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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  January 20, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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i, joseph robinette bidenjr, do solemnly swear... ..that i will faithfully execute... ..the office of president of the united states. today at six: joe biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the united states of america. he inherits a pandemic untamed and a nation divided — few incoming presidents have faced such great challenges. today, on this january day, my whole soul is in this — bringing america together, uniting our people,
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uniting our nation. and i ask every american tojoin me in this cause. applause. kamala harris becomes the first woman to hold the office of vice president — anotherfirst, her black and asian heritage. donald trump skips the ceremony and heads off to florida — he says he'll be back in some form. america is at a turning point and we'll be reporting on what it means for that country — and the rest of the world. also tonight: terrified patients, exhausted nhs staff and wards full to bursting — how the royal derby hospital is coping with the pandemic. a further 1008 —— a further 1821 coronavirus deaths been recorded. more flood warnings for england as storm christoph pushes through — there've been rescues, roads closed and rail services suspended. in half—an—hour, we will rejoin
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katty kay in washington for continuing coverage of the dayjoe biden is inaugurated as us president. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. just a couple of hours agojoe biden took the oath of office, becoming the 46th president of the united states of america. he does so at a time when both politics and people are deeply divided. speaking at the capitol — the scene of a failed insurrection two weeks ago — mr biden said his victory was not a triumph for one candidate but for democracy. listening to him was kamala harris, his vice president — the first woman to hold the office. her black and asian heritage is also a first. conspicuous by his absence from the ceremony was donald trump,
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who broke tradition and headed off to florida pledging he would be "back in some form." his departure ends one of the most turbulent presidencies in us history — and one that shapes the challenges facing the new incumbent of the white house. 0ur north america correspondent, nick bryant, is live in washington for us. the united states of america is under new and very different management. presidentjoe biden. the management. presidentjoe biden. the man he took over from did management. presidentjoe biden. the man he took overfrom did not management. presidentjoe biden. the man he took over from did not even stick around it washington to watch the transfer of power. donald trump is not presidency is over, the page of history has turned. the american story has taken an ugly turn, its capital city under what looks like military operation, a wire and clipboard citadel. the
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trump years ended with an attack on us democracy, the storming of the capitol, the backdrop for the inaugural commemorations, so troops are on the street to stop american fighting american. the tradition is for departing presidents to meet their successor at the front door of their successor at the front door of the white house, but donald trump left out the back, the first us leader not to attend the inauguration in more than 150 years, his snub tojoe biden part of a graceless exit. in his last minutes and he continued to trash the norms of presidential behaviour, stating this farewell ceremony before boarding air force one. —— staging this farewell ceremony. the reality tv president choreographed in his season finale. it is tv president choreographed in his season finale.— season finale. it is my greatest honour and _ season finale. it is my greatest honour and privilege _ season finale. it is my greatest honour and privilege to - season finale. it is my greatest honour and privilege to have i season finale. it is my greatest i honour and privilege to have been your president. the future of this
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country has never been better. i wish the new administration great loss and great success. —— great luck and great success. goodbye, we love you, we will be back in some form. ~ . , ., ., form. he left washington to the strains of the _ form. he left washington to the strains of the village _ form. he left washington to the strains of the village people's l strains of the village people's ymca, a beat music for a president with an impeachment trial hanging over him which could disqualify him from running for office again. he remains an heroic figure for many conservatives, and american strongman they would love to see return. he flew out of town with a final show man flourish. # i did it my weight off because it did it his way. joe biden began the day in prayer, a father who lost a baby daughter and a grown—up son, a husband who lost his first wife. in
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a time of so much mourning his personal anguish became part of his political appeal. then he was ridden to capitol hill and greeted by an honour guard of the police officers who were overrun by the pro—trump model. 0nly who were overrun by the pro—trump model. only two weeks ago the platform for the inauguration was a staging post for the assault on the us capitol, a site of interaction, but now it filled up with america's political establishment, three of the former living presidents, democratic republican, observing the long—running tradition that the transfer of power should be bipartisan. also here, donald trump's vice president mike pence, himself a target of the mob. he decided to attend the inauguration rather than his boss's farewell. covid has made this a crowd free ceremonial, the place on the national mall normally occupied with
