2091 things have changed a lot. we have to do to policies — changed a lot. we have to do to policies we _ changed a lot. we have to do to policies we have digital spaces is quite _ policies we have digital spaces is quite different than a 1998. i think our generation is making the most out of— our generation is making the most out of it _ our generation is making the most out of it. we will never silent since — out of it. we will never silent since day— out of it. we will never silent since day one. we will never silent since day one. international condemnation is growing. in the last hour — a spokesperson for the united nations said the charges against ms suu kyi— undermine democracy and the rule in myanmar. and earlier the g7 — which includes britain, the us, and germany — has demanded that the government is reinstated. there's a different narrative coming from china — which is myanmar�*s largest trading partner. this editorial in the global times calls on the west not to "add fuel
7:06 pm
to the fire" by "forcefully intervening" in myanmar�*s affairs. thin lay win is a burmese journalist based in rome. thank you very much forjoining us. how do you assess efforts by the international community to apply pressure to the burmese military? thanks for having me. unfortunately i think it is going to be limited in terms of what the international community can do. they already have arms embargoes and talk of sanctions against some of the leaders. including the commander in chief. the problem or at least perhaps, i should say, more impact for pressure would actually come from regional partners like china, korea, russia,
7:07 pm
india. the ones that still provide military support. injapan that still provides a lot of funding. unfortunately, were not seeing a lot of effort on that. like you said it editorial in the chinese newspapers. now the burmese military would been able to protect reasonably accurately how china would react. how the us were near the outcome of the un. none of these reactions have been a surprise as to what its calculation error because it leaves itself very alienated? i calculation error because it leaves itself very alienated?— itself very alienated? i don't think that me and _ itself very alienated? i don't think that me and my — itself very alienated? i don't think that me and my army _ itself very alienated? i don't think that me and my army has - itself very alienated? i don't think that me and my army has ever- itself very alienated? i don't think that me and my army has ever to | itself very alienated? i don't think i that me and my army has ever to be perfectly honest really worried about the international perception of it. if it has it would have changed the way it operated a long time ago. it wouldn't have staged this coup. to be honest, what jonathan said earlier, i think my speculation is that what they want is to try and disband and to try and
7:08 pm
get her out of the picture. because there is no other way. they can either win elections i have some sort of legitimacy as long as the parties and their leader is still there. , , ., ., there. help me understand how realistic that _ there. help me understand how realistic that is. _ there. help me understand how realistic that is. people - there. help me understand how realistic that is. people around | there. help me understand how. realistic that is. people around the world won't know her well. they won't know so much about her party. does it have fists won't know so much about her party. does it have fist— does it have fists sufficient infrastructure _ does it have fists sufficient infrastructure and - does it have fists sufficient infrastructure and strength j does it have fists sufficient i infrastructure and strength to withstand that kind of pressure? well, _ withstand that kind of pressure? well, the — withstand that kind of pressure? well, the penalty is more than her. you are absolutely right. i remember five years ago when they came to power on election day. you ask people who they are voting for and a lot of people was the nld. at so many people would say where itjody tell you that voting for her. even though she wasn't running in their constituency perception is definitely the face of it. the main reason people vote for nld is because of her. there are a lot of younger more dynamic lot makers in
7:09 pm
the nld but they really haven't had much of a chance to make an impact. they've voted on one round five years ago. in the legislature. it is a real threat that if she is no longer there the nld may go back to its bare—bones operations like it was in the 19905 and 2000. just was in the 1990s and 2000. just cuickl was in the 1990s and 2000. just quickly before — was in the 1990s and 2000. just quickly before we finished, i wonder how easy has it on how hard is it been for you to communicate with friends and family in myanmar? weill. friends and family in myanmar? well, the first few — friends and family in myanmar? well, the first few hours _ friends and family in myanmar? well, the first few hours of _ friends and family in myanmar? well, the first few hours of when _ the first few hours of when speculation wa5 rife that there was a coup it was pretty difficult to contact people. the four capital franco wa5 contact people. the four capital franco was ok but under lockdown and very difficult to reach people. it's getting better but also people aren't wising up to it wasn't like the activist said, it's very different now for that now there is a lot more reliable the people to
7:10 pm
how to use information technology. i was just 5peaking how to use information technology. i was just speaking to an activist today who said they were using vpn today who said they were using vpn to talk. the first day it was quite worrying. it's gotten better but we don't know how long that will last. the army could go in and tell all the operators you just shut down. it really might not necessarily have a choice or say and it.— choice or say and it. thank you for s-ueakin choice or say and it. thank you for speaking with _ choice or say and it. thank you for speaking with ours. _ choice or say and it. thank you for speaking with ours. stay - choice or say and it. thank you for speaking with ours. stay in - choice or say and it. thank you for speaking with ours. stay in touch l speaking with ours. stay in touch please. lots of updates. on coronavirus in the uk. fir5t — good news about the oxford astrazeneca vaccine. new results show it could reduce the spread of the virus by 67%. big new5 — because this the first time a vaccine has been shown to reduce transmission. here's the health secretary's reaction. that is really good news. it's very positive. becau5e that is really good news. it's very positive. because we know the vaccine is the way out of this and there is new information from oxford
7:11 pm
shows that the oxford job works. we already know vaccines protect people from severe disease. but until now we didn't know how effective they were at preventing people passing the virus to others. the same study also found that a single dose gives 76% protection for three months. and 10 million people in the uk have now received their first dose. professor andrew pollard is chief investigator for the oxford vaccine trial. it reduces the chances of someone who is exposed getting the infection for supper they don't get the infection they can't pass it on. so it decreases the risk of transmission in the population. there is one word of caution in that one of the things this virus is doing as it produces more variance is actually to try and avoid the
7:12 pm
exactly and that's happening for some and to have it is still translation: despite whether it without immunity from the vaccine. yesterday the uk said the variant of coronavirus that was first discovered in england has mutated again. which makes this an even important development. our medical editor fergus walsh tweets "astrazeneca says it aims there are lots of variants — but experts are most worried about the south african variant — which is circulating in some parts of the uk. the woman responsible for testing in the uk is dido harding. this comment today took some by surprise. we've seen the virus mutate, we see in the new variant emerged which was something that none of us had, were able to predict.
