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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 21, 2021 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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be strong, deep feel week, just be strong, deep breath and feel weak, just be strong, deep breath and stay strong # press on, press on, press on # you will see there is i am laura trevelyan in washington, dc. in london i am mike emily. the headlines. once aaain we mike emily. the headlines. once again we have — mike emily. the headlines. once again we have learnt _ mike emily. the headlines. once again we have learnt that - again we have learnt that democracy is precious. democracy is fragile and at this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed. the president wrote a generous letter. because it was private i will not talk about it until i will not talk about it until i talked to him but it was generous.
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a new day for america — joe biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the united states. as vice president — making history as the first woman ever to hold the post. getting straight to work. the new president signs a blizzard of executive orders — and says he received a personal note from his predecessor. the democrats take control of the senate — swearing in new members — giving president biden a narrow majority in both chambers of congress. welcome to washington. i'm laura trevelyan. mike embley is in london. president biden has
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already been hard at work in the oval office. on his first day, joe biden signed i7 executive actions, 15 executive orders, some of which we —— will reverse actions set by his predecessor, former president donald trump. the executive actions will make changes to the us response to the covid—i9 pandemic and try to ease some of the financial strain placed on americans resulting from the pandemic. but other executive actions directly target and undo mr trump's actions on the environment, immigration, the us census, and regulatory changes. president biden's press secretary, jen psaki, has just held her first briefing. she was asked how she and the president plan to combat disinformation. well, ithink, peter, there are a number of ways to combat misinformation. one of them is accurate information and truth and data, and sharing information even when it is hard to hear. and even when it is not meeting the expectations
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of people at home who are desperate for this crisis to be over. we'll have more to share with you in the next few days, hopefully before the weekend, but what we plan to do is not just return these daily briefings — monday through friday, not saturdays and sundays, i'm not a monster — but also to return briefings with our health officials and public health officials. we want to do those regularly, in a dependable way, with data shared with all of you and with the public so they can also track progress we're making on getting the pandemic under control. jen psaki there in herfirst press conference as white house press the bbc�*s david willisjoins me now from los angeles. there is a strong stress they are on truth and the importance of the facts. a sense of business as usual and yet it is not really business as usual, four years of trump did happen and a whole bunch of people don't believe anything they hear from authorities or
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officials. allen indeed. for years of fake news, of other forms of truth and all sorts of things like that.— things like that. indeed we have had — things like that. indeed we have had periods _ things like that. indeed we have had periods where . things like that. indeed we i have had periods where there haven't been press briefings for weeks, sometimes for months in a row. but today, jen psaki said they will be one of these briefings every day and they would also be health weavings as well, referring to the latest news as far as the coronavirus is concerned. she was asked about a whole range of issues today. everything from joe biden's opinions about the death and novelty to his plans to travel abroad for the first time. she did prove pretty adept at dodging questions, for example, one about whetherjoe biden was in favour of a senate trial, senate impeachment trial, of his predecessor donald trump. it has been suggested that such
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a trial could be a divisive at a trial could be a divisive at a time whenjoe biden is all about unifying this country. ms saki didn't address the question full on but she did say that it is possible she it is possible for the senate to multitask, she put it. that they could hold hearings in the morning and then go about their business the rest of the day. that normal business of course is important stuff. it involves hearings and investigations into joe hearings and investigations intojoe biden's nominees for cabinet and other senior positions. they are positions that he was to fill quickly. i might add on that note, this evening, joe biden's cabinet nominee was confirmed. avril hayes will be the first woman to lead the us intelligence
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community. she is becoming the director. she is now the director. she is now the director of national intelligence in this country. jen psaki said at her briefing tonight at the very first foreign leader that president biden will speak to is going to be the leader of canada, justin trudeau. this comesjust be the leader of canada, justin trudeau. this comes just as there has been an investigator —— in there has been an investigator __ in __ there has been an investigator —— in —— cancelling that pipeline that will be a blow to the canadian energy industry but what do you make of the fact that the white house is signalling so clearly that the very first leader he will speak to will be a neighbour, canada. it is a sign i think that they want to rebuild relationships it extends to traditional foreign allies. much has been made in seeking to put a lot of those damaged relationships back on track. jen psaki saying
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today that a first call of a foreign leader will be with justin trudeau later this week. and of course the keystone pipeline has been something of a heart issue. as far as canada is concerned, it may take some smooth talking onjoe biden's part as soon as —— as far as thatis part as soon as —— as far as that is concerned but cancelling it, all part of that green agenda and that is something he has promised to keep front and centre of his legislative agenda going forward. ~ �* ., legislative agenda going forward. �* ., ., forward. we're going back to the event — forward. we're going back to the event where _ forward. we're going back to the event where kamala - forward. we're going back to l the event where kamala harris is going to speak live but because you are in la and because you are in la and because a california is being ravaged by coronavirus, it is crucial that the financial part of mr biden's action on the pandemic, there are so many people, we have had it here and across the world, so many