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supporters of the new president planted with flags on honour of the 400,000 americans who had died of the coronavirus. joe biden, accompanied by his wife doctorjill biden, this is the culmination of an almost 50 year politicaljourney which included decades of public service as a senator on capitol hill and vice president under barack 0bama. his candidacy did not generate huge excitement, and today he co—opted the star power of lady gaga to perform the national anthem. # for the land of the free djokovic then came the swearing in of kamala harris, in the spotlight of history, the first black, the first indian american, the first woman ever to serve as vice president. 50 american, the first woman ever to serve as vice president.— american, the first woman ever to serve as vice president. so help me god. her serve as vice president. so help me god- her story _ serve as vice president. so help me god. her story personified - serve as vice president. so help me god. her story personified the - god. her story personified the american _ god. her story personified the american dream _ god. her story personified the american dream and - god. her story personified the american dream and many - god. her story personified the | american dream and many see god. her story personified the - american dream and many see her as the face of the american future, the
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deputy to the country's oldest ever leader, a possible president in waiting. then it was time forjoe biden to take his solemn pledge. i, joseph robinette bidenjr, do solemnly swear... ..that i will faithfully execute... ..the office of president of the united states. and will to the best of my ability... ..preserve, protect and defend... ..the constitution of the united states. congratulations, mr president. cheering and applause. no modern day president has faced so many overlapping crises. this was a transfer of diminished us power. democracy is precious, democracy is fragile, and at this hour, my friends, democracy has prevailed. here is my message to those beyond
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our borders. america has been tested and we have come out stronger for it. we will repair our alliances and engage with the world once again. not to meet yesterday's challenges, but to date's and tomorrow's. his inau . ural but to date's and tomorrow's. his inaugural address spoke of his overriding mission to heal a broken land ridden with so much political and racial division. this land ridden with so much political and racial division.— and racial division. this is our historic moments _ and racial division. this is our historic moments of - and racial division. this is our historic moments of crisis - and racial division. this is our| historic moments of crisis and challenge, and unity is the path forward. it challenge, and unity is the path forward. , ., forward. it is often said unsuccessful _ forward. it is often said i unsuccessful presidential forward. it is often said _ unsuccessful presidential candidates that they do not use the time, the tight jeans that they do not use the time, the tightjeans —— is often said of successful. that might be true of presidentjoe biden, a man who has experienced so much personal grief. america has a new occupant of the white house and donald trump is now a former president. to many in america and around the world dated
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his loss of power that is the most significant events of the day —— it is his loss of power. nick bryant, bbc news, washington. donald trump lost the election but the people who voted for him — more than 70 million of them — are still there. if presidentjoe biden is to make good on his pledge to heal the political wounds and unite his nation he will have to address their concerns. 0ur correspondent aleem maqbool has travelled to texas to meet some of those who still owe their allegiance to mr trump. the inauguration here is marked by an upturned flag, so convinced is eric braden that donald trump somehow had the election stolen from him. copy that, guys, i appreciate y'all very much. southern patriot council. eric's been so angry he's been eating his right—wing militia onto the streets. —— he has been leading. today we're coming here to the capitol in austin,
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for many reasons. none of them good. back in his trailer home, he tells me he'll never accept joe biden as president and that, for him, the inauguration is a signal that his country is dying before his very eyes. the stars & stripes outside is upside down. in distress. yes, sir. yeah. it is. we are... america is deeply in distress and we are on the moment and the brink of complete division. which looks like what? division? what it looks like is states like texas, that actually have a legal right to leave the union, will do that. that's fanciful, but it is an indication of the strength of feeling there is. the assault on the us capitol has illustrated to many americans the extent to which the right is prepared to go to lodge its protest. it is continuing to do so at state capitals across the country. but the events of the last year have shown that the left in america is also prepared to disrupt and make
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it presence felt. last summer they were roused into action not by misinformation from a president but the killing of george floyd. protest leaderjay gutierrez fears he'll be arrested many more times fighting white supremacy in america especially now, as he sees it, the white has been emboldened. well, there is going to be, you know, chaos in some way. there's going to be uprisings from their end, there's going to continue to be uprisings from our end of wanting to see change and wanting to see justice prevail. so i just think that you're going to see that intensify. i don't think in any way, shape orform, biden winning, i don't see, you know, there to be peace from this point. others on the left say the issues of inequality and poverty are ones that will keep them fighting too. eric and his militia mate tim wanted to show
