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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  January 18, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — an unorthodox us presidency is set for an unconventional ending. donald trump won't even show up to watchjoe biden sworn in on wednesday. it is just the latest break with tradition — adding to mr trump's controversial legacy. also unprecedented — the enormous security. on every corner of the city, soldiers, weapons and armored vehicles. the tools of war for the purpose of peace. washington's recent past casts a shadow over the celebration of democracy. there's shocking new footage of the riot at the capitol. also in the programme.... we have a special report from a london hospital where staff and resources are stretched to the limit. plus, the encouraging news that more than four million people in the uk have now had the first dose of the coronavirus vaccine — including half of over—80s.
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hello, i'm katty kay in washington — james reynolds is in london. vehicle checkpoints. roads shut down. and 25,000 troops deployed on the pentagon's authorization. this isn't baghdad's green zone — it's washington, district of columbia — 44 hours before joe biden's inauguration. so much for america's famed peaceful transfer of power. but there's no choice. security officials are determined to prevent any repeat of the events of january 6th, when that deadly pro—trump mob stormed the us capitol in a failed bid to prevent mr biden's victory from being certified. already, huge chunks of the capitol have been shut down. this entire area — highlighted in red — is closed to traffic.
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and non—scalable fencing has been put around the us capitol and national mall. in the blocks beyond — highlighted in green — only vehicles belonging to local residents and businesses are permitted. law enforcement officials are bracing for the worst — even the possibility of insider attacks from within the us security apparatus. the army secretary ryan mccarthy says he is "conscious" of the possibility of this. the fbi is vetting all 25,000 national guard troops on duty. officials are "taking second, third looks at every one of the individuals assigned to this operation," he said. let's speak to michael german — a former fbi special agent who is now a fellow with the brennan center forjustice�*s liberty and national security programme. thank you forjoining us. let's start with this concern that there may be sympathisers within the security services who might try to mount some kind of attack to disrupt the inauguration process. has this
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always been a worry, or is it particular to this moment in american history?— particular to this moment in american history? thank you for havin: american history? thank you for having me- _ american history? thank you for having me- it — american history? thank you for having me. it has _ american history? thank you for having me. it has been - american history? thank you for having me. it has been a - american history? thank you for i having me. it has been a persistent roblem, having me. it has been a persistent problem. that _ having me. it has been a persistent problem, that lot _ having me. it has been a persistent problem, that lot enforcement - having me. it has been a persistent| problem, that lot enforcement have lon- problem, that lot enforcement have long acknowledged, and in fact, even in their_ long acknowledged, and in fact, even in their2015— long acknowledged, and in fact, even in their 2015 counterterrorism policy — in their 2015 counterterrorism policy guide, they directed... because _ policy guide, they directed... because they found that the subjects of these _ because they found that the subjects of these investigations often have links to _ of these investigations often have links to law enforcement. so it is unfortunately a problem that has been _ unfortunately a problem that has been recognised but has not been aggressively addressed... i mean, that is sort — aggressively addressed... i mean, that is sort of _ aggressively addressed... i mean, that is sort of terrifying. _ aggressively addressed... i mean, that is sort of terrifying. does - that is sort of terrifying. does that is sort of terrifying. does that account for what happened on january six to some extent? maybe there are white supremacist groups not taken seriously, and we have
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seen video of this. police sort of letting them have their free reign of the senate building. mat letting them have their free reign of the senate building.— of the senate building. not only that, the attack _ of the senate building. not only that, the attack on _ of the senate building. not only that, the attack on the - of the senate building. not only that, the attack on the capitol l of the senate building. not only i that, the attack on the capitol was not the _ that, the attack on the capitol was not the first of these violent public — not the first of these violent public assaults. the orig on doors were _ public assaults. the orig on doors were breached. only a month before, a far right _ were breached. only a month before, a far right militant group rampaged through— a far right militant group rampaged through dc at a pro—tramp rally, attacking — through dc at a pro—tramp rally, attacking residents and local establishments, including a black church _ establishments, including a black church 50 — establishments, including a black church. so this is not something new _ church. so this is not something new this— church. so this is not something new. this public violence has been happening — new. this public violence has been happening across the united states for the _ happening across the united states for the last four years, and even though— for the last four years, and even though these militants have been travelling around the country to engage — travelling around the country to engage in— travelling around the country to engage in this violence,... what
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engage in this violence, . .. what does the biden _ engage in this violence,... twist does the biden administration need to do? , ., ., ., ., . to do? first of all, law enforcement have all of— to do? first of all, law enforcement have all of the _ to do? first of all, law enforcement have all of the authority _ to do? first of all, law enforcement have all of the authority they - to do? first of all, law enforcement have all of the authority they need. | have all of the authority they need. obviously. — have all of the authority they need. obviously, there is no type of violence — obviously, there is no type of violence that is legal. they have the authority, theyjust need to direct— the authority, theyjust need to direct the — the authority, theyjust need to direct the justice department and the fbl _ direct the justice department and the fbi. this is not hard, because most _ the fbi. this is not hard, because most of— the fbi. this is not hard, because most of it— the fbi. this is not hard, because most of it has been in public over the last— most of it has been in public over the last four years, so many of the people _ the last four years, so many of the people who — the last four years, so many of the people who are at the capitol were actually _ people who are at the capitol were actually committing violence in cities _ actually committing violence in cities across the united states, so it really— cities across the united states, so it really shouldn't be that hard of a challenge to go and identify these people _ a challenge to go and identify these people. one of the bigger challenges will he _ people. one of the bigger challenges will be identifying people in law enforcement who have sympathies, and a-ain enforcement who have sympathies, and again law— enforcement who have sympathies, and again law enforcement has all of the authorities— again law enforcement has all of the authorities they need. the fbi has jurisdiction. theyjust need to prioritise _ jurisdiction. theyjust need to prioritise that. jurisdiction. they 'ust need to prioritise that.— jurisdiction. they “ust need to prioritise that. thank you very
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much. prioritise that. thank you very much- also — prioritise that. thank you very much. also under _ prioritise that. thank you very much. also under the - prioritise that. thank you very l much. also under the spotlight prioritise that. thank you very . much. also under the spotlight is the number of police officers who might have actually taken part in the events on capitol hill. a veteran houston police officer has been identified as being among the mob who stormed the capitol. the officer has since resigned and is facing a federal investigation. we're joined now by the houston chief of police art acevedo. how did that officers slip through? he has actually been a good employee. having said that, the last four years _ employee. having said that, the last four years in this country, the political— four years in this country, the political divide has been so deep, so heated. — political divide has been so deep, so heated, the rhetoric has been over— so heated, the rhetoric has been over the — so heated, the rhetoric has been over the top. this call for action we have — over the top. this call for action we have been hearing from elected officials, _ we have been hearing from elected officials, now he is facing federal charges —
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officials, now he is facing federal charges and he is gone. it is a tough — charges and he is gone. it is a tough time for our country, but i think— tough time for our country, but i think we — tough time for our country, but i think we have to make our efforts that much— think we have to make our efforts that much more diligent, because... what _ that much more diligent, because... what kind _ that much more diligent, because... what kind of— that much more diligent, because... what kind of betting will you now need to put in place? we what kind of betting will you now need to put in place?— need to put in place? we do very thorou~h need to put in place? we do very thorough vetting. _ need to put in place? we do very thorough vetting. we _ need to put in place? we do very thorough vetting. we look - need to put in place? we do very thorough vetting. we look at - need to put in place? we do very l thorough vetting. we look at social media, _ thorough vetting. we look at social media, we — thorough vetting. we look at social media, we visit neighbours, you name it, media, we visit neighbours, you name it. we _ media, we visit neighbours, you name it. we check— media, we visit neighbours, you name it. we check it — media, we visit neighbours, you name it, we check it. part of the problem is that— it, we check it. part of the problem is that a _ it, we check it. part of the problem is that a lot — it, we check it. part of the problem is that a lot of the social media is now going — is that a lot of the social media is now going to a dark space, and so it is not _ now going to a dark space, and so it is not as— now going to a dark space, and so it is not as easy— now going to a dark space, and so it is not as easy as it has been in the past _ is not as easy as it has been in the past to— is not as easy as it has been in the past to he — is not as easy as it has been in the past to be able to find some of the folks that — past to be able to find some of the folks that may be within our ranks. at the _ folks that may be within our ranks. at the end — folks that may be within our ranks. at the end of the day, our most important — at the end of the day, our most important asset is the community itself~ _ important asset is the community itself. people know who these people are, and _ itself. people know who these people are, and quite frankly when you see what _ are, and quite frankly when you see what happens at our nation's capitol. _ what happens at our nation's capitol, people need to step up. we
