Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 26, 2021 2:00pm-4:31pm GMT

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... a row over vaccines as the eu threatens to restrict supplies to other countries if it doesn't get what it says is its fair share, the uk says not to worry. i'm very confident with the team. we talk to them all the time. they are confident they will deliverfor us, yes. and astrazeneca, the bulk of astrazeneca—oxford is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment. the growing toll of coronavirus. new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid—19 across the uk, and more than 30,000 in care homes in england and wales. 10 days quarantine in a hotel when you arrive back in england and you pay. the government plan which could skupper summer holiday plans. schools will be prioritised when lockdown restrictions are lifted,
2:01 pm
says the government, after mps call for a roadmap for their reopening. a report into mother—and—baby homes and magdalene laundries in northern ireland is expected to be published within the hour. survivors say they were emotionally abused and had to give up their babies for adoption. the supply of coronavirus vaccines is now a critical issue as countries try to stem high infection rates. and the eu is angry because it says it's not getting its fair share. it's threatened to impose controls on the export of vaccines made within the bloc, and that could affect the uk's supply of the pfizerbiontech jab. the eu's health commissioner has criticised astrazeneca, saying the company hasn't delivered the number of vaccines it promised. the company says it's because of supply problems. what does it mean for us?
2:02 pm
well, the british government says supplies of vaccines are "tight", but is confident it will receive enough doses to meet its targets. all this comes as we've just learned the downing street news briefing at 5pm this evening will be held by the prime minister. 0ur europe correspondent nick beake reports. the lorries leaving the main pfizer factory this morning bringing hope to the world. laden with one of the vaccines that will help transport us out of the covid—19 nightmare. with such precious cargo on board, they are escorted all the way. but now, there are concerns that fewer of these jabs could be coming to the uk. the european union is angry that another company which makes the oxford astrazeneca shot will be sending it millions fewer doses than promised. it wants to know why. and in response, it's announced that vaccines leaving the eu are to be more tightly controlled, including those destined for britain. this new schedule is not acceptable
2:03 pm
to the european union. in the future, all companies producing vaccines against covid—19 in the eu will have to provide early notification whenever they want to export vaccines to third countries. european union countries have been criticised for the slow roll—out of vaccines, compared with the likes of the uk, and they won't be helped by the temporary slowdown in production here in belgium, at the main pfizer plant. but this latest row over the supply of vaccines, who gets what and when, threatens to make this international health crisis even more political, at a time when countries are being told they need to work together to get us out of this crisis. the uk was the first in the world to approve a vaccine and more than 7 million people have now received at least one jab. the minister responsible for the vaccine programme conceded supplies were tight, but said the uk would still get enough doses.
2:04 pm
i'm very confident with the team, we talk to the team all the time and they are confident they will deliver for us, yes. and the bulk of the oxford astrazeneca is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment in manufacturing capacity in the uk, which is also good news, so i am confident we will meet our mid—february target and then vaccinate beyond that. the global race to vaccinate against covid—19 has exposed big inequalities, with poorer countries, particularly outside europe, facing a long wait. the way out of this pandemic is by no means easy. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley is at westminster. i nick eardley is at westminster. was talking tojere says i was talking tojeremy hunt two says we do not need to get into these national rows. but we are in one, aren't we? i these national rows. but we are in one. aren't we?— these national rows. but we are in one, aren't we? i think some people will look at — one, aren't we? i think some people will look at this _ one, aren't we? i think some people will look at this and _ one, aren't we? i think some people will look at this and ask _ one, aren't we? i think some people will look at this and ask that - one, aren't we? i think some people will look at this and ask that exact . will look at this and ask that exact question. the view and number ten as
2:05 pm
that they are still confident that they will get to supply they need, they will get to supply they need, the uk will still need to target in mid—february, of having vaccinated the top four categories most at risk people across the uk. inevitably, there are going to be some big questions over the next few weeks about priority, the different companies getting to different countries, speculation about contracts, prices paid and things like that, but certainly, the view in government here is that so—called vaccine nationalism as some have branded it is a bad thing. i have listened to the health secretary matt hancock who has addressed an event at chatham house where he has said the idea of different countries getting into a global race for this would be self—defeating and actually the uk government when it hosts the g7 later this year will want to talk more about countries work together. that said, you are absolutely right, in some senses there is that concern
2:06 pm
that there are going to be different blocks or parts of the world that try and prioritise their own population. it's worth pointing out that i think the eu are trying to dampen that down a bit. you heard in nick's piece suggesting it's not actually about keeping the vaccine in the european union, it's about accountability and making sure that european companies have to justify where the vaccines are going. it is where the vaccines are going. it is not that the _ where the vaccines are going. it is not that the eu _ where the vaccines are going. it is not that the eu simply paid too little too late? eli not that the eu simply paid too little too late?— little too late? eu certainly is dis-cutin little too late? eu certainly is disputing that, _ little too late? eu certainly is disputing that, there - little too late? eu certainly is disputing that, there has - little too late? eu certainly is| disputing that, there has been little too late? eu certainly is i disputing that, there has been a little too late? eu certainly is - disputing that, there has been a lot of questioning of the different ways in which different countries have approached the purchase of these vaccines. i have got to say, in the uk i think there is a feeling in government that the project is going pretty well. it was fairly early on that the uk made some pretty big orders for different vaccines across the globe. the uk was first to
2:07 pm
approve some of those vaccines for use here and i think the feeling in number number ten is that it's still going pretty well, different numbers, different days of it going better than other points, the fact certain parts of england anyway there seem to be much higher rates than in other parts, but certainly the view here is that the uk is doing pretty well when it comes to getting those vaccines rolled out. we will hear from the prime minister this afternoon at 5pm. live coverage here. thank you very much. the office for national statistics says that almost 104,000 people in the uk have now died with coronavirus. more than 30,000 of those were care home residents in england and wales. the figures, which cover up to the 15th of january, are based on death certificates, while the government's statistics rely on positive covid—19 tests and remain slightly lower.
2:08 pm
dominic hughes reports. jonathan is on the long, hard road to recovery, physically and emotionally. a front line health care worker, he fell ill with covid—19 in october, last year. notjust him, but members of his closest family, as well. iwas admitted on the 18th of october and my mother was admitted in the early hours of the 20th of october, my sister was admitted to antrim hospital because the other side was very busy and she was admitted to antrim hospital the afternoon of the 20th of october and i was in on the evening of the 20th of october. jonathan ended up in intensive care and then on the same respiratory ward on which he worked, in the same hospital as his mother martina, he was able to see her and to be with her when she died. to know that mum's not coming home, it's very hard. mum was the link.
2:09 pm
she was always here and it's a very, very lonely house. a very lonely house, and that loneliness and that emptiness is there 2a hours a day, it never leaves you. jonathan's story is one of 100,000, as confirmed by the latest figures from the office for national statistics. data based on death certificates where covid—19 is mentioned shows nearly 103,000 lives have been lost, and then the third highest rate in the pandemic, but it is likely that total deaths are much higher, as that data is now 11 days old. there is another measure of deaths, the one we mention on the news everyday. that covers people who died within 28 days a positive test, and that is likely to breach 100,000 either later today or tomorrow. for some, it is a sign of devastating failure. just generally we have not responded to the warnings as quickly enough, and remember early in the pandemic the government hesitated in terms
2:10 pm
of what they should do in terms of the lockdown and they did not do that quickly enough and whenever we made progress in the lockdown, they quickly came out, so they weren't decisive enough. the past year has taught us some are more vulnerable to the virus than others. more deprived communities have seen a proportionately higher death toll, as have people from a black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds. muhammad died from covid—19 just last month. from his daughter, susanna, a reminder that each one of these deaths is a terrible loss. from his daughter, suzana, a reminder that each one of these for each of us, the trauma, the upset, the distress, the loss is great, and please don't see it as a figure, it is somebody�*s husband, somebody�*s brother, some of his father and we need to remember that each time these statistics are increasing. and beyond the deaths caused by the virus itself, there are those lives lost through delayed treatments or missed symptoms. today is a fresh reminder of the immense toll taken by this virus.
2:11 pm
the government insists it wants schools in england to reopen as soon as possible, once coronavirus lockdown restrictions begin to be eased. but it's widely thought they may remain closed to all but vulnerable pupils and the children of essential workers after next month's half—term break. the minister for school standards, nick gibb said reopening schools was a key priority. it is the government's strong desire to reopen all schools, colleges and universities as as soon as possible. we will prioritise the reopening of schools as we begin the process of lifting lockdown restrictions. we are acutely aware of the damage to children's education and development, particularly to the most disadvantaged pupils by being away from school, increased burdens placed on parents and that's why we allowed early years providers to remain open through this lockdown. labour's shadow education secretary, kate green, critisised the governments messaging on the subject of reopening. we simply do not know the governments plan is for schools reopening other than what we read in
2:12 pm
the newspapers. in recent days, we have had _ the newspapers. in recent days, we have had reports the prime minister wants_ have had reports the prime minister wants peoples back before easter, the health secretary says he wants people _ the health secretary says he wants people back after easter, public health — people back after easter, public health england see primary schools are already safe to reopen so which is it? _ are already safe to reopen so which is it? what's— are already safe to reopen so which is it? what's the plan for reopening? ministers are expected to approve plans that could require some people arriving in england to quarantine in a hotel for ten days, at their own cost. it's not yet known if the restrictions would apply to everyone, orjust those returning from countries with more contagious variants. if implemented it is likely to be a further blow for the struggling international travel industry, making holidays abroad an unlikely proposition. theo leggett reports. hotels are fine for foreign travel, but would you really want to be cooped up in one when you get back home? under plans being discussed by the government, british citizens and residents arriving in england from countries deemed to be high risk would have to go into quarantine in hotels, which they would have to pay for. it is part of a strategy to limit infections from potentially dangerous new variants
2:13 pm
of the coronavirus. the government has already barred foreign nationals from entering the uk from most of south america and southern africa, as well as portugal. this afternoon, the home secretary was tight—lipped about the plans being discussed. if i may, the honourable gentleman has referred to newspaper reports and speculation. it would be wrong of me to speculate about any measures that are not in place right now, as policy is being developed. but the honourable gentleman does speak about quarantining and claims his party has called for tougher restrictions, but i think also the party opposite, if i may say so, should also reflect on their position. hotels are now being prepared for the challenge of looking after people who cannot go out, who may be infectious and could become ill. since the beginning of the pandemic, we have done over 300 risk assessments on our activities and how we operate and changing our protocols, so this would just be in addition to that.
2:14 pm
so everything in the hospitality industry in terms of how we operate has changed, this would be a further change. we obviously wait for the government guidelines to tell us specifically what we need to do, but we are well on our way to be able to achieve it. for the international travel industry, it is a deeply worrying time. the new measures may have little immediate impact, because very few people are arriving from abroad. but if they last into the peak summer period, or make people unwilling to book summer holidays, it's could spell disaster for already struggling business. the risk is we have these restrictions in place - and into the autumn and the sector is not able to have that summer. period it was banking on to earnl money and bring in much needed revenue to replenish those balance sheets which had been decimated i since march last year. quarantine, for how long, or who will be exempt. all four uk nations are discussing the issue and are likely to adopt similar measures.
2:15 pm
the delay between contracting coronavirus and later being admitted to hospital means that, despite a recent fall in cases, the pressure on the nhs continues to grow. with different parts of the country experiencing a peak of infection at different times, our health editor hugh pym has been to ashfield in nottinghamshire to see the impact on the front line there. people need to know it is not a game. it is frightening. barbara lived with cancer before it went into retreat. they're brilliant, lovely nurses. then she was struck by covid. she was keen to get this message across. just wear your mask and wash your hands. that's all it is, isn't it? that's all we've got to do. i think it was last wednesday when i came in, i think. i don't remember. don't you? no. along the corridor is paul who is 53
2:16 pm
and considers himself fit. he's over the worst now, but he says it was a frightening experience. yeah, i fought it for about five or six days. at home? at home, and then ijust couldn't cope any longer. much of this floor of the hospital has always housed wards for those with respiratory conditions. now they've been expanded with room for nearly 100 patients in bays and cubicles. almost all of them with covid. from experience, i can tell you that i'm seeing tell you that i'm seeing more sicker patients this time than i saw in the first wave. umar is a doctor in a&e. he says there's been a huge influx of covid patients. in both his professional and personal life, he's seen the savage impact of the virus. my parents have got covid, my mother—in—law is in icu at the moment. i have just lost some very dear family relatives of covid. so when you see these patients in the hospital, itjust gives you that flashback, as well. but you have got to shut that down, and you've got to continue looking after your patients as best as you can.
2:17 pm
after every patient is seen, diane and her colleagues have to deep—clean the cubicles, floors, walls and surfaces. she is on the covid frontline as much as anyone. can't see no end to it, to be fair. and i think if you could see the light at the end of the tunnel, and somebody to say, you know, it's going to turn off, then that would be brilliant. but we're soldiering on and we're trying our very, very best to work as hard as we possibly can. how do you feel personally sometimes? me? upset, i go home and sometimes i could just sit and cry. it'sjust because it's demanding at the moment. machines beeping. this isn't a big city teaching hospital, so covid puts even more of a strain on resources. they've had to triple the number of intensive care beds, including converting a former children's recovery area. jen is a nurse who's been redeployed from another role to help out. i've been a nurse for 21 years.
2:18 pm
some of the shifts that i have had i are the toughest that i've ever had, in particular one night shift that- i had last week was one of the worst shifts i've ever had i in 21 years of nursing. there are signs of hope in the hospital. a trial of a 24/7 vaccination centre has proved popular with nhs and care staff, getting theirjabs after changing shift. you've got to have a sticker! all right? yeah. and in the maternity unit, life goes on. new life, with sam cuddling her new baby son, 0liver. so, it is difficult because we are not able to see family and things, but we've just welcomed a new little person into the world and, you know, it is a nice time for us, it's a happy time. and it's something to be celebrated. while there is hope, there is also sadness. barbara died yesterday.
2:19 pm
her family were keen for us to use her interview to warn of the serious consequences of covid. that report from hugh pym, camera journalist harriet bradshaw and producer dominic hurst. a report into the operation of institutions for women and babies in northern ireland is to be published later. the document is expected to outline a litany of abuse suffered by about 10,000 pregnant unmarried women and girls between the 1920s and the 1990s. here's our ireland correspondent, chris page. the first thing they did was they took my name from me. they said i could no longer use my ordinary name, and i was given a name to use while i was there. i wasn't to discuss where i came from, or any of my circumstances, with any of the other girls. adele, who doesn't want her full identity revealed, is almost 70. when she was 17, she became pregnant and was sent here.
2:20 pm
marianvale in newry in county down was an institution for unmarried mothers. it was very austere, very regimented. one other thing that really struck me was the attitude of the nuns. they repeatedly called us fallen women, bad women. we had to pay for our sins. on one occasion, we had to put on a show for them and we had to dance for them. dancing like dancing monkeys, for their entertainment. it was horrendous. and that has stuck in my head, and will stick in my head to the day i die. she says her experience of childbirth was traumatic and lonely. and, afterfour months, she had to say goodbye to her baby boy, when he was adopted. i was told, in no uncertain terms, by the nuns and by my parents, well, my mother especially, that the baby was not coming home and that was it. there were no other options and i wasn't given any other options.