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off their preparedness for the battles they are expecting. explosion. yee—ha! he chuckles. oh, yeah, we've got a problem. it was a bit of a game, but one that ended up starting a fire that quickly spread. what the coming months bring... hey, get that water hose! ..may not be as comical or as easy to contain. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in texas. dealing with america's political and racial divisions are among the major issues facing the new president. at home, top of the agenda will be taking control of the coronavirus pandemic in which 400,000 americans have died. alongside that will be the need to stimulate an economy that's lost more than ten million jobs over the last year. abroad, he's expected to re—engage with international bodies and treaties. later today, the us is expected to rejoin the paris climate agreement. and there's the challenge of dealing with china, russia and iran,
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as well as renewing ties with old allies like the uk. more on that relationship in a moment with our political editor laura kuenssberg, but first our north america editor jon sopel is in washington. has there ever been a president in living memory that has the kind of inbox thatjoe biden has? ida. i inbox that joe biden has? no, i don't think— inbox that joe biden has? no, i don't think so. _ inbox that joe biden has? no, i don't think so. a _ inbox that joe biden has? no, i don't think so. a new _ inbox that joe biden has? no, i don't think so. a new presidentj don't think so. a new president coming in, inheriting the most appalling situations, wherever you look across the political waterfront, the state of the economy because of the pandemic, then the pandemic and the fact there are 400,000 dead and a roll—out of the vaccine that is going very slowly, you look at the racial tensions left by the death of george floyd and the aftermath of a number of incidents of that nature which have left people feeling fractious and uneasy, so what we will see from joe biden in these opening date is a flurry of
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executive orders committing he can sign that you not need congressional approval. but big legislation will still be difficult, the senate is on a knife edge, he cannot get his legislation passed easily. then become due today, he talked about a winter of peril facing america become due today, he talked about a winter of perilfacing america —— then we come to today. two weeks ago donald trump just addresses supporters and they marched on the capitol. it seemed the most perilous moment for american democracy. mob rule ruled two weeks ago. today we have had the triumph of democracy but nobody should be under any illusion that it is still fragile and joe biden has a tightrope to walk. he wants to repudiate trump, with pdh to them, that he wants to carry donald trump supported back towards him, back towards the idea that there can be a united states of
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america. ., ., that there can be a united states of america. . . , ., , that there can be a united states of america. . . , .,, ., that there can be a united states of america. . . , ., , ., . ,, america. laura, people often talk about a special— america. laura, people often talk about a special relationship, - america. laura, people often talk about a special relationship, what will that look like withjoe biden and borisjohnson? boulderfriend to boulder friend to the last four years, but this really matters to us here, because british prime ministers like to see american presidents as their closest diplomatic friends, they have pretty much _ diplomatic friends, they have pretty much unrivalled friendships when it comes_ much unrivalled friendships when it comes to _ much unrivalled friendships when it comes to security, defence and common— comes to security, defence and common interest on so many other things. _ common interest on so many other things. and — common interest on so many other things, and when donald trump was in the white _ things, and when donald trump was in the white house, that friend was pretty— the white house, that friend was pretty unreliable and unpredictable, and with_ pretty unreliable and unpredictable, and withjoe biden, therefore, they see this _ and withjoe biden, therefore, they see this as— and withjoe biden, therefore, they see this as an important and positive _ see this as an important and positive turning of the page, not 'ust positive turning of the page, not just because he has been completely clear that _ just because he has been completely clear that he wants to breathe life back into — clear that he wants to breathe life back into those international partnerships like nato or the united nations, _ partnerships like nato or the united nations, that the uk needs for its voice _ nations, that the uk needs for its voice to— nations, that the uk needs for its voice to he — nations, that the uk needs for its voice to be heard on the world
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stage. — voice to be heard on the world stage. but— voice to be heard on the world stage, but also because downing street— stage, but also because downing street thinksjoe biden cares stage, but also because downing street thinks joe biden cares about the same _ street thinks joe biden cares about the same issues that borisjohnson wants— the same issues that borisjohnson wants to _ the same issues that borisjohnson wants to make a mark on, particularly taking real action against — particularly taking real action against climate change, one of the priorities— against climate change, one of the priorities for this government, a real priority after the pandemic. and for— real priority after the pandemic. and for those reasons, downing street— and for those reasons, downing street hopes there will be fewer fireworks, less drama, and a more dependable — fireworks, less drama, and a more dependable friend.— fireworks, less drama, and a more dependable friend. laura in london, jon in washington, _ dependable friend. laura in london, jon in washington, thank— dependable friend. laura in london, jon in washington, thank you - dependable friend. laura in london, jon in washington, thank you both. | to other news now, and there's been more grim news on the coronavirus front, with the number of covid deaths recorded in the last 24 hours more than 1,800, a higher figure than at any time during the pandemic. this week, we've been focussing on the pressures facing hospitals and their staff in the current wave of the pandemic. today, we report from the royal derby hospital. it has postponed most non—urgent surgery, transferred some patients to other hospitals, and redeployed staff to work in intensive care. here's our medical editor, fergus walsh. i've been in nursing for 33 years,
