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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 29, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the european union says it will introduce export controls on coronavirus vaccines as the row over access intensifies. the protection and safety of our citizens is a priority, and the challenges we now face left us with no other choice but to act. it comes as the eu approves the astrazeneca vaccine and janssen says its one—dose jab is 66% effective. in other news, alarm at the un over reports the military in myanmar could reject the result of november's election. the strain of saying goodbye during coronavirus — in south africa, many are unable to have traditional burials,
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hello, and welcome if you're watching on pbs in the us or around the world, and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. the european union is introducing export controls on coronavirus vaccines produced in europe. the move will force pharmaceutical companies to get permission before supplying doses outside the bloc. it comes amid a supply dispute between the eu and two major vaccine suppliers, astrazeneca and pfizer. the european commission says export controls are necessary to ensure that all eu citizens had access to vaccines. nick beake reports from brussels. throughout the week, this post—brexit battle between the eu and a british—based
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vaccine—maker has been intensifying. european countries are demanding that astrazeneca delivers all the jabs they ordered, even if it means taking them from the uk supply. it all hangs on the contract the two sides signed that's now been released, although with parts blanked out. astrazeneca says it agreed to do its reasonable best. the eu insists it was a legally—binding promise. and so it's now announced if it doesn't get what it ordered, it could block covid vaccines leaving europe heading for some countries, including the uk. we have to be very clear, and we have said it many times before. we are not protecting ourselves against any specific country, and we're not in competition or in a race against any country. the only race we're in is against this virus. at pfizer's vaccine—making hq in northern belgium, security's tight. few commodities more precious at the moment than covid jabs. that's why they're carefully escorted on their way. it's not yet clear how supplies
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to the uk will be affected by these new eu restrictions. the european union is taking a really tough line in this covid row. but at the same time, it's facing heavy criticism for the slowness of its vaccination roll—out. it's much slower than the uk's. throughout this pandemic, brussels has insisted that all 27 countries need to work together when it comes to getting hold of jabs. so far, it's not worked well. because this is a rare sight in cities like madrid. thousands of other vaccine appointments have had to be postponed. today, though, some hope, with europe's medicine regulator finally approving the astrazeneca vaccine at the heart of this week's dispute. downing street is desperate to stay out of the eu—astrazeneca row, but insists uk vaccine supplies would not be affected. i'm not going to comment on the eu's own discussions with those manufacturers. what we need to focus on is making
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sure uk residents and the nhs here gets the vaccines that's required, and as i say, we're confident that we will be receiving what we expected in the days and weeks ahead. but one senior eu official accused borisjohnson�*s government of wanting to start a vaccine war. resolving this row is not going to be easy. nick beake, bbc news, brussels. in the last hour, there's been a further twist in the row about how much coronavirus vaccine produced in europe should reach the uk. the european union has invoked article 16 of the brexit treaty to prevent a so—called "back door" supply chain of vaccines from europe reaching the wider uk across the irish border. remember, northern ireland is part of the united kingdom, but it has a land border with the european union via the irish republic. under the brexit deal, all products should be exported from the eu to northern ireland without checks. the eu believes this could be used to circumvent the export restrictions it has brought in.