7:13 pm
scientists would disagre with that. all viruses mutate as they make new copies of themselves to spread and thrive. this virologist told the bbc that the mutations are "a worrying development, though not entirely unexpected". (00v)and the professor of global health at edinburgh university made her reaction quite clear, with an emoji. one more update. a study has found than 88% of people who get coronavirus still have antibodies, six months after infection. here's more from fergus walsh. this was a study done by uk bio back which follows a half a million older uk adults. i'm on that trial myself. i was one of the people that was sent the monthly swabs. you had to prick your finger sent the monthly swabs. you had to prick yourfinger and sent the monthly swabs. you had to prick your finger and send your blood off in the post. and it found that those of us who had had the infection last year, 88% of us still had antibodies six months later. that's good for people who have had natural infection. there should be at least part of their immune system there that offer some protection
7:14 pm
against coronavirus infection going forward. professor lawrence young is a virologist at the warwick medical school... i wonder if you are surprised at these variants are emerging? hat i wonder if you are surprised at these variants are emerging? not at all. there have _ these variants are emerging? not at all. there have been _ these variants are emerging? not at all. there have been emerged - these variants are emerging? not at all. there have been emerged since | all. there have been emerged since the very beginning of the pandemic force of the virus has been changing since day one foot up we've been measuring that all the while. this is no surprise. _ measuring that all the while. this is no surprise. and what was yours reaction to astrazeneca saying they could adapt their vaccine to respond? i could adapt their vaccine to remand?— could adapt their vaccine to resond? ~ ., ., ., , respond? i think a lot of these vaccines are _ respond? i think a lot of these vaccines are very _ respond? i think a lot of these vaccines are very adaptable. i respond? i think a lot of these l vaccines are very adaptable. the question is, does it change all the time? how do you adapt the vaccine, how do you keep up with those changes? i think that's going to be a bit of a battle, actually. organ have to make some changes depending on how much of the population is protected and what the outcome is of mass vaccination. in terms of what exact changes do we need to make to both this vaccine and other vaccine technology is like the rna vaccines. a5 technology is like the rna vaccines. as we learn more on these variance i wonder if that changes the
7:15 pm
calculation about how the vaccine is used, whether there should be there's a gap between a want to send another or whether it should be brought closer together? i think what's really — brought closer together? i think what's really important - brought closer together? i think what's really important at - brought closer together? i think what's really important at the i what's really important at the moment looking at these variance as they are emerging and studying their sequences. is that we get the current vaccines out as soon as possible. and that we give people, particular the most vulnerable booster doses. we are all of the opinion that while some of these variance are able to dodge the immune response, if you have a very strong immune response it was still response was up that's why it's so important now to try and stop the spread of this variant and other forms of virus by vaccination. flan spread of this variant and other forms of virus by vaccination. can i ask about the _ forms of virus by vaccination. can i ask about the good _ forms of virus by vaccination. can i ask about the good news - forms of virus by vaccination. can i ask about the good news from astrazeneca that it thinks it's vaccine will reduce transmissibility by a great deal? but is not 100%. does that mean in some cases people could still transmit the virus even though they've had the vaccine? yes. though they've had the vaccine? yes, i think though they've had the vaccine? yes, i think what — though they've had the vaccine? yes, i think what we _ though they've had the vaccine? yes, i think what we are _ though they've had the vaccine? yes i think what we are seeing today though they've had the vaccine? i2: i think what we are seeing today is some indication of a potential reduction for virus transmission. from the astrazeneca oxford study.
7:16 pm
but on average it was only about 50 for percent. that is good for them if you reduce the load of virus infection in individual then they can't make virus and they can't infect other people. but of course this is biology. biology is always a sliding scale for top it's never going to be all or none. superimposed on that we've got these virus variants that are more infections. they might counteract some of the effects. i don't want to pour cold water on this result, it's a good result but we just need to keep careful and keep watching the data. ~ , : : keep careful and keep watching the data. , . . , keep careful and keep watching the data. , . . data. wise advice. biology is a slidin: data. wise advice. biology is a sliding scale. _ data. wise advice. biology is a sliding scale. thank _ data. wise advice. biology is a sliding scale. thank you. - more on the pandemic. first — china. a team of scientists from the world health organization has visited a virology institute in wuhan. they're researching the source of covid—19. officials in the trump administration had speculated that it had escaped from a lab inside the facility. stephen mcdonell is there.