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people, even if they have symptoms, who simply cannot afford to self isolate. they simply don't have the money for it. ~ , ,., y simply don't have the money for it. ~ , , ., ., simply don't have the money for it. absolutely and that 1.9 trillion dollar _ it. absolutely and that 1.9 trillion dollar relief - it. absolutely and that 1.9 l trillion dollar relief package includes people who have found themselves struggling to find work and so on. butjoe biden's priority with this is helping states to organise the rollout and something the trump administration largely left to individual states and some of them have really struggled to organise it. joe biden was a lot more outreach from the federal authorities to individual states and he has talked of course about 100 million vaccinations within his
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first 100 days in office. it is a very tall order but it is something that he is extremely keen to get off the ground. let's take you live to the final part of this mary anne marsh is a democratic strategist, shejoins us now from cape cod. thank you for being with us. this was extraordinary transfer of power, but one that was underscored and guaranteed by the peasants of 25,000 national guard troops here in washington dc. what is your mood now, 7 the dc. what is your mood now,? the ma'ori dc. what is your mood now,? the majority of _ dc. what is your mood now,? tue: majority of people dc. what is your mood now,? tte: majority of people in dc. what is your mood now,? tt2 majority of people in this country are relieved. i think it sent a strong signal to the world, just like the capital was attacked, that the house
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returned to count the votes, this inauguration ceremony went on, despite any of it. despite the spray paint at the base of the spray paint at the base of the capital today and the west front where president biden and kamala harris took the oath of office. i think it shows determination and resilience that has or has been associated with the us. i think this is something that every citizen in this country needs to hear, everyone around the world needs to here as well and now it will be met by actions in the biden harris invest —— administration. harris invest -- administration. ~ :: :: :: administration. with 25,000 national guard _ administration. with 25,000 national guard troops, - administration. with 25,000 | national guard troops, people would have been unwise to try something in washington, dc. nothing seems to have happened in other state capitals either. is there a worry that when security is a slack and a little that maybe they will be
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trouble to come? t little that maybe they will be trouble to come?— little that maybe they will be trouble to come? i don't think we are out _ trouble to come? i don't think we are out of— trouble to come? i don't think we are out of the _ trouble to come? i don't think we are out of the woods - trouble to come? i don't think we are out of the woods yet. i we are out of the woods yet. and i think there is still unrest around the country. i think there is a lot of work to do in the country. we had that in the inaugural address today, a few moments ago when biden �*s put —— spoke at the foot of the lincoln memorial. it is clear that there are people around this country, militias around the country who have been activated by donald trump and the coup in the capital two weeks ago, but they are still out there. there is no question there is still national security concerns here but it is from domestic terrorist now, not foreign. is from domestic terrorist now, not foreign-— is from domestic terrorist now, not foreign. marianne, i was so struck by _ not foreign. marianne, i was so struck by the — not foreign. marianne, i was so struck by the symbolism - not foreign. marianne, i was so| struck by the symbolism tonight of the lincoln memorial as the setting. in his speech today, president biden talked about the better angels that abraham
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lincoln referred to in his inaugural address. lincoln referred to in his inauguraladdress. it lincoln referred to in his inaugural address. it is america divided at a point of this century. biden talked about the need to end this civil war. a, about the need to end this civil war-— civil war. a beautiful shot from the _ civil war. a beautiful shot from the lincoln - civil war. a beautiful shot| from the lincoln memorial civil war. a beautiful shot - from the lincoln memorial and it is not lost on anyone that joe biden picked that place to deliver that message because just like lincoln, biden is taking over at a time where the united states of america is torn asunder by division, race and politics and everything else. lincoln was famously able to prevail in terms of the civil war. we have a civil war of ideas and politics right now but unfortunately over 240 yea rs but unfortunately over 240 years later, race still seems to bedevil the united states of america and now we have an opportunity to do better. you
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heard it talked about the convention, unity, you heard it in his acceptance speech in november, you heard it again today and tonight, and that will be the theme going forward, to uplift people, to be excited the future. he is emphasising that and you see that tonight and today and it will be important to battle the tougher days that are ahead. many things and up in front of the courts. we have to acknowledge that although trump has gone and an he says he will be back, he has changed the country considerably with what he has done to the supreme court and the manyjudges he has appointed in lower courts was that he has shaped the country for a long while to come. . ., , country for a long while to come. . . , ., come. he certainly has in that resect come. he certainly has in that reapect that — come. he certainly has in that respect that people _ come. he certainly has in that respect that people have - come. he certainly has in that respect that people have to i come. he certainly has in that| respect that people have to be heartened by the fact that all the cases regarding the election itself, 60 of them, trump only one but one. many of his appointments at every level