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our correspondent emma vardy has more from belfast. when it comes to the actual supply of vaccines on the ground for northern ireland, this really is unlikely to affect that at all. this is all political and about a point of principle. because all the way through the brexit negotiations, the eu had this very firm stance that there could be no border on the island of ireland and that goods must be able to flow freely between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. and therefore, the uk had to sign up to this deal which allows that to happen. and, you know, a lot of unionists in northern ireland were very against that. it means a new irish sea border and lots of checks and controls on goods coming from great britain to northern ireland that never existed. but now, by the eu making this move, it almost seems like that point of principle has kind of vanished when it comes to vaccines. and that's what particularly the democratic unionists here are very, very critical of. cos in principle it means, look, you can import vaccines from the eu into the republic of ireland, which is an eu country,
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but it's not allowed to go north into northern ireland, which goes against the whole principle of the ni protocol that everybody signed up to. so, you know, there's a lot of anger here, you know, people sort of scratching their heads that the eu kind of went this far, because there didn't seem to be any suggestion that northern ireland was going to be used as a back door to get vaccines from the eu into the rest of the uk. so it might seem to some people, you know, pretty preemptive that the eu did this, and it could be seen to sort of undermine that working relationship with the way that the northern ireland protocol is working. and we're yet to see whether the uk is going to sort of retaliate in some way. in the last few minutes, this is what northern�*s ireland's fist minister has had to say. this is an incredibly hostile and aggressive act by the european union — aggressive act by the european union. they are trying to stop the surm— union. they are trying to stop the nw of— union. they are trying to stop the nw of a — union. they are trying to stop the supply of a vaccine designed to save lives into— supply of a vaccine designed to save lives into the uk. for years we were
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told after _ lives into the uk. for years we were told after the european union referendum vote that there could not be a hard _ referendum vote that there could not be a hard border on the island of ireland, — be a hard border on the island of ireland, and in one fell swoop they have put— ireland, and in one fell swoop they have put that hard border in place. we now _ have put that hard border in place. we now say— have put that hard border in place. we now say to our own government, the government of the uk, they need to take _ the government of the uk, they need to take robust measures to deal with this issue. _ to take robust measures to deal with this issue, including triggering article — this issue, including triggering article 16 because of course we need to deel— article 16 because of course we need to deal with the supply of critical goods— to deal with the supply of critical goods into northern ireland as well. ben wrightjoins us now from westminster. obviously a lot of anger there in northern ireland over what is happened. northern ireland over what is happened-— northern ireland over what is hauened. ., , ., ., happened. and not “ust a northern ireland. wish happened. and not “ust a northern ireland. this is — happened. and notjust a northern ireland. this is proven _ happened. and notjust a northern ireland. this is proven to - happened. and notjust a northern ireland. this is proven to be - happened. and notjust a northern ireland. this is proven to be an - ireland. this is proven to be an incendiary— ireland. this is proven to be an incendiary move _ ireland. this is proven to be an incendiary move from - ireland. this is proven to be an incendiary move from the - ireland. this is proven to be an - incendiary move from the european commission— incendiary move from the european commission that _ incendiary move from the european commission that has _ incendiary move from the european commission that has united - incendiary move from the european i commission that has united normally political— commission that has united normally political pe0ple — commission that has united normally political people who _ commission that has united normally political people who are _ commission that has united normally political people who are opponents . political people who are opponents in the _ political people who are opponents in the republic— political people who are opponents in the republic of _ political people who are opponents in the republic of ireland, - political people who are opponents in the republic of ireland, in- in the republic of ireland, in northem— in the republic of ireland, in northern ireland _ in the republic of ireland, in northern ireland and - in the republic of ireland, in northern ireland and here i in the republic of ireland, in northern ireland and here ini northern ireland and here in westminster— northern ireland and here in westminster because - northern ireland and here in westminster because of - northern ireland and here in. westminster because of course northern ireland and here in- westminster because of course so much _ westminster because of course so much of— westminster because of course so much of the — westminster because of course so much of the talking _ westminster because of course so much of the talking during - westminster because of course so much of the talking during the - much of the talking during the breaks— much of the talking during the breaks and _ much of the talking during the breaks and negotiation - much of the talking during the breaks and