7:17 pm
this institute does have high security bio labs which have that virus is in them. but so far the us government hasn't presented any solid evidence which would suggest that the virus did escape from here somehow. and then that's how the pandemic started. nevertheless, a lot of interest when the team came here. one of the scientist on the way and said that all the questions that need to be asked would be asked inside this facility. that doesn't mean that it's all about a lab link though. they would say the main reason to speak to the site that they are doing work on viruses and viruses and bats and their potential to jump into viruses and bats and their potential tojump into human beings. they still think that the most likely source is animals and possible intermediate animals then into human beings. naturally they would want to speak to the site is here. and on
7:18 pm
the way out again questions at the scientist and one of them rather cryptically said interesting visit, many questions. now, does that mean you ask many questions or does that mean there are many questions in your mind after the visit? we are not sure. we will have to wait and see in the final report or in some sort of press briefing at the end of this visit what they are able to glean from their trip here. again we should stress we are not expecting after these two weeks of field trips at the who will come out and say we found the origins of the coronavirus was up it's going to take a long time, maybe many years. next let's talk about china's vaccine development. the frontrunners are from two companies — sinovac and sinopharm. they've been approved for use in places such as turkey, brazil and indonesia. but data about how effective they are is limited. here's laura foster. these two vaccines work in the same
7:19 pm
way that the winds are hepatitis a and rabies do. first the virus is killed and given to individuals. because the viruses said it can't cause covid—19. once injected, the persons immune system responds and produces antibodies ready to fight off any future coronavirus infections. like the pfizer and return a vaccines two doses are needed. but unlike the pfizer and madrona vaccines which need extremely cold freezer is to be stored in these only require a normal freight. stored in these only require a normalfreight. this is a key advantage when it comes to storage and distribution. especially in countries around the world where temperatures rarely drop belong not below 30 celsius was up and roads can be nonexistent. what is not clear is how well these vaccines work. we only have partial phase three data so far. cite a farm size its vaccine is 70% effective at it's vaccine is 70% effective at stopping symptoms of covid—19.
7:20 pm
synovitis got was initially thought to be 91% effective. then further trials produce other results. recently figures from brazil were downgraded to just 50 point for percent barely above the threshold of the word out organisation says is needed for a viable vaccine. but sign of access is when it comes to stopping people from becoming seriously ill, its efficacy rates are much higher.— seriously ill, its efficacy rates are much higher. the goal is to ensure that _ are much higher. the goal is to ensure that people _ are much higher. the goal is to ensure that people do - are much higher. the goal is to ensure that people do not - are much higher. the goal is to i ensure that people do not develop severe disease and end up in hospital. so if we considerfrom that perspective it is a very useful tool that will save lives. we should be using all the tools available to us. �* ,., be using all the tools available to us, �* , :, :, , be using all the tools available to us. �* ., , . us. but some are still concerned about whether _ us. but some are still concerned about whether these _ us. but some are still concerned about whether these vaccines i us. but some are still concerned about whether these vaccines in | us. but some are still concerned i about whether these vaccines in the companies behind them can be trusted. the who is due to decide whether to approve side of farm or a back by the more vaccines that work the work the sooner the pandemic will be over. but a rejection it would hurt china's pride. and would be even more dumbest thing that devastating for the growing list of countries pinning their hopes and
7:21 pm
futures on the shots. we can add to laura's report... china has donated half—a—million doses of the sinopharm vaccine to pakistan. that's allowed a nationwide vaccination campaign to begin. here's secunder kermani. iam i am outside the national commander and operation center. this is the hub of pakistan's fight against the coronavirus. data from across the country a centre about debts, infections are now about vaccinations. so far the vaccines that are only being offered to health care workers. the plan is for them to then be made available to them to then be made available to the elderly population. at the moment pakistan just as 500,000 doses following a donation by its close ally china, produced by the state own company. pakistan is also expected to receive a 7 million doses by astrazeneca but in the first half of this year as part of the international kovacs game. with a population of more than 200 million people pakistan is going to
7:22 pm
need many more. so far pakistan has not been as badly affected by this pandemic as many feared it would be. perhaps because of its younger population. the average age here is just 22. now — to a big story developing out of australia. more than 500 australian open tennis players, officials and support staff have been told to isolate after one of the workers at their hotel in melbourne tested positive for covid—19. the state premier of victoria says there is no cause for alarm but the authorities have to work on the assumption that the man has infected others. here's jane dougall at the bbc sport centre. most of the people at the hotel will be deemed to be casual contact. that means there will merely have to have a test. if that comes back negative they can go about their normal training routines. because of this the organisers of the australian open confirmed that no plate will take place on thursday at melbourne park. where there were do to be 62 matches and six warm—up tournaments. there will be an update on the
7:23 pm
schedule for friday later on. the tournament starts next week — and the lead up hasn't been without its challenges. because of australia's strict covid laws — players have already been confined to their rooms. you would have seen videos like this one. this is british player hannah watson running 5kms in her bedroom. while some players were allowed to leave their hotel quarantine to train for five hours a day — we know 72 players had stay inside for 2 weeks after theirflights had positive cases onboard. latika bourke is a correspondent for the sydney morning herald in london. i don't know where to start my right in saying if there weren't a tennis tournament going on that state—level officials would be state—level action? officials would be state-level action? , ., : v officials would be state-level action? , ~ ., �*, ., officials would be state-level action? , ~' . �* , . . action? yes, i think that's fair and won respect- _ action? yes, i think that's fair and won respect. because _ action? yes, i think that's fair and won respect. because across i action? yes, i think that's fair and | won respect. because across other states in australia we have seen premieres slam those cities shut including perth, brisbane, major capital cities. over single cases. and because australia has eliminated
7:24 pm
coronavirus coronavirus is only entering the country through hotel quarantine, through the borders. a5 quarantine, through the borders. as you say, they are is very strict control on how many people can enter into hotel quarantine, enter into australia in and eat one week. in victoria's case, where the australian open has been hosted that is going into a very strict lockdown last year. it was that one of the longest and hardest lockdowns in the world. the state is very proud of its success in eliminated coronavirus from one of the worst outbreaks in australia. but they did have a cluster over the new year and christmas period. the government did not try and shut down the entire state then or impose a huge lockdown again. it's a little bit fair to say yes, the australian open would certainly be in the minds of the premier here. but there has been a great not locking over a small number of cases as well. what is the calculation for _ number of cases as well. what is the calculation for going _ number of cases as well. what is the calculation for going ahead _ number of cases as well. what is the calculation for going ahead here? i calculation for going ahead here? presumably a lot of people are saying this looks like an awful lot of hassle just read some tennis?
