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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 9, 2021 6:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "act like you have the virus." that's the advice in a new campaign urging people to abide by lockdown rules. donald trump is banned permanently from twitter because of worries his tweets could incite more violence. a warning over coronavirus scams after a 92—year—old woman was injected with a fake vaccine. unlikely heroes, giant killing and banana skins — all part of fa cup third round weekend, but liverpool survived a scare to beat a young aston villa squad decimated by a covid outbreak. good morning. another bitterly cold
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start for many, and given we have had quite a bit of snow in the last 24 had quite a bit of snow in the last 2a hours, ice is a concern this morning, as is freezing fog. more details for you in about 15 minutes. it's saturday, 9th january. our top story: people in england are being urged to behave like they are infected with coronavirus as part of a new public awareness campaign encouraging people to stick to the rules. the message, which will be shared on tv, radio and social media, comes as the uk reported the highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. our correspondent dan johnson has more. covid—19, especially the new variant, is spreading quickly across the country. this puts many people at risk of serious disease. a new campaign with a clear message. once more, we must all stay home.
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these stark warnings come in response to the intense pressure on hospitals, which are getting close to capacity, especially in london and the south—east. london's mayor declared a major incident yesterday, saying the virus was out of control. many doctors are frustrated.” saying the virus was out of control. many doctors are frustrated. i am very worried that we have reached the peak and we are really not seeing the kind of behaviour that we saw in the first wave. and i and many of my colleagues in medicine are extremely worried that the peak, this wave, is just going to carry on rising and rising and we will reach a point where the nhs simply won't be able to cope with it. yesterday's record figures showed 1325 people died within 28 days of a positive covid test, the most in a single day during the entire pandemic. the total number of deaths now stands up just short of 80,000. there are more record figures. another 68,000 cases we re record figures. another 68,000 cases were recorded yesterday, and 31,621; patients are being treated in
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hospitals across the uk. ali is one of them. her whole family tested positive on christmas day. of them. her whole family tested positive on christmas daylj of them. her whole family tested positive on christmas day. i was fine, healthy, young family, just getting on with my life, and this has completely floored me. i was told two days ago that if they didn't put me on a ventilator i would die. i have seen two people die in the beds on either side of me while i have been in this hospital. one in three people with covid don't show symptoms, so the messages, act like you have the virus and don't go out, don't mix with people. there are signs that policing of the rules will get tougher with government sources saying the time for engaging, explaining and encouraging is now over, giving way to more strict enforcement. the next few weeks look bad. vaccines give clear hope for the future, but for now we must all stay home, protect the nhs and save lives. dan johnson, bbc
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news. twitter says it has permanently banned president trump from the site following a review of his account. the social media platform said that his tweets were highly likely to encourage more violence. our north america correspondent david willis joins us now from los angeles. they had given a warning, you're absolutely right. it is bizarre, the most powerful man in the world no longer has access to one of his most treasured assets. his twitter account. donald trump of course once described himself as the hemingway of 140 characters. he said he didn't need the mainstream media here, he could talk directly to his supporters, and that he has been doing, 88 million of them, for many yea rs. doing, 88 million of them, for many years. twitter, citing what it cold the risk of further incitement of violence, has now permanently closed
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down donald trump's twitter account and there was a bizarre contest of whack a mole tonight, because the president attempted, in the absence of his own account, to pop up on other accounts. the white house official account among them committed —— to voice his displeasure about twitter‘s decision and to mention he is now considering setting up his own social media outlets. well, it is difficult to imagine one that will give him quite as much access to the great public here than twitter, but nonetheless, mist and here than twitter, but nonetheless, mistand trump here than twitter, but nonetheless, mist and trump are very dismayed, by all accounts, about this. meanwhile the democrats are pushing ahead with attem pts the democrats are pushing ahead with atte m pts to the democrats are pushing ahead with attempts to remove him from office, the house speaker nancy pelosi saying today that if donald trump does not resign, she will seek to invoke what is cold the 25th amendment or go for his impeachment,
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which would mean that he is the only president on record to be impeached twice in his presidency. extraordinary times in the united states at the moment. thank you very much, david willis. people are being warned to stay vigilant about scams in which criminals offer covid vaccines for a fee. in one case, a pensioner was injected with a fake covid—19 vaccine and charged £160 by a man pretending to be a health worker. people have also been sent text messages taking them to a fake nhs website with a booking link. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. moments before this image was captured, this man injected a 92—year—old with a fake covid vaccine. he claimed to be from the nhs. and then administered a jab in the arm, what has been described as
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a data like instrument, charged £160, took the money from the lady, and then disappeared. and just to add insult to that injury, then we attended several days later to try to solicit an extra £100. so this has been a horrendous experience for the victim. it is not known what was injected into the pensioner, but a hospital check found her unharmed. this is an absolutely distaff —— disgusting crime. it is unacceptable, assault, fraud, and it will not be tolerated. we will do everything we can to try to track down and catch this person before they carry out this offence on anyone else. it is thought over £22 million has been lost to covid related scams. these images show a makeshift laboratory set up in a kitchen in west sussex. fake covid cures had been made and sold to people in america and france.
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franklin was caught in his local post office as he tried to send more. he was convicted injuly. how significant a problem is this? how many fraudsters are there, trying to cash in on the crisis? i mean, it is extensive stop since the first lockdown in march we have had about half a million people come to us with advice online, it has doubled since october, the number of people coming directly to us. it is not just a small group. one in three people, in our research, have targeted by some form of covid related scams since the pandemic began. today police advised that nobody from official vaccination programmes will ever turn up unannounced. they will never ask the bank details. and nobody will ever be charged for the vaccine. but with a vaccination programme rolling out across the country, today there is a warning. the where of criminals trying to exploit those who desperately want protection from the deadly virus. jane mccubbin, bbc
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news. prince william has paid tribute to nhs staff working on the covid frontline and thanked them for their continued efforts during the pandemic. in a video call with staff at homerton university hospital in east london, he heard about the challenges that they are facing, following the recent rise in patients with the virus. a huge thank you to all of you for all the hard work, the sleepless nights, the lack of sleep, distress, the anxiety, the exhaustion and everything you are doing, we are so grateful. you are in my thoughts, and catherine and i and the children talk about you guys every day. so we are making sure that they understand the sacrifices that all of you are making. the director michael apted, known for his long running 7—up series, has died aged 79. the documentary followed the same group of people every seven years, from childhood into their 605. he also directed films, including gorillas in the mist and the 1999 bond movie the world is not enough.
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some sad news this morning. john lister — the 101 year old whose story captured the hearts of many around the world — has died. we metjohn last month when he told us how lonely he felt after losing his wife. his words moved us all, and lead to the delivery of tens of thousands of christmas cards. graham satchell reports. we first metjohn on this programme last month. he was an artillery known, a veteran of the d—day landings. john told us about his wife, how they had been married for 70 years, how he missed her, after she died of covid—19. you feel lonely?
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iam i am getting used to it. the care home asked people to send john a christmas card. they arrived from all over the country, all over the world. more than 15,000 in total. "dear the world. more than 15,000 in total. ‘dearjohn, we saw you on first tv and we thought we would send you a card to cheer you up. christmas is a very difficult time for lots of people. sending hugs". what do you think to all the cards that you've had, john? and that's enough, john. just to see you smiling again, that's enough. john died in hospital last week. he
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was 101. his carers say he was deeply moved by the cards and gifts he received, and would read them until late and night, and that he wasn't lonely at the end. it was a gorgeous story when it happened, the response was incredible from you. so really, really sad to hear this news today. we will be joined by his carer, marcia hughes, at 9:30am today. it is another one of those moments, isn't it, when a spotlight is put on a moment in time and people react in the most amazing way. which in itself will have lifted other people as well. exactly. sojohn will have affected other people too. we need those unique stories like that at the moment. let's have a look at today's front pages. the daily mail leads with an appeal from borisjohnson, urging people to stay at home, as the coronavirus daily death toll hit a record high yesterday. the telegraph, says ministers
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are concerned about compliance with the current rules and are considering tougher measures. the mirror reports that a third coronavirus vaccine has been approved for use in the uk. finally, let's show you these pictures from the spanish capital, madrid, which has experienced its first snowfall in ten years. the region has been put on red alert with more snow forecast. we will come to our own weather forecast in a moment, but first a quick look at the inside pages. forecast in a moment, but first a quick look at the inside pagesm was quite a bit around yesterday about how much tv we are all watching. a couple of stories about that. just mindful of this number, i mean, who knows how much, it varies across households, but one suggestion here is that 28 hours of tva suggestion here is that 28 hours of tv a week, in particular, during the pandemic. what do you think, rachel. is that feel about right? four hours
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a day? the average british person which is 28 hours every seven days. four hours a day, isn't that right? i don't trust my maths. seven times four is 28. the thing is, i don't watch four hours of television a day, but my children probably make up day, but my children probably make upfor day, but my children probably make up for the time that i don't watch. it probably makes up. it sounds about right, actually. especially if you get involved in a binge session of something you are watching. the other thing we're talking about today's compliance with the rules after the case of the two women who are fine for five miles from their home to go for a walk together and also for taking coffee or tea with them, in mugs, which the police that was basically a picnic. dublin should police have actually said they are going to review those fines, because yesterday, there was a surprisingly large number of people who supported double sure police, people getting in touch on social media responding to this.