negotiation was i much of the talking during the breaks and negotiation was all much of the talking during the - breaks and negotiation was all about how to _ breaks and negotiation was all about how to avoid — breaks and negotiation was all about how to avoid a — breaks and negotiation was all about how to avoid a hard _ breaks and negotiation was all about how to avoid a hard border _ breaks and negotiation was all about how to avoid a hard border on - breaks and negotiation was all about how to avoid a hard border on the i how to avoid a hard border on the island _ how to avoid a hard border on the island of— how to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland _ how to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland and _ how to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland and yet - how to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland and yet here - how to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland and yet here we i island of ireland and yet here we are a _ island of ireland and yet here we are a month _ island of ireland and yet here we are a month into— island of ireland and yet here we are a month into brexit - island of ireland and yet here we are a month into brexit and - island of ireland and yet here we are a month into brexit and the i are a month into brexit and the commission—
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are a month into brexit and the commission is— are a month into brexit and the commission is saying _ are a month into brexit and the commission is saying it- are a month into brexit and the commission is saying it is- are a month into brexit and the - commission is saying it is prepared to see _ commission is saying it is prepared to see trade — commission is saying it is prepared to see trade stopped _ commission is saying it is prepared to see trade stopped when - commission is saying it is prepared to see trade stopped when it- commission is saying it is preparedl to see trade stopped when it comes to see trade stopped when it comes to vaccines — to see trade stopped when it comes to vaccines between _ to see trade stopped when it comes to vaccines between the _ to see trade stopped when it comes to vaccines between the republic i to see trade stopped when it comes to vaccines between the republic of ireland _ to vaccines between the republic of ireland and — to vaccines between the republic of ireland and northern _ to vaccines between the republic of ireland and northern ireland, - ireland and northern ireland, possibly— ireland and northern ireland, possibly sometime _ ireland and northern ireland, possibly sometime in - ireland and northern ireland, possibly sometime in the - ireland and northern ireland, | possibly sometime in the near future — possibly sometime in the near future now— possibly sometime in the near future. now here _ possibly sometime in the near future. now here in— possibly sometime in the near. future. now here in westminster possibly sometime in the near - future. now here in westminster the government— future. now here in westminster the government have _ future. now here in westminster the government have made _ future. now here in westminster the government have made clear- future. now here in westminster the government have made clear their. government have made clear their displeasure — government have made clear their displeasure. michael— government have made clear their displeasure. michael goes- government have made clear their displeasure. michael goes has- government have made clear their. displeasure. michael goes has spoken to the _ displeasure. michael goes has spoken to the vice _ displeasure. michael goes has spoken to the vice president _ displeasure. michael goes has spoken to the vice president of— displeasure. michael goes has spoken to the vice president of the _ to the vice president of the european _ to the vice president of the european commission- to the vice president of the european commission this| to the vice president of the - european commission this evening to the vice president of the _ european commission this evening and has expressed — european commission this evening and has expressed the _ european commission this evening and has expressed the british _ european commission this evening and has expressed the british concerned i has expressed the british concerned about— has expressed the british concerned about all— has expressed the british concerned about all of— has expressed the british concerned about all of this, _ has expressed the british concerned about all of this, the _ has expressed the british concerned about all of this, the fact _ has expressed the british concerned about all of this, the fact that - about all of this, the fact that they— about all of this, the fact that they were _ about all of this, the fact that they were not _ about all of this, the fact that they were not consulted - about all of this, the fact that they were not consulted or. about all of this, the fact that - they were not consulted or notified before _ they were not consulted or notified before article — they were not consulted or notified before article 16 _ they were not consulted or notified before article 16 came _ they were not consulted or notified before article 16 came into - they were not consulted or notified before article 16 came into play - before article 16 came into play from _ before article 16 came into play from the — before article 16 came into play from the european _ before article 16 came into play from the european side - before article 16 came into play from the european side and - before article 16 came into play. from the european side and they before article 16 came into play - from the european side and they are discussing _ from the european side and they are discussing what _ from the european side and they are discussing what next _ from the european side and they are discussing what next steps - from the european side and they are discussing what