7:25 pm
yes, there is huge resentment and parts of us really about this. because there are so many stranded australians who are stuck outside australia. i tried to get home last year myself and i couldn't. my flight was cancelled. in fact qantas itself is not operating that's all the result of this very tough law. there's about 40,000 australians trying to get into australia at anyone time right now. and the government has been under severe criticism to do more. and yet we see the spectacle movie stars and of course the tennis players themselves getting a fast—track end. i course the tennis players themselves getting a fast-track end.— getting a fast-track end. i suspect this won't be _ getting a fast-track end. i suspect this won't be the _ getting a fast-track end. i suspect this won't be the last _ getting a fast-track end. i suspect this won't be the last time - getting a fast-track end. i suspect this won't be the last time we i getting a fast-track end. i suspect this won't be the last time we talk about it. thank you very much. i also understand has been a white house press briefing and where the biden administration is saying is continuing to look at the
7:26 pm
possibility of returning some sanctions on myanmar because of that coup earlier in the week. i should say no decision on that has been taken. see you in a couple of minutes. hello. wintry weather is set to become increasingly disruptive across the uk in the days ahead as it becomes increasingly widespread. in the next four or five days, all of us will be plunged into colder air. at the moment in scotland, things are particularly frigid and will be again on thursday. there's some more snow to come. there's a bit of a battle there between some colder and milder air on friday. you can see saturday and sunday, the colder air winds up and pushes all the way down into the north of france. it stays into next week, too. overnight, more snow for scotland,
7:27 pm
perhaps some a little further south across the pennines as well. more rain for northern ireland and and other parts of northern england. and and other parts to the south, largely clear skies, a few showers close to the south coast. temperatures above freezing here, much colder across scotland. a widespread frost across the towns and cities, a degree or so above freezing. the snow continues for scotland through the day on thursday. we'll also, i think, see a little for the north pennines, too. quite wet across much of northern england, again to the north of northern ireland, some showers heading into southern england. still, temperatures in double figures for the south, though, whereas to the north, it is cold. but through friday on into saturday, the colder air will start to dig its way further south. that weather front isn't going anywhere from scotland either, so the met office have issued an amber warning for friday and saturday. but the snow continuing to pile up for the areas earmarked at the moment, parts of central and northern scotland. that area may change, though, particularly through the weekend as we see the risk moving further south. friday, though, you can see the snow continuing to feed into scotland. it's rain further south, but as the colder air works south through saturday, snow and increasing threat for northern england by sunday.
7:28 pm
it may well have parts of wales, the midlands and even southern england in its sights. you can really follow that dig down of colder air as we progress through the weekend, with the colder air into all parts of the uk and becoming established through the end of the weekend and on into the new week. it looks like we are going to see some disruption for england and wales through the weekend. and it's cold enough that any lying snow will tend to stick around, and so ice will still be a problem as well. and even on into next week, the story holds. for this weekend, dojust bear in mind there's the risk of disruptive snow.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source. aung san suu kyi, the country's elected leader, is charged with criminal offences. she's been in custody since the military takeover. survivors of china's re—education camp have described their stories of rape and torture. thea;r camp have described their stories of rape and torture.— rape and torture. they did whatever evil their mind _ rape and torture. they did whatever evil their mind to _ rape and torture. they did whatever evil their mind to think— rape and torture. they did whatever evil their mind to think of— rape and torture. they did whatever evil their mind to think of and i rape and torture. they did whatever evil their mind to think of and they l evil their mind to think of and they didn't spare any part of my life. the row with the eu over trade between northern ireland and great britain continues. we'll look at how the sea border became the latest flashpoint.
7:31 pm
women in china's so—called re—education camps have been systematically raped and tortured, according to first hand accounts obtained by the bbc. it's estimated more than a million men and women have been detained in the camps in china's northwest xinjiang region. china claims the camps are education centres to de—radicalise uighurs and other muslim minorities. our correspondent matthew hill has spoken to several former detainees and workers, and you may find some of their accounts distressing. tursunay ziawudun is reliving a story she can barely bring herself to tell. she was held at one of xinjiang's so—called re—education camps. these satellite images show the site where she says she was held, sharing a cell with 13 other women with a bucket for a toilet. and she's haunted by one
7:32 pm
image — masked men coming down a corridor like this one after midnight. translation: they were three men, not one but three. - they did whatever evil their mind could think of and they didn't spare any part of my body, biting it to the extent that it was disgusting to look at. they didn'tjust rape, they were barbaric. they had bitten all over my body. the us have granted her safe refuge after investigating her claims. she's waived her right to anonymity and now feels free to speak out about the full extent of the abuse she says she suffered. translation: they had an electric baton. - i didn't know what it was.