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have capitol, people need to step up. have seen capitol, people need to step up. - have seen extraordinary new footage from inside the senate chamber of some of these rioters, and it is pretty clear that many of them are associated with white supremacist groups. on a personal level, given all that you have done, your leadership in the black lives matter protests, i wasjust leadership in the black lives matter protests, i was just wondering how you felt on a personal level when you felt on a personal level when you found out that a member of the houston police force had been there with these rioters? i houston police force had been there with these rioters?— with these rioters? i cannot tell ou the with these rioters? i cannot tell you the sense _ with these rioters? i cannot tell you the sense of _ with these rioters? i cannot tell you the sense of anger- with these rioters? i cannot tell you the sense of anger and - with these rioters? i cannot tell- you the sense of anger and betrayal. i you the sense of anger and betrayal. i checked _ you the sense of anger and betrayal. i checked my e—mail late sunday night _ i checked my e—mail late sunday night i_ i checked my e—mail late sunday night. i think that most of our officers — night. i think that most of our officers felt betrayed. from this challenge comes an opportunity. the opportunity for us all to double down _ opportunity for us all to double down on — opportunity for us all to double down on our efforts. we read bad
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cops— down on our efforts. we read bad cops out, — down on our efforts. we read bad cops out, not to mention that people from society. we saw it in oklahoma city with _ from society. we saw it in oklahoma city with the — from society. we saw it in oklahoma city with the bombing. now we see it again— city with the bombing. now we see it again with _ city with the bombing. now we see it again with the attack on the capital~ _ again with the attack on the ca - ital. ~ ., again with the attack on the caital, . ., , again with the attack on the caital.~ . , , ., ., capital. we have spoken before about the need to restore _ capital. we have spoken before about the need to restore trust _ capital. we have spoken before about the need to restore trust in _ capital. we have spoken before about the need to restore trust in police - the need to restore trust in police forces. what specifically are you doing in the light of the attack on the capital, and on the new awareness of these right—wing groups and how they are going online. what are you doing specifically to try to combat that and restore trust in your police force? i combat that and restore trust in your police force?— combat that and restore trust in your police force? i think the fact that... your police force? i think the fact that- -- two _ your police force? i think the fact that... two things, _ your police force? i think the fact that... two things, add _ your police force? i think the fact that... two things, add some - that... two things, add some context _ that... two things, add some context. when you look at the capitol — context. when you look at the capitol attack, it looks like officers _ capitol attack, it looks like officers were not doing much to stop them _ officers were not doing much to stop them but— officers were not doing much to stop them. but we see much more video evidence _ them. but we see much more video evidence of— them. but we see much more video evidence of police officers fighting back _ evidence of police officers fighting back. they were just absolutely overwhelmed. the second this
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information comes in, we take actioh — information comes in, we take actioh -- _ information comes in, we take action. —— disinformation stop we don't _ action. —— disinformation stop we don't grow— action. —— disinformation stop we don't grow cops on petrie dishes. it is important — don't grow cops on petrie dishes. it is important that the community itsetf— is important that the community itself comes forward and helps us identifv — itself comes forward and helps us identi . ., ., itself comes forward and helps us identi . ., ,, , ., itself comes forward and helps us identi . ., ,, i. itself comes forward and helps us identi . ., ~' . itself comes forward and helps us identi . ., ,, . ., identify. thank you so much for “oininu identify. thank you so much for joining us- _ there are now about 43 hours and 50 minutes left of president trump's time in office — there is speculation about his mood. anger and frustration are two of the words being bandied about — after all, this wasn't quite how he'd envisaged the election turning out.
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and no doubt he won't be too pleased by his latest approval ratings. according to the pew research center, mr trump is leaving the white house at an all time low. in august, 38% of the public approved of hisjob performance. that's dropped to just 29%. his popularity is even waning among members of his own party. in august 2020, trump had a 77% approval among self—identified republicans, that's now dropped to 60%. i'v e i've spoken to people who speak to the president at a regular basis. they have described the mood as dark. we are seeing pictures of the moving trucks... dark. we are seeing pictures of the moving trucks. . ._ dark. we are seeing pictures of the moving trucks... they have made it to florida- — moving trucks... they have made it to florida. they _ moving trucks... they have made it to florida. they have _ moving trucks... they have made it to florida. they have made - moving trucks... they have made it to florida. they have made it - moving trucks... they have made it to florida. they have made it to - to florida. they have made it to florida. to florida. they have made it to florida- i— to florida. they have made it to florida. i think— to florida. they have made it to florida. i think it _ to florida. they have made it to florida. i think it is _ to florida. they have made it to florida. i think it is sinking - to florida. they have made it to florida. i think it is sinking in. l florida. i think it is sinking in. and it is unprecedented, the way that donald trump is leaving office. you look at recent history, the first lady has released a video, a
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farewell statement. she has had time to film that, put it up in the white house. it sums up what she thinks her achievements are. that is have a listen to that. be her achievements are. that is have a listen to that-— listen to that. be passionate in everything _ listen to that. be passionate in everything you _ listen to that. be passionate in everything you do. _ listen to that. be passionate in everything you do. remember| listen to that. be passionate in - everything you do. remember that violence _ everything you do. remember that violence is — everything you do. remember that violence is not the answer and will never _ violence is not the answer and will never be _ violence is not the answer and will never be justified. when i came to the white — never be justified. when i came to the white house, i reflected on the responsibility i've always felt as a mother— responsibility i've always felt as a mother to — responsibility i've always felt as a mother to encourage, give it strength— mother to encourage, give it strength and teach values of kindness. strength and teach values of kindness-— strength and teach values of kindness. ., ,, ., ., , kindness. yeah. she found that, but ou don't kindness. yeah. she found that, but you don't have _ kindness. yeah. she found that, but you don't have time _ kindness. yeah. she found that, but you don't have time or— kindness. yeah. she found that, but you don't have time or the _ you don't have time or the inclination to welcome the biden family to the white house. it is tradition that the outgoing president welcomes the incoming president. no courtesy visit. we all remember the sweet time that the bush family welcome the bombers.
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they invited them. —— obamas. showing them the view. none of that has happened. she did it rather well. all of these things that were meant to happen, maybe they look like the trappings of democracy, but that peaceful transfer of power. without that, some of the fabric of that transfer is undermined. true. an a , that transfer is undermined. true. anyway. it — that transfer is undermined. true. anyway. it is _ that transfer is undermined. true. anyway. it is all — that transfer is undermined. true. anyway, it is all unusual— that transfer is undermined. true. anyway, it is all unusual here - that transfer is undermined. true. anyway, it is all unusual here in l anyway, it is all unusual here in washington. for those watching on bbc world news — we'll be right back.
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mps have backed a motion brought by the labour party calling for the £20 a week uplift in universal credit to be continued beyond april. 278 mps voted for the motion, and none against, after the government told conservative mps to abstain. but six tory mps defied the whip to vote with labour. here's the shadow work and pensions secretaryjonathan reynolds opening the debate in the house of commons. when thinking about how to cast a vote today, i urge everyone to take a moment to reflect on what this cut will mean to the people who send us here. the uncertainty it will add in an already uncertain time. the loss it will bring when we have already lost so much. the fear it will cause when what people need is hope. so, for our constituents, for the economy and for the national interest, we need to cancel this cut. well, as the vote was non—binding, the government does not have to change its policy.
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it's position is that it needs more "clarity" about the best way to support low—income families. in the uk, the covid pandemic has left some hospitals at breaking point. ten hospital trusts across england are reporting that they having no spare critical care beds — that's despite extra capacity already being added. on the front line — doctors say it's a relentless struggle to save patients. clive myrie has this special report from the royal london hospital. there are those who must look into the abyss — to spare all of us. how many floors are taken up by covid patients here? we've got patients on the third floor, fourth floor, sixth floor, seventh floor, eighth floor... of 548 beds at the royal london hospital, 420 have covid patients. for ten days, we joined staff
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in one of the uk's biggest intensive care units... yes, still coming. go, go, go. ..at the peak of the second wave... he could die from this, by the way, i'm sorry to have to say that. - ..as a new variant of covid—i9 forces a reckoning for our health service... sorry! so we're now going to run into a problem because we haven't got any beds. ..and a reckoning for us. nobody wants to go through this. i wouldn't wish this on anybody. this really is horrible. as london sleeps, the night shift begins at the royal london hospital. nursing sister carleen kelly makes her way to a job that's crushing her, in the middle of the covid nightmare. sleep isn't what it used to be. there's anxiety when you wake
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up and you remember what you have to go into. we're fragile and, erm, angry. in the emergency department, consultant nick bunker is up to his neck in problems. so, he's got covid and he's had a stroke. a new covid patient has been admitted for every hour he's been on shift. by sam, eight. so we're now going to run into a problem because we haven't got any beds. no beds? so, i had five beds to start the night. we've got two patients next door who need to come in. just down there. thank you. all right. and here's another. where will he go? just bring the back of the bed up. see if that helps. and is he on 100% now? yeah. in pressurised rooms, the patients receive oxygen through masks,
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their condition monitored, but who may need more sustained help from a ventilator? sats below 96. one man's breathing badly falters. just do it, just do it, just do it. he must be intubated, fast. and we watch as medics put him to sleep and push a long plastic tube down his throat, hooking him up to his new breathing machine. when he'll wake up, no—one knows. the news concerning vaccines, however, it does look a little more promising.