next steps might. from the european side and they are | discussing what next steps might be. the labour— discussing what next steps might be. the labour party— discussing what next steps might be. the labour party has _ discussing what next steps might be. the labour party has said _ discussing what next steps might be. the labour party has said that - discussing what next steps might be. the labour party has said that this i the labour party has said that this move _ the labour party has said that this move is— the labour party has said that this move is deeply— the labour party has said that this move is deeply destabilising - the labour party has said that this move is deeply destabilising and l move is deeply destabilising and undermines _ move is deeply destabilising and undermines the _ move is deeply destabilising and undermines the huge _ move is deeply destabilising and undermines the huge efforts - move is deeply destabilising and . undermines the huge efforts made move is deeply destabilising and - undermines the huge efforts made and bein- undermines the huge efforts made and being made _ undermines the huge efforts made and being made to — undermines the huge efforts made and being made to make _ undermines the huge efforts made and being made to make the _ undermines the huge efforts made and being made to make the northern - being made to make the northern ireland _ being made to make the northern ireland protocol— being made to make the northern ireland protocol work. _ being made to make the northern ireland protocol work. so - being made to make the northern ireland protocol work. so it- being made to make the northern ireland protocol work. so it has. being made to make the northern. ireland protocol work. so it has had the effect _ ireland protocol work. so it has had the effect of — ireland protocol work. so it has had the effect of uniting _ ireland protocol work. so it has had the effect of uniting political- the effect of uniting political opinion— the effect of uniting political opinion right _ the effect of uniting political opinion right across - the effect of uniting political opinion right across the - the effect of uniting political. opinion right across the board. the effect of uniting political- opinion right across the board. 50 opinion right across the board. fl: what opinion right across the board. what are the next steps to try opinion right across the board.“ what are the next steps to try and resolve this potentially? is what are the next steps to try and resolve this potentially?— resolve this potentially? is not clear and you _ resolve this potentially? is not clear and you heard _ resolve this potentially? is not clear and you heard arlene - resolve this potentially? is not. clear and you heard arlene foster say what — clear and you heard arlene foster say what you _ clear and you heard arlene foster say what you want _ clear and you heard arlene foster say what you want to _ clear and you heard arlene foster say what you want to was - clear and you heard arlene foster say what you want to was see - clear and you heard arlene foster say what you want to was see the| say what you want to was see the government— say what you want to was see the government here _ say what you want to was see the government here good _ say what you want to was see the government here good in - say what you want to was see the government here good in a - say what you want to was see the i government here good in a similar route _ government here good in a similar route thev— government here good in a similar route they have _ government here good in a similar route. they have been _ government here good in a similar route. they have been calling - government here good in a similar route. they have been calling over the last _ route. they have been calling over the last couple _ route. they have been calling over the last couple of— route. they have been calling over the last couple of weeks _ route. they have been calling over. the last couple of weeks themselves for this— the last couple of weeks themselves for this one — the last couple of weeks themselves for this one of— the last couple of weeks themselves for this one of action _ the last couple of weeks themselves
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for this one of action to _ the last couple of weeks themselves for this one of action to be _ the last couple of weeks themselves for this one of action to be taken - for this one of action to be taken by the _ for this one of action to be taken by the uk — for this one of action to be taken by the uk government _ for this one of action to be taken by the uk government because i for this one of action to be takenl by the uk government because of for this one of action to be taken - by the uk government because of the disruption _ by the uk government because of the disruption of — by the uk government because of the disruption of food _ by the uk government because of the disruption of food supplies _ by the uk government because of the disruption of food supplies from - disruption of food supplies from great _ disruption of food supplies from great britain _ disruption of food supplies from great britain to _ disruption of food supplies from great britain to northern - disruption of food supplies from i great britain to northern ireland. and i_ great britain to northern ireland. and i think— great britain to northern ireland. and i think during _ great britain to northern ireland. and i think during this _ great britain to northern ireland. and i think during this row- great britain to northern ireland. | and i think during this row around the availability— and i think during this row around the availability of _ and i think during this row around the availability of astrazeneca - the availability of astrazeneca vaccines — the availability of astrazeneca vaccines and _ the availability of astrazeneca vaccines and concern - the availability of astrazeneca vaccines and concern that - the availability