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and i have never seen anything like this. in all honesty, it is physically and emotionally exhausting. i don't think anyone feels that i we've seen the worst of this yet. if we carry on in this trajectory, we'll be completely overwhelmed in a couple of weeks. the warnings keep coming, and notjust from london. this is the royal derby hospital. nearly half its patients have covid. paul robinson is 50. he's terrified. i had an horrendous night, and i messaged my wife this morning just to say that i wasn't sure if i was going to survive. we've just bought ourselves a new beautiful bungalow, which we're supposed to be moving into. and it's our dream. and i may not see it. the intensive care unit has doubled in size and is still growing, but they've already had to transfer some critically ill patients
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to other hospitals. this time, — it's been a perfect storm, really, of the new variant's arrived, we've hit winter at just the wrong time, christmas has arrived at exactly the worst time it could have done, and there'sjust been a steady, inexorable rise of cases. we are still on the upramp of patients coming through. check the length on the remaining line, please. | caring for those patients places huge demands on staff. one, two, three, roll. every icu uses this procedure, proning — turning patients on their front to help their breathing. this is the very definition of intensive care. all over the country, there are medical teams like this one trying to keep thousands of covid patients alive. all that and coping with other winter pressures as well. there is light amid the darkness.
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treatments are getting better — steroids and some arthritis drugs have greatly improved the chances of survival. but to provide care, you need staff. so many are off sick, those left are drained. on one shift, nurses had to walk past covid deniers demonstrating outside the hospital. we've got staff who are absolutely exhausted and traumatised, a lot of staff are struggling with their mental health. the nurses are coming in and working extremely hard. a lot of them are doing extra shifts, they're all exhausted. and then to see protesters saying it's not real, for the nurses then to come in. those on the covid front line say if the public could see through their eyes, they'd take more care. it's not a hoax, it's very real, people are dying daily within the hospital, and i myself have held the hand of patients that are dying within the department. i think people need to take it a little bit more seriously,
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and i don't think they're aware of the impact. the emergency department has separate entrances for covid and non—covid patients. like scores of other hospitals across the uk, they're approaching the limit. if we reach a point where the hospital is so full that we can't get patients out the emergency department in a timely fashion, the whole system down here comes to a halt, and that's where we start holding patients on ambulances, that's where we start to see the real risks of patient harm creeping up in the emergency department. there is a path out of the pandemic via the vaccine, but the benefits won't be felt here for many weeks. for now, hospitals are bracing for worse to come. fergus walsh, bbc news, derby. well, today's latest government coronavirus figures show there were 38,905 new coronavirus
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infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means that on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week is 42,026. as you can see, that number is falling. across the uk, an average of 39,068 people were in hospital with coronavirus over the seven days to sunday, including suspected cases in wales. 1,820 deaths were reported. that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. as we've heard, that's the biggest single total reported so far. on average in the past week, 1,218 deaths were announced every day. the total number of deaths so far across the uk is 93,290. let's get an update on the uk's programme of mass vaccinations. 343,163 people have had their first dose of one of the three approved covid—19 vaccines
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in the latest 24—hour period, taking the overall number of people who've had their firstjab to 4,609,740. borisjohnson has chaired another meeting of the government's emergency cobra committee this afternoon to discuss the danger of flooding caused by storm christoph. emergency services in south yorkshire, cheshire, and greater manchester have already declared major incidents. and people living in the north west, yorkshire and the midlands are being urged to prepare for the risk of significant flooding. danny savage is in york. george, this view of a swollen river behind me has replicated right across northern england, the
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midlands, parts of wales as well. will it be enough, though, to cause serious damage? that is still unclear, but it is going to be touch and go in some areas. the rain today has been especially heavy throughout daylight areas, but some people have had a lucky escape from flood water over the last 24 hours. tea—time last night — a supermarket delivery van is on its side in the river wear in westgate in county durham. the van driver has scrambled out of a side window and is now sitting on top. people living nearby heard him shouting for help. they believe he followed satnav directions through a ford and was swept away. he was rescued cold but unharmed by specialist firefighters. in south manchester tonight, there is concern that flood defences may not cope in the didsbury and northenden areas. the worst—case scenario is that 3000 homes may have to be evacuated, although people are flummoxed about where they can go in a pandemic.