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here the uk has become the first country to give emergency approval for 3 different vaccines — it's also the first to change the dosing regime so there's a longer gap betweenjabs. it allows more people to get vaccinated but not to same level of protection. other countries are now deciding if they'll make the same choice. we'rejoined now by dr helen salisbury — a gp based in oxford and a columnist for the british medicaljournal. thank you so much. everyone about my age right now is having the same conversation. "have your parents had the jab?" are there is still conversations you are hearing a lot? absolutely they are conversations we are hearing. it is going well with us. are hearing. it is going well with us we — are hearing. it is going well with us. we have pretty much vaccinated all of— us. we have pretty much vaccinated all of the _ us. we have pretty much vaccinated all of the patients in our little area — all of the patients in our little area who _ all of the patients in our little area who are over 80, and we are now going— area who are over 80, and we are now going down— area who are over 80, and we are now going down to — area who are over 80, and we are now going down to the group between 75 and 80 _ going down to the group between 75 and 80. we have also been able to go out to— and 80. we have also been able to go out to our— and 80. we have also been able to go out to our care homes and vaccinate the people _ out to our care homes and vaccinate the people there. both the staff and the people there. both the staff and the residents. and we have just started —
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the residents. and we have just started being able to visit our housebound elderly. so we are feeling — housebound elderly. so we are feeling quite pleased. the main limiting — feeling quite pleased. the main limiting factor is the amount of vaccine — limiting factor is the amount of vaccine we have. we are always waiting — vaccine we have. we are always waiting for— vaccine we have. we are always waiting for the next delivery. it is amazin: waiting for the next delivery. it is amazing to _ waiting for the next delivery. it is amazing to talk _ waiting for the next delivery. it 3 amazing to talk to a doctor. i can see the smile on your face. that is not something we have seen for a long time. what is your view on the delay of the second dose? yes. long time. what is your view on the delay of the second dose? yes, there was two questions. _ delay of the second dose? yes, there was two questions. one _ delay of the second dose? yes, there was two questions. one was - delay of the second dose? yes, there was two questions. one was about i was two questions. one was about when _ was two questions. one was about when we _ was two questions. one was about when we had already given one dose and promised a second dose, and said it's really— and promised a second dose, and said it's really important when you come in three _ it's really important when you come in three weeks and this is the day and time — in three weeks and this is the day and time you are coming. the question— and time you are coming. the question is— and time you are coming. the question is whether it was right to change _ question is whether it was right to change the course of treatment that they had _ change the course of treatment that they had consented to. i certainly had quite — they had consented to. i certainly had quite a — they had consented to. i certainly had quite a lot of patients with the pfizer— had quite a lot of patients with the pfizer vaccine saying wouldn't it be
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better— pfizer vaccine saying wouldn't it be better to _ pfizer vaccine saying wouldn't it be better to wait for the oxford vaccine _ better to wait for the oxford vaccine i_ better to wait for the oxford vaccine. i felt it was not fair to id vaccine. i felt it was not fair to go back— vaccine. i felt it was not fair to go back on— vaccine. i felt it was not fair to go back on an arrangement that had been made — go back on an arrangement that had been made at very short notice, just a few— been made at very short notice, just a few days _ been made at very short notice, just a few days notice, with our oldest and most — a few days notice, with our oldest and most vulnerable patients. and not being — and most vulnerable patients. and not being able to say, "well, we absolutely — not being able to say, "well, we absolutely can assure you because we have got _ absolutely can assure you because we have got the science and the evidence _ have got the science and the evidence that this will be as good. we do _ evidence that this will be as good. we do know it for the oxford vaccine because _ we do know it for the oxford vaccine because they did test it like that. but with— because they did test it like that. but with the pfizer vaccine, they only really have data on a three—week gap. having said that, i do trust _ three—week gap. having said that, i do trust the — three—week gap. having said that, i do trust the scientists at the joint committee. they know much more about it than— committee. they know much more about it than i_ committee. they know much more about it than i do _ committee. they know much more about it than i do. and i feel quite comfortable going forward being able to say. _ comfortable going forward being able to say, "well, we do not have the evidence. — to say, "well, we do not have the evidence, but our best guess is that we will— evidence, but our best guess is that we will he _ evidence, but our best guess is that we will be out of this pandemic most
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quickly— we will be out of this pandemic most quickly if— we will be out of this pandemic most quickly if we give as many people the first— quickly if we give as many people the first dose as we possibly can and then— the first dose as we possibly can and then come back to give the second — and then come back to give the second dose within three months. we don't know. _ second dose within three months. we don't know, but that is our best guess — don't know, but that is our best guess and _ don't know, but that is our best guess. and i think people will agree on that— guess. and i think people will agree on that basis. it was really about breaking — on that basis. it was really about breaking the arrangement that we had made _ breaking the arrangement that we had made. ., i. ., ., ., ., made. doctor, you have waded into a family discussion. _ made. doctor, you have waded into a family discussion. my _ made. doctor, you have waded into a family discussion. my father - made. doctor, you have waded into a family discussion. my father has - made. doctor, you have waded into a family discussion. my father has had | family discussion. my father has had his firstjob and is still waiting for his second. we have a big debate about whether he now has any protection from having one shot. can you clarify that for us? i understand that is not how the vaccine is designed, but somebody that has had a first shot, are they protected in any way from having had that first shot?— that first shot? they certainly are, and with the _ that first shot? they certainly are, and with the oxford _ that first shot? they certainly are, and with the oxford astrazeneca, | and with the oxford astrazeneca, that is _ and with the oxford astrazeneca, that is how it was designed. with the pfizer— that is how it was designed. with the pfizer shot, we know that at 21
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days people had quite a lot of protection. we don't know exactly what _ protection. we don't know exactly what happens between the 21 days and the 12 weeks stop we have to assume, as with _ the 12 weeks stop we have to assume, as with many— the 12 weeks stop we have to assume, as with many other vaccines, that it will he _ as with many other vaccines, that it will be maintained at a reasonably good _ will be maintained at a reasonably good level. i think people are working — good level. i think people are working on the assumption that maybe with one _ working on the assumption that maybe with one shot you were somewhere around _ with one shot you were somewhere around 70% — with one shot you were somewhere around 70% protected. i don't have the exact— around 70% protected. i don't have the exact figures. 75% of more people — the exact figures. 75% of more people is— the exact figures. 75% of more people is probably better than 95% of fewer _ people is probably better than 95% of fewer people. it people is probably better than 95% of fewer people-— people is probably better than 95% of fewer people. it would mean you do not aet of fewer people. it would mean you do not get as _ of fewer people. it would mean you do not get as severe _ of fewer people. it would mean you do not get as severe symptoms? if| of fewer people. it would mean you i do not get as severe symptoms? if we both got covid, he is more likely to get more severe symptoms than i am? that is something i am not entirely sure about — that is something i am not entirely sure about. the question about it being _ sure about. the question about it being 95%— sure about. the question about it being 95% effective. is that that
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one in_ being 95% effective. is that that one in 20 — being 95% effective. is that that one in 20 people will get covid, but the other— one in 20 people will get covid, but the other won't at all. 0r one in 20 people will get covid, but the other won't at all. or that most people _ the other won't at all. or that most people that — the other won't at all. or that most people that have it will only get a few symptoms stop i think it is probably— few symptoms stop i think it is probably a mixture of the two. for the pfizer— probably a mixture of the two. for the pfizer shot, we do know that the only people that got covid got it mildly — only people that got covid got it mildly. no one was hospitalised after— mildly. no one was hospitalised after the — mildly. no one was hospitalised after the oxford astrazeneca trial. but i after the oxford astrazeneca trial. but i think— after the oxford astrazeneca trial. but i think we have to come up with all vaccines. — but i think we have to come up with all vaccines, there will be some people — all vaccines, there will be some people that don't respond, and they will he _ people that don't respond, and they will be some people that can still .et will be some people that can still get ilt _ will be some people that can still get ill. really, the vaccine is about— get ill. really, the vaccine is about protecting individuals, but it is more _ about protecting individuals, but it is more about getting us all protected so we can stamp it out. and then — protected so we can stamp it out. and then when it does arise we can find it— and then when it does arise we can find it again— and then when it does arise we can find it again and get rid of it. we have to find it again and get rid of it. have to leave find it again and get rid of it. - have to leave it there. thank you, because you have helped resolve a
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dispute. i'm not going to tell you which side of this dispute i am on. when is a £20 bill worth $57,000? indeed, this is the del monte note — from the 1996 design series. it's unique because the sticker found its way onto the bill between stages of the printing process. as you can see, it has the official seal and the note's serial number printed over it. current bidding for the note is at $57,500. but it's not the first time it's been up for sale — in 2003, the note sold on ebay for 10,000 dollars, and it went under the hammer a few years later — that time going for over 25,000 dollars. you have to say it. bananas if you ask me.