of astrazeneca vaccines and concern that is l vaccines and concern that is obviously— vaccines and concern that is obviously on _ vaccines and concern that is obviously on the _ vaccines and concern that is obviously on the european i vaccines and concern that is i obviously on the european side vaccines and concern that is - obviously on the european side about how much— obviously on the european side about how much of— obviously on the european side about how much of that _ obviously on the european side about how much of that supply— obviously on the european side about how much of that supply is _ obviously on the european side about how much of that supply is currentlyl how much of that supply is currently doing _ how much of that supply is currently doing to _ how much of that supply is currently doing to the — how much of that supply is currently doing to the uk, _ how much of that supply is currently doing to the uk, i— how much of that supply is currently going to the uk, i think— how much of that supply is currently going to the uk, i think the - how much of that supply is currently going to the uk, ithinkthe uk- going to the uk, i think the uk government— going to the uk, i think the uk government has— going to the uk, i think the uk government has been- going to the uk, i think the uk government has been very - going to the uk, ithinkthe uk. government has been very careful going to the uk, ithinkthe uk- government has been very careful not to try— government has been very careful not to try and _ government has been very careful not to try and inflame _ government has been very careful not to try and inflame the _ government has been very careful not to try and inflame the situation - government has been very careful not to try and inflame the situation in - to try and inflame the situation in any way— to try and inflame the situation in any way or— to try and inflame the situation in any way or sort _ to try and inflame the situation in any way or sort of— to try and inflame the situation in any way or sort of provoke - to try and inflame the situation in any way or sort of provoke the . any way or sort of provoke the european _ any way or sort of provoke the european commission. - any way or sort of provoke the european commission. i- any way or sort of provoke the european commission. i don't| any way or sort of provoke the - european commission. i don't think they are _ european commission. i don't think they are going _ european commission. i don't think they are going to _ european commission. i don't think they are going to want _ european commission. i don't think they are going to want to _ european commission. i don't think they are going to want to race - european commission. i don't think they are going to want to race thatl they are going to want to race that he on _ they are going to want to race that he on this— they are going to want to race that he on this anymore _ they are going to want to race that he on this anymore than _ they are going to want to race that he on this anymore than they - they are going to want to race that he on this anymore than they will,i he on this anymore than they will, and might— he on this anymore than they will, and might be _ he on this anymore than they will, and might be that _ he on this anymore than they will, and might be that faced _ he on this anymore than they will, and might be that faced with - he on this anymore than they will, and might be that faced with quite clear dismay— and might be that faced with quite clear dismay from _ and might be that faced with quite clear dismay from the _ and might be that faced with quite clear dismay from the british - clear dismay from the british government— clear dismay from the british government and _ clear dismay from the british government and the - clear dismay from the british government and the irish - clear dismay from the british - government and the irish government in dublin— government and the irish government in dublin that— government and the irish government in dublin that the _ government and the irish government in dublin that the european _ in dublin that the european commission— in dublin that the european commission finds - in dublin that the european commission finds a - in dublin that the european commission finds a way - in dublin that the european commission finds a way toi in dublin that the european - commission finds a way to reverse this but— commission finds a way to reverse this but we — commission finds a way to reverse this but we will— commission finds a way to reverse this but we will see. _ commission finds a way to reverse this but we will see. 0k, - commission finds a way to reverse this but we will see.— commission finds a way to reverse this but we will see. 0k, thank you very much. — this but we will see. 0k, thank you very much. ben- — yet another new vaccine has been shown to be effective in major trials in just 2a hours. the latest is the janssen vaccine. it's 66% effective overall and only needs a single dose. and crucially, it's 85% effective
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against severe disease. on thursday, novavax announced its uk trials had shown its vaccine to be 89% effective. and crucially, that vaccine protects against the new more contagious uk variant. when those vaccines are approved, they'lljoin a number of other vaccines that have been authorised for emergency use or given full backing in different parts of the world. so let's take a look at some of the vaccines already in use. the pfizer—biontech vaccine has been cleared for use in 32 nations, more than any other, with a reported efficacy of 95%. the moderna vaccine is reported to have an overall efficacy of 9a.1% and has been cleared for use in 11 countries. the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine has a the overall efficacy was 70%, ranging from 62—90% depending on the schedule of doses. it's now been approved in the eu. russia's sputnik vaccine has a 91.4% efficacy.