2:21 pm
adele met her son, when he contacted her a0 years afterwards. but other children didn't get to know their mothers in later life. life began for me... mark's mother was also in marianvale. he discovered her identity recently. her name was kathleen maguire. she'd moved to england and, he says, died young. you know, i still should have been afforded the right to have met with my mother. in some ways, cos i was the only child she had. i found out she had no other children. she subsequently married, i think, when she went to england, and i really hope she was happy. the stories of shame, stigma and secrecy in northern ireland echo those in the irish republic, where there has been a government apology. campaigners in this part of the uk want the same. abuse of women and babies did not stop at the border. i the state here not only permitted, but policed what happened - and is ultimately responsible - for the grave and systemic human
2:22 pm
rights abuses of these women. today, ministers in belfast will discuss what should happen next. adele hopes there will be a public inquiry into the organisations who ran mother and baby homes. they took our dignity, they took our rights, they took our freedoms. we should have been wrapped in care and love and looked after and our children looked after, not given away. news coming in from wales. the welsh government has missed its target for over over 80s by the weekend. weather has been a factor and is being blamed for the target not being blamed for the target not being missed. four centres were shut on sunday as snow caused travel disruption across much of wales. appointments were cancelled and rescheduled for safety reasons and
2:23 pm
the first minister mark drakeford has told welsh parliament many over 80s did not feel safe to attend the appointments in the snow and ice, the figures show over 96,000 have reached a first dose. but there is a large in the data. the headline is the welsh government has missed its 70% target for the over 80s. we will bring you more. democrats in the us house of representatives have officially delivered their article of impeachment against former president donald trump to the senate. it's the first step in the process of putting him on trial, accused of inciting the insurrection, when his supporters stormed congress earlier this month. in india thousands of farmers protesting changes to agricultural law have entered delhi's historic red fort complex. 0n foot and in tractors, they fought through police barricades and tear gas, and one at protestor has died. the farmers say they'll lose income, but the government insists it is liberalising the sector. it's just over a year since china imposed the world's first lockdown on the city of wuhan.
2:24 pm
by then, coronavirus had been spreading there for several weeks, time in which the chinese government had insisted that everything was under control. a new bbc documentary, co—produced with pbs frontline, has revealed the gap between what was happening on the ground, what chinese officials and scientists knew, and what the world was told. caroline hawley reports. new year's eve 2019. by now, it's been 30 days since a chinese man in his 70s was hit by a mysterious pneumonia—like disease, but the world is still blissfully unaware of the virus that's about to change all of our lives. preparing to ring in the new year, an american virologist takes a call from this man, george gao, director of china's centre for disease control. he'd identified the virus. it was a new coronavirus. and that it was not highly transmissible.
2:25 pm
well, this didn't really resonate with me, because i'd heard about many, many people who had been infected. the world health organization in geneva should have been officially informed about the new disease, but it first learned about it from social media. at internal meetings, who officials made their frustration plain. the associated press shared with pbs frontline and the bbc some leaked recordings from the second week of january. back in wuhan, hospitals were filling up and health workers were becoming ever more alarmed. they are not allowed to talk to the international media without authorisation, but one has spoken anonymously to the bbc. their words are voiced by an actor.
2:26 pm
one patient in hospital in late january was 76—year—old zhang lifa. his son had driven across china, so that he could have an operation in his home town, after he'd broken his leg in the fall. as he was recovering from surgery, he got a fever.
2:27 pm
the chinese government has told us that it has always acted with transparency and in a timely fashion. but it wasn't until seven weeks after the first known patient got sick that it announced there was, indeed, human—to—human transmission and by then, covid—19 had a deadly momentum that would carry it into every corner of the globe. it has now killed more than 2 million people. caroline hawley, bbc news. you can see more on that tonight at 9pm on bbc 2. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris.
2:28 pm
the weather turns milder but as that pushes on with more cloud, as it moves into the cold air we have got something of a battle zone set in place and over the next few days there is a risk of heavy hail snow across northern england and scotland, posing a risk of disruption. through the rest of today we have this band of rain but it's the higher communities, these tens above 200 metres elevation where you could see snow. it's going to be longest lasting to the north of the central belt where we could see accumulations of 5—10 centimetres but if you live in the lower elevations, you could see a few flakes of snow as precipitation starts but it will turn back to rain as the milder air continues to work its way in. 0vernight tonight, we have got a lot of cloud and i suspect it will be rather murky. until ford patches over the high
2:29 pm
ground but turning increasingly mild. temperatures by the end of the night about eight or nine accounts across south—west, pretty slow start to the day, grey skies again, later in the day some rain pushing towards southern parts of wales and south—west england. temperatures could reach 11. mild but true across the north and east of the country. then another of these battle zones in place for thursday bringing rain for many of us but the potential is there for some very disruptive snow across higher elevation roots. some of these, are all high enough to see some significant falls of snow and disruption as well. and some rail lines go high as well so we could see railway problems. for most of us, milderairfrom see railway problems. for most of us, milder airfrom the see railway problems. for most of us, milder air from the south—west, 14 in london, not much snow there but in scotland the risk is there as
2:30 pm
it is across northern england. heavy hail snow to come as we go through thursday, 15 up to 30 centimetres of snow, you can imagine the prospect for some disruption. friday night, any change in the winter direction could turn the rain to snow but for the time being it'sjust rain in the forecast. hello this, is bbc news with simon mccoy. the headlines: a row over vaccines as the eu threatens to restrict supplies to other countries if it doesn't get what it says is its fair share, the uk says not to worry. i'm very confident with the team. we talk to them all the time. they are confident they will deliver for us, yes. the bulk of astrazeneca—oxford is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment. the growing toll of coronavirus — new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid 19 across the uk, and more than 30,000 in care homes
2:31 pm
in england and wales. 10 days' quarantine in a hotel when you arrive back in england, and you pay — the government plan which could scupper summer holiday plans. schools will be prioritised when lockdown restrictions are lifted, says the government, after mps call for a roadmap for their reopening. a report into mother and baby homes and magdalene laundries in northern ireland is expected to be published shortly — survivors say they were emotionally abused and had to give up their babies for adoption. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. hello. good afternoon, we start with chelsea who are set to name thomas tuchel as their new manager. he's expected to sign an eighteen month deal to replace frank lampard, who lost hisjob at stamford bridge yesterday. joe lynskey reports. chelsea got a super—rich owner into thousand and three. these are the
2:32 pm
faces he has hired and fired since. roman abramovich goes for coaches who have won major titles at the biggest clubs, frank lampard with the exception but now that fate is over. chelsea are set on thomas tuchel, who made his name in germany and won the league twice at france macro. heated paris saint—germain the champions league final in august but they sacked him last month. he is a but they sacked him last month. he: is a very good manager, modern snot, off the pitch, we will see how he goes. in paris he did not win hearts, but to be theron him, there were players at the club with a lot of power and he was coping with huge egos. of power and he was coping with huge e . os. , :, of power and he was coping with huge e i as, , ., , , of power and he was coping with huge ecos. , :, , , ., egos. there is a blueprint for german coaches _ egos. there is a blueprint for german coaches and - egos. there is a blueprint for german coaches and tuchel i egos. there is a blueprint for - german coaches and tuchel knows how to followjurgen klopp, he has replaced him a two bundesliga clubs before. timo werner and kai havertz both came here from germany, part of
2:33 pm
it hit had no depends some expert that did not work for lampard. he says he is disappointed he cannot take them forward but even suitable's icons do not get times —— part of a £200 million spent. he is not 'ust a part of a £200 million spent. he is notjust a colleague, _ part of a £200 million spent. he is notjust a colleague, he _ part of a £200 million spent. he is notjust a colleague, he is - part of a £200 million spent. he is notjust a colleague, he is an - notjust a colleague, he is an important person my career, but of course i feel sorry. it is the brutality of modern football, sooner or later it will happen to you. thomas tuchel needs two negative covid tests to be in charge tomorrow. they called the professor back home, a tactician who gets the best out of those around him. —— they call him the professor. for chelsea, what matters most is the view from above. another man under pressure, more from his own fans than the club's owner, is steve bruce. the newcastle manager did not allow questions from printjournalists at his press conference yesterday. he knows he needs to stop his side's slump in form, they haven't won in ten games,
2:34 pm
and are at home to leeds tonight. we have been on a poor run, and i can understand how they feel. all i can understand how they feel. all i can do is try to get the team and as good shape as i can. sometimes you have to draw on your experience. it is myjob, if i am on the floor it is myjob, if i am on the floor it is myjob to take training, be involved with training, go to work with the cultures and guest —— and get the team is best prepared as i possibly can. that's one of four games tonight. manchester city can go top with a win at west brom. next to rugby union, england are going to be without another key forward in the upcoming six nations. sam underhill has had to withdraw from the squad. the bath flanker has a hip injury and follows mako vunipola and joe launchbury in being ruled out. jack willis will replace underhill in the squad. england's first game is against scotland at twickenham a week on saturday. and sport england says it'll invest another £50 million to help get people engaged and active again. the main focus will be grassroots organisations hit
2:35 pm
hard by the pandemic. tanayah sam is an ex—offender who now works with young people at risk of offending. you can't restrict son when it comes to the life, the sanctity of life, and if we are not able to get sports with young people, violence will increase —— you can't restrict funds. my speciality is lying in working with young people who will lean towards the violent end of things, i am lean towards the violent end of things, iam interested in lean towards the violent end of things, i am interested in reducing levels of violence, we have seen a number of young people killing each other, that is a pandemic in and of itself. i other, that is a pandemic in and of itself. :, other, that is a pandemic in and of itself. ., :, :, , :, itself. i will have more for you later. itself. i will have more for you later- back — itself. i will have more for you later. back to _ itself. i will have more for you later. back to you, _ itself. i will have more for you later. back to you, simon. - britain's jobless rate has soared to its highest level for more than four years. latest figures showed 1.72 million people were out of work in the three months to november — but economists say the picture would be far worse without
2:36 pm
the furlough scheme, which has been extended until the end of april. sarah corker reports. in retail, we are always at risk, we never know what's going to happen because, you know, it is struggling in recent years because of the rise of online. abby was made redundant in september when american fashion brandj crew pulled out of the uk. i would say i've probably sent off 30 or 40 applications in the last six months, the majority of which, itjust goes into the abyss. today's figures for the three months to november showed unemployment rose to 5%, with more than 1.7 million people out of work, the highest level in five years, and the number of people claiming benefits hit 2.6 million in december. it would have been significantly worse without the furlough scheme. just to put it into context, over the last 20 years, the unemployment rate on average was 5.7%. hospitality and retail continue to be the hardest hit sectors. the high street was already struggling, but the pandemic has
2:37 pm
accelerated the shift towards online shopping, and in 2020, nearly 180,000 retailjobs in the uk were lost, and predictions for 2021 are grim. and debenhams is the latest casualty. it survived recessions and world wars, but after nearly 250 years, it is disappearing from the high street. 0nline retailer boohoo is buying the brand but is not taking on the stores or its 12,000 strong workforce. i don't think we've ever seen anything like this, and unfortunately i don't think it's going to stop. this cheshire—based recruiter says, despite the obvious challenges, there are new opportunities, too. retail as a sector is massive. you have the distribution network of retail, online, and there are newjobs that have been created in e—commerce, marketing and lots of other places. for the last 28 years, andrea has worked for fashion brand jaeger, most recently as a manager at the leamington spa store,
2:38 pm
but the chains collapsed and she lost herjob does make weeks ago. obviously, i'm having to apply for benefits and obviously i'm trying to keep my flat on. salary coming in and you've got bills to pay. the government says grants and loans are helping to protectjobs during these difficult times, but economists warn the furlough scheme is hiding the true picture of unemployment, and worse is still to come. sarah corker, bbc news. the impact of covid—19 continues to be felt notjust by the families of those who die — but also by those who help support them as they make final arrangements. for funeral directors it's been an exhausting — and emotional — 12 months, as tim muffett reports. west malling in kent, and an extra delivery of coffins to keep up with demand. normally, we'd have a larger, sort of 20, maybe 30 empty coffins being delivered here, but again, because of the levels that we've seen, we've had to have
2:39 pm
more frequent deliveries. i've been in the profession for over 20 years, and i've never experienced anything like this before. viner and sons was established in 1777. right now, it's conducting twice as many funerals as normal for this time of year. covid cases, i would say, were around 80% of the deceased that we are dealing with. it's been a struggle for us. obviously, we are dealing with bereaved families in general anyway, and when you are under such circumstances as covid, it just heightens everything. it heightens emotions, and you know, as much as we are here to to deal with that, obviously we can't help but get involved with families' emotions as well. vinters park crematorium in maidstone, and the funeral of 86—year—old beryl hook. my mum was a lovely lady. well, she gave birth to me, brought me up, and i could not fault her. she was very generous, very caring.
2:40 pm
what else can i say, really? she was my mum, and already i'm missing her. unfortunately, she contracted covid in hospital and, sadly, within a week, she passed away. it's extremely frustrating, - because obviously we couldn't go and see her when she was conscious still in the hospital and, you know, i we've come here today, and it still doesn't feel. like you've had proper closure, because there was no contact i from her going into hospital to the death to the funeral. | before, we could do sort of five or six a week. we are now, sort of, over that 12, 15 a week. how draining is that for you and your colleagues? emotionally, very draining. you know, when we have to deal with the families coming in to us, but physically as well. you know, it's a very manualjob, it's a very hands—on job. this sort of profession has been very taboo for many, many years, but i think that it's quite sad, but something like this has had to bring it to the forefront.
2:41 pm
that report from tim muffett. we can speak now to linda magistris who is the founder of good grief trust, which helps those affected by grief in the uk. good afternoon. 0ne good afternoon. one of the most heart—wrenching parts of all this is when you hear from heart—wrenching parts of all this is when you hearfrom people heart—wrenching parts of all this is when you hear from people who cannot be with their loved ones as they die. that must change that entire grieving process fundamentally? absolutely, it is incredibly complicated now. grieving and loss and bereavement is one of the hardest things you can go through, as prince william said, but when you have those added layers of covid, we have those added layers of covid, we have almost 100,000 people who had died through covert but we cannot forget hundreds of thousands more have been affected, a family affected by the restrictions and limitations are not being able to say goodbye even if it was not a
2:42 pm
covid death.— covid death. restrictions at funerals. — covid death. restrictions at funerals, this _ covid death. restrictions at funerals, this is _ covid death. restrictions at funerals, this is another - covid death. restrictions at - funerals, this is another aspect, it is so inhuman, if you like, even those who were very close cannot be at the funeral, for example? it is reall , at the funeral, for example? it is really. really _ at the funeral, for example? it 3 really, really catastrophic, we are talking about a tsunami of grief and mental health issues and at good grief trust we have brought together over 800 support services and need to get together those who have been grieving at home, all those distribution and bereavement support channels and the literature and information has not been getting to the reeves people because front line services are on their knees, so we need to tell people that there is help, please look at the good grief trust, but there is hope going forward because so many people are really, really struggling. the forward because so many people are really, really struggling.— really, really struggling. the last thing perhaps— really, really struggling. the last thing perhaps people _ really, really struggling. the last thing perhaps people feel- really, really struggling. the last thing perhaps people feel like i really, really struggling. the last i thing perhaps people feel like doing when they are grieving is doing a zoom call?— zoom call? absolutely, sadly we cannot imagine _ zoom call? absolutely, sadly we cannot imagine saying _ zoom call? absolutely, sadly we cannot imagine saying goodbye i zoom call? absolutely, sadly we i cannot imagine saying goodbye to somebody in a hospital environment
2:43 pm
on zoom, facetime or on the telephone, but when you get home and you cannot reach out to family and friends, you cannot have somebody come around and give you a hug, sometimes in the funeral he cannot go into the chapel, the door is closed in front of you, it is completely different to anything we have experienced and it is notjust now but i'm going that we need to offer support. now but i'm going that we need to offer suoport-_ offer support. what happens to a erson if offer support. what happens to a person if that _ offer support. what happens to a person if that process _ offer support. what happens to a person if that process has - offer support. what happens to a person if that process has got i person if that process has got wrong, if you like, they are not allowed to grieve properly? from day one, we allowed to grieve properly? from day one. we need — allowed to grieve properly? from day one. we need to _ allowed to grieve properly? from day one, we need to make _ allowed to grieve properly? from day one, we need to make sure _ allowed to grieve properly? from day one, we need to make sure they i allowed to grieve properly? from day| one, we need to make sure they know we are here. we offer tailored support from day one so they know they are not alone. after natures need others who have been to a similar bereavement to know their feelings are completely normal, they are not going crazy, because sadly young people can turn to self—harm, we have drug and alcohol abuse i can be attributed to a significant bereavement that has not been
2:44 pm
supported early on. sea, bereavement that has not been supported early on.— supported early on. a lot of people's — supported early on. a lot of people's first _ supported early on. a lot of people's first reaction i supported early on. a lot of| people's first reaction would supported early on. a lot of i people's first reaction would be to speak, person—to—person, with family, close friend, that has been removed by this? it family, close friend, that has been removed by this?— removed by this? it really has, it is so incredibly _ removed by this? it really has, it is so incredibly difficult, - removed by this? it really has, it is so incredibly difficult, we i removed by this? it really has, it is so incredibly difficult, we have j is so incredibly difficult, we have offered virtual cafes for practically one year now, three times a week, it is instant support, instant peer support, it is not as good as having a coffee and holding a person because my hand, but it is what can offer now. we need to support people because it is so isolating for so many people, hundreds of thousands, notjust isolating for so many people, hundreds of thousands, not just that awful number of 100,000 covid deaths, but 600,000 people die generally, normally everyday, they have all been impacted by covid. with this current pandemic, with everybody, more and more knowing someone who has died from
2:45 pm
coronavirus, dealing with that, what advice would you give to someone who may know they are about to have to face this? let may know they are about to have to face this? , :, ,:, face this? let me meet you something from our website, _ face this? let me meet you something from our website, this _ face this? let me meet you something from our website, this has _ face this? let me meet you something from our website, this has been i face this? let me meet you something from our website, this has been so i from our website, this has been so incredibly popular. "if you know someone who has lost a very important person in their life that you are afraid to mention them because you think you might make sense as by reminding them that they died, you are not reminding them. they did not figure but they died. you are reminding them that you remember that they lived, that is a great, great gift." that has been incredibly popular, it is reaching to friends and family and giving them permission to support people who are grieving, we know that if we do not support people early, that is key to helping people move forward, they need to know others are there for them. :, , :, :, :, they need to know others are there for them. :, , :, ., ,, :, for them. really good to talk to ou, for them. really good to talk to you. linda _ for them. really good to talk to you, linda magistris, _ for them. really good to talk to you, linda magistris, thank- for them. really good to talk to you, linda magistris, thank you j for them. really good to talk to i you, linda magistris, thank you very much.