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fraser would be happy. that was for you. hello, there. we've got some heavy persistent rain on the way, it's all down to it's all down to storm christoph. that is going to be working its way in. particular concern is the pennines could see something like 150 millimetres. the met office amber weather warning is out in force for these areas. i have to say, rivers in these areas are already
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running at elevated levels. that's before the bulk of christoph's rain has even begun to arrive. it will start to turn increasingly wet though overnight, and with this zone of heavy rain starting to line up across northern ireland, north wales, the north midlands and northern england, colder air further north in scotland, a few wintry showers here, frost and a risk of some icy stretches. in the south, it's mild — temperatures ten celsius in plymouth. now, through tuesday, parts of the midlands, rain for a time across southern wales, southwest england, brighter further north in scotland, but still with plenty of showers packing into northern areas where we have the cold air. in england and wales, mild, 11—12 celsius, maybe dry and bright across the southeast for most of the day. then into tuesday evening and overnight, into wednesday, we see further pulses of rain falling on increasingly saturated ground. so hour—by—hour, the risk of flooding and potentially some severe flooding is set to increase.
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we still have those big temperature contrasts as well on wednesday, saturated ground. so hour—by—hour, the risk of flooding and potentially some severe flooding is set to increase. we still have those big temperature contrasts as well on wednesday, cold air becoming more widespread in scotland, still mild further south in england and wales. then as we go through wednesday night, an area of low pressure begins to transfer into the north sea, where it deepens. we start to get stronger northerly winds mixing in that cold scottish air. and the rain turns to snow, heavy snow, even down to sea level. but with the snow combined with strong winds, particularly
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for the southern uplands, we are talking about blizzards and drifting. there may be some snow pushing into parts of northern england and north wales as well. so we do have disruptive weather on the way this week with the risk of heavy rain and flooding, maybe severe flooding across parts of northern england and the midlands. as that lot clears through, the rain turns to heavy snow into parts of scotland wednesday night and into thursday causing issues.
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you're watching bbc news with me katty kay in washington, james reynolds is in london. our top stories... a changing of the guard in the us resets relations with lawmakers and diplomats. we'll speak to the uk ambassador to washington, karen pierce, live in the next few minutes. online misinformation dropped dramatically the week after twitter banned president trump and some of his allies, a new report says. likely notjust a coincidence. also in the programme.... plus, no audience, no parties, no president trump. so just how doesjoe biden make his mark on inauguration day? we'll speak to a tv producer who's directed countless major events for the democratic party. and i'll be testing james on his knowledge of inagurations gone by. there's only been 58 just
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a few things to remember. every four to eight years, when the keys to the white house change hands — washington buzzes with lawmakers and lobbyists hoping to make inroads with the incoming administration. and that extends to diplomats also — who now must work with new white house staff, and learn to laugh at newjokes. for governments like the uk — that poses a challenge. on a whole range of issues from climate change to the iran nuclear deal — the uk may now find it has more in common with the new biden administration. but prime minister borisjohnson will also be acutely aware that many americans lump him and the brexit he's delivered into the same category as donald trump. the uk ambassador to the us, karen pierce, joins us now from washington.
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cani can ijust can i just start can ijust start by can i just start by asking can ijust start by asking your plans for the inauguration? what would you normally be doing for the inauguration as an ambassador and what are you going to be doing? well, the americans very kindly invite _ well, the americans very kindly invite ambassadors. the whole to the inauguration. so we will be putting on and _ inauguration. so we will be putting on and thermal underwear. it's always— on and thermal underwear. it's always cold outside. will be going down _ always cold outside. will be going down to— always cold outside. will be going down to the state department first and in _ down to the state department first and in buses and we willjoin people at the _ and in buses and we willjoin people at the capitol for the inauguration. and that's — at the capitol for the inauguration. and that's pretty standard, i think for inaugurations. what's missing this time — for inaugurations. what's missing this time because of covid are the celebrations afterwards. the balls in the _ celebrations afterwards. the balls in the concerts.— in the concerts. what do you anticipate — in the concerts. what do you anticipate in _ in the concerts. what do you anticipate in terms _ in the concerts. what do you anticipate in terms of - in the concerts. what do you anticipate in terms of the - in the concerts. what do you - anticipate in terms of the change in administration in terms of policy. is there a real difference for you as britain's ambassador to washington under donald trump? and i are going to be britain's ambassador
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under a different president from a different political party. in a very different political party. in a very different type of man with different priorities. different type of man with different riorities. ~ . . ., , different type of man with different riorities. . . ., , ., priorities. what changes for you here? i think _ priorities. what changes for you here? i think one _ priorities. what changes for you here? i think one thing stays i priorities. what changes for you | here? i think one thing stays the same _ here? i think one thing stays the same let's— here? i think one thing stays the same let's start with that. ourjob, myioh _ same let's start with that. ourjob, myioh to— same let's start with that. ourjob, myjob to get on with the american administration of the day. to find common— administration of the day. to find common cause to advance common interests _ common cause to advance common interests and values. and that's easier— interests and values. and that's easier with some administrations then with — easier with some administrations then with others. particularly with then with others. particularly with the biden— then with others. particularly with the biden administration, we are looking _ the biden administration, we are looking forward to doing good things on climate. joe biden has said he wants— on climate. joe biden has said he wants to — on climate. joe biden has said he wants to rejoin the paris climate agreement. britain and italy co—host the climate — agreement. britain and italy co—host the climate summit in november and gtascow— the climate summit in november and glascow this year. so that they are something — glascow this year. so that they are something we can do to gather to really— something we can do to gather to really make a dent in global warming. and then britain hosts the g-7 warming. and then britain hosts the g—7 presidency and 2021. and the significance of that is it's an opportunity to bring together the
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democratic technologically advanced countries _ democratic technologically advanced countries to make a start on covert recovery _ countries to make a start on covert recovery. and we know that is very and fortin— recovery. and we know that is very and fortin for president biden. who in the biden — and fortin for president biden. two in the biden administration is and fortin for president biden. wirr in the biden administration is a person you think you will be what's happening with most regularly? weill. happening with most regularly? well, i ho -e to be happening with most regularly? well, i hope to be able _ happening with most regularly? well, i hope to be able to _ happening with most regularly? well, i hope to be able to whatsapp with a range _ i hope to be able to whatsapp with a range of— i hope to be able to whatsapp with a range of americans. that's certainly what has _ range of americans. that's certainly what has happened before. so i'll be doing _ what has happened before. so i'll be doing the _ what has happened before. so i'll be doing the best i can to make good contacts. — doing the best i can to make good contacts, network, get alongside people. — contacts, network, get alongside people, talk about the things that we can— people, talk about the things that we can do— people, talk about the things that we can do together. i think one big challenge _ we can do together. i think one big challenge for both of us will be new technology. how do we bring the best of innovation and science to bear and make — of innovation and science to bear and make sure that we have technological developments that benefit _ technological developments that benefit people, move us into new and exciting _ benefit people, move us into new and exciting areas and how we can put all that _ exciting areas and how we can put all that together in the age of covid — all that together in the age of covid recovery. i all that together in the age of covid recovery.— all that together in the age of covid recovery. i knew i wasn't coin: covid recovery. i knew i wasn't aroin to covid recovery. i knew i wasn't going to get — covid recovery. i knew i wasn't