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that's according to the manufacturer. it's got emergency clearance in 15 nations. and china's coronavac vaccine, developed by sinovac, has been cleared in six countries. it was found to be 50.4% effective in brazilian clinical trials. of course, it's mainly wealthier nations who are getting these vaccines, and that concerns the world health organization. the who has called on countries to think about the less priveleged. they're right down the end of the queue right now, and they're looking up to the top of the queue. and the people at the top of the queue are fighting about where they are in the queue. they're fighting over the cake when they don't even have access to the crumbs. so i think we need to step back and reflect upon our brave colleagues and where they stand today and what we're going to do about that. anna marriott is the health policy adviser for oxfam. she told me how the row between the eu and astrazeneca shows there isn't much equality
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in vaccine distribution. at the heart of the challenges facing the eu it lies a vaccine scarcity problem. and we know that that scarcity problem is amplified multiple times over if you look at the access of these vaccines across the globe. our research as the people's vaccine alliance shows that nine in ten people in the poorest countries are set to miss out on a vaccine this year. and i think we've reached a very critical moment, and rather than descending into vaccine trade wars, what we need our governments to do now is to focus on the practical solutions to that supply problem. and to do that, we need them to ensure that the pharmaceutical corporations share the vaccine science, know—how, transfer their technology so that we can get more manufacturers onboard across the globe producing
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these vaccines at scale. so we can, if you like, flood the world with safe and effective vaccines as quickly as possible, because that is the only quick exit route to this crisis. but if that were what's going to happen, it would've happened by now, wouldn't it? they would've been more working together and more conjoined thinking by these pharmaceutical companies and governments. well, we've certainly been warning for the last nine or ten months that we do need to move to a different model of collaboration and solidarity. we know that that vaccine science sharing got us to this place in the first place, that we could accelerate the production of, the development of these effective vaccines in the first place. now what we need to do is move to that new model of sharing and not leaving these vaccines as the private property of pharmaceutical companies.
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how much responsibility do you think the who has in this and how much do individual governments have? i think everybody has responsibility now. and we need to see leadership from the world health organization, particularly in a mechanism that was launched last year called the covid technology access pool, which provides a mechanism for sharing this vaccine science so that pharmaceutical corporations can share with other manufacturers how to make these vaccines. but we also know that governments, rich country governments are blocking these practical solutions. they are putting the profits and the private ownership of these vaccines ahead of public interest right now. so we need to see them working together. i think it will become increasingly untenable, as the challenges faced by the eu now show, it will become increasingly untenable not for them to act, because we know that as long as this vaccine is allowed to continue
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in developing countries, the chances of mutations the chances of the vaccines we already have and have already received becoming ineffective are going to increase every day. so there is a real urgency here and a self—interest from rich countries to fix those supply problems quickly and get us to that exit route from this crisis. so, lots of information there about vaccines, who'll get them and how well they work. it's a lot to take in, so do visit our website, where you'll see a full breakdown from our team of expert correspondents. bbc.com/news for all that and more. stay with us on bbc news. still to come, live performances may be cancelled around the world, but in new zealand, music—lovers can gather for concerts. we hear from what could be the biggest live act in the world at the moment.