2:46 pm
the headlines on bbc news... a row over vaccines — as the eu threatens to restrict supplies to other countries if it doesn't get what it says is its fair share, the uk says not to worry the growing toll of coronavirus — new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid 19 across the uk, and more than 30,000 in care homes in england and wales. 10 days, quarantine in a hotel when you arrive back in england — and you pay.. the government plan which could scupper summer holiday plans. you are watching bbc news. let's cross now to northern ireland where first minister arlene foster is outlining details of a report into mother and baby homes. this was a storm and commissioned piece of research carried out by queen's university and ulster university examining whether a public inquiry should be held into the homes —— this was a stormont
2:47 pm
commissioned inquiry. a report suggested budget to 100,000 women and girls gave birth in these homes operated by protestant and catholic organisations. survivors, both mothers and children who were born in the homes, have long called for an inquiry. the northern ireland executive is meeting and we are about to hear the results of that discussion. first minister arlene foster on twitter said she had spoken to survivors about the report on the next steps, she has already described this as a shameful chapter and says now the silence is broken and says now the silence is broken and the stories have rightfully begun to be told. i and the stories have rightfully begun to be told.— and the stories have rightfully begun to be told. i have received men -- received _ begun to be told. i have received men -- received notice - begun to be told. i have received men -- received notice from i begun to be told. i have received men -- received notice from the| men —— received notice from the first minister under deputy minister that they wish to make a statement. before i called and, i will remind them that social distancing must be observed. members still had to make sure their neighbours on the
2:48 pm
speaking list if they wish to be called, which they do by writing in their place as well as notifying the business office or the speaker's table. i remind members to be concise in their questions and i remind them that no points of order will be taken during the statement or the question period afterwards, i called the first minister.— called the first minister. thank you very much. — called the first minister. thank you very much. mr _ called the first minister. thank you very much, mr speaker. _ called the first minister. thank you very much, mr speaker. today i called the first minister. thank you very much, mr speaker. today the | very much, mr speaker. today the executive — very much, mr speaker. today the executive has considered the research _ executive has considered the research report into the operation of mother— research report into the operation of mother and baby homes and magallan laundries in northern ireland~ — magallan laundries in northern ireland. first and foremost, we want to offer_ ireland. first and foremost, we want to offer personal thanks to those women _ to offer personal thanks to those women and their now adult children who want— women and their now adult children who want to come forward to contributing the researcher —— and matt _ contributing the researcher —— and matt dillon— contributing the researcher —— and matt dillon laundries. your voices were _ matt dillon laundries. your voices were silenced also many years, that was a _ were silenced also many years, that was a significant wrong. as a society— was a significant wrong. as a society we must acknowledge this and do all— society we must acknowledge this and do all we _ society we must acknowledge this and do all we can to bring the truth of your— do all we can to bring the truth of your experience into the open. this
2:49 pm
report— your experience into the open. this report is— your experience into the open. this report is an — your experience into the open. this report is an important first step towards — report is an important first step towards a — report is an important first step towards a full understanding of what happened _ towards a full understanding of what happened to thousands of women and children— happened to thousands of women and children in_ happened to thousands of women and children in our recent past. it helps — children in our recent past. it helps us _ children in our recent past. it helps us reflect upon and recognise how poorly— helps us reflect upon and recognise how poorly they were treated, often in ways _ how poorly they were treated, often in ways lacking even a basic level of compassion and kindness. the full report— of compassion and kindness. the full report will— of compassion and kindness. the full report will be published this afternoon, victims and survivors have _ afternoon, victims and survivors have been— afternoon, victims and survivors have been given advanced site of the research _ have been given advanced site of the research report, i advised of what it found _ research report, i advised of what it found and given the opportunity to have _ it found and given the opportunity to have questions answered prior to its going _ to have questions answered prior to its going into the public domain, and they— its going into the public domain, and they have been told of the executive's decision today and the independent investigation into these historical— independent investigation into these historical institutions. this will be co—designed with victims and survivors— be co—designed with victims and survivors and give them the opportunity to influence the aim of the investigation, how it should be conducted. — the investigation, how it should be conducted, he should participate, who should share and how long nature take _ who should share and how long nature take they— who should share and how long nature take. they will be part of the
2:50 pm
consideration over whether it should be statutory or non—statutory. it is intended _ be statutory or non—statutory. it is intended that the co—designed work will he _ intended that the co—designed work will be expertly facilitated and concluded within six months. the executive — concluded within six months. the executive established an interdepartmental working group in 2016 to _ interdepartmental working group in 2016 to gather and consider evidence about— 2016 to gather and consider evidence about the _ 2016 to gather and consider evidence about the operation of these institutions. the working group has been _ institutions. the working group has been taxed — institutions. the working group has been taxed with examining historical clerical— been taxed with examining historical clerical child abuse which fell outside — clerical child abuse which fell outside the wiener topper historical institutional abuse inquiry, and that isn't— institutional abuse inquiry, and that isn't telling —— which fell outside — that isn't telling —— which fell outside the remit of the. the current— outside the remit of the. the current chair isjudith gillespie, she has— current chair isjudith gillespie, she has been in the role for life energy— she has been in the role for life energy and i want to acknowledge both the _ energy and i want to acknowledge both the commitment, determination and energy— both the commitment, determination and energy she has brought. we want to recognise the work of the previous— to recognise the work of the previous chairs, nora gibbons, who tragically— previous chairs, nora gibbons, who tragically passed away last, and peter— tragically passed away last, and peter mcbride. while we talk about
2:51 pm
historical— peter mcbride. while we talk about historical institutions, the last mother— historical institutions, the last mother and baby institution closed its doors _ mother and baby institution closed its doors as late as 1990, that they should _ its doors as late as 1990, that they should be — its doors as late as 1990, that they should be aware. as a recent report of the _ should be aware. as a recent report of the commission of the investigation into mother and baby homes _ investigation into mother and baby homes in _ investigation into mother and baby homes in the republic of ireland shows, — homes in the republic of ireland shows, the abuse and poor treatment of women _ shows, the abuse and poor treatment of women at — shows, the abuse and poor treatment of women at a vulnerable point in their— of women at a vulnerable point in their life — of women at a vulnerable point in their life were not unique to here and were — their life were not unique to here and were part of the culture of a number— and were part of the culture of a number of— and were part of the culture of a number of countries around the world — number of countries around the world the _ number of countries around the world. the research which was led to the report— world. the research which was led to the report being published today was undertakenjointly by the report being published today was undertaken jointly by queen's university and the ulster university. it examined the operation of both mother and baby homes _ operation of both mother and baby homes and magdalene laundries in northern— homes and magdalene laundries in northern ireland and the wider historical— northern ireland and the wider historical and social context in which — historical and social context in which they operated between 1922 and 1990, a _ which they operated between 1922 and 1990, a 68 year period. the research examined _ 1990, a 68 year period. the research examined eight mother and baby homes, — examined eight mother and baby homes, a — examined eight mother and baby homes, a number of former workhouses and four— homes, a number of former workhouses and four magdalene laundries, it involves— and four magdalene laundries, it involves a — and four magdalene laundries, it involves a literature review, it examined _ involves a literature review, it
2:52 pm
examined outright records —— archives— examined outright records —— archives records. it sought and obtained — archives records. it sought and obtained the personal testimonies of with a _ obtained the personal testimonies of with a bit— obtained the personal testimonies of with a bit experience of institutions and their now adult children — institutions and their now adult children. the research is so much richer— children. the research is so much richer and — children. the research is so much richer and real because of the testimonials lived experience. it also obtained oral accounts from others _ also obtained oral accounts from others with a connection to the institutions, either because they work— institutions, either because they work by— institutions, either because they work by all were involved in placing women _ work by all were involved in placing women and — work by all were involved in placing women and girls. under the terms of the reference for the research, universities looked at how and why women _ universities looked at how and why women and girls entered the institutions and where they and their— institutions and where they and their babies went when they left. living _ their babies went when they left. living conditions and care arrangements were considered, as were _ arrangements were considered, as were maternal and infant mortality rates _ were maternal and infant mortality rates. given reports elsewhere, researchers were asked to determine whether— researchers were asked to determine whether there was evidence to support— whether there was evidence to support concerns about postmortem practices — support concerns about postmortem practices and procedures and whether there was— practices and procedures and whether there was evidence of vaccine or
2:53 pm
medical— there was evidence of vaccine or medical child. i was specific emphasis on the practice around adoption, — emphasis on the practice around adoption, particularly content to adoption —— there was specific emphasis _ adoption —— there was specific emphasis. i will give adoption —— there was specific emphasis. iwill give members adoption —— there was specific emphasis. i will give members a sense _ emphasis. i will give members a sense of— emphasis. i will give members a sense of the headline findings. all others _ sense of the headline findings. all others should be shocked to find that over — others should be shocked to find that over 10,500 women entered that over10,500 women entered mother— that over 10,500 women entered mother and baby homes over a 68 year period. _ mother and baby homes over a 68 year period, likely to be a conservative estimate — period, likely to be a conservative estimate. the records relating to mother— estimate. the records relating to mother and baby homes are not complete — mother and baby homes are not complete for all of the institutions, a high percentage of the women and girls, around 86%, were— the women and girls, around 86%, were from — the women and girls, around 86%, were from northern ireland, the others _ were from northern ireland, the others were from outside of the jurisdiction, about 11.5% across—the—board and a small number came _ across—the—board and a small number came from _ across—the—board and a small number came from great britain and elsewhere. the youngest child admitted wasjust 12 elsewhere. the youngest child admitted was just 12 years old. shockingly, around one third of those _ shockingly, around one third of those admitted were under dh of 19. -- under— those admitted were under dh of 19.
2:54 pm
-- under the — those admitted were under dh of 19. —— underthe age those admitted were under dh of 19. —— under the age of. the majority were _ —— under the age of. the majority were age — —— under the age of. the majority were age 20 _ —— under the age of. the majority were age 20 to 29, and a 44—year—old woman— were age 20 to 29, and a 44—year—old woman was— were age 20 to 29, and a 44—year—old woman was the eldest. appallingly, a number— woman was the eldest. appallingly, a number were woman was the eldest. appallingly, a numberwere the woman was the eldest. appallingly, a number were the victims of sexual crime _ number were the victims of sexual crime including rape and incest. the living _ crime including rape and incest. the living conditions and care arrangements for women in the mother and baby— arrangements for women in the mother and baby homes are difficult to determine from the archival records is very— determine from the archival records is very little was recorded. but the personal— is very little was recorded. but the personal oral testimonies provide a greater— personal oral testimonies provide a greater insight into the lived experience. while a small number of women _ experience. while a small number of women offered a more positive account— women offered a more positive account of life in mother and baby homes, _ account of life in mother and baby homes, others spoke of strenuous physical— homes, others spoke of strenuous physical labour being expected of them _ physical labour being expected of them late into their pregnancies. based _ them late into their pregnancies. based on — them late into their pregnancies. based on the information available to the _ based on the information available to the researchers, it is thought around — to the researchers, it is thought around 4%— to the researchers, it is thought around 4% of babies were stillborn or died _ around 4% of babies were stillborn or died shortly after birth across the entire — or died shortly after birth across the entire period. this can be compared _ the entire period. this can be compared with data held by the registrar— compared with data held by the registrar general for the period between — registrar general for the period between 1961 and 1980, indicating
2:55 pm
around _ between 1961 and 1980, indicating around 7.8% of neonatal birds are babies— around 7.8% of neonatal birds are babies born — around 7.8% of neonatal birds are babies born outside of marriage died in their— babies born outside of marriage died in their first — babies born outside of marriage died in their first month of life always stillborn — in their first month of life always stillborn -- _ in their first month of life always stillborn. —— neonatal birds. the report— stillborn. —— neonatal birds. the report not— stillborn. —— neonatal birds. the report not to _ stillborn. —— neonatal birds. the report not to reach focal conclusions about the rates of mortality— conclusions about the rates of mortality in mother and baby homes, mothers _ mortality in mother and baby homes, mothers and children did not remain intheir— mothers and children did not remain in their long — mothers and children did not remain in their long periods, unlike in the republic— in their long periods, unlike in the republic of— in their long periods, unlike in the republic of ireland, as outlined in another— republic of ireland, as outlined in another report. researchers are clear— another report. researchers are clear that — another report. researchers are clear that gun conclusions can often only be _ clear that gun conclusions can often only be reached through an examination of the records of other institutions. an estimated 32% of infants— institutions. an estimated 32% of infants were sent to baby homes following — infants were sent to baby homes following separation from their birth— following separation from their birth mother. 0ther babies were aborted — birth mother. 0ther babies were aborted out, frosted, intraday's terms. — aborted out, frosted, intraday's terms, around a quarter of babies were _ terms, around a quarter of babies were placed for adoption —— other babies— were placed for adoption —— other babies were boarded out. since 1920
2:56 pm
91 adoption legislation was enacted, a mother's— 91 adoption legislation was enacted, a mother's consent was required, but in later— a mother's consent was required, but in later years — a mother's consent was required, but in later years a coach could dispense _ in later years a coach could dispense with content in certain circumstances. a number of oral testimonies raise concerns over the issue _ testimonies raise concerns over the issue of— testimonies raise concerns over the issue of informed consent for adoption _ issue of informed consent for adoption. most commonly these testimonies feature discussion of the traumatic and sometimes pressurised circumstances in which often _ pressurised circumstances in which often very— pressurised circumstances in which often very young women were asked to make decisions about adoption. in a smaller— make decisions about adoption. in a smaller number of cases, test and it included _ smaller number of cases, test and it included allegations of irregularities signatures on consent forms _ irregularities signatures on consent forms. without access to adoption records _ forms. without access to adoption records it— forms. without access to adoption records it is— forms. without access to adoption records it is difficult to conclude that legal and procedural requirements were followed in all cases— requirements were followed in all cases and — requirements were followed in all cases and given that some children were transferred to other jurisdictions, including across—the—board, it could require access— across—the—board, it could require access to — across—the—board, it could require access to adoption records held in those _ access to adoption records held in those jurisdictions. access to adoption records held in thosejurisdictions. indisputably, there _ thosejurisdictions. indisputably, there was— thosejurisdictions. indisputably, there was considerable movement of
2:57 pm
babies— there was considerable movement of babies from northern ireland to the republic— babies from northern ireland to the republic of ireland, in significant numbers — republic of ireland, in significant numbers. 202 babies from marion vale, _ numbers. 202 babies from marion vale i937 — numbers. 202 babies from marion vale, 1937 to 1982, 171 from marion phil. _ vale, 1937 to 1982, 171 from marion phil. i950 — vale, 1937 to 1982, 171 from marion phil, 1950 to 1990, 120 babies from another— phil, 1950 to 1990, 120 babies from another home, 1942 to 1970, 58 from thornhilt, _ another home, 1942 to 1970, 58 from thornhill, 1930 to 1970. how this came _ thornhill, 1930 to 1970. how this came to — thornhill, 1930 to 1970. how this came to be — thornhill, 1930 to 1970. how this came to be rated many more questions which _ came to be rated many more questions which will— came to be rated many more questions which will require answers. —— will raise _ which will require answers. —— will raise many— which will require answers. —— will raise many more questions. several others _ raise many more questions. several others have — raise many more questions. several others have already raised this issue _ others have already raised this issue with rogic 0'gorman, the minister. — issue with rogic 0'gorman, the minister, in the republic of ireland _ minister, in the republic of ireland. he has committed to consider— ireland. he has committed to consider the scope for co—operation in the _ consider the scope for co—operation in the area — consider the scope for co—operation in the area of adoption linked to mother— in the area of adoption linked to mother and baby homes and i want to put on _ mother and baby homes and i want to put on record the sensitivity around adoption _ put on record the sensitivity around adoption. many women and adopted children— adoption. many women and adopted children may not want to be found
2:58 pm
and we _ children may not want to be found and we need to be mindful of that and we need to be mindful of that and expect the rights and wishes of individuals— and expect the rights and wishes of individuals —— and respect the rights — individuals —— and respect the rights. almost 3000 girls and women are estimated to have entered the three _ are estimated to have entered the three good shepherd st mary's homes and sunday the industrial home, which _ and sunday the industrial home, which operated as a, quote, girls' training _ which operated as a, quote, girls' training home and a probation homes for women _ training home and a probation homes for women sent by the police, called -- caught— for women sent by the police, called —— caught some social services. they entered _ —— caught some social services. they entered by— —— caught some social services. they entered by a — —— caught some social services. they entered bya number of —— caught some social services. they entered by a number of routes, some from mother— entered by a number of routes, some from mother and baby institutions, women _ from mother and baby institutions, women with learning disabilities and mental— women with learning disabilities and mental health issues also entered these _ mental health issues also entered these institutions. there is evidence _ these institutions. there is evidence of admissionsjeff these institutions. there is evidence of admissions jeff studio: that is— evidence of admissions jeff studio: that is arlene foster, paying tribute — that is arlene foster, paying tribute to— that is arlene foster, paying tribute to the silent voices. we want to offer— tribute to the silent voices. - want to offer our personal thanks to the women and now adult children who contributed to the research, your voices were silenced also many years
2:59 pm
and it was a significant run. she said some residents were treated without even basic compassion and kindness, we will keep an eye on the rest of that statement and speak to our corresponding later. chris fawkes has the weather. we might see disruptive hill snow across higher parts. we have a banjo brain pushing in from the south—west, some snow possible but turning back mains at low levels. —— we have a band of rain. the snow accumulates for a time, bringing perhaps five or ten centimetres across scotland to the north of potential belts. cold across northern eastern areas, turning much milder, 10 degrees in plymouth and eight in belfast. overnight, it will get rather cloudy and murky witnessed until four,
3:00 pm
get rather cloudy and murky witnessed untilfour, the crowd still sick enough for rain but it will turn quite mild, particularly considering western areas. a slow start to the day, understand hilltop patches, some rain arriving from the south—west. thursday brings the prospect of disruptive hill snow for northern england and scotland. this is bbc news. the headlines... a row over vaccines, as the eu threatens to restrict supplies to other countries if it doesn't get what it says is its fair share. the uk says not to worry. i'm very confident with the team. we talk to them all the time. they are confident they will deliverfor us, yes. and astrazeneca, the bulk of astrazeneca—oxford is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment. the growing toll of coronavirus. new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid 19 across the uk, and more than 30,000 in care homes in england and wales. 10 days quarantine in a hotel when you arrive back in england, and you pay. the government plan which could skupper summer holiday plans. schools will be prioritised when lockdown restrictions are lifted, says the government, after mps call for a roadmap for their reopening.