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going to get a _ covid recovery. i knew i wasn't going to get a name. - covid recovery. i knew i wasn't going to get a name. anyway. | covid recovery. i knew i wasn't i going to get a name. anyway. there is one thing in common, biden has used the phrase build back better. the uk's use the phrase build back better. i want to know who came up with that first? i’m better. i want to know who came up with that first?— with that first? i'm afraid that you ended. i used _ with that first? i'm afraid that you ended. i used to _ with that first? i'm afraid that you ended. i used to be _ with that first? i'm afraid that you ended. i used to be at _ with that first? i'm afraid that you ended. i used to be at the - with that first? i'm afraid that you ended. i used to be at the un i with that first? i'm afraid that you j ended. i used to be at the un and with that first? i'm afraid that you | ended. i used to be at the un and i remember— ended. i used to be at the un and i rememberthe ended. i used to be at the un and i remember the phrase being used. ended. i used to be at the un and i rememberthe phrase being used. it was used _ rememberthe phrase being used. it was used i_ rememberthe phrase being used. it was used i think injapan in 2015 talking — was used i think injapan in 2015 talking about recovery from natural disasters — talking about recovery from natural disasters. and it's a phrase that lots of— disasters. and it's a phrase that lots of people have used including the prime — lots of people have used including the prime minister and lots of people have used including the prime ministerand including president biden. | the prime minister and including president biden.— the prime minister and including president biden. i know you are a dilomat president biden. i know you are a diplomat and _ president biden. i know you are a diplomat and i'm _ president biden. i know you are a diplomat and i'm assuming i president biden. i know you are a diplomat and i'm assuming you . president biden. i know you are a i diplomat and i'm assuming you get to give me a diplomatic answer to this month for supper do you think your blood pressure might go down a little bit after wednesday? it has been a bit of _ little bit after wednesday? it has been a bit of a _ little bit after wednesday? it has been a bit of a roller _ little bit after wednesday? it has been a bit of a roller coaster. i little bit after wednesday? it has been a bit of a roller coaster. as| been a bit of a roller coaster. as someone — been a bit of a roller coaster. as someone who has been a great supporter— someone who has been a great supporter of american democracy and what america has done for the world, actually— what america has done for the world, actually since i was a kid. what we
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saw the _ actually since i was a kid. what we saw the other day at the capital was truly shocking. and i think the prime — truly shocking. and i think the prime minister said it well was up he said _ prime minister said it well was up he said he — prime minister said it well was up he said he had grown up with americans being a beacon of democracy. and i feel the same, just the same _ democracy. and i feel the same, just the same as— democracy. and i feel the same, just the same as that. sol democracy. and i feel the same, just the same as that. so i think things will be _ the same as that. so i think things will be calm. but i think the incoming _ will be calm. but i think the incoming biden administration would say that— incoming biden administration would say that there is a lot to do. we want _ say that there is a lot to do. we want to— say that there is a lot to do. we want to be _ say that there is a lot to do. we want to be supportive in that. we want _ want to be supportive in that. we want to— want to be supportive in that. we want to help them achieve what they want to help them achieve what they want to— want to help them achieve what they want to achieve. they are going to be great _ want to achieve. they are going to be great supporters of the un and the multilateral system. ithink be great supporters of the un and the multilateral system. i think we are as _ the multilateral system. i think we are as welt — the multilateral system. i think we are as well. so we believe we can help there — are as well. so we believe we can help there. on things like vaccines, vaccines— help there. on things like vaccines, vaccines for— help there. on things like vaccines, vaccines for the developing as well as our— vaccines for the developing as well as our own — vaccines for the developing as well as our own citizen. sol vaccines for the developing as well as our own citizen. so i think it's going _ as our own citizen. so i think it's going to — as our own citizen. so i think it's going to be _ as our own citizen. so i think it's going to be a very busy time. i don't _ going to be a very busy time. i don't know— going to be a very busy time. i don't know about my blood pressure but i don't know about my blood pressure but i think— don't know about my blood pressure but i think i'm going to wear out shoe _ but i think i'm going to wear out shoe leather. because there is a lot to do _ shoe leather. because there is a lot to do. . .. shoe leather. because there is a lot to do. . ,, ., ., ., , to do. talking of multilateralism, it's no secret _ to do. talking of multilateralism, it's no secret that _ to do. talking of multilateralism, it's no secret that job _ to do. talking of multilateralism, it's no secret that job biden i to do. talking of multilateralism, it's no secret that job biden is i to do. talking of multilateralism, it's no secret that job biden is in | it's no secret thatjob biden is in favor of multilateral ship. he's also in favor of europe. there's
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always a little bit ofjargon when a new administration comes in for some i was wondering who wins and who loses? it occurs to me that the germans have been slightly frozen out by the trump administration perhaps because donald trump didn't have a very good relationship with the chancellor angler merkel. is this a good moment to be the german ambassador perhaps to washington? i think the biden administration will want to— think the biden administration will want to make clear that they really value _ want to make clear that they really value alliances. they really value partners — value alliances. they really value partners. and they will want to project — partners. and they will want to project a — partners. and they will want to project a cooperative spirit. i think— project a cooperative spirit. i think germany will benefit from that. _ think germany will benefit from that. as — think germany will benefit from that, as you say. in my experience when _ that, as you say. in my experience when new— that, as you say. in my experience when new administrations come in, new presidents command, republican or democrat, you often get this right. _ or democrat, you often get this right, where going to concentrate on x because _ right, where going to concentrate on x because x— right, where going to concentrate on x because x is interesting. an x is economically powerful or whatever it is. and _ economically powerful or whatever it is. and then after a while the
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administration of the day comes to realize _ administration of the day comes to realize that you don't just administration of the day comes to realize that you don'tjust rely administration of the day comes to realize that you don't just rely on one partner, you actually need to have _ one partner, you actually need to have an _ one partner, you actually need to have an alliance and work across... ambassador. — have an alliance and work across... ambassador, i rememberyears ago ambassador, i remember years ago there was a kerfuffle about the two and fro in the oval office. is there one item from the uk orfrom and fro in the oval office. is there one item from the uk or from your embassy that you would like to loan president biden to put in the oval office? �* . president biden to put in the oval office? �* , ., , . office? i've been in the oval office and it's quite _ office? i've been in the oval office and it's quite an _ office? i've been in the oval office and it's quite an inspiring - office? i've been in the oval office and it's quite an inspiring room. i. and it's quite an inspiring room. i wouldn't — and it's quite an inspiring room. i wouldn't presume to tell any president whose personal office it is what _ president whose personal office it is what they should have and they are. is what they should have and they are if— is what they should have and they are. if there's anything that president biden would like that we can provide we will be very happy to do so _ can provide we will be very happy to do so but— can provide we will be very happy to do so. but we will be equally content _ do so. but we will be equally content if he just stamps his personal— content if he just stamps his personal mark on it. we content if he just stamps his personal mark on it.- content if he just stamps his personal mark on it. we will make sure the president _ personal mark on it. we will make sure the president hears - personal mark on it. we will make sure the president hears that i
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sure the president hears that message. he can call you if there's anything he wants to borrow. thank you very much forjoining the program. we are glad to hear that we think your blood pressure is going to go down a little bit. everybody i think in the country would agree the ambassador that's been a tumultuous few years in a tumultuous few weeks and looking forward to perhaps getting a little more calmer in washington. what do you think? president trump's permanent suspension from twitter and other social media platforms a little over a week ago was an extraordinary development. and it seems to have made an extraordinary impact. according to findings by zignal labs, online misinformation about the us election fell by as much as 73% in the week after president trump was booted from those social media sites. the bbc�*s expert in this subject, marianna spring joins us now. my my nana, any kind of surprise to you about how much of an impact the bands have had? it about how much of an impact the bands have had?— bands have had? it came as little surrise bands have had? it came as little surprise was _ bands have had? it came as little surprise was that _ bands have had? it came as little surprise was that mainly - bands have had? it came as little surprise was that mainly becausej bands have had? it came as littlel surprise was that mainly because i been _ surprise was that mainly because i been reporting on and covering how