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i don't know where they think you could go at the last minute, and you can't go to family, because you're isolating, you can't go to friends, because you don't want to risk putting them in danger. there's a big band of rain that's hitting the whole of the country, but predominantly across that central region, so merseyside, cheshire, manchester, derbyshire, the yorkshire area as well. that's where we are seeing some of the heaviest impact at this moment. a lot of water is now coming down the rivers of northern england and wales. in york, flood defences and sandbags are being put in place. the river here won't peak until tomorrow. riverside properties are most at risk. evacuating is problematic. neil mcclure lives in one of the houses here. covid makes it that bit more uncertain, because if we do flood, we'll have to evacuate, we've got a little toddler, so we will have to evacuate. in worcestershire, temporary flood defences are being built by the river severn in bewdley. with more rain forecast, many rivers are yet to peak. the situation may get worse over the next couple of days.
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danny savage, bbc news, york. let's return to our main story. as we've heard, 56—year—old kamala harris, the new vice president, has made history today. 0ur correspodent lebo diseko has been looking at her political career and route to power. ladies and gentlemen, the vice president—elect of the united states, kamala devi harris, and mr douglas emhoff. it took nearly 250 years for america to reach this moment, for a woman to hold the second highest office in the country. i, kamala devi harris, do solemnly sweart. .. that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states... the streets here might be uncharacteristically empty today, but make no mistake — millions of americans are heralding this as the start of a new era as kamala harris takes office. america's new vice president is the daughter of immigrants, born to an indian mother and jamaican father.
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both were involved in the civil—rights movement of the 1960s, something she says shaped her. that quest for justice perhaps the motivation for her career in law, rising to become the attorney general of her home state of california. but there are those who say she is not the progressive prosecutor that she claims to be. they point to an approach they say was too harsh on black men and say she didn't do enough to tackle police brutality. i stand before you today to announce my candidacy for president of the united states. in 2019, she launched her own bid to become us president. it was unsuccessful, but there was one particularly memorable moment. during a debate, she hit out atjoe biden for working with senators who'd supported racial segregation and for his opposition to bussing
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black children to white schools. you know, there was a little girl in california who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bussed to schools, and she was bussed to school every day, and that little girl was me. it didn't stop mr biden from choosing her as his running mate. we did it, we did it, joe! you're going to be the next president of the united states. for her childhood friend, this is a moment that she was made for. did you see this in herfuture, when you were kids or teenagers? absolutely not! we were just like teenagers now, we were bad! we hung out... no, but as she progressed into our world and got into the da's office and then the attorney general, i saw, yes, you know, you could be the president of the united states. and look at you, she's right here. kamala harris is a step away from the presidency, but with this honour comes the burden of expectation and responsibility. the wounds inflicted by america's
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divisions are still raw. she will have to try and heal a country in chaos while carrying the weight of her historic victory. lebo diseko, bbc news, washington. let's get a final thought from our north america editor, jon sopel. time for a look at the weather here's chris fawkes. a number of flood warnings rising very quickly through this afternoon, but now nearly 140 flood warnings and falls across parts of england and falls across parts of england and wales, and those numbers will probably to rise for some time. a met office amber warning for rain is in force until tomorrow morning, and as well as that, over recent hours, we have seen rain turned to snow in scotland, and across southern scotland, and across southern scotland is warning for 10—30 centimetres of snow, blizzards developing later. clearly a sharp knife edge between the rain and snow, it is not out of the question that we will see snow work into north—east england as well. we could
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see 5—10 centimetres here, but a lot of uncertainty about that kind of detail. it will be very windy later in the night across eastern areas, with gusts reaching 50—60 mph, strong enough to wake you from your slumber and potentially bring down the odd tree. if that wasn't enough, fog in scotland, frost across the northern half of the uk, and some ice into thursday morning, a real smorgasbord of weather, none of it too on thursday, the low pressure pulls into the north sea, rain at lower levels, notice the rain easing off, but all of that range from recent days will flow down the river catchments, so even long after it has stopped raining, we could see flood and getting worse before it gets better for flood and getting worse before it gets betterfor some hard—hit gets better for some hard—hit communities. gets betterfor some hard—hit communities. it will be a cold day thanks to the winds, and that continues into friday. an icy start to the day for some with morning frost around, plenty of sunshine,
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wintry and frequent showers

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