3:01 pm
the supply of coronavirus vaccines is now a critical issue, as countries try to stem high infection rates. and the eu is angry, because it says it's not getting its fair share. it's threatened to impose controls on the export of vaccines made within the bloc, and that could affect the uk's supply of the pfizerbiontech jab. the eu's health commissioner has criticised astrazeneca, saying the company hasn't delivered the number of vaccines it promised. the company says it's because of supply problems. the health secretary matt hancock has told bbc news this afternoon that the government "opposes protectionism in all its forms."
3:02 pm
he has urged all international partners to "be collaborative" and "work closely together" where vaccine distribution is concerned. all this comes as we've learnt the downing street news briefing at 5pm this evening will be held by the prime minister. 0ur europe correspondent nick beake reports. the lorries leaving pfizer's main factories this morning bringing hope to the world. laden with one of the vaccines that will help transport us out of the covid nightmare. with such precious cargo on board, they are escorted all the way. but now, there are concerns that fewer of these jabs could be coming to the uk. the european union is angry that another company which makes the oxford astrazeneca shot will be sending it millions fewer doses than promised. it wants to know why. and in response, it's announced that vaccines leaving the eu are to be more tightly controlled, including those destined for britain. this new schedule is not acceptable to the european union. in the future, all companies
3:03 pm
producing vaccines against covid—19 in the eu will have to provide early notification whenever they want to export vaccines to third countries. european union countries have been criticised for the slow roll—out of vaccines, compared with the likes of the united kingdom, and they won't be helped by the temporary slowdown in production here in belgium, at the main pfizer plants. but this latest row over the supply of vaccines, who gets what and when, threatens to make this international health crisis even more political, at a time when countries are being told they need to work together to get us out of this crisis. the uk was the first in the world to approve a vaccine and more than 7 million people have now received at least one jab. the minister responsible for the vaccine programme conceded supplies were tight, but said the uk would still get enough doses. i'm very confident with the team.
3:04 pm
we talk to them all the time, they are confident they will deliver for us, yes. and the bulk of the oxford, astrazeneca—oxford is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment in manufacturing capacity in the uk, which is also good news, so i am confident we will meet our mid—february target and then we'll keep vaccinating beyond that. the global race to vaccinate against covid—19 has exposed big inequalities, with poorer countries, particularly outside europe, facing a long wait. the way out of this pandemic is by no means easy. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley is at westminster. around nick eardley is at westminster. over vaccines now. helps! around over vaccines now. that hels! , , , , around over vaccines now. that hels! , , ,, :, ., helps! yes, it is less unfortunate timinu , helps! yes, it is less unfortunate timing. isn't _ helps! yes, it is less unfortunate timing. isn't it. _ helps! yes, it is less unfortunate timing, isn't it, simon? - helps! yes, it is less unfortunate timing, isn't it, simon? the i helps! yes, it is less unfortunate i timing, isn't it, simon? the message the government want people in the uk to hear is that it is confident the supply of both the pfizer vaccine which is made in belgium and the
3:05 pm
astrazeneca vaccine which was, much of which is made in the uk, they are both going to be ok. the view and government is that the supply chain well still manage to function properly and it is not going to have a big impact on the target of vaccinating the people in the top four at—risk categories, all 50 million of them, by mid—february. and it's interesting because we had from the health secretary about exactly the context for all of this and i think there is some concern in government about this idea of vaccine nationalism, different countries throwing money at vaccine projects to try and make sure they are first and say we want to get as many vaccines and jags into peoples arms as possible in our country whatever that might mean. the message matt hancock was making at a speech this afternoon was very much the protectionism at the moment is a
3:06 pm
bad thing and that we're possible this needs to be done collaboratively and internationally and although there is that sense that this is not the most conducive discuss of that is happening with the european union at the moment, when it comes to the astrazeneca vaccine, frustration you heard in nick's piece coming from some in the eu, i think the government is still confident it can keep the supply chain up and this is not going to have a massive impact on the number of vaccines getting into arms here. isn't this simply a case of the eu paid too little, too late. the uk spent seven times more than many countries in that initial phase and that's why at the moment the vaccination programme in the uk is doing 0k? it vaccination programme in the uk is doinu 0k? , : ., , :, vaccination programme in the uk is doin. 0k? , . ., , ., ., doing 0k? it is certainly one way of lookin: at doing 0k? it is certainly one way of looking at it- _ doing 0k? it is certainly one way of looking at it. there _ doing 0k? it is certainly one way of looking at it. there has _ doing 0k? it is certainly one way of looking at it. there has been i looking at it. there has been criticism with the speed at which the eu has been signing off on the use of some vaccines, how quickly it managed to procure some of them, at
3:07 pm
the same time, in the uk, i think there isa the same time, in the uk, i think there is a feeling that things are going pretty well. there have been some bumps on the road when it comes to the uneven distribution of the vaccine. some areas seeing a lot more people vaccinated than others. there are questions over supply and let's be under no illusion there will be bumps in the road. the government acknowledges when it comes to this roll—out. but it's fair to say the government feels at the moment that the roll—out of the vaccine is going pretty well. they are pretty comfortable with the numbers that are being done every day. some of them are pretty impressive. there have been days when it has been up to 500,000 nearlyjags going into peoplepeoples arms. but there still question of what those bumps on the roads are going to look like and this is not all going to be plain sailing. i think there will be some weeks are better than others.— better than others. thanks very much.
3:08 pm
the office for national statistics says that almost 104,000 people in the uk have now died with coronavirus. more than 30,000 of those were care home residents in england and wales. the figures, which cover up to the 15th of january, are based on death certificates, while the government's statistics rely on positive covid—19 tests, and remain slightly lower. dominic hughes reports. jonathan is on the long, hard road to recovery, physically and emotionally. a front line health care worker, he fell ill with covid—19 in october last year. notjust him, but members of his closest family, as well. i went into hospital on the 18th of october and my mother was admitted in the early hours of the 20th of october and my sister was admitted to antrim hospital because the other hispital was very busy and she was admitted in the afternoon of the 20th of october and i was in on the evening of the 20th of october. jonathan ended up in intensive care and then on the same respiratory ward on which he worked, in the same hospital as his mother martina,
3:09 pm
he was able to see her and be with her when she died. to know that mum's not coming home, it's very hard. mum was the link. she was always here and it's a very, very lonely house. a very lonely house, and that loneliness and that emptiness is there 24 hours a day, it never leaves you. jonathan's story is one of 100,000, as confirmed by the latest figures from the office for national statistics. data based on death certificates where covid—19 is mentioned shows nearly 104,000 lives have been lost to the virus. and then the third highest rate in the pandemic, but it is likely that total deaths are much higher, as that data is now 11 days old. there is another measure of deaths, the one we mention on the news everyday. that covers people who died within 28 days a positive
3:10 pm
test, and that is likely to breach 100,000, either later today or tomorrow. for some, it is a sign of devastating failure. just generally, we have not responded to the warnings enough, rememberearly in the pandemic the government hesitated in terms of what they should do in terms of lockdown, they did not do that quickly enough and whenever we made progress in the lockdown, they quickly came out, so they weren't decisive enough. the past year has taught us some are more vulnerable to the virus than others. more deprived communities have seen a proportionately higher death toll, as have people from a black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds. this man died from covid—19 just last month. from his daughter, suzana, a reminder that each one of these deaths is a terrible loss. for each of us, the trauma, the upset, the distress, the loss is great, and please don'tjust see it as a figure, it is somebody�*s husband, somebody�*s brother, some of his father and we need
3:11 pm
husband, somebody�*s brother, somebody�*s father and we need to remember that each time these statistics are increasing. and beyond the deaths caused by the virus itself, there are those lives lost through delayed treatments or missed symptoms. today is a fresh reminder of the immense toll taken by this virus. the data released today reveals and in excess of 30,000 care and care 0ur social affairs correspondent alison holtjoins me. we have talked about facts before. we see the number of deaths related rising. it's not a surprise given what's happening in the community in general but in one week, that's an
3:12 pm
increase of 349 deaths related to covid—19, a 25% rise on the week before but i think it's important when you have this many numbers flying around that you need to give some sort of context to it. it seems from the numbers, analysing the numbers, that in the first wave of the pandemic, care homes as we know we really badly hit. a large proportion happening there. at the moment, it looks like a small proportion are happening in care homes this time round. but we're still crunching those numbers and need to check a few things on that. you would hope that would be the case given is being rolled out. ppe being in place this time, it was a real problem at the start of the first wave of the pandemic. testing for staff, first wave of the pandemic. testing forstaff, restrictions first wave of the pandemic. testing for staff, restrictions on staff movement, all of those things which have been put in over recent months to try and protect care homes better. ~ , ,:, to try and protect care homes better. ~ , , better. whilst some lessons were learned, clearly _ better. whilst some lessons were learned, clearly some _ better. whilst some lessons were
3:13 pm
learned, clearly some were i better. whilst some lessons were learned, clearly some were not. i learned, clearly some were not. there is still a problem. vaccination, is that the total hope, if you like, an offer to care homes at the moment? the if you like, an offer to care homes at the moment?— if you like, an offer to care homes at the moment? the new variant of the virus has _ at the moment? the new variant of the virus has made _ at the moment? the new variant of the virus has made it _ at the moment? the new variant of the virus has made it even - at the moment? the new variant of the virus has made it even more i the virus has made it even more difficult to keep covid—19 out of care homes, even with those measures, so that's obviously having a significant impact. vaccinations are being rolled out, a high number of care homes have had vaccinations amongst all the residents and staff. that on its own i'm told is not going to be enough. so today we had the start of really interesting piece of research being done, a trial and they are trying to recruit more than 400 care homes to do a randomised trial, looking at different forms of treatment which they can either give care home residents to protect them, so these are drugs which are well tested, to see if they can have a a preventative effect on covid—19 or else drugs which might help with the treatment if there is an outbreak.