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the disinformation ecosystem works online _ the disinformation ecosystem works online. and it tends to be fueled by really— online. and it tends to be fueled by really big _ online. and it tends to be fueled by really big accounts with lots of followers making claims repeatedly. in followers making claims repeatedly. in this _ followers making claims repeatedly. in this case, that's president trump's _ in this case, that's president trump's prick twitter account. especially where a number of accounts _ especially where a number of accounts of voter fraud and rigged elections — accounts of voter fraud and rigged elections were made repeatedly and notjust— elections were made repeatedly and notjust ten days elections were made repeatedly and not just ten days after the election but as— not just ten days after the election but as far— not just ten days after the election but as far back as april of this year~ — but as far back as april of this year~ and _ but as far back as april of this year. and those were used to fuel online _ year. and those were used to fuel online conspiracies. there was no evidence — online conspiracies. there was no evidence to — online conspiracies. there was no evidence to substantiate them and president — evidence to substantiate them and president trump has still yet to prove _ president trump has still yet to prove or— president trump has still yet to prove or show that evidence. so when that ecosystem is disrupted you would _ that ecosystem is disrupted you would expect to see a drop in the kind of— would expect to see a drop in the kind of hashtags that we are being shared _ kind of hashtags that we are being shared really widely prior to the storming — shared really widely prior to the storming of capitol hill. that includes _ storming of capitol hill. that includes hashtags like mark for a tromp _ includes hashtags like mark for a tromp or— includes hashtags like mark for a tromp or fight for trump. also those luke tromp or fight for trump. also those luke to _ tromp or fight for trump. also those luke to cue — tromp or fight for trump. also those luke to cue in on. you and on is baseless — luke to cue in on. you and on is baseless conspiracy that suggests president trump is waging a secret war against satanic pedophiles. there _ war against satanic pedophiles. there is— war against satanic pedophiles. there is no evidence to substantiate that _ there is no evidence to substantiate that also _ there is no evidence to substantiate that. also it's important to point out that— that. also it's important to point out that it's notjust that. also it's important to point out that it's not just trump's account— out that it's not just trump's account removed but i never a big
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facebook— account removed but i never a big facebook group sought the steal that term in— facebook group sought the steal that term in fact was coined by trump. trump _ term in fact was coined by trump. trump suggested the election was own~ _ trump suggested the election was own. these are habits of information. as our lorries accounts -- 0anon— information. as our lorries accounts -- qanon accounts and vectors of online _ -- qanon accounts and vectors of online information have been removed and therefore we seen this reduction. and therefore we seen this reduction-— and therefore we seen this reduction. , , ., ., reduction. does this mean that we don't have — reduction. does this mean that we don't have to _ reduction. does this mean that we don't have to worry _ reduction. does this mean that we don't have to worry about - don't have to worry about conspiracies any more? sadly, it does not mean _ conspiracies any more? sadly, it does not mean that. _ conspiracies any more? sadly, it does not mean that. the - conspiracies any more? sadly, it| does not mean that. the problem conspiracies any more? sadly, it i does not mean that. the problem here is that— does not mean that. the problem here is that a _ does not mean that. the problem here is that a lot _ does not mean that. the problem here is that a lot of these conspiracies have _ is that a lot of these conspiracies have gone — is that a lot of these conspiracies have gone so viral that had such an impact _ have gone so viral that had such an impact and — have gone so viral that had such an impact and they have radicalized so many— impact and they have radicalized so many people on social media that a lot of— many people on social media that a lot of these people will continue to believe _ lot of these people will continue to believe those conspiracies. in they continue _ believe those conspiracies. in they continue to— believe those conspiracies. in they continue to believe conspiracies are but what _ continue to believe conspiracies are but what happen i capitol hill suggesting that it was anti—for actavis — suggesting that it was anti—for actavis. there is no evidence to support — actavis. there is no evidence to support that. the other things there is a lot— support that. the other things there is a lot of— support that. the other things there is a lot of most radicalized in extreme _ is a lot of most radicalized in extreme people are moving to other platforms. _ extreme people are moving to other platforms. those that are encrypted and much _ platforms. those that are encrypted and much harder to investigate and to cover. _ and much harder to investigate and to cover. the real fear in the days
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leading _ to cover. the real fear in the days leading up— to cover. the real fear in the days leading up to the inauguration are that extreme acts or violence could be organized in these cryptic channels. no evidence is going to de—radicalize these individuals. it's de—radicalize these individuals. it's going — de—radicalize these individuals. it's going to take a long time for them _ it's going to take a long time for them to— it's going to take a long time for them to become less prone to conspiracies. including other topics vaccines. _ conspiracies. including other topics vaccines, the pandemic, notjust politics. — vaccines, the pandemic, notjust politics. |— vaccines, the pandemic, not “ust olitics. . . vaccines, the pandemic, not “ust olitics. , , ., vaccines, the pandemic, not “ust olitics. ,, ., ., , politics. i guess for those of us who are in _ politics. i guess for those of us who are in favor— politics. i guess for those of us who are in favor of— politics. i guess for those of us who are in favor of real - politics. i guess for those of us i who are in favor of real information as opposed to misinformation this is very good news that there's been a decline in election misinformation to that degree. i'm just wondering how zegna labs came up with that figure is 73% was up it sounds enormous. but my understanding is actually what's happening is that a lot of these platform sites having been thrown out those platforms have sort of fragmented and gone underground. they found other places to go to. it might be that they've gone off twitter and facebook and parlors but they popped up in other areas perhaps not as want to, but as 20 smaller accounts. do you think it's reliable, this figure? i 20 smaller accounts. do you think it's reliable, this figure?— it's reliable, this figure? i think it's reliable, this figure? i think it's hard to _ it's reliable, this figure? i think it's hard to put _
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it's reliable, this figure? i think it's hard to put a _ it's reliable, this figure? i think it's hard to put a figure - it's reliable, this figure? i think it's hard to put a figure on i it's reliable, this figure? i think it's hard to put a figure on how| it's hard to put a figure on how much — it's hard to put a figure on how much misinformation is circulating online _ much misinformation is circulating online. obviously this data looked at the _ online. obviously this data looked at the main platforms. we have seen at the main platforms. we have seen a general— at the main platforms. we have seen a general reduction in the conversation around hashtags like stop the _ conversation around hashtags like stop the steel and others because they have — stop the steel and others because they have been banned and removed. lots they have been banned and removed. lots of— they have been banned and removed. lots of people particularly those who are — lots of people particularly those who are the most radicalized adaptive. these conspiracy theorists are very— adaptive. these conspiracy theorists are very good at evolving. they often _ are very good at evolving. they often use — are very good at evolving. they often use new hashtags they set up new accounts and they moved to new platforms. _ new accounts and they moved to new platforms. there are cons and pros in some _ platforms. there are cons and pros in some ways of people moving to smaller— in some ways of people moving to smaller platforms. i want hand they reach _ smaller platforms. i want hand they reach fewer people which means that fewer _ reach fewer people which means that fewer people become radicalized. but on the _ fewer people become radicalized. but on the other hand they are surrounded by the most extreme. the worry— surrounded by the most extreme. the worry is— surrounded by the most extreme. the worry is it's _ surrounded by the most extreme. the worry is it's on these platforms they— worry is it's on these platforms they could _ worry is it's on these platforms they could organize violence. thank ou. eve they could organize violence. thank you- every time _ they could organize violence. thank you- every time i — speaks about a satanic pedophiles cult it takes my breath away. russia's most prominent opposition figure — alexei navalny — has urged people to take to the streets — "for the future of russia" — after returning to moscow for the first time since being poisoned last year. mr navalny was speaking at a court
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hearing — which took place inside a police station. he'll be detained for 30 days. another hearing — at the end of the month — could result in a lengthyjail sentence. from moscow, steve rosenberg reports. chanting. they shout. the supporters came to the police station where he was being held. eight makeshift court room had been set up inside. it would rule on whether the kremlin critic should be sent to jail. in a freezing cold russian winter, piping hot tea was a welcome relief. it's bitterly cold here. it's —20. but supporters of mr levine ers waiting for the result of the court hearing and shouting, let him go. in a video message from the court room he denounced the hearing as a mockery
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ofjustice. after he was ordered to be kept in custody for 30 days he called on russians to take to the streets. and not stay silent. he is the russian opposition leader most capable of organizing large scale antigovernment protest. it's why the kremlin sees him as a threat. he is number one — kremlin sees him as a threat. he is number one danger _ kremlin sees him as a threat. he is number one danger in _ kremlin sees him as a threat. he is number one danger in russia. i kremlin sees him as a threat. the: 3 number one danger in russia. it's very difficult to fight against massive public protest. mr navalny is convinced _ massive public protest. mr navalny is convinced it _ massive public protest. mr navalny is convinced it was _ massive public protest. mr navalny is convinced it was the _ massive public protest. mr navalny is convinced it was the kremlin i massive public protest. mr navalny| is convinced it was the kremlin that ordered his poisoning by nerve agent felt up the russian agency deny any connection. at the decision to contain him will have been taken at the very top. for now he is going to jailfor a month. that could turn
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into years. and if it does, the authorities risk turning him into a political martyr. some think the kremlin always wanted to avoid. an extraordinarily brave man. stay with us on bbc news, still to come... how do you drum up a sense of occasion on inauguration when it's on line? working here from the man who president barack obama ba rack obama event. the inquiry into the bombing resume today. this time focusing on the response of the emergency services. questions have been raised whether the youngest victim could have survived had medics responded differently. i survived had medics responded differently-—