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" u nfortu nately", says social media responding to this. "unfortu nately", says chris, social media responding to this. "unfortunately", says chris, who works in the nhs, "i only feel like some high—profile fines for what people see as minor breaches the only thing that will make people ta ke only thing that will make people take notice of change behaviour which we in the nhs need". one of the problems of course is that it is on what local means, in how you are allowed to travel. and in this case, you've got police officers who took one position on it, and they will be others that take a different position. we will talk about that later on. i would like to travel there, where helen ‘s. later on. i would like to travel there, where helen 's.|j later on. i would like to travel there, where helen 's. i thought you meant here, and i was going to say, no, you can't, you're not allowed to live on your position on the sofa. hello, helen. we didn't have the amounts of snow we had on the once in 30 year event in spain but we still had considerable amounts of snow falling yesterday across northern england and north wales. not as much snow falling today but it is still utterly cold out there
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and frosty and they will be some freezing fog around. i'll storm philomena, that is the storm that brought the snow to spain, still warnings out. —— quite significant amounts of snow. the snow we will get will be across the north mainly. the stories about how cold it will be, northern ireland, the coldest day for about a decade and my nest ten or 11 day for about a decade and my nest ten or11 in day for about a decade and my nest ten or 11 in parts of scotland, too, under the starry sky. —— my nest. freezing fog is an issue. —— minus. really grey and leak. the other difference today is we have a weather front moving in off the atla ntic weather front moving in off the atlantic so slightly increasing our temperatures. we may see highs of six or seven for the north—west of scotland, but with it, some snow over the hills, of course, even at lower levels. northern ireland seeing more snow compared with yesterday. gradually the weather front sinks further southwards overnight so a smattering of wintry
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weather, not as cold as a result because we have got more cloud but still getting a frost to the north of it and certainly so to the south where again we could have some freezing fog patches boasting on sunday morning. the high pressure slipped further south tomorrow. —— first thing. hopefully we will see more sunshine coming through in the south tomorrow. further north, still the weather front around and still bringing in more cloud and rain off the atlantic and a brisk wind in across the north as well although temperatures still higher, still feeling on the chilly side. four 5/3 —— further south and we haven't had that all week, it has been bitterly cold. —— fouror that all week, it has been bitterly cold. —— four or five. that all week, it has been bitterly cold. —— four orfive. it won't that all week, it has been bitterly cold. —— four or five. it won't be as cold as it has been for the last two or three weeks next week, things will store a little, but u nfortu nately, will store a little, but unfortunately, with the thaw taking place and further weather fronts, we start to concern ourselves with the risk of flooding. there are warnings
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out for rain already for the north and west of the uk for. by monday and west of the uk for. by monday and tuesday, some uncertainty as to how far south of the weather fronts will get thejob look how far south of the weather fronts will get the job look at the temperatures are positively mild compared to what we have been used to certainly for what we have got this morning was up that it might be that we see a dip in those two bridges once again towards the end of the week. but as i say, watching out for ice this morning and for some freezing fog on what looks to be yet another cold weekend. thanks very much. it is icy out there, be wary of that. now it's time for click. hey, welcome to click. happy new year? i hope you got some respite and a bit of a break recently.
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lara lewington! hello, how are you? i'm good, thanks, all things considered. any new year's resolutions your end? absolutely not. don't do resolutions, that means i can't break them. i tell you what, i've decided to stay at home more and watch more tv. what's your plans for the next few weeks? i think i'll have a quiet start to the year and then, well, i guess we can only hope. but, in the meantime, if you're having that january wa nting—to—get—fit feeling, then of course it is going to be a bit harder than usual this year but you could take advantage of some of the tech platforms that did really well last year. they certainly benefited from the at—home exercise boom. one of those companies is zwift, a virtual cycling platform whose subscribers are now in the millions. and this is no potle in the park, either. in—app races have taken the competition to extreme levels, and jonathan coates threw himself into this to find out more.
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cycling is a sport which has always embraced technology and now it has taken the ultimate leap into the virtual world. zwift is an online platform that allows amateur and professional cyclists to train and compete against one another. its popularity has soared during the pandemic and now it has more than 3 million subscribers. by putting a normal everyday bike on a smart trainer — basically a treadmill for a bike with a bluetooth connection — a rider's real—life physical output is converted into a moving avatar. in zwift, the resistance levels automatically change depending on gradients and conditions, and there's a whole host of other tech that can help add to the realism. the more advanced trainers simulate going over cobbles or through dirt tracks and there are even fans that can match the wind speed to how fast you're cycling.
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but, once you're plugged in, all you need to do is start pedalling. you canjoin a group ride, do a workout or simply cruise around some of the best routes in the world with maps, stats and data. so, to see what all the fuss was about, i thought i'd get stuck in. the plan, to get fit enough so that in five weeks, i could take part in a race on zwift. and, in order to do that, i recruited matt rowe, a professional cycling coach who trains people through zwift. it is the future, for sure, for training, and that's for amateur cyclists, who have four or five hours a week, right through to professional ranks. for indoor training, the benefits it brings to performance gains, speaks volumes. now, there's one key metric that seems to be the lifeblood of zwift, and that's watts. put it like this — your tv needs about 250 watts to work, and olympic
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gold—medallist bradley wiggins broke the hour cycling record by generating an hour average of 440 watts just with his legs. zwift bills itself as a training platform and, unlike many sports, this set—up can actually replicate many aspects of cycling with genuine road speeds and conditions, meaning that all the data you gather is comparable to what you get in real life. so matt has set me a test tonight to see how fit i am. basically, it's to see how hard i can push myself and how many watts i can generate. so i've got my screen down here where i can see the training plan. what i've got to do, what he's going to put me on. it's 45 minutes, and it looks pretty brutal. at the moment, i'm doing 167 watts, or thereabouts. my legs are really, really starting to hurt now. that was one of the hardest things i have done... for a long time. i mean, look at me. it's just horrendous.
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certainly i had some work to do and the training carried on — five days a week for five weeks. but while you can train hard and make real gains, it feels like competition is the pinnacle of zwifting. it's where zwift goes to the next level, both for the users and for the company itself. suddenly the platform switches from being training—focused to something more akin to an esports platform. you can select a race, turn up at the right time and you're suddenly on the starting line with a huge group of other riders. and, if you're good, there's serious money to be made from winning. i've heard from several zwifters who say, "i made more money on this one zwift race than i ever made in an outdoor race that i've ever done." there's been some big cash prizes. at december‘s uci cycling esports world championships, the prize money was almost $10,000 for the winners. incredibly, female cyclists can make more money racing from zwift than in real life. so after five weeks
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of training, five days a week, the time had come. it was race day. at 12:30pm, on a tuesday afternoon, the race began. and i had matt there on zoom to coach me through. that's the most painful thing i have ever done. that was... i mean, it was genuinely really fun. there was a real kind of thrill of racing. it must be unique to zwift. if parents are worried about kids doing too much gaming at home, then get them on this, because they'll get fit, and honestly, you can't do it for more than 45 minutes or you'll fall over. but it was time to hear the results. five weeks ago, i had a functional threshold power of 230 watts. so had the training worked? today you were 38 minutes, you did 288 watts. an extra 30, 30—odd watts, 34 watts, they're saying in nearly twice
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the amount of time. gosh, that's a massive increase. that's a massive increase. out of 32 riders, you ran 14th. hey! good result, you've got to be happy with that. there's what we call a couple of sandbaggers is in the group. there's two riders who were minutes ahead of third place in the cs. there were two guys in the race in my category, category c, who were considerably faster than everyone else. in fact, they came first and second with a minute between third place, and these guys who are essentially are category a riders, they‘ re really fast, really light, really powerful, competing in lower categories. you know, i came 14th, but it sounds like i could have actually come 12th. and ifeel a little bit like,
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i don't know, ifeel a little bit cheated. perhaps where there's competition, there's always going to be cheating, and professional cycling has had its fair share of scandals, and now zwift is having to deal with digital performance enhancement and other methods of manipulation. but as i began to find out more about cheating on zwift, one name kept coming up. i can say this guy's name, cam jeffers, because he...it was all over the news anyway. i don't like to be compared to lance armstrong and i don't think it's unfair to compare me to lance armstrong. in 2019, cyclist and youtuber cameron jeffers took part in and won the inaugural british eracing championships in london on zwift, but shortly after the race, he was given a 6—month suspension from all racing after british cycling ruled he had breached its disciplinary code during championships. i got a call one day from british cycling saying that they've had an anonymous complaint that my bike wasn't legit.