3:14 pm
so it's interesting they are thinking in those terms because this is a very vulnerable proportion of the population. is a very vulnerable proportion of the population-— is a very vulnerable proportion of the --oulation. : ~ ,, , . nadra ahmed is the executive chair of the national care association, which represents care home operators. shejoins me now. i suspect we will not be surprised by that horrific figure. h0. by that horrific figure. no, surprised _ by that horrific figure. no, surprised and _ by that horrific figure. no, surprised and actually i by that horrific figure. i157, surprised and actually very saddened by it because everyone of those people that have lost their lives to covid—19 in our settings have left behind grieving families whom they may not have seen for a period of time and that's a devastating impact on everybody. time and that's a devastating impact on everybody-— on everybody. we're talking about lessons learned _ on everybody. we're talking about lessons learned since _ on everybody. we're talking about lessons learned since the - on everybody. we're talking about lessons learned since the first i lessons learned since the first wave. have they've been? i lessons learned since the first wave. have they've been? i think we have moved — wave. have they've been? i think we have moved forward. _ wave. have they've been? i think we have moved forward. there - wave. have they've been? i think we have moved forward. there have - wave. have they've been? i think we i have moved forward. there have been steps to move forward and part of thatis steps to move forward and part of that is the testing regime which we were crying out for. i think if we had better prepared this time last
3:15 pm
year, for what might be arriving on the shores and we knew that it might be, we might have been in a much better place when we look at the figures today. the fact that ppe became a massive issue, the fact that... sorry. the fact that we were not, did not have testing available, the fact that people were being discharged out of hospitals into care homes with this comment at it was all going to be ok, there is nothing to fear. so we have moved from there, to where we now have testing, we do have ppe, all of that is happening in care services and of course the vaccine is that final chink in the armour that we really need which will enable us to move forward to a different form of normality and care services, so it's essential for us that all of this comes as it was promised and there
3:16 pm
are no more broken promises about this. ., . , ., are no more broken promises about this. ., ., , ., , are no more broken promises about this. ., ., , this. how are your staff coping? i think the staff _ this. how are your staff coping? i think the staff is _ this. how are your staff coping? i think the staff is our _ this. how are your staff coping? i think the staff is our biggest - think the staff is our biggest challenge and has been for quite some time. we are short—staffed, we have 112,000 vacancies, they are exhausted, they are as prone to the new variant has anybody else, they are trying to look after some of the free listing and most vulnerable people in our communities, they are not recognised by the nation as a whole. very often we hear some very good things about yes, they are front—line workers but when it comes to the reality of it, we're not getting the same attention when we are asking for them to be properly recognised through funding routes, so that we can actually give them some hope about what the future might look like. at this moment in time, despite theirfears might look like. at this moment in time, despite their fears and personal anxieties, they are coming
3:17 pm
into the service on a daily basis to try and support some of the most vulnerable people who themselves are facing all sorts of personal challenges.— facing all sorts of personal challenges. facing all sorts of personal challenues. ~ ., , ., challenges. we have spoken a few times over — challenges. we have spoken a few times over the _ challenges. we have spoken a few times over the past _ challenges. we have spoken a few times over the past year. - challenges. we have spoken a few times over the past year. it - challenges. we have spoken a few| times over the past year. it strikes me that my questions are always very similar and me that my questions are always very similarand so are me that my questions are always very similar and so are your answers. it saddens really because things move forward but they do not new forward quickly enough and i think that is the challenge that we face. we know the challenge that we face. we know the answers might be. and when it comes to it, those answers are not turned into reality. fast enough. so as your reporter said earlier on, in lockdown, we know why we locked down, we know what we're trying to down, we know what we're trying to do is to stop people passing this variant, the different variants on, the community transmission levels and as soon as it starts to ease we open up and we all now what happened
3:18 pm
over christmas. people were terrified that we were going to face this terrible period injanuary. we are open to visiting, trying to enable as much as we can and then we know that could have an impact as we go forward. so we're going two steps forward but we're certainly going one step backwards at point. and i am really concerned about our staffing. i think it is an enormous issue here because we are losing staff to the nhs now, because there is a good recruitment campaign going on for the nhs staff and people worked in social care will have the training, why would they not think that they might move there? but what that they might move there? but what that leaves is it leaves a bigger voice for social care and i think thatis voice for social care and i think that is the challenge we face on a regular basis. in order to recruit and retain staff, and have the status of our sector, raised enough so that people see it as a career of choice and see the value of it, and then we can look after them as we
3:19 pm
look after, as they look after the people that we care for, we can create a much stronger and more robust social care sector so that if this goes on, for a period of time, we are in a better period of time, not having the same questions and answers. i’m not having the same questions and answers. �* ., ., , ., ., answers. i'm going to let you go, ou are answers. i'm going to let you go, you are clearly — answers. i'm going to let you go, you are clearly in _ answers. i'm going to let you go, you are clearly in demand, - answers. i'm going to let you go, you are clearly in demand, it's i answers. i'm going to let you go, i you are clearly in demand, it's good to talk to you. you are clearly in demand, it's good to talk to vom— to talk to you. sorry about that. no, to talk to you. sorry about that. no. don't _ to talk to you. sorry about that. no. don't worry _ to talk to you. sorry about that. no, don't worry about _ to talk to you. sorry about that. no, don't worry about it. - later this afternoon we'll have live coverage of the latest downing street coronavirus briefing, led by the prime minister. he'll be joined by the chief medical officer professor chris whitty and the head of nhs england, sir simon stevens. coverage begins at 4.30 on bbc one and the bbc news channel. residents of homes for unmarried mothers and their children in northern ireland suffered a "lifetime of trauma", arlene foster has said.the first minister's comments come as a long—awaited report is finally published into mother—and—baby homes and magdalene laundries in northern ireland.
3:20 pm
chris page is live in belfast. it's a devastating report. it is and this report _ it's a devastating report. it is and this report compiled _ it's a devastating report. it is and this report compiled by _ it's a devastating report. it is and} this report compiled by historians from universities here, queens and ulster, looking at institutions for unmarried mothers in northern ireland. there has been a lot of attention on this issue in the republic of ireland, particularly the last fortnight, you might remember a couple of weeks ago a major inquiry report was published there and there was a state apology. this research report i think what's in it that's most shocking is that sheer number of women in northern ireland who passed through these institutions, more than 10,520 mother and baby homes between 1920 and 1990, so this really is recent history, not a long time ago as far as many are concerned and they were subject to emotional abuse. there are questions about infant mortality rates, questions over forced adoption and those are two issues
3:21 pm
going to be investigated further. also the institutions known as magdalene laundries, workhouses where women had to do unpaid strenuous labour, about 3000 women went to four dylan laundries in northern ireland. this is a hidden part of northern ireland history. —— magdalene laundries. there will be an end dependent investigation, arlene foster paid tribute to the survivors. it’s arlene foster paid tribute to the survivors. �* , survivors. it's with huge regret that we acknowledge - survivors. it's with huge regret that we acknowledge the - survivors. it's with huge regret that we acknowledge the pain | survivors. it's with huge regret. that we acknowledge the pain of those _ that we acknowledge the pain of those experiences and the hurt caused — those experiences and the hurt caused to— those experiences and the hurt caused to women and girls who did nothing _ caused to women and girls who did nothing more than be pregnant outside — nothing more than be pregnant outside of marriage, some of them criminallx — outside of marriage, some of them criminally. against their will. none of us _ criminally. against their will. none of us should be proud of however society— of us should be proud of however society shunned women in these circumstances and their experienced whilst _ circumstances and their experienced whilst resident in these institutions.— whilst resident in these institutions. ,., ., , institutions. the report was commissioned _ institutions. the report was commissioned back - institutions. the report was commissioned back in -
3:22 pm
institutions. the report was commissioned back in 2018| institutions. the report was - commissioned back in 2018 and has been quite a long time coming. now arlene foster says there will be a process by which victims and survivors will be involved in designing the independent investigation which will come up over the coming months and years now thatis over the coming months and years now that is a process that will take by the sounds of things between now and perhaps the late summer, it could be a public inquiry. arlene foster has indicated it could be and that is what survivors have said they want but exactly what terms of reference investigation will have and the format, well, that will be the next stage in the process.— stage in the process. thanks very much. ministers are expected to approve plans that could require some people arriving in england to quarantine in a hotel for ten days, at their own cost. it's not yet known if the restrictions would apply to everyone, orjust those returning from countries with more contagious variants. if implemented it is likely to be a further blow for the struggling international travel industry, making holidays abroad an unlikely proposition. theo leggett reports.
3:23 pm
hotels are fine for foreign travel, but would you really want to be cooped up in one when you get back home? under plans being discussed by the government, british citizens and residents arriving in england from countries deemed to be high risk would have to go into quarantine in hotels, which they would have to pay for. it is part of a strategy to limit infections from potentially dangerous new variants of the coronavirus. the government has already barred foreign nationals from entering the uk from most of south america and southern africa, as well as portugal. this afternoon, the home secretary was tight—tipped about the plans being discussed. if i may, mr speaker, the honourable gentleman has referred to newspaper reports and speculation. it would be wrong of me to speculate about any measures that are not in place right now, as policy is being developed. but the honourable gentleman does speak about quarantining and claims his party has called for tougher restrictions, but i think also the party opposite, if i may say so, should also reflect on their position. hotels are now being prepared
3:24 pm
for the challenge of looking after people who cannot go out, who may be infectious and could become ill. since the beginning of the pandemic, we have done over 300 risk assessments on our activities and how we operate and changing our protocols, so this would just be in addition to that. so everything in the hospitality industry in terms of how we operate has changed, this would be a further change. we obviously wait for the government guidelines to tell us specifically what we need to do, but we are well on our way to be able to achieve it. for the international travel industry, it is a deeply worrying time. the new measures may have little immediate impact, because very few people are arriving from abroad. but if they last into the peak summer period, or make people unwilling to book summer holidays, it's could spell disaster for already struggling business. the risk is we have these restrictions in place - and into the autumn and the sector is not able to have that summer. period it was banking on to earnl money and bring in much needed revenue to replenish those balance
3:25 pm
sheets which had been decimated i since march last year. it's still not known exactly who will have to go into hotel quarantine, for how long, or who will be exempt. all four uk nations are discussing the issue and are likely to adopt similar measures. to discuss this i'm joined byjennifer morris news editor of the travel trade gazette, a weekly newspaper for the travel industry. thank you for your time. the travel industry needs this like a hole in the head. but for anybody planning a holiday, it'sjust, we will the head. but for anybody planning a holiday, it's just, we will have to wait and see? holiday, it'sjust, we will have to wait and see?— holiday, it'sjust, we will have to wait and see? , ~ ., , , wait and see? yes, i think obviously it's not particularly _ wait and see? yes, i think obviously it's not particularly welcome - wait and see? yes, i think obviously it's not particularly welcome news . it's not particularly welcome news for an industry that's already hugely struggling. what i would say is as a reporter mentioned before, it's a particularly peak—time for travel anyway so a lot of travel businesses are hunkering down and preparing for the summer rush. —— not a particularly peak—time. not
3:26 pm
great news but i would say if these strict measures come into play and make a big difference and impact on our effectiveness overcoming this virus, perhaps that can set a better landscape for us going into the rest of the year for holidays.— of the year for holidays. that's an 0 timistic of the year for holidays. that's an optimistic view. _ of the year for holidays. that's an optimistic view. but _ of the year for holidays. that's an optimistic view. but i _ of the year for holidays. that's an optimistic view. but i if _ of the year for holidays. that's an optimistic view. but i if travellers | optimistic view. but i if travellers face ten days chording time coming back to england, scotland says the same, if not more stringent, you will not go abroad, will you? this same, if not more stringent, you will not go abroad, will you? as an industry we _ will not go abroad, will you? as an industry we need _ will not go abroad, will you? as an industry we need a _ will not go abroad, will you? as an industry we need a road _ will not go abroad, will you? as an industry we need a road map - will not go abroad, will you? as an industry we need a road map out l will not go abroad, will you? is an industry we need a road map out of the situation from the government. we don't know the details at the moment but there's no indication as to whether this will last one month or into the summer as you suggested. if it goes for longer that could have a formal get a mental impact. if they can spell out to the industry at this point we will be looking to review these policies and give us a timeframe, at least the industry can start preparing, and industry can start preparing, and industry that for a year now has been completely decimated and impacted and shutdown. and we still
3:27 pm
have the industry waiting for any sector specific support from the government. so much has happened in the past year yet we have still not been given any support and everyone would understand of the industries out there, travel has been particularly impacted. how do other countries compare _ particularly impacted. how do other countries compare with _ particularly impacted. how do other countries compare with us? - particularly impacted. how do other countries compare with us? given i countries compare with us? given that we have seen before people have been abroad when the rules have changed whilst we have been away. you can neverjudge week by week but at the moment, how do we compare? it's difficult. people keep seeing the process of australia and how effective its auto quarantine policy which is fair, but it's difficult, it's not like—for—like, we are far more connected here in europe, we have a lot of people travelling, family and friends, business into europe, so it's not quite the same situation as australia. it's difficult to compare, no one can argue with the rising coronavirus cases and i would say as well the
3:28 pm
industry is behind public health measures. it's not something we are against, it isjust measures. it's not something we are against, it is just we want some recognition for the fact the industry has been impacted and thousands ofjobs are at risk, the figure of 164,000 jobs have made redundant or were under threat of redundancy and that's a big consideration, it should be for the government as well.— consideration, it should be for the government as well. presumably the industry would _ government as well. presumably the industry would favour _ government as well. presumably the industry would favour a _ government as well. presumably the industry would favour a more - industry would favour a more targeted approach, the government saying only countries where there is a more contagious version of covid—19, those other countries we will look at, everyone else will be treated as normal. i will look at, everyone else will be treated as normal.— will look at, everyone else will be treated as normal. i think there's a hue treated as normal. i think there's a huge consumer— treated as normal. i think there's a huge consumer confidence - treated as normal. i think there's a huge consumer confidence issue i huge consumer confidence issue around this. i think on balance it would be better to have fewer countries that have these strict measures in place if they come into force rather than a blanket quarantine for all uk arrivals because that leaves a lot of uncertainty for anybody looking to go away whereas if a consumer can
3:29 pm
pinpoint the destination and decide not to go to that one but book somewhere similar, that will be more beneficial for the industry. realize beneficial for the industry. really aood to beneficial for the industry. really good to talk _ beneficial for the industry. really good to talk to _ beneficial for the industry. really good to talk to you. _ beneficial for the industry. really good to talk to you. thank - beneficial for the industry. really good to talk to you. thank you i beneficial for the industry. really l good to talk to you. thank you very much. we might see disruptive hill snow across higher parts. we have a band of rain pushing in from the south—west, some snow possible but turning back at low levels. still cold across northern and eastern areas but turning much more mild from the south and west. ten and and eight in belfast. overnight tonight, cloudy and murky with mist and health fog, the cloud deck enough for the odd patch of rain.
3:30 pm
quite mild, tomorrow slow start to the day later in the rain arriving from the south—east, thursday brings the prospect of disruptive hills now for northern england in hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. a row over vaccines — as the eu threatens to restrict supplies to other countries if it doesn't get what it says is its fair share, the uk says not to worry. iam very i am very confident with the team, we talk to them all the time and they are confident they will deliver to us. the bulk of astrazeneca oxford there is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment. the growing toll of coronavirus — new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid—19 across the uk, and more than 30,000 in care homes in england and wales. 10 days quarantine in a hotel when you arrive back
3:31 pm
in england — and you pay. the government plan which could scupper summer holiday plans. schools will be prioritised when lockdown restrictions are lifted, says the government, after mps call for a roadmap for their reopening. �*significant wrongs.�* northern ireland's first minister says the voices of survivors of mother—and—baby homes will be heard "loudly and clearly" with a new independent investigation. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, good afternoon. we start with games in the premier league, the focus on newcastle's manager steve bruce. they haven't won in ten games and are not scoring goals. leeds united are the visitors and steve bruce knows things need to change quickly. we and steve bruce knows things need to change quickly-— change quickly. we have been on a oor run change quickly. we have been on a poor run and _ change quickly. we have been on a poor run and i _ change quickly. we have been on a poor run and i understand - change quickly. we have been on a poor run and i understand how- change quickly. we have been on a | poor run and i understand how they feet _ poor run and i understand how they feet all_ poor run and i understand how they feet all i_ poor run and i understand how they feel. all i can do is try and get
3:32 pm
the team _ feel. all i can do is try and get the team and as good a shape as i possibly— the team and as good a shape as i possibly can. sometimes you have to draw on _ possibly can. sometimes you have to draw on your— possibly can. sometimes you have to draw on your experience and it is my 'ob, draw on your experience and it is my job, if_ draw on your experience and it is my job, if i_ draw on your experience and it is my job, if i am _ draw on your experience and it is my job, if i am on— draw on your experience and it is my job, if i am on the floor, to take training, — job, if i am on the floor, to take training, tre— job, if i am on the floor, to take training, be involved in training, know— training, be involved in training, know how— training, be involved in training, know how to work with the coaches and get _ know how to work with the coaches and get the — know how to work with the coaches and get the team best prepared i possibly— and get the team best prepared i possibly can. and get the team best prepared i possibly can-— possibly can. elsewhere tonight manchester _ possibly can. elsewhere tonight manchester city _ possibly can. elsewhere tonight manchester city can _ possibly can. elsewhere tonight manchester city can go - possibly can. elsewhere tonight manchester city can go top - possibly can. elsewhere tonightj manchester city can go top with possibly can. elsewhere tonight l manchester city can go top with a wind at west brom. west ham are at crystal palace. chelsea take on wales tomorrow. the first game, they are expected to name thomas tuchel as their replacement. chelsea got a super—rich owner in 2003. these are the faces he has hired and fired since. roman abramovich goes for coaches who have won major titles at the biggest clubs, frank lampard was the exception but now that fate is over. chelsea are set on thomas tuchel, who made his name in germany and won the league
3:33 pm
twice at france macro. he took paris saint—germain the champions league final in august but he is also used to patients. paris sacked him last month when they were one point off top. fin paris sacked him last month when they were one point off top. on the itch he they were one point off top. on the pitch he has — they were one point off top. on the pitch he has a _ they were one point off top. on the pitch he has a very _ they were one point off top. on the pitch he has a very good _ they were one point off top. on the pitch he has a very good manager, | pitch he has a very good manager, modern and smart, off the pitch we will see how he goes. in paris the problem was he didn't wind hearts but to be fair to him the players at the clubs is wheeled a lot of player and thomas tuchel was coping with huge egos. there is a blueprint for german coaches and tuchel knows how to followjurgen klopp, he has replaced him at two bundesliga clubs before. chelsea could do with know—how from that league. timo werner and kai havertz both came here from germany, part of a £200 million summer spend that didn't work for frank lampard. he says he is disappointed he cannot take them forward but even
3:34 pm
football icons do not get time. he is notjust a colleague, he is an important person my career, but of course i feel sorry. it is the brutality of modern football, sooner or later it will happen to you. thomas tuchel needs two negative covid tests to be in charge tomorrow. they call him the professor back home, a tactician who gets the best out of those around him. for coaches at chelsea, what matters most is the view from above. next to rugby union, england are going to be without another key forward in the upcoming six nations. sam underhill has had to withdraw from the squad. the bath flanker has a hip injury and follows mako vunipola and joe launchbury in being ruled out. jack willis will replace underhill in the squad. england's first game is against scotland at twickenham a week on saturday. 14 wickets fell on the opening day in pakistan, where south africa are playing their first test match in 14 years following the return of international cricket. the tourists started well. opener dean elgar top scoring with 58 but they slipped
3:35 pm
from 133 for 3 to 220 all out. pakistan less than convincing in reply losing three wickets — and then a fourth as captain babar azam went forjust seven — meaning the hosts will resume tomorrow on 33—4. ireland meanwhile have lost their one day series against afghanistan 3—0. having been set a target of 267 to win, ireland were all out for 230 as they lost by 36 runs in abu dabi. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the government insists it wants schools in england to reopen as soon as possible — once coronavirus lockdown restrictions begin to be eased. but it's widely thought they may remain closed to all but vulnerable pupils and the children of essential workers after next month's half—term break. the minister for school standards, nick gibb said reopening schools was a key priority. it is the government's strong desire
3:36 pm
to reopen _ it is the government's strong desire to reopen all schools, colleges and universities as soon as possible. we will prioritise the reopening of schools— will prioritise the reopening of schools as we begin the process of lifting _ schools as we begin the process of lifting lockdown restrictions. we are acutely aware of the damage to children's— are acutely aware of the damage to children's education and development, particularly to the most _ development, particularly to the most disadvantaged pupils, by being away from _ most disadvantaged pupils, by being away from school and of the increased burdens that are placed on parents _ increased burdens that are placed on parents. and that is why we allow early _ parents. and that is why we allow early years — parents. and that is why we allow early years providers to remain open throughout— early years providers to remain open throughout this lockdown. labour's shadow education secretary, kate green critisised the governments messaging over the reopening of schools. we simply don't know what the government planners for reopening other than what we read the newspapers. in recent days we have had reports that the prime minister wants pupils back before easter. the health secretary says after easter, public health england c overnight that primary schools are already safe to reopen, so which is it? what is the plan for the reopening?