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differently. i saw a little girl i in: differently. i saw a little girl lying there- _ differently. i saw a little girl lying there. i _ differently. i saw a little girl lying there. i bent _ differently. i saw a little girl lying there. i bent down i differently. i saw a little girl lying there. i bent down to l differently. i saw a little girl- lying there. i bent down to her, she was still conscious, i asked her name and i thought she said sophie. her name was safi. eight years old and lying on the floor of manchester arena after the bomb went off. they first person to return it was paul reed. ,, , , . first person to return it was paul reed, ,, , , ., , first person to return it was paul reed. ,, , , ., , ., , �* reed. she “ust started, she wasn't u set, reed. she just started, she wasn't upset. she — reed. she just started, she wasn't upset. she just — reed. she just started, she wasn't upset, she just got _ reed. she just started, she wasn't upset, she just got a _ reed. she just started, she wasn't upset, she just got a little - reed. she just started, she wasn't upset, she just got a little bit i upset, shejust got a little bit upset. she asked me for her mum and i said not to worry, within a in a minute. ,, i said not to worry, within a in a minute. i. , ., , , minute. do you remember anybody t in: to minute. do you remember anybody trying to bring _ minute. do you remember anybody trying to bring bandages _ minute. do you remember anybody trying to bring bandages or - minute. do you remember anybody | trying to bring bandages or anything to anything to try to stop the blood? . . to anything to try to stop the blood? .,, ., ,., , .,, blood? there was nobody, there was no bandages- — blood? there was nobody, there was no bandages. paul— blood? there was nobody, there was no bandages. paul has _ blood? there was nobody, there was no bandages. paul has been - blood? there was nobody, there was i no bandages. paul has been commended for helinr no bandages. paul has been commended for helping to _ no bandages. paul has been commended for helping to carry _ no bandages. paul has been commended for helping to carry her _ no bandages. paul has been commended for helping to carry her out _ no bandages. paul has been commended for helping to carry her out and _ no bandages. paul has been commended for helping to carry her out and get i for helping to carry her out and get her into an ambulance quickly for some experts have pointed that manchester inquiry say her injuries were un—survivable. at a different team commissioned by the family has said she might have survived had she received better medical treatment. the little girl died more than an hour after the attack. after losing
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a critical amount of blood. her parents have only recently learned the experts opinion that she didn't get the help she needed. there the experts opinion that she didn't get the help she needed. there was a member of the _ get the help she needed. there was a member of the public _ get the help she needed. there was a member of the public with _ get the help she needed. there was a member of the public with her, i - member of the public with her, i can't _ member of the public with her, i can't expect them to turn to kate her, — can't expect them to turn to kate her, split— can't expect them to turn to kate her, split her leg and so on. but the medically trained people that were with her didn't apply basic first aid~ — were with her didn't apply basic first aid. to give her a chance. the manchester _ first aid. to give hera chance. iie: manchester arena inquiry will examine the emergency response to the attack. the inquiries acknowledge it's important to the enormous pressure that came under that night. as we've been discussing this hour, joe biden will be sworn in as the 46th president of the united states on wednesday, in an inauguration ceremony like no other. his speech will be delivered to a largely empty national mall, with little of the fanfare we're accustomed to.
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so how do you manage to create a sense of occasion in such complex circumstances? don mischer is a legendary television producer and director, he's produced the academy awards, super bowl half—time shows, and barack obama's inauguration event we are one. hejoined us earlier and explained what it was like producing that event for president obama. well, we did the event at the lincoln— well, we did the event at the lincoln center for his inaugural concert — lincoln center for his inaugural concert it _ lincoln center for his inaugural concert. it was an incredible moment _ concert. it was an incredible moment. it was a euphoric time. we elected _ moment. it was a euphoric time. we elected our— moment. it was a euphoric time. we elected our first black president. spirits— elected our first black president. spirits were very high. i remember showing _ spirits were very high. i remember showing up— spirits were very high. i remember showing up at the lincoln memorial that morning before daybreak and it was very— that morning before daybreak and it was very cold, it was 17 degrees in the wind _ was very cold, it was 17 degrees in the wind was blowing 25 miles an hour~ _ the wind was blowing 25 miles an hour~ and — the wind was blowing 25 miles an hour. and as we drove around to get to the _ hour. and as we drove around to get to the lincoln memorial we saw all these _ to the lincoln memorial we saw all these families with kids all bundled up these families with kids all bundled up with— these families with kids all bundled up with blankets. and they were
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going _ up with blankets. and they were going to — up with blankets. and they were going to sit around the reflecting pool and — going to sit around the reflecting pool and wait for hours and hours because — pool and wait for hours and hours because the programme didn't again until one _ because the programme didn't again until one o'clock in the afternoon. in until one o'clock in the afternoon. in the _ until one o'clock in the afternoon. in the bitter— until one o'clock in the afternoon. in the bitter cold. and it was a magical— in the bitter cold. and it was a magical time. in the bitter cold. and it was a magicaltime.| in the bitter cold. and it was a magical time-— in the bitter cold. and it was a magical time. in the bitter cold. and it was a maaical time. ., �* ., ., magical time. i hadn't realized that ou didn't magical time. i hadn't realized that you didn't have _ magical time. i hadn't realized that you didn't have a _ magical time. i hadn't realized that you didn't have a budget _ magical time. i hadn't realized that you didn't have a budget for - magical time. i hadn't realized that you didn't have a budget for that i you didn't have a budget for that concert. so somebody stepped into pay for. concert. so somebody stepped into -a for. ~ �* pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did _ pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did pay _ pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did pay us _ pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did pay us for - pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did pay us for it - pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did pay us for it but - pay for. well, hbo carried it live and they did pay us for it but as | pay for. well, hbo carried it live | and they did pay us for it but as is always— and they did pay us for it but as is always the — and they did pay us for it but as is always the case with inaugural events, — always the case with inaugural events, there is never very much money — events, there is never very much money so— events, there is never very much money. so we had many high—profile stars on _ money. so we had many high—profile stars on that — money. so we had many high—profile stars on that show. we have beyonce, for example — stars on that show. we have beyonce, for example. normally when you book beyonce. _ for example. normally when you book beyonce, you are talking about hundred — beyonce, you are talking about hundred and $60,000 just in security and her— hundred and $60,000 just in security and her group that comes with our. makeup _ and her group that comes with our. makeup and all of that kind saw. she came _ makeup and all of that kind saw. she came and _ makeup and all of that kind saw. she came and did it for absolutely nothing _ came and did it for absolutely nothing. she did it for free. we
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couldn't— nothing. she did it for free. we couldn't pay for anything. we called up couldn't pay for anything. we called up bono _ couldn't pay for anything. we called up bono and said would love to have him come _ up bono and said would love to have him come and be a part of this event — him come and be a part of this event and _ him come and be a part of this event. and when we describe the event _ event. and when we describe the event to— event. and when we describe the event to him he said, you know what, this sounds— event to him he said, you know what, this sounds really special to me. i like to— this sounds really special to me. i like to bring my boys with me. and he said _ like to bring my boys with me. and he said l'm — like to bring my boys with me. and he said i'm gonna pay for the whole thing. _ he said i'm gonna pay for the whole thing. the _ he said i'm gonna pay for the whole thing, the plane, ourtransportation you don't— thing, the plane, ourtransportation you don't have to pay for anything. and that _ you don't have to pay for anything. and that was very atypical. and it was part— and that was very atypical. and it was part of— and that was very atypical. and it was part of the magic that happened here in— was part of the magic that happened here in 2009. when obama took office _ here in 2009. when obama took office. unfortunately, it's not feeling — office. unfortunately, it's not feeling that way now. this office. unfortunately, it's not feeling that way now.- office. unfortunately, it's not feeling that way now. this is going to be different, _ feeling that way now. this is going to be different, it— feeling that way now. this is going to be different, it has _ feeling that way now. this is going to be different, it has to _ feeling that way now. this is going to be different, it has to be - to be different, it has to be virtual. is it possible forjoe biden to capture some of that spirit that you had for president obama? let mejust say that you had for president obama? let me just say at the outset, i think— let me just say at the outset, i think there _ let me just say at the outset, i think there is no substitute for the