7:33 pm
it was pushed into my private parts and i was tormented with electric shocks. it estimated over a million uighurs and other muslims are held in the camps. these never before broadcast pictures were filmed secretly in a camp under construction and published by a magazine on religious liberty. we've interviewed a former guard and seen his chinese police documents. he is the first ever to come forward and the risk of him speaking to the bbc is so great we have reconstructed the interview with an actor. those who were taken inside were locked in a cell which held eight to 16 inmates. there were cameras watching them all the time and there were books about xi jinping. they had to study the book and memorise it in chinese. if they failed, the punishment was severe. many former camp inmates flee to istanbul.
7:34 pm
some talk of having to choose between punishment or being complicit in these crimes. translation: i worked six months| as a cleaning worker for the women. han chinese men would pay money to have their pick of the pretty young inmates. this was the first time gulzira has told anyone the full extent of what she says she was forced to do. translation: my job . is to remove their clothes completely and then handcuff them on their beds so they cannot move. we can't say if the rape is approved by the camp commanders or even by those more senior, but the accounts of the many women i've spoken to include gang rape in public and are similar in brutality. the uighurs rights group that helped tursunay get to america say their full stories do not
7:35 pm
emerge until later. survivors of the camps have told of horrific tortures, very often sexual abuse, however, is told in less detail. it's traumatic to remember and women are often afraid of bringing shame to their own family members. the chinese government said in a statement that the xinjiang camps offered vocational and educational training to tackle extremism and terrorism. they did not address directly the accusations of rape and torture, but it added that chinese government attaches great importance to women's rights. "lies and absurd accusations including mass detention do not hold water." translation: it is very obvious their goal is to destroy - everyone and everyone knows it. these women are done. much of the testimony of the women is too disturbing
7:36 pm
to broadcast, but it's important, they say, that the world knows what has happened to them. matthew hale, bbc news. —— matthew hill. let's get more on coronavirus around the world. a team of health professionals from germany's military has travelled to portugal to help there. here they are arriving in lisbon. in recent days, portugal has seen the seen the world's highest rates of covid—19 cases and death. the 26—member team brought with them 50 ventilators and 150 hospital beds. switzerland is the latest country to raise questions surrounding the astrazeneca vaccine. the swiss government has decided to not use it, saying there is insufficient data and called for "new studies". here's more from imogen foulkes in bern. the swiss government has a contract with astrazeneca to purchase this vaccine, but what is wanted is more
7:37 pm
data. i think the focus is actually on the over 65 �*5, because we do know that the existing data in that group for this particular virus is quite small. it doesn't mean the vaccine doesn't work. what it means is that for the over 65, it was a very small group that it was tested on. there are bigger studies going on. there are bigger studies going on in the united states and in africa, i believe. a swiss medic said it waits for those. brazil has the second highest number of coronavirus deaths in the world, and infection rates are stubbornly high. and there's concern about the spread of a more transmissible strain, which caused an explosion of infections in the amazonian city of manaus. let's the variant has been registered in sao paulo. camilla mota is there. how widespread is this variant? this variant was how widespread is this variant? try 3 variant was found in earlyjanuary
7:38 pm
variant was found in early january and it concerns a specialist because it carries several mutations, just like the variance found in the uk and south africa in december. the concern is that these mutations could make the virus more transmissible. a recent study showed that the variance was already around 91% of the samples collected in january, so a strong indication that the mutations actually could make the mutations actually could make the virus more contagious. experts believe that the variance is already spread throughout the country and has been found in different states, but the fact is that we can't really know for sure because brazil doesn't have a broad genomic surveillance system is, so we can't be sure how far this variant has spread. brazil has never really controlled the pandemic, but has been seen a surge
7:39 pm
in the number of cases. so doctors are urging people to comply with social distancing recommendations, and highlighting the importance of vaccinating as many people as possible. vaccinating as many people as ossible. ., ., ,., possible. tell me more about the vaccine programme _ possible. tell me more about the vaccine programme in _ possible. tell me more about the vaccine programme in brazil. i'm| vaccine programme in brazil. i'm interested to know how how large is got? it interested to know how how large is at? ., , , ., ., interested to know how how large is at? , ., ., , :, got? it has started a couple of weeks ago. — got? it has started a couple of weeks ago, but _ got? it has started a couple of weeks ago, but it _ got? it has started a couple of weeks ago, but it has - got? it has started a couple of weeks ago, but it has been i got? it has started a couple of- weeks ago, but it has been moving really, really slow. just a few million doses have been distributed, and we're talking about 210 million brazilians. in the current rhythm, the recent forecast point out that it would take us four years to achieve herd immunity, which is a really long time. a lot of brazilians are frustrated and many of them blame their government for the situation because it seems it hasn't really prepared for this moment. for example, the government missed several opportunities to negotiate tens of millions of doses of covid—19 vaccines. it missed a
7:40 pm
chance to close a contract with pfizer while pushing unproven treatment methods against covid—19. with a new variant and the pace of the vaccination roll—out, the outlook for brazil is quite worrying. outlook for brazil is quite worrying-— outlook for brazil is quite war in. . . . ~' i., , worrying. camilla, thank you very much indeed. _ worrying. camilla, thank you very much indeed. britain _ worrying. camilla, thank you very much indeed. britain is _ worrying. camilla, thank you very much indeed. britain is trying i worrying. camilla, thank you very much indeed. britain is trying to l much indeed. britain is trying to negotiate changes to the arrangement the governor and the movement of goods between northern ireland of the uk. it's only a month since the northern ireland protocol, but it's proving to be a point of tension for brexit in ireland. borisjohnson was warned that leaving the eu could undermine peace in northern ireland. —— brexit and ireland. -- brexit and ireland. carrying brexit through _ -- brexit and ireland. carrying brexit through will _ -- brexit and ireland. carrying brexit through will raise i -- brexit and ireland. carrying| brexit through will raise strains -- brexit and ireland. carrying i brexit through will raise strains we haven't yet thought of. borisjohnson was warned that placing checks on goods crossing the irish sea would threaten northern ireland's place in the uk. know uk prime minister could ever agree _ know uk prime minister could ever agree to _ know uk prime minister could ever agree to it —