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i was like, "you know what? come and check my bike if you want. i don't know what you're on about." zwift said the charge related tojeffers using a bot to ride for him to unlock a special bike in game, thus giving him an unfair advantage over his competitors. jeffers claims that he obtained the bike for a series of youtube videos he was making earlier in the year, rather than for the race. qualifiers, i remember saying to a couple of people, "do you not think, should i not be using a bike that i've legitimately unlocked ? " and they said, "there's no rulebook, there's no rules been written for this event, so there's no way you can get disqualified for using a bike that you haven't legitimately obtained." butjust like in any sport, there's a battle between those regulating and those trying to gain an advantage. cheers. let me say this, it was fair they took it away from him, but i think he could have won without the tron bike,
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so that's the sad thing. zwift are cracking down on any attempts to cheat in their races, with the support of global cycling governing bodies. if the platform wants to be taken seriously, it has to maintain its sporting integrity. i think cheating is probably something we will have it will never go away. someone will figure how to game the system, but having said that, there are things we know we can do, including hardware. so, for example, the world championships this year, everyone will be on the same bit of equipment. in addition to real world anti—doping controls that bar the use of performance—enhancing drugs, there will also be a group of analysts monitoring riders' race data for any red flags when compared to their previous performance stats. after just five weeks of using the platform, i got so much fitter but really i was hooked, and it was the social
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element and the gamification that kept me coming back. people were showing up not for training, they were showing up because they crave that social connection. if i think about what zwift could be, it's certainly much larger than bike racing, as a community. if it's a gamified training tool or an esports platform, zwift has hit upon something which has resonated with cyclists. and key to this is the fervent community that is building with youtubers, live streamers, online trainers, and social groups. that's it for the shortcut of click for this week, the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever, you can keep up with the team of social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at bbc click. thanks for watching, and we will see you soon. bye— bye.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. people in england are being urged to "act like you've got" coronavirus as part of a new campaign. message will be shared on tv and radio adverts, the on social media in a bid to encourage people to abide by lockdown rules. it comes as the uk reported the highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. a major incident has also been declared in london, with fears hospitals could be overwhelmed within weeks. president donald trump has been permanently suspended from twitter. the company said the decision was made after a review of his account, adding his tweets were highly likely to encourage more violence. mr trump was locked out
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of his account for 12 hours on wednesday after he called the people who stormed the us capitol building " patriots. " people are being warned to stay vigilant about scams in which criminals offer covid vaccines for a fee. in one case, a pensioner was injected with a fake covid—19 vaccine and charged £160 by a man pretending to be a health worker. city of london police say it was "crucial" he was caught as soon as possible as he "may endanger people's lives. " we all need destructions at the moment, and what better destruction than the fa cup? yeah, the third round never really fails to disappoint. it started in a different way. look at this photo. it looks like a school team photo, doesn't it? this is aston villa's tea m doesn't it? this is aston villa's team last night, because of covid—19, an outbreak, none of the first team could play so they did
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field the youth side. many under eighteens, many who had to be dropped off by their parents to face the likes of mo and sodium mono. it isa the likes of mo and sodium mono. it is a great story. —— the likes of mo salah and sadio mane. in the face of this adversity, the aston villa kids did really well against a strong liverpool side. the premier league champions took the lead, but then before half time, how about this brilliant moment for villa's 17—year—old louis, barry — he was born just down the road from villa park and could almost hear his family apparently screaming at their tv, and it was 1—1 at half time. liverpool clicked into gear in the second half though, with three goals in five minutes — mo salah rounding it off. but after the match, the liverpool manager had nothing but praise for barry and the rest of his young teammates. these boys are all talents. if you play for liverpool in the academy you are play for liverpool in the academy you a re really play for liverpool in the academy you are really good player, and we that tonight. it is the more easy thing to defend, they defended really well, and then, i don't know ifjamie really well, and then, i don't know if jamie vardy has really well, and then, i don't know ifjamie vardy has a really well, and then, i don't know if jamie vardy has a little brother, but... laughter. the counter—attack,
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scored a goal off it, that is absolutely deserved and finance are congratulations to them. what was it like playing against these superstars? did you find yourself saying, there is sabina, there is mo salah! yes, of course! thiago silva all of them, it isjust salah! yes, of course! thiago silva all of them, it is just a salah! yes, of course! thiago silva all of them, it isjust a surreal moment, but hopefully more to come. the night's other third round tie was all premier league, and wolves knocked out crystal palace 1—0. adama, traore's wonder goal, was worthy of a place in the fourth round. when the third round draw was made, one of the stand—out ties was chorley of national league north against championship team derby, with wayne rooney coming to town. now, that game looks a little different as derby, like villa, have to pick a team from their youth ranks after being impacted by the virus. in fact, derby had even more positive cases reported yesterday but the game is still going ahead. the chorley manager admits he has mixed opinions on the tie.
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i think it is a bit bittersweet, because wayne rooney stepping up to victoria park, for me to meet him, and the players we play against, these top calibre players, it is something we were looking forward to. and with this news that might not be the case. but at the same time it probably does give us a bit more of an advantage, although i would still feel that we are clearly looking at championship players and international players. we will have more on that in an hours time, and why they love adele. now we reported on breakfastjust yesterday the fresh doubts, over the already delayed tokyo olympics. they're set to go ahead injuly this year, despite a third wave of cases in the japanese capital. so how are athletes coping with the uncertainty? they are still allowed to train in this lockdown, but doing that is one of many challenges, asjoe lynskey reports. you've won it!
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gold for great britain again! circular still wakes to make olympic memories. —— tokyo still waits. the 2020 games are on hold and british athletes have to reach their peak in athletes have to reach their peak in a lockdown. so die green's way to the far east as to a farm in the east midlands. he has turned it into a gym. i was east midlands. he has turned it into a gym. iwas in east midlands. he has turned it into a gym. i was in the gym, doing a biometrics session, doing jcb figures. had 100 monolayers onjust to try to keep warm. the motivation is so strong with all the athletes that i see. everybody has that ultimate ambition. athletics indoor seasonis ultimate ambition. athletics indoor season is mostly cancelled and track races season is mostly cancelled and track ra ces a re season is mostly cancelled and track races are hard to find. so too are hockey matches. great britain's women won gold in rio, but they have played four games since march. they can still train together, and that helps them stick together. 26 individuals in our squad, and at each particular time, someone will be having a bit of a struggle, or a bit of a low point. that is where
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you lean on your teammates. i think we've all realised how lucky we are. but cases injapan are rising again. tokyo but cases injapan are rising again. to kyo we nt but cases injapan are rising again. tokyo went into a state of emergency this weekend so much is still uncertain. it could be that these games are postponed or cancelled altogether, so how does that affect you as an athlete? it affects me a lot, because i'm going to be 35 in a few months, so i don't have too many years left. to be honest, i try not to think about it too much. it wastes a lot of negative energy inside my head, thinking about the what ifs. in my head, it is going ahead. this weekend, elite athletes will keep training, but the tokyo finish line is still some way off. it must be so hard, just trying to put myself into the shoes of an athlete, in the back of the mind they must always be that thought, is this going to be in vain? all the blood, sweat and tears and hard work. thanks, mike. if you thought donald trump would leave the white house quietly this week has been anything but.