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kind of— think there is no substitute for the kind of energy and connection that an artist— kind of energy and connection that an artist or— kind of energy and connection that an artist or speaker gets when they are performing in front of a live audience — are performing in front of a live audience and they are responding. but as— audience and they are responding. but as you — audience and they are responding. but as you just said, that's not a possibility— but as you just said, that's not a possibility now. i think that they are going — possibility now. i think that they are going to be looking for, how can we make _ are going to be looking for, how can we make the virtual event as strong as possible? it is we make the virtual event as strong as possible?— as possible? it is going to be a very different _ as possible? it is going to be a very different kind _ as possible? it is going to be a very different kind of— as possible? it is going to be a very different kind of event. i very different kind of event. 160,000, that's what i charge. is that your fee? i 160,000, that's what i charge. is that yourfee?_ that your fee? i am tone deaf for it's a really _ that your fee? i am tone deaf for it's a really bad _ that your fee? i am tone deaf for it's a really bad song _ that your fee? i am tone deaf for it's a really bad song for- that your fee? i am tone deaf for it's a really bad song for that - that your fee? i am tone deaf for it's a really bad song for that is l it's a really bad song for that is not a nice experience but there you go. there are more questions than answers. you are a student of history and today i am the quiz master. share you are a student of history and today i am the quiz master. are you read ? today i am the quiz master. are you ready? can — today i am the quiz master. are you ready? can i — today i am the quiz master. are you ready? can i phone _ today i am the quiz master. are you ready? can i phone a _ today i am the quiz master. are you ready? can i phone a friend? - today i am the quiz master. are you ready? can i phone a friend? you i ready? can i phone a friend? you cannot. ready? can i phone a friend? you cannot- you _ ready? can i phone a friend? you cannot. you know— ready? can i phone a friend? you cannot. you know all— ready? can i phone a friend? you cannot. you know all of the question
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number one. who had the coldest inauguration in american history? reagan. inauguration in american history? reaaan. ., ., h inauguration in american history? reaaan. ., ., �*, reagan. you are so good. it's really anno inc. reagan. you are so good. it's really annoying- yes. _ reagan. you are so good. it's really annoying. yes, ronald _ reagan. you are so good. it's really annoying. yes, ronald reagan. - reagan. you are so good. it's really annoying. yes, ronald reagan. it. reagan. you are so good. it's really l annoying. yes, ronald reagan. it was “14 c. it annoying. yes, ronald reagan. it was —14 c. it was so cold that president reagan took his oath of office inside the us capital. who's this fun you might not get this on for some who was the last president to wear a top hat? some who was the last president to wear a ton hat?— some who was the last president to wear a top hat? john f kennedy 1961. i was can wear a top hat? john f kennedy 1961. l was can ask — wear a top hat? john f kennedy 1961. l was can ask you _ wear a top hat? john f kennedy 1961. i was can ask you that _ wear a top hat? john f kennedy 1961. i was can ask you that question. - wear a top hat? john f kennedy 1961. i was can ask you that question. you | i was can ask you that question. you are riuht. i was can ask you that question. you are right- it— i was can ask you that question. you are right. it was _ i was can ask you that question. you are right. it was candidate. it'd been the tradition. actually eisenhower had broken the tradition but kennedy went back to it. by then i suspect will not be wearing a hat for that what do you reckon? it’s a for that what do you reckon? it's a shame. for that what do you reckon? it's a shame- they _ for that what do you reckon? it's a shame. they should _ for that what do you reckon? it's a shame. they should bring - for that what do you reckon? it�*s a shame. they should bring back the hat. , , . ., , shame. they should bring back the hat. ,, ..y ., ., shame. they should bring back the hat. ,, , ., ., hat. especially that top hat, right? i could see — hat. especially that top hat, right? i could see wanting _ hat. especially that top hat, right? i could see wanting a _ hat. especially that top hat, right? i could see wanting a top - hat. especially that top hat, right? i could see wanting a top hat. - hat. especially that top hat, right? i could see wanting a top hat. we. i could see wanting a top hat. we are dating ourselves. question
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number three, are dating ourselves. question numberthree, drummer overtheirs, number three, drummer over theirs, who is numberthree, drummer overtheirs, who is the only president to both take the oath of office and administer a?— take the oath of office and administer a?- it - take the oath of office and administer a?- it is i take the oath of office and administer a? taft. it is quite annoying. _ administer a? taft. it is quite annoying. isn't _ administer a? taft. it is quite annoying, isn't it? _ administer a? taft. it is quite annoying, isn't it? the - administer a? iagft. it is quite annoying, isn't it? the fact that he does all this stuff. he annoying, isn't it? the fact that he does all this stuff.— does all this stuff. he was a little laru er. does all this stuff. he was a little larger- he _ does all this stuff. he was a little larger- he was — does all this stuff. he was a little larger. he was also _ does all this stuff. he was a little larger. he was also america's - larger. he was also america's heaviest president. _ larger. he was also america's heaviest president. he - larger. he was also america's heaviest president. he was i larger. he was also america's. heaviest president. he was the larger. he was also america's - heaviest president. he was the 27th president and he was the tenth chief justice and so he motors to both take the oath of office. but who is the best game show contestant in history ever anywhere in the world? james reynolds. because he was on university challenge. there you go. how did you do? irate university challenge. there you go. how did you do?— university challenge. there you go. how did you do? we lost in the first round. i how did you do? we lost in the first round- idon't— how did you do? we lost in the first round. i don't think _ how did you do? we lost in the first round. i don't think i _ how did you do? we lost in the first round. i don't think i got _ how did you do? we lost in the first round. i don't think i got one - round. i don't think i got one question right. i've done better tonight. i question right. i've done better toniaht. ., ., ., . tonight. i had to get that in. well done, tonight. i had to get that in. well done. james- _ tonight. i had to get that in. well done, james. i'm _ tonight. i had to get that in. well done, james. i'm very _ tonight. i had to get that in. well done, james. i'm very glad. - tonight. i had to get that in. well done, james. i'm very glad. the | done, james. i'm very glad. the clock, counting on to inauguration
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we are at 43 hours and five minutes until there will be a peaceful transfer of power here in washington, dc. hello there. hello there disruptive weather to come of the next few days. all courtesy of christoph was up this area of low pressure there is going to be bringing some very heavy falls of rain. i'm trying? of particular concern is this zone over the peaks in the pennines between tuesday and thursday we could see something like 150 to 200 mm of rain. the met office have put out this amber weather warning. office have put out this amber weatherwarning. rivers office have put out this amber weather warning. rivers within this area are already flowing at elevated levels. that's even before the rain from christoph has arrived without as you can imagine we are likely to see significant flooding problems of the next few days. it's this swathes
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of the uk for some northern island, northern england, midlands will see relentless rain on tuesday. rain for a time over southern wales and england probably dry and bright in the southeast. cold scotland the risk of frost and ice to start the day. a few wintry showers of the high ground for the england and wales came out. 11 to 12 degrees probably dry and bright in the southeast. tuesday night we see more rain moving in across those very saturated areas. all that rain will be working down the river. i will buy our as we get towards the middle part of the week the risk of flooding and probably severe flooding and probably severe flooding is going to increase was up still mild across england a whale colder air becoming more widespread in scotland through wednesday. then wednesday night our area of low pressure finally begins to move out into the north sea. as it does it deepens. we get stronger winds and scotland mixing in more of that cold air the rain turns to snow. even down to sea level. but it's across probably the southern alkalines that
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were looking at very large accumulations of snow. where those strong winds might lead to blizzard and drifting of the snow. it's a cold day some of that snow reaching southwards into parts of northern england and wales potentially as well. taking a look at friday's weather charts, think starting to come down a little bit. low pressure moving close to scandinavia. still a feat of cold air moving in across the uk. so frost and ice a risk to start the day on friday. many areas bright with sunshine but will continue to see showers wintry some snow and those across northern areas of scotland. probably if you showers coming down the ira c. quite a cold day for most of us five celsius for quite a few of us. into the weekend weather prospects we will keep that cool sunshine and shower mix of weather. some showers wintry across northern areas. saturday and sunday there is the potential for areas of low pressure. maybejust there is the potential for areas of low pressure. maybe just going into northern france about potentially going across southern england,
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southern wales. if they take that moat northward track we could see some rain and maybe some snow across southern england in southern wales. there is a huge amount of uncertainty about that. the weather is more certain further north where it is cold. and showers. next week we continue to see this battle zone with the cold air northeast of the uk. while their portion from the southwest continue to see the threat of pressure bringing further styles of pressure bringing further styles of rain and maybe snow on the northern edge as they move through as well. over the next few days disruptive weather is on the way. northern england and that midlands persistent rain likely to lead to some flooding and potentially severe flooding. wednesday night into thursday heavy snow, maybe some drifting and blizzards. a tickly over the southern chaplains. at your
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