3:37 pm
it's just over a year since china imposed the world's first lockdown on the city of wuhan. by then, coronavirus had been spreading there for several weeks — time in which the chinese government had insisted that everything was under control. a new bbc documentary co—produced with pbs frontline has revealed the gap between what was happening on the ground, what chinese officials and scientists knew — and what the world was told. caroline hawley reports —— and a warning that this report does contain distressing images. new year's eve, 2019. by now, it has been 30 days since a chinese man in his 70s was hit by a mysterious pneumonia like disease but the world are still blissfully unaware of the virus that is about to change all of our lives. preparing to ring in the new year, an american biologist takes a call from this man, george gary, director of china's centre for disease control. he gary, director of china's centre for disease control.— disease control. he had identified the virus, disease control. he had identified the virus. it _ disease control. he had identified the virus, it was _ disease control. he had identified the virus, it was a _
3:38 pm
disease control. he had identified the virus, it was a new _ disease control. he had identified i the virus, it was a new coronavirus, and it was not highly transmissible. this didn't really resonate with me because i had heard from many people who had been infected. the because i had heard from many people who had been infected.— who had been infected. the world health organization _ who had been infected. the world health organization in _ who had been infected. the world health organization in geneva - who had been infected. the world i health organization in geneva should have been officially informed about the new disease but at first learned about it from social media. at internal meetings, who officials make their frustration plain. internal meetings, who officials make theirfrustration plain. the associated press shared with bbc front line in the bbc some leaked recordings from the second week in january. backin back in wuhan, hospitals were filling up and health workers were becoming ever more alarmed. they are not allowed to talk to the international media without authorisation but one has spoken anonymously to the bbc. their words are re—voiced by an actor.
3:39 pm
one patient in hospital in late january was a 76—year—old man. his son had driven across china so that he could have an operation on his home town at that he had broken his leg in a fall. as he was recovering from surgery, he got a fever.
3:40 pm
the chinese government has told us that it has always acted with transparency and in a timely fashion but it wasn't until seven weeks until the first known patient got sick about it and thence there was indeed human—to—human transmission, and by then, covid—19 had a deadly momentum that would carry it into every corner of the globe. it has now killed more than 2 million people. you can see more on that tonight at 9pm on bbc 2 the delay between contracting coronavirus — and later being admitted to hospital means that despite a recent fall in cases, the pressure on the nhs continues to grow.
3:41 pm
with different parts of the country experiencing a peak of infection at different times, our health editor hugh pym has been to ashfield in nottinghamshire to see the impact on the frontline there. people need to know it is not a game. it is frightening. barbara lived with cancer _ game. it is frightening. barbara lived with cancer before - game. it is frightening. barbara lived with cancer before it - game. it is frightening. barbara lived with cancer before it went | lived with cancer before it went into retreat. then she was struck by covid. she was keen to get this message across. just covid. she was keen to get this message across.— covid. she was keen to get this message across. covid. she was keen to get this messare across. , , . y ., ., a message across. just wear your mask, and wash your — message across. just wear your mask, and wash your hands. _ message across. just wear your mask, and wash your hands. that _ message across. just wear your mask, and wash your hands. that is - message across. just wear your mask, and wash your hands. that is all - message across. just wear your mask, and wash your hands. that is all it - and wash your hands. that is all it is, isn't it? it's what they've got to do. i is, isn't it? it's what they've got to do. ~ ., , is, isn't it? it's what they've got to do. ~ .,, .,, is, isn't it? it's what they've got todo. ~ . , to do. i think it was last wednesday when i came _ to do. i think it was last wednesday when i came in. _ to do. i think it was last wednesday when i came in, i— to do. i think it was last wednesday when i came in, i don't _ to do. i think it was last wednesday when i came in, i don't remember. | when i came in, i don't remember. along _ when i came in, i don't remember. along the — when i came in, i don't remember. along the corridor as paul, 53, and who considers himself fit. he is over worse now but he says it was
3:42 pm
frightening experience. i over worse now but he says it was frightening experience.— frightening experience. i fought it for about five _ frightening experience. i fought it for about five or _ frightening experience. i fought it for about five or six _ frightening experience. i fought it for about five or six days. - frightening experience. i fought it for about five or six days. at - frightening experience. i fought it l for about five or six days. at home, and then— for about five or six days. at home, and then just — for about five or six days. at home, and thenjust couldn't for about five or six days. at home, and then just couldn't cope any longer~ — and then 'ust couldn't cope any loner. ~ . ., , ., longer. much of this load of the hosital longer. much of this load of the hospital was — longer. much of this load of the hospital was always _ longer. much of this load of the hospital was always housed - longer. much of this load of the i hospital was always housed wards longer. much of this load of the - hospital was always housed wards for those with respiratory conditions. now they have been expanded with room for nearly 100 patients and bays and cubicles, almost all of them with covid.— bays and cubicles, almost all of them with covid. from experience i can tell you — them with covid. from experience i can tell you that _ them with covid. from experience i can tell you that i _ them with covid. from experience i can tell you that i am _ them with covid. from experience i can tell you that i am seeing - them with covid. from experience i can tell you that i am seeing more | can tell you that i am seeing more sicker patients less time than i was the first time. this sicker patients less time than i was the first time-— the first time. this man is a doctor in a&e the first time. this man is a doctor in me and — the first time. this man is a doctor in me and he _ the first time. this man is a doctor in a&e and he says _ the first time. this man is a doctor in a&e and he says it _ the first time. this man is a doctor in a&e and he says it has - the first time. this man is a doctor in a&e and he says it has been - the first time. this man is a doctor in a&e and he says it has been a l in a&e and he says it has been a huge influx of covid patients and in both his personal and professional life he has seen the savage impact of the virus. mr; life he has seen the savage impact of the virus-— of the virus. my parents have got covid, of the virus. my parents have got covid. my — of the virus. my parents have got covid, my mother _ of the virus. my parents have got covid, my mother risen - of the virus. my parents have got covid, my mother risen i - of the virus. my parents have got covid, my mother risen i see - of the virus. my parents have got covid, my mother risen i see you j of the virus. my parents have got i covid, my mother risen i see you at the moment— covid, my mother risen i see you at the moment and i have lost relatives with covid, _ the moment and i have lost relatives with covid, so when you see these patients— with covid, so when you see these patients in— with covid, so when you see these patients in the hospitaljust gives you that — patients in the hospitaljust gives you that flashback as well, but you have got _ you that flashback as well, but you have got to — you that flashback as well, but you have got to shut that down and continue — have got to shut that down and continue looking at your patients as best you _ continue looking at your patients as best you can. continue looking at your patients as best you can-— best you can. after every patient is seen, best you can. after every patient is seen. diane _ best you can. after every patient is
3:43 pm
seen, diane and _ best you can. after every patient is seen, diane and her— best you can. after every patient is seen, diane and her colleagues - best you can. after every patient is i seen, diane and her colleagues after deep clean the cubicle, floors, walls and surfaces. she is on the covid front line as much as anyone. can't see an end to it, to be fair, and i think if you could see the light at the end of the tunnel and somebody to say it was going to turn off that would be brilliant, but we are soldiering on and trying our very best to work as well as we possibly can. very best to work as well as we possibly can-— possibly can. how do you feel personally — possibly can. how do you feel personally sometimes? - possibly can. how do you feel personally sometimes? me? | possibly can. how do you feel- personally sometimes? me? upset. sometimes i — personally sometimes? me? upset. sometimes i could _ personally sometimes? me? upset. sometimes i could just _ personally sometimes? me? upset. sometimes i could just sit _ personally sometimes? me? upset. sometimes i could just sit and - personally sometimes? me? upset. sometimes i could just sit and cry. i sometimes i could just sit and cry. it is just because it is demanding at the moment. this it isjust because it is demanding at the moment.— at the moment. this is not a big city teaching _ at the moment. this is not a big city teaching hospital _ at the moment. this is not a big city teaching hospital so - at the moment. this is not a big city teaching hospital so covid . at the moment. this is not a big i city teaching hospital so covid puts even more of a strain on resources. they have had to triple the number of intensive care beds including converting a former children's recovery area. jane is a nurse who has been redeployed from another role to help out. i has been redeployed from another role to help out.— role to help out. i have been a nurse for— role to help out. i have been a nurse for 21 — role to help out. i have been a nurse for 21 years, _ role to help out. i have been a nurse for 21 years, some - role to help out. i have been a nurse for 21 years, some of. role to help out. i have been a| nurse for 21 years, some of the chefs that i have found hard, one
3:44 pm
night shift i had last week was one of the worst chefs i have had in 21 years. of the worst chefs i have had in 21 ears. ., , , ., .,, years. there are signs of hope in the hospital- _ years. there are signs of hope in the hospital. a _ years. there are signs of hope in the hospital. a trial _ years. there are signs of hope in the hospital. a trial of _ years. there are signs of hope in the hospital. a trial of 820 - years. there are signs of hope in the hospital. a trial of 820 47 i the hospital. a trial of 820 47 vaccination centre has proved popular with nhs staff getting jabs after shift. and then the maternity unit, life goes on. new life with sam cuddling her new baby son oliver. 50 sam cuddling her new baby son oliver. , , . sam cuddling her new baby son oliver. , '. , , oliver. so it is difficult because we're rrot _ oliver. so it is difficult because we're rrot going _ oliver. so it is difficult because we're not going to _ oliver. so it is difficult because we're not going to be - oliver. so it is difficult because we're not going to be able i oliver. so it is difficult because we're not going to be able to l oliver. so it is difficult because i we're not going to be able to see family and things but we welcome a little person and to the world and it is a nice time for us, a happy time and something to be celebrated. while there is hope, there is also sadness. barbara dry yesterday, her family were keen for us to use her
3:45 pm
interview to warn of the serious consequences of covid. that report from hugh pym, camera journalist harriet bradshaw and producer dominic hurst. more than 300 global companies and organisations have urged world leaders to classify seafarers as keyworkers so they are no longer stranded at sea because of the pandemic. about 200,000 sea—men and women have played a crucial role in keeping global trade flowing, but many have been stuck at sea for months. the headlines on bbc news. a row over vaccines — as the eu threatens to restrict supplies to other countries if it doesn't get what it says is its fair share, the uk says not to worry. the growing toll of coronavirus — new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid—19 across the uk, and more than 30,000 in care homes in england and wales. ten days' quarantine in a hotel when you arrive back in england — and you pay. the government plan which could scupper summer holiday plans. police in delhi have clashed
3:46 pm
with protesting farmers after tens of thousands converged on the city to express anger over agriculture reforms. the mass demonstrations turned violent after protesters broke through police barricades. farmers fear the reforms to the agricultural industry will damage their livelihoods. the demonstrations began two months again but todays protest is the biggest yet — it coincides with india's republic day celebrations. rajini vaidya nathan reports. it was meant to be a peaceful protest but as farmers push their way into daily protesting and is the government's new agricultural laws, it soon turned violent. —— delhi. barricades were breached and police fired tear gas. some protesters were beaten. this on a day in the end celebrate national pride. the mood is tense year as thousands of farmers try to make their way enter
3:47 pm
delhi. they say they have been trying to get the government to listen to them for weeks. now they say they hope their voices heard. the government says the reforms will benefit farmers by allowing them to sell directly to private corporations but those here fear the guaranteed prices they get for some crops will eventually disappear. haste crops will eventually disappear. we won't go back home until they repeal the law _ won't go back home until they repeal the law. , ~ , , the law. only the prime minister is sa inc the law. only the prime minister is sa in: this the law. only the prime minister is saying this is _ the law. only the prime minister is saying this is a _ the law. only the prime minister is saying this is a good _ the law. only the prime minister is saying this is a good law. - the law. only the prime minister is saying this is a good law. the i saying this is a good law. the entire country opposes it. four in ten indians _ entire country opposes it. four in ten indians work— entire country opposes it. four in ten indians work in _ entire country opposes it. four in ten indians work in agriculture. i ten indians work in agriculture. farmers here are a powerful force. despite multiple rounds of talks they are refusing to budge. as he hosted the annual republic day parade, the country's prime minister finds himself on the back foot. many say his handling of this csu has weakened him politically. as
3:48 pm
hundreds of farmers forcefully enter delhi's historic red fort they remain defiant. they say they won't give up until these laws are repealed. italy is entering another period of political turbulence after the resignation of the prime minister. giuseppe conte hopes that italy's head of state, president sergio mattarella, will ask him to try to form a new, stronger alternative government. our correspondent mark lowen joined us from rome and i asked him whether this move comes as much of a surprise. last week, conte lost as absolute majority in the upper house of parliament, the senate, after a small coalition party led by a former prime minister with through its ministers, and so without the numbers in the senate it would have been a tortuous task for prime minister conte to pass anything really through parliament. there would be in horse trading in backroom negotiations on each move,
3:49 pm
so facing another vote later on this week he decided to jump early. he went to the presidency and tendered his resignation, but it is seen as a tactical move really buy conte because what he hopes nye will happen is when tomorrow the president begins consultations with party leaders to see who could have the numbers to command a parliamentary majority that actually the president will give the prime minister another chance to now come back with a revamped coalition, to search around and try to find other coalition partners potentially and to peel off opposition members to try to come back and form a strengthened coalition which could command a parliamentary majority. if he cannot do that it would fall to other party leaders to have a go on feeling that fresh elections would come. the thought of going on holiday right now may seem like a long way off, and for many of us, working from home is the reality for a good while yet. with that in mind, one couple from edinburgh decided
3:50 pm
enough was enough. in october, they moved to barbados. the islands offering a twelve—month visa to anyone who fancies a change of scenery, as long as they can stump up the cash. hazel martin's been finding out what life is like for them. the cocktails are ordered. my husband the cocktails are ordered. iii husband worked the cocktails are ordered. m husband worked in the cocktails are ordered. 1511: husband worked in dublin the cocktails are ordered. m1: husband worked in dublin so the cocktails are ordered. m1 husband worked in dublin so rather than stay in the cold for the winter we thought we would go to spain, and so off we went to spain injanuary to be locked down in february, so we went back to edinburgh and then one of my friends said, barbados are doing a programme, you can go and stay there for a year so we thought, let's do it! wejust stay there for a year so we thought, let's do it! we just bundled a few things in a case and jumped on a plane. things in a case and 'umped on a lane. ~ ., , things in a case and 'umped on a lane, . ., , ., ~' ., things in a case and 'umped on a lane. ~ ., , ., plane. with tourism taking a massive hit, the barbadian _ plane. with tourism taking a massive hit, the barbadian government i hit, the barbadian government introduced the welcome stamp initiative last summer. it opened up the islands to foreign nationals to