7:41 pm
but borisjohnson did agree to it. the advice of those two former conservative prime ministers was discounted, and during this conversation in 2019 with the then irish leader leo varadkar, the prime minister agreed to border checks in the irish sea, border checks between one part of his country and another. that was crucial to getting a deal on the terms of the uk leaving, which then paved the way for a trade deal and a new protocol for northern ireland. we're now seeing what that means in practice. supermarkets reported shortages of some fresh produce when the brexit transition ended injanuary. and this week, things turned ugly. threats to port workers caused checks at ports around belfast to be suspended. people had death threats against them _ people had death threats against them and — people had death threats against them and there _ people had death threats against them and there was— people had death threats against them and there was informationl people had death threats against i them and there was information being gathered _ them and there was information being gathered about — them and there was information being gathered about the _ them and there was information being gathered about the number _ them and there was information being gathered about the number that i them and there was information being gathered about the number that were | gathered about the number that were bein- gathered about the number that were being taken, — gathered about the number that were being taken, which— gathered about the number that were being taken, which would _ gathered about the number that were being taken, which would normally i being taken, which would normally indicate _ being taken, which would normally indicate pecule _ being taken, which would normally indicate people are _ being taken, which would normally indicate people are being - being taken, which would normally indicate people are being targeted| indicate people are being targeted for attack — police say it was a case of rising tension rather than attacks actually being imminent. underpinning what we're seeing at the ports is a tension that was visible throughout the brexit process.
7:42 pm
it connects back to the peace deal in the 905 that ended years of violence in northern ireland. it also connects to another border, the land border, between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. throughout the brexit process, the eu and the uk agreed there would be no border checks here under brexit. but borisjohnson chose a form of brexit that took the uk outside of the eu's single market, and because of that, checks on goods moving between the eu and the uk would have to go somewhere. they couldn't go on the island of ireland, so the solution was in the irish sea. as i was saying, border controls, inside the uk. to unionists, who want northern ireland treated as any other part of the uk, that was hard to stomach. and seeking to ease these concerns, in late 2019, borisjohnson said this. if somebody asks you to do that, tell them to ring up the prime
7:43 pm
minister and i will direct them. right now in 2021, people doing business in northern ireland are being told to film in forms, and putting them in the bin isn't an option if they want to stick to the rules. unionists are furious. the protocol has betrayed us and has made _ the protocol has betrayed us and has made us _ the protocol has betrayed us and has made us feel like foreigners in our own country. in fact, unionists want the northern irish protocol torn up, and there's pressure on it from all sides. last week, having spent years talking about avoiding checks on the irish land border at all costs, vaccines made them change their mind. the eu threatened to suspend the northern protocol in order to stop vaccines manufactured in the eu moving across the border from the republic of ireland into the uk. that idea was so toxic to just about everyone, it was ditched within hours, but the uk believes there have been consequences. trust is been eroded, damages been done _ trust is been eroded, damages been done urgent— trust is been eroded, damages been done. urgent action _ trust is been eroded, damages been done. urgent action is _ trust is been eroded, damages been done. urgent action is therefore i done. urgent action is therefore needed — now, leaving aside that the uk may not be the one to talk about trust,
7:44 pm
given that last year, it repeatedly threatened to break international law to override arrangements on northern ireland. it now wants changes. it says a planned increase in border checks from march needs to be delayed by two years. it also wants a loosening of rules on the movement of seeds, parcels and pets between britain and northern ireland. and it points to a section of the protocol which says the arrangements "should impact as little as possible on the everyday life of communities" in both ireland and northern ireland. everyone agrees on that in principle, but the question is — what's causing the impact on communities? this is the irish government. is causing all of this tension, it's brexit. the protocol is an attempt to try to reduce tension and solve problems links to brexit. political conflict is the norm, but sectarian conflict is not. northern ireland's precious peace changed everything about life there. there's no desire to go back. the european union and westminster
7:45 pm
me to _ the european union and westminster me to look— the european union and westminster me to look at themselves and consider— me to look at themselves and consider their options —— need to look _ consider their options —— need to look. people are talking about conflict — look. people are talking about conflict and issues and divisions, and that— conflict and issues and divisions, and that should be happening. we thought— and that should be happening. we thought we had escaped. it may not happen. but if it does, borisjohnson can't say he wasn't warned. a5 for the promise of getting brexit done, in northern ireland, it's not done yet. political correspondent rob watson joins us now. you sent out a briefing to lots of people and bbc news every morning, and this morning's mentioned the situation in northern ireland. it still very much an ongoing issue. it is, and my compliments to you and the team for that sequence of clips that i think explained it really nicely. just to go over the sort of basics again, when britain voted to leave the european union and particularly when it voted under boris johnson's
7:46 pm