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overnight he was banned from twitter permanently, there have been calls for him to be removed from office after five people died when supporters of the president stormed the capitol building. drew willison was responsible for security at the building when serving as the senate sergeant at arms between 2008 to 2015, hejoins us now. now, a very good morning to you. you have extraordinary experience, obviously from a distance we don't know about this. as you are watching events unfold, i'm not sure where you were, but what were you thinking as you saw those people get access inside the buildings and then the events u nfold ? inside the buildings and then the events unfold? i was at home in maryland, watching it on tv. i was actually watching the electoral count, which was supposed to be the most interesting thing that went on all day. and it wasjust
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heartbreaking to see. it is not a building with people in it, it is a symbol of democracy, and it is heartbreaking to see it being overrun by people that meant to do it harm. and the fact that there was a joint session of congress going on, with the vice president of the united states, it made it that much more difficult to watch. a very hard day for those of us who have spent our lives working on capitol hill. as you are speaking to us now, i think we are seeing what was in some ways the initial surge, the group of people who had been holding a rally and came towards the building and then they surged up those main steps. it is a picture you will be very familiar with. what went wrong at that point, to allow that initial access ? at that point, to allow that initial access? i think the difficulty is, in planning for events, the capital hosts protest, you know, dozens and dozens of times per year, they were
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a posture that was probably better suited for a raucous protest rather thana suited for a raucous protest rather than a presidential inspired a riot coming up from down the street. so you are seeing people who prepared for a protest there, you are seeing people who prepared fora protest there, in you are seeing people who prepared for a protest there, in normal police uniforms, in normal gear, rather than being teed up for a riot, with riot gear and baton sound helmets and the other things, at least initially. and once they get over those barricades, least initially. and once they get overthose barricades, it least initially. and once they get over those barricades, it is difficult. i wasjust going to draw your attention, given your experience, to the suggestions that some people are making, which is that had this been a different group of people, had this been a black lives matter protest, which they have been in that area, they would have been in that area, they would have been in that area, they would have been an entirely different approach to what was happening. you make of those suggestions?” approach to what was happening. you make of those suggestions? i think theissue make of those suggestions? i think the issue is a bit more complicated than that, honestly. during the
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black lives matter protest last summer, the capital police were on a similar posture to what they were on wednesday. that protest, and what turned into a struggle between anarchists and proud boys and other groups looking to disrupt the black lives matter protest, a different pa rt of lives matter protest, a different part of town, and the metropolitan police and some of the other law enforcement agencies, they were better prepared, i think, for what was going to be a conflict between those two groups. but the capital police stayed at a relatively quieter posture. it is difficult, at the capital, because of free speech issues and wanting to be an open and welcoming environment, which is sort ofa welcoming environment, which is sort of a cornerstone of our democracy, it is difficult, it is difficult to go to it is difficult, it is difficult to gotoa
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it is difficult, it is difficult to go to a full, too full riot gear without it being contrary to the image that the members of congress wants to present. there has been a lot of criticism for the police who we re lot of criticism for the police who were there at the time, who allowed those people in. but at the same time, some people suggested that had they not taken the approach they did, had they, for example, and you might have expected this, given the place they are protecting, had they started shooting, had they started protecting that place in a way, possibly, that they are trained to do, there could have been dreadful injuries, and! do, there could have been dreadful injuries, and i know sadly five people have lost their lives.|j think you are right. it would have beena very think you are right. it would have been a very difficult situation either way. but once people were on the steps and in the building, it is an extremely, extremely difficult position. i think the men and women of the capital police behaved in a
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very brave fashion in getting people back out of the building, back down the steps and outside the perimeter, with as little, you know, violence is possible. it was a violent scene, and there was no way that people weren't going to be heard, but i think given the circumstances, they did a very good job of protecting as much life and property as they could have, which is a tribute to the men and women on the front line. have, which is a tribute to the men and women on the front linem have, which is a tribute to the men and women on the front line. if i could just ask you, you made reference already to the fact that the president, donald trump is addressing that rally outside, and a lot of people see it very clearly as incitement to what then happened. what we know today is that twitter has permanently suspended donald trump's account, now, that was one of the ways in which he often communicated with people. i wonder what your reaction is to that, are you surprised it didn't happen before? because many people have suggested that a lot of his tweets
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previously have been incendiary, but he has been allowed to carry on? from my personal view it is long overdue. he has incited hatred and promoted conspiracy theories and fomented a lot of a lot of unnecessary anger through a series of lies and narratives that simply are not true. i think it is overdue, but i think it is also difficult for those platforms not to provide an outlet for the president of the united states. it is his preferred way of communicating in what he calls a very unfiltered fashion. unfortunately his version of unfiltered is also very untrue. certainly i think twitter in particular did a betterjob after the election when they started tagging his tweets as containing false information on making false claims about the election, and i think by the time wednesday rolled around and he was on the platform
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congratulating anarchists and people attacking the united states capital, i think twitter and some of the other social media companies just made the decision that they had simply had enough, it was simply not worth it to them to have him behaving the way he had been doing. it has been very interesting talking to you this morning. thank you for your time. that was drew wilson, formerly senator sergeant of arms up until 2015, and that job incorporates, as he explained, a lot of the security around those buildings. so that is very interesting. can i be slightly frivolous? i was distracted by his christmas tree in the background.” saw that too. i thought, given what we we re saw that too. i thought, given what we were talking about, it wasn't the moment the saying anything, it was quite dark and not lit up but it was still up, on january nine.” quite dark and not lit up but it was still up, on january nine. i was on a call last night with a friend also
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still has her tree up. notjust a few very light, the entire thing. maybe traditions are different in the us, i don't know. she is in bristol, so, i don't know what her excuses! she can make the choice to keep it up! he was in america, though, so... iwas keep it up! he was in america, though, so... i was wondering keep it up! he was in america, though, so... iwas wondering if over there... though, so... iwas wondering if over there. .. we have though, so... iwas wondering if over there... we have kept though, so... iwas wondering if over there. .. we have kept our house lights up. i know lots of people have, just because we need something to lift the gloom a bit, don't we? perhaps a little bit of snow will have lifted the spirits for some in the north yesterday, northern england and north wales are seen quite a covering, as you can see behind me. even in our back garden with just a flurry, it was exciting, but unfortunately not enough to do any sledging. it is another cold and frosty start this morning and
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freezing fog around. a slight change taking place, and incursion of atla ntica re, taking place, and incursion of atlanticare, which will lift the temperatures a little bit. —— atla ntic temperatures a little bit. —— atlantic air. in the south, it is cold and frosty but freezing fog so temperatures aren't as low. where we have the snow, clearly, have to mention that it will be icy and there are ice warnings out. some rain and hill snow and snow at lower levels the north and west of scotla nd levels the north and west of scotland through the day on a brisk wind and temperatures actually start to lift here through the day. sixes and sevens, higher than we have had all week. but where we keep the freezing fog in the south barely above freezing. through the evening and overnight, the weatherfront make some progress further south, just patchy rain falling onto frozen services, potentially could be a bit icy again overnight tonight. certainly closed —— cold to the
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south and cold to the north but it does mean the weather front straddling the uk on —— in the uk. we will see increasing amounts of heavy and persistent rain, snow over the hills, dry and bright weather, sunshine coming through, hopefully with a breeze picking up and it will lift more readily and we will see temperatures at 45 in the south but they will be higher further north —— four or five. they will be higher further north —— four orfive. at they will be higher further north —— four or five. at the atlantic air also comes with it and risk of flooding. these weather fronts are lining up so not only do we have the rain with the milder air in trails within those weather fronts, it means that the snow we have seen, we will see athol setting in and then you have to double whammy. —— a thaw. you have all the thaw happening and the rain, fog several days. starting today, sunday and
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monday as well with more rain to come. by that stage, more rain spreading southwards potentially but a little bit of uncertainty that far in advance, rachel and charlie. now it's time for the film review with anna smith. hello and welcome to the film review it with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's home releases. by the time wonder woman 1984 came out in mid—december, only a fraction of eu cinemas were actually open. but i have good news.
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everyone will be able to watch it at home from wednesday. this sequel from pattyjenkins begins with a flashback to the utopian world of thymiscira, before jumping into the 1980s. diana prince, played by gal gadot, is now living in washington, dc. she is leading a double life, working for the smithsonian and occasionally leaping into superhero mode to thwart robbers and joyriders in the like. she then meets a more complexed foe in would be oil baron max lord, who's played by the mandalorian's pedro pascal. i take what i want in return. in terms of tone, this feels deliciously 1980s. there are shades of everything from ghostbusters to back to the future to big. there's also an air of vintage
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dc films like superman and batman returns. i'm ready to go. i think we can do better. political and feminist messages are here if you choose to look for them, which i certainly do, but the tone is a little lighter than the first film. bridesmaids star kristin wiig is a standout as diana's colleague barbara minerva. her journey from clumsy, mild—mannered scientist to the super villain cheetah is immensely enjoyable, and aided by terrific works by costume designer lindy hemming. barbara, what did you do? meanwhile, steve, played by chris pine, makes a return in some what dubious circumstances. it's not the only preposterous plot point, but i was still swept away by this film's action, breezy nostalgia and positive spirit. wonder woman 1984 will be on premium video on—demand from wednesday the 13th of january. now to a documentary about a unique actor and comedian, the late robin williams.