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music. the shuttle challenger exploded soon after liftoff. there were seven astronauts on board, one of them a woman schoolteacher. all of them are believed to have been killed. by the evening, tahrir square, the heart of official cairo, was in the hands of the demonstrators. they were using the word "revolution". the earthquake singled out buildings and brought them down in seconds. tonight, the search for any survivors has an increasing desperation about it as the hours pass. the new government is firmly in control of the entire - republic of uganda. survivors of the auschwitz concentration camp have been commemorating the 40th anniversary of their liberation. they toured the huts, gas chambers and crematoria and relived their horrifying experiences.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines — the european union announces export controls for covid vaccines. it will force drug companies to get permission before supplying doses outside the bloc. the european medicine agency approves the astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine, making it the third available for use across the eu. the un secretary—general antonio guterres has expressed "great concern" over rising political tension in myanmar. the armed forces are contesting the results of the election last november, which was overwhelmingly won by the ruling national league for democracy party headed by aung san suu kyi. the military has alleged widespread voting irregularities and has called for verifications to the country's voting lists. our south east asia correspondentjonathan head is following the story. launching a coup now would be quite
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extraordinary after a really resounding election victory. i mean, aung san suu kyi, after five years of course with the terrible controversy over the rohingya crisis, but many other issues over economic performance, no one expected her party to do even as well as it did last time in the historic election that brought it to power. but in fact, it did even better. and worse still for the military, the party the military backs did much, much worse. it ended up with only around 6% of all the seats that were contested in both central and regional parliaments. and i think the military is feeling very bruised about that. it's also very worried about what aung san suu kyi will do with this really powerful mandate. remember, although she has carefully managed her relations with the military over the last five years, she does have an explicit goal of removing them from politics and reducing their power. and i suspect that's the reason we're seeing this sabre—rattling, but it is real sabre—rattling. i mean, usually the armed forces is pretty careful about what it says, and to leave it open as to whether they might even launch a coup, and as the armed forces
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commander himself suggested, perhaps overthrow the constitution, the very constitution that the military wrote themselves over a decade ago, is an extraordinary threat. and i suspect it's one the government will take seriously. we do have a session of parliament opening on monday. that will begin the process. it's a very long interregnum between election and the government formally being formed in april, but that will begin the process of forming the new administration and laying out its agenda. so i suspect this is a very serious warning shot across the bows not to threaten the military�*s interests and its positions in power. well, to fight the outbreak, south africa's president, cyril ramaphosa, says funerals have been coronavirus "super spreaders". he's called for regulations — including shorter ceremonies, smaller crowds, and for a covid death, no viewing of the body — to be followed. but some people are struggling to accept the changes. pumza fihlani reports. music. from big state funerals with pomp
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and ceremony to send—offs for ordinary people, coronavirus is changing long—standing practices around death and burials here. in my family, like with many in south africa, funerals are often a big occasion. it's a time where hundreds of people gather to show support for the bereaved family. it's also a time where age—old traditions are observed and ritual practices are performed. but large family funerals have now been replaced by small hurried affairs, at what cost? funerals are seen as an important rite of passage in many african cultures. but under the strict covid regulations, where there is little to no contact with the deceased, certain burial practices are impossible. it's something funeral parlours say is difficult for families to accept. families like to cleanse their own deceased relatives. what that means is they want to take them out of caskets,
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wash them and do their own outside the mortuary after we've prepared them. this then poses a health risk for them. so when we come back to them and say, "no, this cannot be done at such a time," it causes a taboo for them. because then that makes them not allow the spirits to be free and to rest in peace and all of that. under the new regulations, services can only be attended by 50 people to try and minimise the spread of covid—19. but in a society where even grief is shared, some are struggling with the new norm. now you can imagine the trauma in the aftermath of covid—19 that you're going to have when people have not had that last rite of passage between those who are departing and those who have departed. certainly people will struggle dealing with the fact that they have not performed these rituals. and whatever misfortune some of them will be facing, they may attribute this precisely to the fact that their ancestors,
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wherever they are, are restless, they are unhappy of the manner of departure. to try and bridge that gap, some funeral parlours are now live—streaming funerals and having drive—through memorial services to help families feel more connected. but for some, it's falling short. well, with my mother passing away and having to do things differently, | everyone wants to come to see, you know? - since they can't be here, - now they also want to watch. at the end of the day, you are looking for. the presence of the people. and as much as you know that they are there, - but they are not here. it's not the same. it's really not the same. all these changes point to one thing — that the rich traditions associated with certain aspects of death in south africa have gone for now. pumza fihlani, bbc
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news, johannesburg. let's look at some of the day's other news. china has said it will no longer recognise the british national overseas passport held by thousands of people in hong kong. the uk government had said that, from sunday, holders of the passport and their families could apply to live, work and study in the uk. the visa scheme was announced in july following the introduction of strict new security laws by the chinese government. a moscow court has ordered the arrests of a number of close political associates of the jailed opposition leader alexei navalny. mr navalny�*s brother, oleg, and his office coordinator have been held. other prominent navalny supporters face charges of organising a protest during an epidemic. police near the indian capital delhi have fired tear gas and used batons to separate protesting farmers and another group who wanted the farmers to leave the site. tens of thousands of farmers have been protesting on the outskirts of delhi against the new laws, which they say will benefit large agriculture companies.