particularly when it voted under borisjohnson's go particularly when it voted under boris johnson's go for particularly when it voted under borisjohnson's go for a hard brexit, the customs union and the single market always meant they would have to be regulatory customs checks between the uk and the eu. the real problem was on the island of ireland because the history of conflict there, particularly in the north. the question was where do you put a regulatory border? do you put it on the island of ireland? everyone thought that would be a bad idea because it could be at the target of attacks by pro—united ireland paramilitaries, or do you put it in the irish sea between great britain and northern ireland? in of course has upset the mainly protestant community who favour a continued you none —— union between britain and northern ireland. rab. continued you none -- union between britain and northern ireland.- britain and northern ireland. rob, a erson on britain and northern ireland. rob, a person on this _ britain and northern ireland. rob, a person on this issue _ britain and northern ireland. rob, a person on this issue is _ britain and northern ireland. rob, a| person on this issue is commissioned vice president. he's been speaking to iris media, what's he been
7:47 pm
saying? —— irish media. iie saying? -- irish media. he essentially _ saying? —— irish media. h2 essentially said he thinks the protocol reach many long years since brexit, should be enough to sort out this problem. to bring things right up this problem. to bring things right up to speed, we were just discussing what the backgrounds of this problem is. it seems to me that the big question now is what happens? does the british government walk away from the protocol and say what we said there was going to be? we said there would not be —— there would be checks between northern ireland great britain and we don't like the way the protocol is working. the excuse that the eu commission by threatening to do the same thing last friday. which would be an immensely serious. he's coming to next week, some resolving between the uk and the eu. be in the no doubt, this is potentially an
7:48 pm
immensely serious moment in terms of peace in northern ireland and the future relationship between the uk and the eu. this is post—brexit relations being tested for the first time. ., , relations being tested for the first time. ,,,. relations being tested for the first time. , , time. rob, i suspect it will be the last. time. rob, i suspect it will be the last- thank _ time. rob, i suspect it will be the last. thank you _ time. rob, i suspect it will be the last. thank you very _ time. rob, i suspect it will be the last. thank you very much - time. rob, i suspect it will be the last. thank you very much as i time. rob, i suspect it will be the | last. thank you very much as ever. stay with me here. we're going to talk about celebrities being accused of sensationalism. people around the uk have joined in a national clap in memory of captain sir tom moore, who died yesterday at the age 100. the tribute also recognised the health workers for whom he raised tens of millions for. there are growing calls for a national memorial to him. our north of england correspondent judith moritz has more. at a time of grief, a moment of celebration. a national clap for captain sir tom. his family said they were joining
7:49 pm
in, with huge love in their hearts. and the prime minister added his applause, along with other political leaders, in appreciation and remembrance of the extraordinary efforts of an incredible man, who raised millions for the nhs, and won the nation's hearts in the process. he exemplified the best of our values. in the house of commons, captain sir tom's contribution was marked with a moment of reflection. i invite members to nowjoin me to have a minute's silence to commemorate sir tom's life, and to pay our respects to those who have lost their lives as a result of covid, and their families and friends. across the nhs, captain sir tom has left a lasting legacy, like here in southampton, where some of the money he raised help to pay for a hospital scheme to support vulnerable patients. helped to pay for a hospital scheme to support vulnerable patients. we know that it was a real
7:50 pm
passion for him, and again, i think this project in particular will help to support his legacy and what he really wanted to do as a result of his fundraising. captain sir tom moore made an impact on everyone, from cadets at the army foundation college, where he was honorary colonel, to the staff of the nhs, who remain forever grateful for his fundraising and for lifting the spirits of the nation. judith moritz, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story... the leaders of the coup in myanmar have raised criminal charges against the country's elected leader aung san suu kyi. netflix has dominated this year's nominations for the golden globes.
7:51 pm
it's in the running for 42 awards — that's three times as many as its nearest rival. unsurprisingly, the awards ceremony is being held virtually, with the winners announced at the end of the month. anna smith is a film critic here in london. hi, anna. what jumped hi, anna. whatjumped out to you? netflix, exciting times for them. many not —— nominations, perhaps not surprise when voters will have been watching things on streaming. also, it's an exciting day for female film directors because no less than three out of the five best director nominees are female, which in absolute record. and 77 years, only five have been nominated before, believe it or not, so huge progress. netflix prospering because a lot of big films have been held back by the studio. , : big films have been held back by the studio. , . ., , , . ., ., studio. there is an aspect of that, es. studio. there is an aspect of that, yes- we've _ studio. there is an aspect of that, yes- we've seen _ studio. there is an aspect of that, yes. we've seen a _ studio. there is an aspect of that, yes. we've seen a lot _ studio. there is an aspect of that, yes. we've seen a lot of _ studio. there is an aspect of that, yes. we've seen a lot of major i studio. there is an aspect of that, l yes. we've seen a lot of major films delayed this year, and netflix have
7:52 pm
invested a lot more, so it's a combination of factors. but i think this is kind of escalated that. this has made the streaming services perhaps more prominent than they would have been this year. i wonder if it's leveled _ would have been this year. i wonder if it's leveled the _ would have been this year. i wonder if it's leveled the playing _ would have been this year. i wonder if it's leveled the playing field i would have been this year. i wonder if it's leveled the playing field a i if it's leveled the playing field a little bit. and allowed smaller producers to be more competitive. also, these huge marketing budget have not been spent in the same way as usual. normally there have been big lavish parties in la. without those, it is more of a level playing field. hopefully this is more of a meritocracy, and you see some highly smaller, independently flavoured films coming forward. get smaller, independently flavoured films coming forward.— films coming forward. get your c stal films coming forward. get your crystal ball— films coming forward. get your crystal ball out. _ films coming forward. get your crystal ball out. who _ films coming forward. get your crystal ball out. who do - films coming forward. get your crystal ball out. who do you i films coming forward. get your. crystal ball out. who do you think has a good chance? i crystal ball out. who do you think has a good chance?— crystal ball out. who do you think has a good chance? i think no man's land has a strong _ has a good chance? i think no man's land has a strong chance. _ has a good chance? i think no man's land has a strong chance. in - has a good chance? i think no man's land has a strong chance. in terms | land has a strong chance. in terms ofthe