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of federal government and federal courts and the supreme court ruled against him. so i think that was one of the things that everyone took great comfort in, is that institutions like the courts, institutions like the courts, institutions like the courts, institutions like congress were able to hold us together, even at the greatest peril we faced two weeks ago and yes, our democracy was challenged but as biden said today in his speech, it made us stronger i think we all have to take comfort in that. there will be divisions, it is clear when it comes to trying to get some legislation passed in the senate in particular where there are small margins, the house has a very small margin, it doesn't mean that the democrats and wide and are going to be successful right out of the gate, but i think there are opportunities to work together, even though donald trump has left his imprint, he did a lot of damage in four years, but i don't get will take a full four years to undo all off a lot of that. and you saw that tonight with the executive orders. the hiring of a lot of people, the approval of the nomination and
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vote to put the new dni secretary into night as well. there is plenty to be done there, but it is not lost on anyone that donald trump has left the united states and not the best place and not a place we want to be in, but i think everyone's committed to working to try to put that behind us and even for someone like mitch mcconnell, has made mention of that as well. mcconnell, has made mention of that as well-— that as well. marianne marsh, thanks so _ that as well. marianne marsh, thanks so much _ that as well. marianne marsh, thanks so much for— that as well. marianne marsh, thanks so much forjoining - that as well. marianne marsh, thanks so much forjoining us. thank you. president biden has been keen to show that he was getting on with the job of governing it came after an inauguration like no other — without the public and amid intense security after the storming of the capitol. mr biden called for unity, and an end to the nation's �*uncivil war�*. our north america editor jon sopel looks back on a different inauguration. president biden declared that america would rebuild its international alliances, as world leaders sent their congratulations and good wishes to the new president. his spokesman confirmed that the first world leader he will speak to isjustin trudeau — canada's leader but plenty of others have been reacting to his inauguration. we've heard from german chancelor angela merkel
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via her spokesperson — she said: french president emmanuel macron tweeted: and joe biden, america's second catholic president, has heard directly from the pope — who wrote: "i extend cordial good wishes and the assurance of my prayers that almighty god will grant you wisdom and strength in the exercise of your high office". our north america editor jon sopel looks back on a different inauguration. music. so far, so normal. announcer: ladies and - gentlemen, the president-elect of the united states. this is what america does every four years, but everything about today was exceptional, given the last two weeks, given the pandemic and the security situation, given the presidency that was ending. at first glance, the west front of the capital looks much as it always does
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on inauguration day, but look towards the washington monument and the normal forest of people has been replaced by a garden of flags. a socially distanced inauguration for a nation tearing itself apart. the oath of office, taken by the man who's now tasked with healing the nation's wounds. ijoseph robinette bidenjunior do solemnly square... that i will faithfully execute... the office of president of the united states... the platform where he stood two weeks ago was the staging post for the assault on congress, then the mob ruled. today, democracy had come through, but it was a close run thing. we have learned again that democracy is precious, democracy is fragile and at this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed. cheering and applause. he warned america was in
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the midst of a winter of peril, and has any new president had to confront such an array of problems — covid, economic turbulence, racial unrest. and the passions inflamed by donald trump's insistence that the election was stolen. today, on this january day, my whole soul is in this. bringing america together, uniting our people, uniting our nation, and i ask every american to join me in this cause. joe biden never mentioned donald trump by name, but it was a firm repudiation of all that he stood for, though he was careful to reach out to the former president's supporters. we must end this uncivil war that pits red against blue, rural versus urban, conservative versus liberal. we can do this if we open our souls instead of hardening our hearts. at 78 years old, joe biden
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becomes the oldest man to become president, but the real history is being made by his deputy, kamala harris, the first woman vice president, the first of black and indian heritage, an example of the american dream. so help me god. applause. though covid has brought drabness, this inauguration had sparkle, with lady gaga, complete with gold microphone, singing the national anthem. # what so proudly we hailed at the twilight�*s last gleaming. and jennifer lopez, too. # let's get loud. the political good and great were out in force, three former presidents were in attendance, republican and democrat — and former vice president mike pence was there as well,
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choosing the inauguration over a rival attraction a few miles away. and that's because donald trump had decided to break with 150 years of tradition and snubjoe biden. normally, the outgoing president meets the successor at the front door and rides with him to the capitol, but mr trump was slipping out the back, still incapable of accepting that he lost the election. though the former reality tv host—turned film director, tried to orchestrate his own departure. he awarded himself a military sendoff, complete with 21 gun salute and his parting shot will have delighted his supporters and horrified his detractors. a goodbye, we love you, we will be back in some form. and the music was spot on as he flew off on air force one for the last time. # it was my way...