3:51 pm
live for a year and work from home for theirjobs in other countries. for their jobs in other countries. jim for theirjobs in other countries. jim works five in the morning to 1:30pm, and the rest, but that's a kind of normal working day for him. he doesn't mind it at all because it is quite bright in the morning and quite quiet, so he gets a load of stuff done so is quite happy. but i feel like i am on holiday. the beaches are something else. they really are beautiful, and there is loads of beach bars and nice casual restaurants. the people's approach is really casual, laid—back and friendly. i have met loads of people, a very eclectic bunch of people, a very eclectic bunch of people and they are alljust absolutely brilliant. there is a lot to do here, and a lot of rum gets drunk. if you are a rum drink characters definitely should be on your bucket list. bud characters definitely should be on your bucket list.— your bucket list. and are you missing home? _
3:52 pm
your bucket list. and are you missing home? well, - your bucket list. and are you missing home? well, we've| your bucket list. and are you i missing home? well, we've got facetime and _ missing home? well, we've got facetime and everything! i missing home? well, we've got i facetime and everything! actually, it is a shame because my two oldest sons are in florida so i have not been able to see them, and then my youngest son is here and then helene, my daughter, she is a carer so she is right on the front line, so she is right on the front line, so ijustjemmy her along, and you are doing such a good job! the are doing such a good 'ob! the island has i are doing such a good 'ob! the island has had i are doing such a good job! the island has had just over 1000 cases in total injust island has had just over 1000 cases in total in just nine deaths but has battened down the hatches following a recent spike. you have to arrive with a recent test result and isolate until you return a second. there is currently a curfew in place and those who do test positive have to stay in government run quarantine facilities. it to stay in government run quarantine facilities. , , , to stay in government run quarantine facilities. , , facilities. it is basically you get taken away _ facilities. it is basically you get taken away to _ facilities. it is basically you get taken away to an _ facilities. it is basically you get taken away to an army - facilities. it is basically you get| taken away to an army barracks facilities. it is basically you get i taken away to an army barracks and keptin taken away to an army barracks and kept in isolation up there, so it is
3:53 pm
not... it is a good way to do it, because people have to toe the line. when they go into lockdown theyjust do it immediately, no mucking about. over 3500 so—called stampers have taken up the offer so far. over 3500 so-called stampers have taken up the offer so far. sometimes ou've ot taken up the offer so far. sometimes you've got to — taken up the offer so far. sometimes you've got to take — taken up the offer so far. sometimes you've got to take an _ taken up the offer so far. sometimes you've got to take an opportunity i you've got to take an opportunity and just go for it. even if it doesn't work out, i was always saying it is these things that go wrong that you remember anyway, whether it is a wedding or christening. if everything goes really smoothly there is nothing to report, really. take a chance and to do something. you never know, you might like it. palaeontologists in argentina have unearthed fossils of what could be the largest dinosaur to have ever walked the earth. not me, this! first discovered in 2012, experts have onlyjust realised the significance of the remains after investigations by a number of argentinian museums and universities. mark lobel reports. could this be the largest dinosaur to have ever roamed our planet? feast your eyes on this
3:54 pm
colossal titanosaur. first found almost a decade ago, experts are now sticking their neck out with a big claim. this incomplete skeleton is thought to belong to a huge, 40—tonne herbivore, a member of the longnecked, long—tailed pillar—like—legged patagonian sauropods, towering over fellow creatures a mere 98 million years ago — now thought to be the largest discovered dinosaur to have walked the earth. the final resting place for these fossilised remains, including 24 vertebrae and fragments of pelvic bone, under this muddy valley of west central argentina. now rising once again on top of the world to regain its place amongst giants. in our history books at least.
3:55 pm
a team of nepali climbers that made the first winter summit of k2, the world's second tallest peak, arrived back in the country to a heroes' welcome on tuesday. the 10 men, who climbed the 8,611 metre k2 peak onjanuary 16, attributed their success to team spirit and a resolve to raise their country's pride. fans and family placed colourful prayer scarfs on their arrival at the airport in kathmandu. let's take a look at some pictures of the first giant panda cub to be born in south korea, which have gone viral. this is fu bao. these images of her clinging on to her zookeeper�*s leg have had millions of views worldwide. fu bao is believed to be about six months old and her name mean 'lucky treasure'. ben brown is a long next.
3:56 pm
now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. the weather is turning milder from the south—west but as it moves in with a lot of rain bearing clouds, as it moves into the cold they are better something of a battle zone set in place and over the next few days that is the risk of some heavy hill snow across northern england and scotland posing the threat of disruption. to the rest of today band of rain pushing and for many of us but it is these higher communities and these towns above 200 metres elevation where you could see some snow. the snow will be longest lasting to the north of the central belt where we could see accumulations of 5—10 centimetres over high ground but if you live at these lower elevations you could see it few flakes these lower elevations you could see it few fla kes of these lower elevations you could see it few flakes of snow as the precipitation starts but it will turn back to rain as the mild air continues to work its way end. overnight tonight a lot of cloud around and i suspect it will be rather murky what some may stand
3:57 pm
hill fog patches forming over high ground but turning increasingly, 8—9 across eastern through wednesday a pretty slow start to the day with my stand hill fog patches are round and later in the day rain pushing into southern parts of wales and south—west england. the temperature here could reach around 11 celsius, but still quite cool across the north and east and then another of these battle zones are set in place for thursday with rain for many of us but the potential is there for some disruptive snow across higher elevation rates. some of these high rates, the snake pass coming out of manchester and the m 62 across the pennines and the a74 in scotland, all high enough to see some significant falls snow and disruption and of course some of the rail lines go high as well so we could see problems on the rail lines too. for most of us mild weather pushing in from the south—west, 14
3:58 pm
in london and not much snow there but in scotland the risk is there as it has across north of england. heavy hill snow to come in through thursday, 15—30 mentor metres of snow. —— centimetres. you can imagine the possibility for some disruption. any change in direction to turn rain to snow but for the time being, just rain and the forecast.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines... fears of vaccine nationalism, as the eu threatens to restrict vaccine supplies to other countries. the uk government says it's confident about its supplies. i'm very confident with the team. we talk to them all the time. they are confident they will deliverfor us, yes. and astrazeneca, the bulk of astrazeneca—oxford is manufactured in the uk, because we made that early investment. the growing toll of coronavirus. new figures which suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid—19 across the uk, with 30,000 in care homes in england and wales. the government prepares to announce whether it will impose hotel quarantine restrictions for those travellers arriving back in england
4:01 pm
minsisters say schools will be prioritised when lockdown restrictions are lifted, after mps call for a roadmap for their reopening. "significant wrongs." northern ireland's first minister says the voices of survivors of mother—and—baby homes will be heard "loudly and clearly" with a new independent investigation. the government says it is confident there will be no disruption to the uk's coronavirus vaccination roll—out, despite a threat from the european union to impose export controls on vaccine supplies. borisjohnson will lead a downing street briefing in an hour's time, as concerns grow about so—called "vaccine nationalism". the eu's health commissioner has criticised the pharmaceutical giant
4:02 pm
astrazeneca, after it said it would have to reduce the supplies originally promised to the eu. the health secretary, matt hancock, has told bbc news the government opposes protectionism in all its forms. our europe correspondent nick beake reports. the lorries leaving pfizer's main factories this morning are bringing hope to the world. laden with one of the vaccines that will help transport us out of the covid nightmare. with such precious cargo on board, they're escorted all the way. but now, there are concerns that fewer of these jabs could be coming to the uk. the european union is angry that another company which makes the oxford astrazeneca shot will be sending it millions fewer doses than promised. it wants to know why. and in response, it's announced that vaccines leaving the eu are to be more tightly controlled, including those destined for britain. this new schedule is not acceptable
4:03 pm
to the european union. in the future, all companies producing vaccines against covid—19 in the eu will have to provide early notification whenever they want to export vaccines to third countries. european union countries have been criticised for the slow roll—out of vaccines, compared with the likes of the united kingdom, and they won't be helped by the temporary slowdown in production here in belgium, at the main pfizer plants. but this latest row over the supply of vaccines, who gets what and when, threatens to make this international health crisis even more political, at a time when countries are being told they need to work together to get us out of this crisis. the uk was the first in the world to approve a vaccine and more than 7 million people have now received at least one jab. the minister responsible for the vaccine programme conceded supplies were tight, but said the uk would still get enough doses.
4:04 pm
i'm very confident with the team. we talk to them all the time. they are confident they will deliver for us, yes. and the bulk of the, astrazeneca—oxford is manufactured in the uk because we made that early investment in manufacturing capacity in the uk, which is also good news, so i am confident we will meet our mid—february target and then we'll keep vaccinating beyond that. the global race to vaccinate against covid—19 has exposed big inequalities, with poorer countries, particularly outside europe, facing a long wait. the way out of this pandemic is by no means easy. the office for national statistics says that almost 104,000 people in the uk have now died with coronavirus. more than 30,000 of those were care home residents in england and wales. the figures, which cover up to the 15th of january, are based on death certificates, while the government's statistics, the ones we report every day, rely on positive covid—19 tests and remain slightly lower. dominic hughes reports.
4:05 pm
jonathan newell is on the long, hard road to recovery, physically and emotionally. a front line health care worker, he fell ill with covid—19 in october, last year. notjust him, but members of his closest family, as well. i was admitted on the 19th of october and my mother was admitted in the early hours of the 20th of october, my sister then was admitted to antrim hospital at this stage was very busy and she was admitted to antrim hospital on the afternoon of the 20th of october and my father was admitted in on the evening of the 20th of october. jonathan ended up in intensive care and then on the same respiratory ward on which he worked, in the same hospital as his mother martina, he was able to see her and to be
4:06 pm
with her when she died. to know that mum's not coming home, it's very hard. we were a very close family. mum was the link. she was always here and it's a very, very lonely house. a very lonely house, and that loneliness and that emptiness is there 24 hours a day, it never leaves you. jonathan's story is one of 100,000, as confirmed by the latest figures from the office for national statistics. data based on death certificates where covid—19 is mentioned shows nearly 104,000 lives have been lost. more than 7700 in the week leading to the 15th of january, ofjanuary, the third highest rate in the pandemic, but it is likely that total deaths are much higher, as that data is now 11 days old. there is another measure of deaths, the one we mention on the news everyday. that covers people who died within 28 days a positive test, and that is likely to breach 100,000, either later today or tomorrow. for some, it is a sign of devastating failure. just generally, we have not
4:07 pm
responded to the warnings as quickly enough, remember early on in the pandemic, the government hesitated in terms of what they should do in terms of the lockdown, they did not do that quickly enough and whenever we made progress in the lockdown, they quickly came out, so they weren't decisive enough. the past year has taught us some are more vulnerable to the virus than others. more deprived communities have seen a proportionately higher death toll, as have people from a black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds. mohammed shafi died from covid—19 just last month. from his daughter, suzana, a reminder that each one of these deaths is a terrible loss. from his daughter, suzana, a reminder that each one of these is a terrible loss. for each of us, the trauma, the upset, the distress, the loss is great, and please don't see it as a figure, it is somebody�*s husband, somebody�*s brother, somebody�*s father and we need to remember that each time these
4:08 pm
statistics are increasing. and beyond the deaths caused by the virus itself, there are those lives lost through delayed treatments or missed symptoms. today is a fresh reminder of the immense toll taken by this virus. ministers are expected to approve plans that could require some people arriving in england to quarantine in a hotel for ten days, at their own cost. it's not yet known if the restrictions would apply to everyone orjust those returning from countries with more contagious variants. if implemented, it is likely to be a further blow for the struggling international travel industry, making holidays abroad an unlikely proposition. theo leggett reports. hotels are fine for foreign travel, but would you really want to be cooped up in one when you get back home? under plans being discussed by the government, british citizens and residents arriving in england from countries deemed to be high risk would have to go into quarantine in hotels, which they would have to pay for. it is part of a strategy to limit infections from potentially dangerous new variants of the coronavirus.
4:09 pm
the government has already barred foreign nationals from entering the uk from most of south america and southern africa, as well as portugal. this afternoon, the home secretary was tight—tipped about the plans being discussed. if i may, mr speaker, the honourable gentleman has referred to newspaper reports and speculation. it would be wrong of me, mr speaker, to speculate about any measures that are not in place right now, as policy is being developed. but the honourable gentleman does speak about quarantining, and he claims his party has called for tougher restrictions, but i think also the party opposite, if i may say so, should also reflect on their position. hotels are now being prepared for the challenge of looking after people who cannot go out, who may be infectious and could become ill. since the beginning of the pandemic, we have done over 300 risk assessments on our activities and how we operate and changing our protocols, so this would just be in addition to that. so everything in the hospitality industry in terms of how we operate has changed, this would be a further change.
4:10 pm
we obviously wait for the government guidelines to tell us specifically what we need to do, but we are well on our way to be able to achieve it. for the international travel industry, it is a deeply worrying time. the new measures may have little immediate impact, because very few people are arriving from abroad. but if they last into the peak summer period, or make people unwilling to book summer holidays, it could spell disaster for already struggling business. the risk is that we have these restrictions in- place through the summer and into the autumn and the sector is not able to have that summer. period it was banking on to earnl money and bring in much needed revenue to replenish those balance sheets which had been decimated i since march last year. it's still not known exactly who will have to go into hotel quarantine, for how long, or who will be exempt. all four uk nations are discussing the issue and are likely to adopt similar measures.