7:53 pm
land has a strong chance. in terms of the golden _ land has a strong chance. in terms of the golden globes _ land has a strong chance. in terms of the golden globes in _ land has a strong chance. in terms of the golden globes in the - land has a strong chance. in terms| of the golden globes in the oscars, are there any indicator who might have a chance when the oscars come along? have a chance when the oscars come alon: ? , , , ., , have a chance when the oscars come alonr? , _ ., ,, , along? yes, this year is slightly different because _ along? yes, this year is slightly different because the _ along? yes, this year is slightly different because the oscars i along? yes, this year is slightly different because the oscars or| along? yes, this year is slightly i different because the oscars or even later this year. traditionally, the golden globes is a fairly good predictor. they divide things into musical or comedy and drama, but if you look at the drama categories, it very often is a strong predictor. great to have you on. let's talk nearer to the time in the virtual ceremony comes around. let's turn our attention to india. the government has accused singer rihanna of �*celebrity sensationalism' after she spoke out in support of farmers protesting against agricultural reforms. this tweet of hers has gone viral. it's been liked by more than half a million people, and widely shared. here's teenage climate activist greta thunberg tweeting in solidarity. for months, farmers have been camped
7:54 pm
on the outskirts of delhi in protest against agricultural reforms they say will affect their livelihoods. we showed you these pictures last week. protesters climbed delhi's iconic red fort, the home of former emperors. there were huge clashes with police in the streets. there is still a heavy police presence in delhi. these are the latest pictures we have. police have erected these huge barricades to block the protesters. our reporter salman ravi is in delhi. has been more than two months since the farm organisations from all the directions. saying that these laws will only give way for corporate companies. members of civil society have taken to the streets, expressing solidarity with farmers. you can see the members of the
7:55 pm
students and different other social organisations. they have come on the streets of delhi, to express support for farmers. streets of delhi, to express support forfarmers. heavy deployment streets of delhi, to express support for farmers. heavy deployment of police and paramilitary forces who stop the protesters from entering central delhi, which is beyond this barricade. there has been no breakthrough so far, despite scenes of the farm organisations, and still there is hope after prime minister narendra modi the government is ready to enter a fresh dialogue with the former organisations —— former organisations. the indian government argues the reforms give farmers more freedom to control their own trade and expand their own markets. the farmers argue, however, argue that the increased competition will give corporations all the power. it's a heavily political topic in india and so as you'd expect, rihanna's tweet caused a stir. india's external affairs ministry released this statement:
7:56 pm
we will return to that story in the coming days and or in weeks. thanks for watching, see you soon. bye—bye. hello. wintry weather is set to become increasingly disruptive across the uk in the days ahead as it becomes increasingly widespread. in the next four or five days, all of us will be plunged into colder air. at the moment in scotland, things are particularly frigid and will be again on thursday. there's some more snow to come. there's a bit of a battle there between some colder and milder air on friday. you can see saturday and sunday, the colder air winds up and pushes all the way down into the north of france. it stays into next week, too. overnight, more snow for scotland, perhaps some a little further south across the pennines as well. more rain for northern ireland and and other parts of northern england. to the south, largely clear skies, a few showers close to the south coast. temperatures above freezing here,
7:57 pm
much colder across scotland. a widespread frost across the towns and cities, a degree or so above freezing. the snow continues for scotland through the day on thursday. we'll also, i think, see a little for the north pennines, too. quite wet across much of northern england, again to the north of northern ireland, some showers heading into southern england. still, temperatures in double figures for the south, though, whereas to the north, it is cold. but through friday on into saturday, the colder air will start to dig its way further south. that weather front isn't going anywhere from scotland either, so the met office have issued an amber warning for friday and saturday. but the snow continuing to pile up for the areas earmarked at the moment, parts of central and northern scotland. that area may change, though, particularly through the weekend as we see the risk moving further south. friday, though, you can see the snow continuing to feed into scotland. it's rain further south, but as the colder air works south through saturday, snow and increasing threat for northern england by sunday. it may well have parts of wales, the midlands and even southern england in its sights.
7:58 pm
you can really follow that dig down of colder air as we progress through the weekend, with the colder air into all parts of the uk and becoming established through the end of the weekend and on into the new week. it looks like we are going to see some disruption for england and wales through the weekend. and it's cold enough that any lying snow will tend to stick around, and so ice will still be a problem as well. and even on into next week, the story holds. for this weekend, dojust bear in mind there's the risk of disruptive snow.
7:59 pm
8:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri. the headlines at 8pm: ten million people across the uk have now had their first coronavirus vaccination. but the prime minister warns there's a way to go before lifting restrictions. the level of infection is still forbiddingly high for us to imagine the relaxation of current guidelines. a national clap in celebration of the life of captain sir tom moore, who died yesterday, as well as for health care workers. the row with the eu over trade between northern ireland and great britain — high level meetings to try to ease disruption. black footballers facing online abuse — the government says social media companies face massive fines if they don't act.

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on