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by the time now ex—president trump arrived in florida, melania had gone from sombre black to beach club chic. never comfortable in washington, she might find the transformation a whole lot easier than her husband. joe biden is now in the white house and he wants to hit the ground running. there will be a flurry of executive orders to reverse a lot of trump era policies, but policy always change with a new president. what will be so different is the manner of governing. crazy town is likely to be replaced by dullsville but maybe that's what america needs right now. jon sopel, bbc news, washington. how the atmosphere here in
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washington has changed. �*i3 washington has changed. 13 hours since president trump left and already we have a new press secretary and a blizzard of executive orders and, now, a point at which foreign countries look differently and to that and china and russia will have their own very pressing reasons for assessing the new president's priorities and intentions, as will the uk. we will hearfrom and intentions, as will the uk. we will hear from john in beijing, stephen moscow but first to laura here in london. uk prime minister is like to see presidents as diplomatic best friend. both nations have a partnership to go back for so long with unrivalled working particularly when it comes to security and defence. and when that friend is unconventional and unpredictable, as was donald trump, it can make for some awkward political moments. so for the government today it is a positive turning of the page.
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in part becausejoe biden has been clear that he wants to work with international groups such as nato, so important the uk and its place on the world stage. it is also seen as a positive because in number 10 they believe thatjoe biden cares about some of the issues that boris johnson cares about some of the issues that borisjohnson wants to make a difference. like climate change. the prime minister today said it is a stop forward and a positive day for america after bumpy time. but less diplomatically, i've been told that the uk may lose some exclusivity but they would gain predictability and the whole thing would be less cringeworthy. fewer fireworks and less drama perhaps in this relationship between the countries but tonight, a sense in the government that the uk is gaining a more dependable friend. fin is gaining a more dependable friend. .. ., friend. on the face of it, donald _ friend. on the face of it, donald trump _ friend. on the face of it, donald trump has - friend. on the face of it, donald trump has been | friend. on the face of it, | donald trump has been a nightmare for china. hitting it with a trade war, trolling it over his allegations that the
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virus leaked from a laboratory here and sanctioning its companies over their links to the human rights abuses in shin junk. it willjoe biden be any better? not only is his incoming administration continuing trump's tough on china rhetoric he promises to rebuild alliances with democratic countries in europe and beyond to better contained beijing. but there is something else as well. in donald trump, china saw the tantalising prospect of a crisis in democratic values, a decline in american power and a vacuum on the global stage into which it could step. in short, the chaos and confusion of donald trump made china's rulers feel good about themselves and their system. and for that they may well come to miss him.- system. and for that they may well come to miss him. now that he has gone- _ well come to miss him. now that he has gone. there _ well come to miss him. now that
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he has gone. there is _ well come to miss him. now that he has gone. there is little - doubt that the kremlin would have preferred four more years of donald — have preferred four more years of donald trump in the white house — of donald trump in the white house. the chaos and division in america _ house. the chaos and division in america characterised his presidency and the weakening of the western alliance. that was all welcomed here in moscow. plus, — all welcomed here in moscow. plus, donald trump almost never criticised — plus, donald trump almost never criticised vladimir putin in public _ criticised vladimir putin in public. the joe biden is a vocal— public. the joe biden is a vocal kremlin critic and has already— vocal kremlin critic and has already said that for america russia — already said that for america russia is— already said that for america russia is the greatest threat. so moscow was bracing itself for more _ so moscow was bracing itself for more sanctions. and when it comes— for more sanctions. and when it comes to — for more sanctions. and when it comes to vladimir putin and joe biden, — comes to vladimir putin and joe biden, don't expect much personal chemistry. joe biden once — personal chemistry. joe biden once recalled a visit to moscow in 2011 — once recalled a visit to moscow in 2011 is — once recalled a visit to moscow in 2011 is as vice president and — in 2011 is as vice president and the _ in 2011 is as vice president and the story goes that he looked _ and the story goes that he looked vladimir putin in eye and concluded that mr putin has no soul and he told him that — has no soul and he told him that. hardly the ingredients for a — that. hardly the ingredients for a beautiful friendship. that. hardly the ingredients fora beautifulfriendship. but for a beautiful friendship. but ithink— fora beautifulfriendship. but i think there will be a degree of pragmatism on both sides that— of pragmatism on both sides that could help secure agreements on pressing