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with festivals including glastonbury cancelled because of the pandemic, music fans across much of the world have had to settle for performances filmed remotely. but in new zealand, the success of the government's covid strategy has meant thousands of people still gather for live concerts. our reporter, mark savage, has spoken to one local band who could, for now, claim to be the biggest live act in the world. we need to get back to the stage, so i need you to clear a path for us to walk straight down this line here. a scene that is unimaginable in most of the world right now. but with just 25 covid—related deaths in new zealand, the country's ban on mass gatherings has been lifted and the rock band six60 are out every weekend playing to thousands of fans. for the first gig back, when you walked out on stage, how did it feel? it felt right. we live for the stage, and that's how we came together, us performing live, so it's kind of our bread—and—butter. and itjust felt good to be home.
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the audience don't have to wear masks or take covid tests. all they have to do is make sure they have the government's tracing app installed on their phones. as far as the show�*s concerned, it's normal. people are embracing, they're together, shoulder—to—shoulder, singing along. but there are some challenges. the band have had to book alternative dates for every show on their tour in case of a new break—out. and that also means they've had to scale back the ambition the money around willy—nilly, you know what i mean? you have to be a bit more strategic and a bit more poignant about your decisions. and that comes with its challenges. right now, six60 could claim to be the biggest live band on the planet, but the success of their shows will give hope to musicians around the world that concerts will resume one day.
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mark savage, bbc news. thank you for watching. bye—bye. hello there. for many of us, the last few days have been exceptionally mild for the time of year. but that's all set to change this weekend. it'll turn colder for all of us, and we could see some issues, perhaps some disruptions from sleet and snow, especially across england and wales. and the reason for this change over the weekend is that the uk will be a battleground of the air masses, colder air moving southwards meeting milder airfurther south, and an area of low pressure on that boundary will have a weather front bringing outbreaks of rain. we'll see some of that rain turning increasingly into sleet and snow. quite windy, as well, so some of this snow will be drifting, particularly over the higher ground of wales. now that rain will be making inroads tonight across southern areas,
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some of that heavy. but further north, it'll be cold, mainly dry, just a few showers around — these will be wintry in nature, risk of ice here as well. further south, this rain really peps up and moves northwards, and you start to see white in there — it's starting to snow by the end of the night across north and mid—wales. so quite a temperature contrast from north to south. so here's saturday, then — cold, frosty with some ice in the north, but further south it's a different story — cloudy, wet, increasing amounts of snow over the higher ground of wales, then down to lower levels. drifting in, that strong wind could see some wet snow, as well, developing through the midlands down into the south east, even down to lower levels in the heaviest bursts. more rain pushing into the far south west. here, just about double figure values — otherwise for most, it'll be a much chillier day. as we move through saturday night, that's when the rain, sleet, and snow clears away from the south, but it leaves a legacy of ice for parts of england and wales, particularly on untreated surfaces. it'll be a very cold
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night for all areas, a very hard frost across some of the scottish glens. that takes us into sunday, then. a very cold start, then we look to the west to another area of low pressure which will edge in — pretty much a repeat performance to what saturday is looking like. so starting off dry, then the clouds build up — rain pushing in, turning to sleet and snow across northern ireland this time and parts of wales, the midlands into southern england, maybe wet snow down to lower levels. and a colder day for all, but drier and brighter in the north.
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this is bbc world news, the headlines... the european union has confirmed its introducing export controls on coronavirus vaccines. individual member states will decide whether to allow exports of vaccines produced in their territory. this comes amid a dispute over vaccine deliveries between the eu and astrazeneca. meanwhile the european medicens agency says it recommends the covid—19 astrazeneca vaccine for authorisation in the eu in people aged 18 and older. this is the third covid—19 vaccine the ema has authorised. in china — the world health organisation team sent to investigate the origin of the pandemic has visited the hospital where the first cases were treated. the un secretary—general
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antonio gutteres has expressed "great concern" over rising political tension in myanmar. the armed forces are contesting the results of the election last

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