4:11 pm
let's bring you more on those threats of vaccine nationalism as the eu threatens to restrict supplies. let's speak now to professor david salisbury. he's associate fellow of chatham house's global health programme, and former director of immunisation at the department of health. thank you so much for being with us again on bbc news. as this case the eu being slightly angry, really, because their own supplies of vaccines have been cut especially by astrazeneca? i’m vaccines have been cut especially by astrazeneca?— astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are an: and astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are angry and i'm _ astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are angry and i'm sure _ astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are angry and i'm sure that _ astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are angry and i'm sure that they - astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are angry and i'm sure that they will- astrazeneca? i'm sure that they are angry and i'm sure that they will be | angry and i'm sure that they will be disappointed and the populations in all the respective countries will be frustrated, as well be the health programmes that were hoping to roll out the supplies of vaccine. nobody should be surprised that this has happened. because that is what happens with vaccine campaigns as
4:12 pm
the pressure builds up, it's very hard to maintain supplies. but this looks like possibly _ hard to maintain supplies. but this looks like possibly a _ hard to maintain supplies. but this looks like possibly a fit _ hard to maintain supplies. but this looks like possibly a fit of - hard to maintain supplies. but this looks like possibly a fit of peak i hard to maintain supplies. but this looks like possibly a fit of peak by | looks like possibly a fit of peak by the eu, that they will try and possibly restrict supplies to non—uconn trees because their own supplies have been reduced it. —— non—eu countries. 1 supplies have been reduced it. -- non-eu countries.— supplies have been reduced it. -- non-eu countries. i don't know what the will non-eu countries. i don't know what they will actually _ non-eu countries. i don't know what they will actually do. _ non-eu countries. i don't know what they will actually do. many - non-eu countries. i don't know what they will actually do. many of - non-eu countries. i don't know what they will actually do. many of the i they will actually do. many of the uk supplies from astrazeneca are in this country, produced in this country. and well be available in this country. i can understand the frustration as i have said of countries who were hoping to get vaccines and see delays ahead of them. it's hard to know what actually will happen in terms of slowing down of supplies that we are hoping for. we will have to wait, watch and hope that we do have the supplies that have been predicted for us. is supplies that have been predicted for us. , , , ., , for us. is it pretty tough being in chare of
4:13 pm
for us. is it pretty tough being in charge of one — for us. is it pretty tough being in charge of one of _ for us. is it pretty tough being in charge of one of these _ charge of one of these pharmaceutical giants at the moment, in the sense that everybody wants what you are making, everybody wants your vaccines in vast quantities, and actually maintaining the supplies that you have promised isn't always that easy, technically? yes, demand is extraordinary. everybody will want every dose of vaccine. and everybody will hope that their contracts were actually going to be honoured. and then if you are a vaccine manufacturer, of course you want to supply everybody with as much vaccine as you possibly can. but vaccines are biological products, they are difficult to manufacture, and very, very often, you just don't get as much vaccine as you thought you were going to get and that's both true of the producers and it's true also of the customers. is producers and it's true also of the customers-— producers and it's true also of the customers. , . , ., . . customers. is there a better vaccine nationalism — customers. is there a better vaccine nationalism going _ customers. is there a better vaccine nationalism going on _ customers. is there a better vaccine nationalism going on here? - customers. is there a better vaccine nationalism going on here? the i customers. is there a better vaccine nationalism going on here? the uk| customers. is there a better vaccine i nationalism going on here? the uk is clearly doing very well in its
4:14 pm
roulette, more than 6.5 million people have had the first dose already, we know eu countries are trailing behind, lots of countries around the world. i’m trailing behind, lots of countries around the world.— trailing behind, lots of countries around the world. i'm sure everybody will look at their _ around the world. i'm sure everybody will look at their own _ around the world. i'm sure everybody will look at their own progress, i will look at their own progress, they will look at their own opportunities to do better, and they will look at the sort of league tables of who is doing particularly well and wish that they had perhaps acted earlier to put contracts in place. the problem about it of courses that vaccine supply is finite. and the more one person gets, the less another one will get and in a the whole world ultimately has to protect its citizens against this virus. ., ., , this virus. the government here has said it's confident _ this virus. the government here has said it's confident about _ this virus. the government here has said it's confident about its - this virus. the government here has said it's confident about its own i said it's confident about its own supplies, certainly in the short—term. that immediate target of vaccinating the first four key groups by the middle of february. 1 think it will be fantastic if that's
4:15 pm
achieved. if the 15 million people in those four highest risk groups do indeed get theirfirst in those four highest risk groups do indeed get their first doses, by mid—february, that will be a huge achievement. the number of lives that will be saved by doing that is extraordinary. and that is where the deaths will come and that is why we have to get those people protected as quickly as possible. it’s have to get those people protected as quickly as possible.— as quickly as possible. it's always ood to as quickly as possible. it's always good to talk _ as quickly as possible. it's always good to talk to _ as quickly as possible. it's always good to talk to you, _ as quickly as possible. it's always good to talk to you, thank- as quickly as possible. it's always good to talk to you, thank you i as quickly as possible. it's always good to talk to you, thank you so j good to talk to you, thank you so much for being with us once again. thanks. jessica gold from london is in south africa with her mum and son. she flew out in november for work and is worried about how she's going to be able to get back. jessica joins me now. tell us your story because you have had a few plans to travel back here
4:16 pm
cancelled, haven't you?— cancelled, haven't you? that's correct. thanks _ cancelled, haven't you? that's correct. thanks for _ cancelled, haven't you? that's correct. thanks for talking i cancelled, haven't you? that's correct. thanks for talking to i cancelled, haven't you? that's i correct. thanks for talking to me. yes, basically i came for work as you said on my own in november. i needed to be here, had not been here since lockdown so i came on my own originally for ten days and decided to stay for the holidays, i had my mum and sunjoined me so they to stay for the holidays, i had my mum and sun joined me so they flew out a couple of weeks later and we were all scheduled to fly back on january the 1st. on different airlines and then our flights just kept getting cancelled so from the 1st of january it was postponed to the 12th, subsequently to the 2nd of february and that got cancelled again so as it stands, it will be, we should fly home hopefully on the 16th of february. i have just to be clear because i did get some comments about this, i have absolutely no problem, in fact i fully support the fact to quarantine and have done that in the past when returning from italy and from spain.
4:17 pm
in the summer, but my point was rather have people corn team at home if they have a home in the uk because in my case, i have a 13—year—old sun, a 77—year—old mother and for us to stay in hotel room i have to pay a lot of money which in these times, certainly not the best of times, when we could quarantine at home and still abide by all the rules and follow regulations. 50 by all the rules and follow regulations.— by all the rules and follow regulations. by all the rules and follow reulations. , ., , regulations. so if this does come in and it looks — regulations. so if this does come in and it looks likely _ regulations. so if this does come in and it looks likely that _ regulations. so if this does come in and it looks likely that ministers i and it looks likely that ministers are going to announce this, apple in quarantine in a hotel, what would that mean for your plans? —— appear in quarantine. would you bite the bullet and check into a hotel? 1 think i would have to see what they say. nobody has a timeline, they won't say it will last this long and that can always change, our visas
4:18 pm
here expire and they have been extended because of these reasons on the 31st of march. so i know we would have until then and luckily we are staying essentially at home here. so that is fine. but there are other things to take into consideration, for example my mother needs to get back for medical checkups and things she needs to do. my checkups and things she needs to do. my sun, school is not in session, we don't know if they will go back after the half term break so he would have to return to school. those are considerations i would have to take into account so i will plate by ear and decide at that point whether stay until the end of march comeback earlier. i’m point whether stay until the end of march comeback earlier.— march comeback earlier. i'm sure --eole march comeback earlier. i'm sure people would _ march comeback earlier. i'm sure people would be _ march comeback earlier. i'm sure people would be sympathetic- march comeback earlier. i'm sure people would be sympathetic but| march comeback earlier. i'm sure i people would be sympathetic but they might also say yes but actually being locked into a hotel with very strict measures when food is bought to your door, you cannot leave that hotel room for two weeks or ten days, it's more effective than being
4:19 pm
at home, especially when we see the variants, the south african variant, the brazilian variant, at a time when vaccination roulette is going very well, the government really want to protect —— vaccination roll—out. i want to protect -- vaccination roll-out— want to protect -- vaccination roll-out. .., , , , ., roll-out. i completely understand that and supported. _ roll-out. i completely understand that and supported. i _ roll-out. i completely understand that and supported. i understand | roll-out. i completely understand i that and supported. i understand the reason behind it but from my personal experience, when i had to do that before, i followed regulations exactly as they wear. i understand there may be people who do not, but i filled out a passenger location, locatorform, went out, stayed home, had groceries delivered to my house, did not leave for 14 days, now it is ten. so i am speaking for myself obviously, saying i would do that. but yes, i understand that they have to take these measures, like i said it's an expense that not many people can
4:20 pm
afford. haste expense that not many people can afford. ~ , ., ., , , , afford. we will see what happens, and what the _ afford. we will see what happens, and what the government - afford. we will see what happens, and what the government decide i afford. we will see what happens, i and what the government decide on that, we have not yet had their announcement but thank you so much for being with us. thank you very much for your time.— as we've been hearing the new data released today reveals in excess of 30,000 care home residents in england and wales had covid—19 recorded on their death certificates. ons figures show there were 1,719 deaths involving coronavirus among care home residents, either in homes themselves or residents who were in hospitals, in the week of 15th january. that's the highest weekly number since 21st may. sam monaghan is the chief exectuive of mha homes, often known as methodist homes, the largest charity care home provider in the uk. thank you for being with us. thank ou. still thank you for being with us. thank you- still an _ thank you for being with us. thank you. still an extraordinary - thank you for being with us. thank you. still an extraordinary death i you. still an extraordinary death toll in care _ you. still an extraordinary death toll in care homes _ you. still an extraordinary death toll in care homes in _ you. still an extraordinary death toll in care homes in this - you. still an extraordinary death i toll in care homes in this country. what's going on still in care homes?
4:21 pm
we are experiencing it less badly than we were in the first wave. but still, there are outbreaks and obviously the new variant has compounded that in more recent weeks. but we have now thankfully got sufficient ppe, we have got a regime of testing which is really, really helpful in terms of identifying any staff or residents who have the infection and therefore can either be self isolated in the home or staff can obviously go home. that has all helped, but it is still a hugely sobering figure to arrive at, this 100,000 and 30% of those being residents of care homes. is at being residents of care homes. is at the fact that — being residents of care homes. is at the fact that in — being residents of care homes. is at the fact that in some _ being residents of care homes. is at the fact that in some care homes, the fact that in some care homes, the situation just hasn't improved that much since the first wave of coronavirus?— that much since the first wave of coronavirus? �* ., , ., coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what ou coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what you mean. — coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what you mean. by _ coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what you mean. by not— coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what you mean, by not improved - coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what you mean, by not improved as i coronavirus? i'm not quite sure what| you mean, by not improved as much. as i say, we have the regimes are
4:22 pm
ppe and testing in place. the procedures and policies have been honed during the course of particularly first wave. so i think we feel we are doing absolutely everything we possibly can, but what we have found is that obviously the infection is still coming into homes, undoubtedly it is through staff, our staff are trying to live as isolated as they can in the community. but obviously the strength and virulence of the new variant particularly has had a big impact. variant particularly has had a big im act. . , , ., , variant particularly has had a big imact. . , , ., , ., impact. that is the prime means of ent ? impact. that is the prime means of entry? care — impact. that is the prime means of entry? care home _ impact. that is the prime means of entry? care home staff? _ impact. that is the prime means of entry? care home staff? is- impact. that is the prime means of entry? care home staff? is it i impact. that is the prime means of entry? care home staff? is it very. entry? care home staff? is it very hard to deal with that? to stop that happening? hard to deal with that? to stop that ha- ttenin? , ., _ hard to deal with that? to stop that hat-enin? , ., _ , hard to deal with that? to stop that hautenin? , ., ,, , ., happening? obviously staff live out in the community _ happening? obviously staff live out in the community with _ happening? obviously staff live out in the community with their- happening? obviously staff live out| in the community with their families and however much they might try and restrict their movement in the community, inevitably they will be coming into contact with others out there. so our staff are trying to take as many precautions as they possibly can, but that is the
4:23 pm
picture and at the moment certainly we have not experienced the same level of infection and mortality that we did in the first wave. so a lot of the strategy this is a potent virus and we hope the vaccine will arm people to be far safer going forward in terms of the acute nature of some symptoms. in two speaking of the vaccine, what is the cover in your homes? we have been pleased to see we have 87% of residents vaccinated. the only outstanding ones are in homes where we have currently got a number of cases of covid—19 so public health have advised vaccinations cannot be done. it's only the first dose and we are concerned to know exactly whether there is any added risk because the second dose has now been pushed back from three weeks to 12 weeks and
4:24 pm
that extends the period of vulnerability of a lower level of protection that the first dose will give people. protection that the first dose will give people-— protection that the first dose will ive --eole. . ~ . ., give people. thank you so much for bein with give people. thank you so much for being with us- _ give people. thank you so much for being with us. chief— give people. thank you so much for being with us. chief executive i give people. thank you so much for being with us. chief executive of. being with us. chief executive of mha homes, thank you for your time and good luck. mha homes, thank you for your time and good luck-— the leadership team of the only nhs child gender identity service in england and wales is to be disbanded. last week, the care quality commission rated the gender identity development service at the tavistock and portman nhs trust "inadequate" after inspectors identified "significant concerns". a high court ruling last month against the trust that children under 16 are unlikely to be able to give informed consent to treatment with puberty blockers. hannah barnes from the bbc�*s newsnight programme has been reporting on this issue for the past 18 months and joins me now with the latest. just give us the background to this and explain exactly what happened. what has happened in the last 24 hours or so is that as you say, we have learned that a new management
4:25 pm
structure is going to be put in place. the current team will be disbanded and replaced by an interim management board. it's important to point out the members of the executive have not lost theirjobs. they remain there carrying out assessment, but the management and responding to those points raised in the cqc inspection report, the responsibility for those will be falling to this new board. we have just heard about. the background to this is the cqc inspection report, but a number of concerns have been raised about the service for a while, there was an internal review backin while, there was an internal review back in 2019 and us at newsnight revealed some of the contents of the interviews that took place as part of that review. last year. which were then passed on to the cqc. this
4:26 pm
is an area of — were then passed on to the cqc. this is an area of huge controversy. as the been any reaction to this decision? ihia the been any reaction to this decision?— the been any reaction to this decision? ., ., ., , , decision? no reaction as yet, because the _ decision? no reaction as yet, because the board _ decision? no reaction as yet, because the board are - decision? no reaction as yet, i because the board are currently approving these new arrangements as we speak. they will come into place on the 1st of february and we do know that the trust are appealing that decision in the high court. but it's clear that both the trust and nhs england are taking the findings of the cqc very seriously. the trust are also trying to bring in new clinical expertise to the gender identity development service to help them follow through on the recommendations that will be required going forward. goad recommendations that will be required going forward. good to talk to ou, required going forward. good to talk to you. thank _ required going forward. good to talk to you, thank you. _ now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. the weather is turning milder from the south—west today,
4:27 pm
but as that miled air pushes in a lot of cloud, and rain—bearing cloud, at that, as it moves into the cold air we have got something of a battle zone set in place and over the next few days there is a risk of seeing some heavy hill snow across northern england and scotland, posing a threat of disruption. through the rest of today, we have this band of rain for many of us, but it's the higher communities, these towns above 200 metres elevation, where you could see snow. it's going to be longest lasting to the north of the central belt, where we could see accumulations of 5—10 centimetres, but if you live in the lower elevations, you could see a few flakes of snow, just as precipitation starts, but it will turn back to rain as the milder air continues to work its way in. overnight tonight, we have got a lot of cloud around and i suspect it will be rather murky. mist and hill fog patches over the high ground but turning increasingly mild. temperatures by the end of the night about eight or nine across south—western areas, pretty slow start to the day,
4:28 pm
grey skies again, later in the day we will see some rain pushing towards southern parts of wales and south—west england. temperatures here could reach around 11. very mild but still cool across the north and east of the country. then we've got another of these battle zones in place for thursday, again bringing rain for many of us, but the potential is there for some very disruptive snow across higher elevation routes. some of these routes, a57, m62, high parts of the m6, the a74 in scotland are all high enough to see some significant falls of snow and disruption as well. and some rail lines go high as well, so we could see railway problems. for most of us, milder air from the south—west, 14 in london, not much snow there, but in scotland the risk is there, as it is across northern england. heavy hill snow to come as we go through thursday, 15 up to 30 centimetres of snow,
4:29 pm
that's a foot of snow, you can imagine the prospect for some disruption. into friday night, watching this system, any change in the winter into friday night, watching this system, any change in the wind direction could turn the rain to snow but for the time being, it's just rain in the forecast.
4:30 pm
all hello, good afternoon, this is bbc news, bringing you the latest head of a coronavirus briefing from downing street this afternoon. our latest headlines. the growing toll of coronavirus, new figures suggest more than 100,000 people have now died with covid—19 across uk, with 30,000 deaths in care homes in england and wales. fears of vaccine nationalism, as the european union threatens to restrict vaccine, the uk government says it isn't confident about its supplies. the welsh government admits it missed its target to vaccinate over the weekend. more than half of all those aged over 80 have had their
4:31 pm
first dose of the vaccine. letters are

96 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on