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he was always able to power through it. and he'd become this guy that you knew, remembered and loved. the way that he was able to battle the inner turmoils, he was a freaking warrior. it no longer feels loyal to be silent about it but may be more loyal to share. when williams took his own life in 2014, the media speculated about the reasons. an autopsy laterfound he had previously undiagnosed lewy body dementia. nearly every region of his brain was under attack. he experienced himself disintegrating. robin's wish probes into his final months and suggests that the neurodegenerative disorder was behind his suicide. these lewy bodies that were in nearly every region of his brain. the actor's widow gives a detailed testimony and an interview with sean levy, director of night at the museum 3, is equally poignant.
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i remember him saying to me, "i don't know what is going on, i'm not me anymore." not all the interviews in the film work so well. chats with neighbours feel a bit like filler and lectures from medical experts have a defensive tone as if straining to set the record straight. it does at least succeed in doing that, and in raising awareness about a debilitating disease. but its focus remains unclear. this is neither a scientific documentary nor a satisfying biography. it only covers part of williams's career and private life. but there is enough archived footage and heartfelt tribute in robin's wish to remind you of a funny, kind and fiercely intelligent man. the thing that matters are others. that is what life is about. it('s out on digital and on—demand now. what if we could eliminate everything from the stage except the stuff that we care about the most?
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without cables or wires, what would be left? it would be us and you. and that is with the show is. now to the world of music and david byrne's american utopia. spike lee directs this concert film of byrne's live broadway production which features songs from the band talking heads as well as his solo work. the concert is engagingly simple and technically brilliant. byrne and musicians perform with wireless instruments. they're meticulously choreographed and sartorially coordinated, yet each use individual charisma. music. it is an energetic show that preaches hope amid political turmoil. a cover of the janelle monae's protest song hell you talmbout is particularly powerful.
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i was lucky enough to see byrne's american utopia tour, and this comes pretty close to capturing the magic of this live experience. it's on digital now and available on dvd from monday the 11th of january. listen. listen! do you hear that? it's really strong. it's great. she sounds really good. hi, baby. now a new film that has just come to netflix, pieces of a woman, starring vanessa kirby. the crown actress puts in a phenomenal performance as martha, a woman who tragically loses her newborn child. the film opens with the detailed depiction of her agonising labour. i found it incredibly tough to watch but it is a rare and a very important perspective to see in cinemas. this comes from real life partners director komel mundruczo and writer kata weber.
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they gradually shifted tone from an exploration of grief to a courtroom drama. we need somejustice here! no, you need. that is what you want and need! that is your way, not my way! that is what you need! shia labeouf, recently the subject of a lawsuit himself, plays martha's partner, while ellen burstyn is tremendous as her mother. who cares about what they think? this is about me. this is about my life. pieces of a woman is on netflix now. next up, a documentary set in a monastery in the himalayas. music.
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sing me a song is the follow—up to thomas balmes's happiness about an eight—year—old monk in the village of leah. this picks up on the same child ten years later when he isjuggling monastery life with a more worldly ritual — social media. as he meets a prospective girlfriend on wechat, the film cuts to her life as a singer in the city of timpu. sing me a song is an intriguing portrait of a changing community, but it raises more questions than answers. it is available on—demand now. hello! you're just in time for a not party. we're not having fun in celebration of not closing.
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onto a blend of documentary and drama, bloody nose, empty pockets is a film set on the last night of a vegas dive bar. anybody want a drink or shot? tell a story? as a series of characters roll—up for a long session, it's easy to believe this is a fly on the wall reality show. but bloody nose, empty pockets is actually filmed in new orleans, with a hired cast playing versions of themselves or whatever they feel like doing as the booze flows. what kind of a party if it is an australian guy didn't take his pants off? i've been saying that for years. in a casting process that sounds a lot of fun, film—maker brothers bill and turner ross scoured late night dives to find drinkers with stories to tell and got them used to having cameras around. the result is a staged but evocative evening with effective moments of truth. many punters talk about what led them to the bar scene. pam says that her childhood ambition
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was to be immature and she loves that it is thanksgiving every day. the mood can be grim but it is more bittersweet than depression as these folks find community with virtual strangers. if you're missing your local boozer, then bloody nose, empty pockets is on—demand now. finally, to a film that is definitely pure fiction — vanguard, starring jackie chan. the actor's seventh collaboration with director stanley tong casts him as tang, the boss of an international security firm called vanguard. they are protecting a chinese accountant who has fallen foul of the mob. and his daughter has equally foolishly advertised her exact whereabouts on instagram. after a face—off in london's chinatown, tang and his team of attractive, quick—thinking operatives head to africa to protect this innocent influencer and they find her frolicking
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with computer—generated lions, unaware that a team of surly thugs are out to kidnap her. much like the plot, the action scenes are completely over the top. at one point, a truck made of gold smashes into a shopping mall in dubai. the dialogue is a mixture of mandarin, english and arabic, but either way, the script feels like a combination of bad b movies and scooby—doo cartoons. gurning baddies referred to meddling brats and ticking bombs. vanguard is so absurd it is occasionally entertaining. but whether it is worth your hard earned cash is another matter. it's available on—demand now. thanks for watching the film review, with me, anna smith. mark kermode will be back next week. meantime, stay safe.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "act like you have the virus." that's the advice in a new campaign urging people to abide by lockdown rules. donald trump is banned permanently from twitter because of worries his tweets could incite more violence. a warning over coronavirus scams after a 92—year—old woman was injected with a fake vaccine. good morning. in the sport, there's nothing like the fa cup third round to rouse spirits. especially for non—league chorley who're in dream land, as they try to cause another huge upset against derby of the championship.
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good morning. another bitterly cold start for many, and given we have had quite a bit of snow in the last 24 hours, ice is a concern this morning, as is freezing fog. more details for you in about 15 minutes. it's saturday, 9th january. our top story: people in england are being urged to behave like they are infected with coronavirus as part of a new public awareness campaign encouraging people to stick to the rules. the message, which will be shared on tv, radio and social media, comes as the uk reported the highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. our correspondent dan johnson has more. covid—19, especially the new variant, is spreading quickly across the country. this puts many people at risk of serious disease. a new campaign with a clear message.
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once more, we must all stay home. these stark warnings come in response to the intense pressure on hospitals, which are getting close to capacity, especially in london and the south—east. london's mayor declared a major incident yesterday, saying the virus was out of control. many doctors are frustrated. i am very worried that we have reached the peak and we are really not seeing the kind of behaviour that we saw in the first wave. and i and many of my colleagues in medicine are extremely worried that the peak, this wave, is just going to carry on rising and rising and we will reach a point where the nhs simply won't be able to cope with it. yesterday's record figures showed 1325 people died within 28 days of a positive covid test, the most in a single day during the entire pandemic. the total number of deaths now stands up just short of 80,000. there are more record figures. another 68,000 cases were recorded yesterday, and 31,624 patients are being
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treated in hospitals across the uk. allie is one of them. her whole family tested positive on christmas day. i was fine, healthy, young family, just getting on with my life, and this has completely floored me. i was told two days ago that if they didn't put me on a ventilator i would die. i have seen two people die in the beds on either side of me while i have been in this hospital. one in three people with covid don't show symptoms, so the messages, act like you have the virus and don't go out, don't mix with people. there are signs that policing of the rules will get tougher with government sources saying the time for engaging, explaining and encouraging is now over, giving way to more strict enforcement. the next few weeks look bad. vaccines give clear hope for the future, but for now we must
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all stay home, protect the nhs and save lives. dan johnson, bbc news. people are being warned to stay vigilant about scams in which criminals offer covid vaccines for a fee. in one case, a pensioner was injected with a fake covid—19 vaccine and charged £160 by a man pretending to be a health worker. city of london police say it was "crucial" he was caught as soon as possible as he "may endanger people's lives. " twitter says it has permanently banned president trump from the site following a review of his account. the social media platform said that his tweets were highly likely to encourage more violence. david willis reports. the most powerful man in the world no longer has access to one of his most valued assets, twitter. donald trump's preferred platform for picking fights, settling scores and promoting conspiracy theories has
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blocked him for good, citing what the company because the risk of further incitement to violence. president trump has been blamed for fomenting the protests which led to the depths of five people at the us capitol on wednesday, and twitter believes his continued use of its platform could stoke further violence in the run—up tojoe biden's inauguration in 11 days time stop president's sun, donald jr, biden's inauguration in 11 days time stop president's sun, donaldjr, on his twitter account, said free speech no longer existed in america, and the ban orwellian. and in a tweet swiftly deleted from his official white house account, mr trump said he was now looking into the possibility of creating his own social media platform. facebook, having already banned donald trump for the remainder of his term in office, the president is looking increasingly isolated. facing multiple resignations and with members of his own party deserting him, some are concerned about what he might do next. in the final suite
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before his account was closed, he said the one thing he will not be doing is attending the swearing in of his successor, breaking with a tradition that stretches back more than 150 years. joe biden said he was fine with that, and called mr trumpa was fine with that, and called mr trump a national embarrassment. he has been an embarrassment for the country, embarrassed us around the world. noteworthy, not whetherto hold that office. -- not worthy. there are those who believe the president should also be denied access to the nuclear button. the house speaker nancy pelosi is actively seeking his removal. democrats plan to introduce an impeachment resolution on monday. sadly, the president is running exactly to branch, he is a deranged, unhinged, dangerous president of the united states. and there are only a number of days until we can be protected from him, but he has done something so serious that they should be prosecution against him.