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agreements on pressing agreements such as a nuclear arms— agreements such as a nuclear arms control treaty that expires— arms control treaty that expires in a few days time. that— expires in a few days time. that was— expires in a few days time. that was steve there in moscow. laura in london, you have long experience of washington and you know how important the messaging is. nowi you know how important the messaging is. now i am conscious of this being an old white bloke speaking to a white woman, but this message on colour. kamala harris the first woman of colour as vice president but the young poet, amanda gorman, a recent harvard graduate, the youngest poet in recent history created a presidential inauguration and she says she is running for president in 2036. t she says she is running for president in 2036.- she says she is running for president in 2036. i know. and - resident president in 2036. i know. and president biden's _ president in 2036. i know. and president biden's cabinet - president in 2036. i know. and president biden's cabinet is - president biden's cabinet is confirmed and it will be the most diverse that america has ever seen. most diverse that america has everseen. his most diverse that america has ever seen. his nominee for homeland security secretary would be the first hispanic man ever to have thatjob. he has
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got leading black economists filling key economic posts and kamala harris, as you were just saying, is making history on two fronts. not only is she the first woman ever to be vice president but she is both jamaican and indian in dissent and so she is breaking barriers all over the place. remember four years ago in new york city, hillary clinton had a special glass ceiling that had been built in the jacobjavits centre that was supposed to shatter when she was elected president. of course that did not happen but now, the biden administration, four years later, despite being headed by a white logo, nonetheless is going to be the most diverse in history. and despite american —— across america tonight and across the world, people are
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seeing someone that looks like them and that is the symbolism of america that is so powerful. and a brutal truth of in there that we have the oldest president to take office. people, when they were voting for this ticket they had to see kamala harris as a possible president. ladies and gentlemen. the vice president— ladies and gentlemen. the vice president of— ladies and gentlemen. the vice president of the _ ladies and gentlemen. the vice president of the united - ladies and gentlemen. the vice president of the united states, | president of the united states, carmela — president of the united states, carmela d _ president of the united states, carmela d harris. _ president of the united states, carmela d harris. —— _ president of the united states, carmela d harris. —— kamala. president of the united states, carmela d harris. —— kamala d| carmela d harris. —— kamala d harris —
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carmela d harris. -- kamala d harris. , , harris. good evening. it is my honour to _ harris. good evening. it is my honour to be _ harris. good evening. it is my honour to be here, _ harris. good evening. it is my honour to be here, to - harris. good evening. it is my honour to be here, to stand . harris. good evening. it is my| honour to be here, to stand on the shoulders of those who came before, to speak tonight is your vice president. in ways, this moment embodies our character as a nation. it demonstrates who we are, even in dark times. we not only dream, we do. we not only see what has been, we see what can be. we shoot for the moon and then we plant our flag on be. we shoot for the moon and then we plant ourflag on it. we are bold, fearless and ambitious. we are undaunted in our belief that we shall overcome, that we will rise up. this is american aspiration. in
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the middle of the civil war, abraham lincoln saw a better future and built it in the middle of the civil rights movement, dr king fought for racial justice in american justice. aspiration is what drove the women of this nation throughout history to demand equal rights and the authors of the bill of rights to claim freedoms that had rarely been written down before. a great experiment takes great determination. the will to do the work and then the wisdom to keep refining, keep tinkering, keep perfecting, the same determination is being realised in america today. i see it in the scientists were
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transforming the future.

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