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more than a dozen people have now been charged in connection with wednesday's protests, among them this man, richard barnett, who is pictured with his feet up on nancy pelosi's desk. but after a week of unprecedented turbulence, it is difficult to know what will affect donald trump's fortunes more. impeachment, if it happens, or the lack of access to a social media soapbox that has been so effective in building and rallying his mass band of supporters. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. prince william has paid tribute to nhs staff working on the covid frontline and thanked them for their continued efforts during the pandemic. in a video call with staff at homerton university hospital in east london, he heard about the challenges that they are facing, following the recent rise in patients with the virus. a huge thank you to all of you for all the hard work, the sleepless nights, the lack of sleep, distress, the anxiety, the exhaustion and everything you are doing, we're so grateful. you're all in my thoughts,
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and catherine and i and the children talk about you guys every day. so we are making sure that they understand the sacrifices that all of you are making. the director michael apted, known for his long running 7 up series, has died aged 79. the documentary followed the same group of people every seven years, from childhood into their sixties. he also directed films, including gorillas in the mist and the 1999 bond movie the world is not enough. you've heard of a fireman's lift. well, here's a story that gives a whole new meaning to the phrase. this pet iguana, leaped onto the firefighter‘s helmet whilst they were tackling flames at a house in northamptonshire. apparently he didn't even realise it was on his head — he thought it was a colleague's hand! the iguana escaped unhurt and the property only sustained minor damage.
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all was well. there you go. the most interesting thing about that story is your pronunciation of the iguana. what did i say? "??ig-wanner maybe we can find a name for the iguana, and that will solve that problem. i will be parried —— paranoid about that all morning. let's move on. seriously ill covid—19 patients across the uk, now have access to two new drugs that can significantly reduce the risk of death from the virus. the medicines, which are used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, can also reduce the length of time that people need to spend in intensive care by about a week. professor anthony gordon was the uk's chief investigator into the trial of the drugs for covid treatment. he's also an intensive care consultant, and hejoins us now.
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how are you today? good morning, i'm well, thank you. great work you have been doing here. tell me, did you have some kind of idea that these drugs might be effective or is it just that you are trying almost anything at the moment? we thought they might be effective. what we have seen with covid—19 would be seriously ill patients is that there is lots of information, particularly in the lungs, but also elsewhere, it is that inflammation in the lungs which makes it difficult for people to breathe. so people proposed these drugs might work but nobody knew for sure, so we had to test them in the clinical trials and that is what we have done. as you pointed out, these patients who were really sick in the intensive care unit, needing help with our breathing support, they we re with our breathing support, they were given these drugs, more patient survived and they recovered more quickly. we know the processes around the testing of drugs are much quicker and more efficient at this time of the pandemic then they might
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normally be, so give us the idea of how you went about testing the effectiveness of these? so, they we re effectiveness of these? so, they were tested and what we call randomised clinical trials, so, basically half the patients get one drug and half the patients get the other one, and we compare with how the patients do. it is only through this rigourous testing to be really learn what works. if you try and do it any other way, byjust giving the drugs and reporting what happens, you never know when the patient would have got better or worse without it. so it's only through this robust testing that we know that, and i have to say that i think the uk has led so many trials in covid, through its national institute for health research, linked with the nhs, so that we contest test these medicines in normal clinical practice. so this is the first time these drugs have been used for this purpose anywhere in the world? they have been tested in
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less sick patients, people thought maybe we gave them, earlier we can prevent deterioration, and i think that shows why we need to trials, it would appearfrom that shows why we need to trials, it would appear from our data that it is only the sickest patients who really benefit, when they have the most information. but as women it is quite powerful drugs to turn off that inflammatory response. because it has not been peer reviewed yet, this research, should we be worried about that at all? no, it is undergoing peer review, but we have published the date on online so that people can read it so that the information is there. but peer review means that external people have looked at it, but we have put it online so that everybody can read about it and importantly guidelines committees and drug regulators can start seeing that information and forming guidance to help clinicians as quickly as possible. and i think thatis as quickly as possible. and i think that is what scientists are trying to do in this pandemic, rather than
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do things one after another, which ta kes do things one after another, which takes time, we are trying to do the normal processes, just at the same time, to get answers quickly. and as our audience knows, these drugs, can they be used in conjunction with the other drugs that have been brought in to help fight covid, like dexamethasone? yeah, importantly, we think this should be given on top of the dexamethasone. that is the first drug shown to improve survival, and this is the second. importantly, dexamethasone, comedy steroids are given to less sick patients as soon as they need oxygen. if they still do not get worse than that is the time to give these more powerful anti—inflammatory drugs. time to give these more powerful anti-inflammatory drugs. and we know how under pressure hospitals are, not just how under pressure hospitals are, notjust in london and the south—east it all over the country. how much of a difference will be use of drugs like this actually make on the ground ? of drugs like this actually make on the ground? absolutely, the numbers are rising and the pressures are extremely high. what we saw again,
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only in the sickest patients, you need to treat 12 patients and he will save one life, so that is not a huge number of patients to treat, and with the numbers coming in, this could save hundreds or thousands of lives. thank you so much for all the work you are doing, and best wishes as well, for continuing your work on the frontline. thank you. and i know mornings like this, when you wake up and the news yesterday was so grim in terms of the deaths comedy statistics around coronavirus, i think it is really important that we still talk about the amazing progress that has been made for treatment of this virus, and we will talk more about vaccines later in the show. i thought you we re later in the show. i thought you were going to say it is very important that the weather will be nice. we can't rely on data. and there isn't much we can do about it. but it can look at you, like it does there? —— it can look pretty.
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but it can look at you, like it does there? -- it can look pretty. yes but it is cold and grey and not my type of weather but further north where we have had recently cold weather overnight, when the sun comes up, weather overnight, when the sun comes up, it be lovely. i talk about bracing lead cold weather because we have had alcohol is 90 northern ireland for ten years. it is hovering around minus 10— —11. —— we have had coldest weather. —— coldest night. mist, grey weatherand have had coldest weather. —— coldest night. mist, grey weather and dense fog patches which will take mid—morning to clear away and some areas, it could linger all day. changes afoot for the north and west of scotla nd changes afoot for the north and west of scotland with rain and hill snow coming into that cold air, perhaps even at low levels for a time, and also clouding overfor even at low levels for a time, and also clouding over for northern ireland. it is a weather front as it slips its way south, it will weaken all the time that it introduces more cloud and patchy rain, hill snow and it means it won't be quite as
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bitterly cold overnight tonight in the north but it still will be pretty cold in southern areas, a little bit of freezing fog around tomorrow morning so a very different complexion to our weather with the weather front straddled across the uk. we could end up with a cloudy zone underneath this line of cloud and rain, patchy hill snow as well. high pressure keeps things largely dry soa high pressure keeps things largely dry so a bit more confident that tomorrow might see more sunshine coming into the south but it will still be cold, it is just gradually starting to warm up. helen, thank you very much. from seeing friends, to finding jobs, the pandemic has not only changed young people's day—to—day lives, but also their plans for the future. john maguire has been speaking to four people turning 21 in 2021, about how they've been affected and their hopes for the year ahead. hi, my name is vanessa and i am a third yet maths student. oh my name is macrae and i live in aberdeen.
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hello, i is macrae and i live in aberdeen. hello, lam is macrae and i live in aberdeen. hello, i am a student, model and foot ball hello, i am a student, model and football player. will i'm 20 and turning 21 in may. 20 years old from liverpool. in 2021, i want to graduate 20 —— university. liverpool. in 2021, i want to graduate 20 -- university. hopefully getting a job. wanting to graduate. my getting a job. wanting to graduate. my aspirations is to find some stability and hopefully take the next step. they share their age but also a frustration at how the path year contained and the water ambitions. 2020 was a very tough yearfor me. i had this really fantastic year the year before. i guess the academic year before where i was able to go to my talks, i was able to go and visit schools and inspired kids to do technology and things like that. but then i couldn't do that anymore but i felt as though may reach suddenly got
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really, really small. inspired by the black lives matter movement, va nessa the black lives matter movement, vanessa persuaded her university to offer scholarships. a scholarship for bame students, that is massive because it means that somebody who wouldn't normally have the opportunity has it now and wouldn't miss out because of factors that tend to impact the black community the most. so yeah, that was probably one of the bigger achievements that year. greg had hoped to take a course, paving the way to a job. year. greg had hoped to take a course, paving the way to a jobm was hard going at times because i was hard going at times because i was told that i was going to be starting a course injanuary, but thenit starting a course injanuary, but then it was put off and put off and put off. because of lockdown, i'm registered blind. i don't have good vision. some people aren't too aware of my difficulty. because i have a
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cane. i might be looking at something in the shops and i will be checking if things are safe for me to go. i will be looking and seeing the milk and i look to the left and someone has come and stood right next to me. peoplejust someone has come and stood right next to me. people just don't grasp it at all. helen is a football coach, a student and a model. diverse pursuits but all hindered by the pandemic. it's been a frustrating year. it was like being a hard year. notjust only like the coronavirus but there has been a lot of things that have come with that so it has really affected me, i think, in terms of university, sport, justjobs, everything. 2021's going to be a better year, it's got to be thought of it can't get any worse than 2020. so i think that's what's motivated me to try and stay on track, and the back of my mind, i'm just thinking every time, you know, this isn't going to go on forever and things are going to get
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better. adam has set his sights on a creative career stop film, music, dance. last year was stifling. same experiences as everyone else. it was a very confusing year. from someone like myself coming from this community, i guess it's a bit challenging because there is life of opportunities —— lack of opportunities —— lack of opportunities was up you don't know where to go, who to speak to and where to go, who to speak to and where to go next. it is like you are ina where to go next. it is like you are in a maze and you have to figure it out yourself. i find in a maze and you have to figure it out yourself. ifind it in a maze and you have to figure it out yourself. i find it so in a maze and you have to figure it out yourself. ifind it so many in a maze and you have to figure it out yourself. i find it so many —— in a maze and you have to figure it out yourself. ifind it so many —— i find it so challenging in so many different ways, financially, co nsta ntly different ways, financially, constantly battling my mental issues, mental health. getting that mentality of there is better days coming, you are not always going to have bad days. so as they turn 2021 n as have bad days. so as they turn 2021 —— as they turn 21, what does this year have for them and what do they
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have in store for 2021? once i graduate which is the big thing on my radar at the moment, i will have some more time, a bit more resources, to continue to push for the things i am passionate about and i think the things i am passionate about and ithinki the things i am passionate about and i think i can and i definitely well. first of all, i'd like to see covid come to an end because it'sjust been an absolute nightmare for everyone. it has been something else, i would say. and the second thing, i'd like to see employment rates rise. i'd like to work in an office because i can touch type. i'm very much a team player. i like speaking to people. i like to play a part. i'm notjust one that sits back and asks everyone else to do the work for me. especially in 2021, i wanted to be a special year. i wa nt i wanted to be a special year. i want to make sure i get through university, i'm on top of everything. i grabbed every opportunity i get the with modelling
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and stuff. somethings come along with that, that, i feel like just because it was like not 2020, i'll because it was like not 2020, i'll be ina because it was like not 2020, i'll be in a better position. this year, turning 21 is the most important year of my life. i'm hoping i can find some sort of stability where i can find some sort of income so i can find some sort of income so i can save and move up. can find some sort of income so i can save and move up. i hope that maybe i can be in a way better position financially and then my career, or at least taken the steps forward , career, or at least taken the steps forward, that i've wanted last year. so it is pretty much a catch up game for me. as they come of age, there remains the optimism of youth. john maguire, bbc news. i thought that was fascinating actually and we will follow them up and see how they get on over the course of the year. best of luck to them and thank you very much for sharing your hopes and aspirations. we will stay with some of the problems facing younger people at the moment. a growing number of students in england have said they will not pay rent on university accommodation they cannot use during lockdown.
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around 15,000 people at a number of universities have signed up to the rent strike. here's what some of them have been saying. we won't be gathered to go back to accommodation until at least march soa accommodation until at least march so a lot of us are angry that we are having to pay so much money for something that we're only able to access for about half the time we're paying for. we understand this is a difficult time for everyone, universities included. the university definitely has a city as well, but the idea that it is going to be students that are going to have to foot the bill for this is very frustrating and it's really getting a lot of people down. it's frustrating because you just want to bea frustrating because you just want to be a unique, you want to get the best experience, you want to get your money 's worth. —— uni. best experience, you want to get your money 's worth. -- uni. a lot of stu d e nts your money 's worth. -- uni. a lot of students feel cheated that they have had to pay for accommodation but they can't go on to compaq —— campus. i don't know how i'm going to get my stuff out of my room when
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the uk is in lockdown so i'm going to end up paying rent on a place that i'm not even in, it isjust a very stressful and uncertain time at the moment. let's talk now to ben beadle, who's the chief executive of the national residential landlords association. morning to you, ben. these are stu d e nts morning to you, ben. these are students have a situation where they're paying for private rented accommodation in a place they are not allowed to go to. why do they have to carry on paying the rent? morning, charlie. well, it's obviously a rotten situation and it's a rotten situation for everybody, quite frankly. the situation we see varies across the country so some universities are allowing very limited access at the moment, it is one of the people in the previous piece said, they will come a time where we will be able to go back to relative normality and those students will want those homes
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there. so in the immediate term, why can't the landlords, i don't know, hold the rent? say if you are not in the accommodation, you don't have to pay because of is that an option? well, it's not quite as straightforward as that. we would reiterate the government advice on this which is for landlords and te na nts to this which is for landlords and tenants to have an early conversation about the best way to ta ke conversation about the best way to take these things forward and indeed we have seen landlords responding very, very positively in terms of rent deferrals was not in some insta nces rent deferrals was not in some instances reducing the rent, and in some instances, letting people out of their tenancy, but there is a very cyclical nature to the student accommodation life—cycle and the reality is, lots of landlords can afford to release people from their obligations, the knock—on implications that that property will realistically remain empty, landlords will face potentially 200% increase in cancel tax for a vacant
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property and what we know about the rental market that we operate in is that 94% of properties are owned by individuals, typically most of those are owned by one person, and that individual is feeling just as much pain as the students in this situation. rather than pick people against each other, what we actually need is some tangible help for stu d e nts to need is some tangible help for students to be able to meet their obligations, both in terms of contract, but also looking at the way that students are engaging with university establishments, paying nine grand for courses that they thought they would be attending in person and now having to do remotely. i do think there should be a special case for these people. student fee thing is a slightly separate this particular argument. do you think there is a case for, i get, maybe in the interest of both the landlords can you describe their situations, students themselves, that the government should pay some kind of, in some way, should get
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involved in this process whereby they help students to pay rent for accommodation they're not in and possibly thereby the landlords get some amount of rent for a property they might —— that might otherwise be empty. is that what you're calling for? so there is a contract in place and the government would do very well to override all of those contracts that are in place. it is a very tricky one for the government. what we would like to see is greater support out there for renters. this isa support out there for renters. this is a sickle argument —— fiscal argument but robbing people to pay poor is not... what do you mean? financial support, grants for students, loans for other renters, a whole range of things that the government can do, what they can't do is effectively annul a contract that is in place. that would require some very, very hefty legislation and compensation and so what we would rather see is financial
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support for students to be able to meet their obligations. they would need to be eve and take on both sides, that's for sure. thank you very much. we're nowjoined by helen knapman who is assistant news and investigations editor at moneysavingexpert.com as ever with the pandemic, some people struggling much more than others and clearly they will be some families, some parents, who can afford quite easily, possibly, to carry on paying rent but they will be many others who in normal times meeting the cost of accommodation is a stretch. their incomes will have now been hit even harder because of the latest lockdown. they will be really struggling and the idea of paying for some ring that isn't being used is really tough, so what additional support is there out there for students in that situation? this is a really difficult situation and i really feel for students who are sort of struggling to pay for rent, for
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example. in the first instance i would suggest they check their contracts. it is very unlikely u nfortu nately contracts. it is very unlikely unfortunately that they will be break laws in that, letting them out of these contracts early, but i suggest they check those first and lakeshore to see if they have a legal right. —— make sure. if not, i suggest they talk to their landlord or university provider. there are two scenarios here, you might be in university halls that are run by your university or you might be in a privately owned accommodation's run bya privately owned accommodation's run by a management company, for example, or by a landlord. if you are ina example, or by a landlord. if you are in a university whole scenario, they have more of the duty of care towards students you might be able towards students you might be able to argue for a discount. some universities we've seen are offering help to students, for example bristol university, two universities in manchester are offering discounts and those range from —— from 30% of your fees for one term to sort of discount in january, your fees for one term to sort of discount injanuary, so do talk to your provider and see what you can do. it is going to be slightly
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trickier if you are in a private accommodation but again, talk to your landlord, you never know what help they can offer in terms of a rent discount or a rent holiday. landlords themselves can take mortgage holidays, so that might give them some wiggle room to help students. let's not forget 8096 of stu d e nts students. let's not forget 8096 of students are in that kind of accommodation and not in university accommodation, so the vast majority are in that situation. you have that conversation with the landlord and he or she is immovable, can't for whatever reason help out or suspend rent, but she refused to pay rent, where does that leave you legally? emma, this is a tricky situation, so at the moment, students or other renters on the whole, can't be evicted because of other coronavirus issues —— yes. if you are struggling to pay, government is across the uk have various measures in place to prevent evictions. that was actually supposed to end on monday but it has been delayed now to march in england was not actually to february, apologies. so if you are in that
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instance, you are protected from eviction but that could end up in court action later down the line and it isa court action later down the line and it is a risky position to be in. so before deciding not to pay, do talk to your landlord, do talk to your accommodation provider. also considered talking to your student union who may be able to help you lobby and try and get the university to budge if it is not doing anything so far. that you very much indeed, helen. probably also worth mentioning, the government in england has got a fund, £20 million fund, to help students who are in most need of support during the coronavirus crisis to cover exceptional hardship so it may be worth looking at those sources of additionalfunding or worth looking at those sources of additional funding or grants as well from the individual universities who are extending help to students who need it at the moment. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. straight to the sport. normally this is the weekend of the year when it feels like everything begins revving up. and we have renewed vigor in our lives. we are, and we have! and it isa lives. we are, and we have! and it is a special weekend because we know they will be some unlikely heroes somewhere. there will be an upset. everybody will be looking at that spellers game. i can't quite see an upsetair, spellers game. i can't quite see an upset air, but what a story that is. somewhere, though, a premier league tea m somewhere, though, a premier league team will be treading on a banana skin, it could be everton, burnley, fulham, manchester united, all
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facing the league teams. 20 games in all today. what is even more exciting is that it decided today, there are no replays because of the pandemic and worries about fixture congestion. so extra time and penalties, whatever happens today, we will know who goes through. that adds to the sense ofjeopardy. the coronavirus has already had an impact with aston villa. aston villa had to play their youth teams in their third round match last night, and after being dropped off by their parents or the academy bus, the villa kids really impressed against the likes of mo salah and sadio mane in a strong liverpool team. the premier league champions did take the lead, but then before half time, how about a flash of brilliance from villa's 17 year—old louis barry? a local lad, and villa fan, he made it 1—1 at half time. liverpool clicked into gear in the second half, though, with three goals in five minutes, mo salah rounding it off to send them through, but villa's young stars also had a feeling of victory affter their heroic display.
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a wonder goal by adama traore was enough for wolves to win the other third round tie last night. the all premier league match against crystal palace all his own work. lots of fa cup action look forward to today. newcastle are up against arsenal live on bbc one at 5:30pm. but their manager steve bruce isn't happy with football continuing amid increasing coronavirus outbreaks at clubs. we have had to players, very, very sick, who we have to take very seriously, and we have had one or two members of staff, one in particular he was nearly hospitalised. so it has not been easy. so, yes, we will keep going along, but as i said, financially it is right but may be morally it is wrong. one of the games of the day is at lunchtime. the lancashire town of chorley is famous for its comedy, through chorley fm in peter kay's phoenix nights and more recently, britain's got talent finalist steve royle.
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but until recently the football team has been the butt ofjokes among local rivals. today though the non—league side from the sixth tier of english football take on championship club derby county, and chorley in the third round for the first time are determined to have the last laugh. they liked a chuckle in chorley as much as they have been enjoying their fa cup goals this season. just ask britain's got talent finalist comics steve royle, whose smile is even broader now that his beloved chorley, from low league obscurity, hitting the big time in the third round the fa cup today. you are talking about a third round the chorley but even a year ago you would be doing triple chorley cakes. that was a third round, three chorley cakes in one session, but now. . . chorley cakes in one session, but now... all i can say is, i came third in britain's got talent, and i just hope that chorley can take it one step further. i used to joke
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about chorley, in my stand—up routine. i used to talk about it, when i first moved here 20 years ago there was an advert on the local radio station that used to say come to chorley this christmas, where the train station is near shops. and that was it. so the fact they were talking about bigger things, it is crazy. # someone like you... they like to sing in chorley two, the manager, who is also a school headmaster, wa nted who is also a school headmaster, wanted the team to reach a wider audience, and their version of this adele song went viral after this season's previous giantkilling heroics. it has been wonderful, to be honest. to just heroics. it has been wonderful, to be honest. tojust have heroics. it has been wonderful, to be honest. to just have something else alongside the football, and one day, five or six years ago, ijust put on this song, adele, and we all started singing it and since then it has just stuck. and when we have a big moment, somebody pops it on and we give what we think is a good rendition. # i wish nothing but the best for
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you... it was a real sort of feelgood moment for everybody to see, you can see the fa cup is still alive. what was the reaction in school? did you get it so that you cou ntless school? did you get it so that you countless times? my first reaction was my little boy who said, don't ever do that again, dad, not on telly. and the schoolkids have absolutely loved it, they have really ta ke n absolutely loved it, they have really ta ken to absolutely loved it, they have really taken to it. unlike in more normal school times, before the latest lockdown, it has been a week like no other forjamie, latest lockdown, it has been a week like no otherforjamie, sorting out school and preparing for the big cup match. it has been one of the busiest weeks that i've lived through. without a doubt, it is extremely cathartic for us. we've got this release. ifeel very fortu nate to got this release. ifeel very fortunate to have that. the vast majority of my staff have got school, then they go home, they are living in lockdown, and for me and my players, we are a bit more locked—in sense that we've got our dayjobs, and locked—in sense that we've got our day jobs, and then locked—in sense that we've got our dayjobs, and then we got something else to look forward to, and you know, the pinnacle of that is saturday against derby, which is
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great. as chorley welcome derby today, jamie would find himself standing alongside his hero, wayne rooney, who are self—isolating with his first team squad after a covid outbreak there. so chorley went out to play derby's youngsters, which has elevated the ambitions of chorley‘s captain, lift engineer. you want to test yourself against the big stars. obviously having wayne rooney on the bench, obviously we have not got that now, and playing against the youngsters, it was a bit more of a chance, you going to attend you when this one and you've got an amazing chance to play a premier league team. despite their being no fans as chorley‘s round today, steve royle reckons there still a way to get behind the team. i'm giving a plea to everybody in chorley right now, watch the match with your windows open and then we cannot at least absorb of then we cannot at least absorb of the atmosphere that is in the town. it's just jokes for 15 minutes! while delivering a final 1—liner to wayne rooney. i'll be perfectly honest with you, he's one of my heroes and i feel awful saying this,
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but yeah, i hope you had a good christmas and a good new year, 2021 was supposed to be a better year, but unfortunately, wayne, not for you, my friend. not for you. and whatever happens i am sure they will be in very good voice in chorley today. derby's squad is even more depleted now because of a night clu b more depleted now because of a night club confirmed some of the party that were to be involved today, some of the youth squad, have tested positive, so they are self—isolating. a small number, but the match still goes ahead at 12:50pm. this is why it will be so interesting. teams, like you said with aston villa, a classic case, by going to be boxing and costing. absolutely, that is why chorley fa ncy absolutely, that is why chorley fancy their chances of making the fourth—round now. admittedly, derby's youth team should still be too strong. don't forget, you can follow it all on bbc 5 live. the government is urging
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everyone to "act like you've got coronavirus" as part of a new campaign encouraging people to stay at home during lockdown. it comes a day after a major incident was declared in london. the mayor, sadiq khan, says the spread of the virus is now "out of control". we're joined now by gp sarahjarvis. very good morning. how are things with you? well, how do you think, from what you've just heard? it is really, really scary for me. we are literally seeing hospitals not quite in my patch, but in east young —— east london, the royal london said they were working in disaster mode. at the whittington hospital in north london we've got two—thirds of beds which are filled with covid patients. normally, hospitals 90% capacity plus, especially during the winter. and it is not by any means just london and the south—east. hull has three and half to four times as many patients as they had in the
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first week. east sussex and maidstone are similar. one third of hospitals have got a third of their beds filled with covid patients. we normally monitor the 90% capacity in the winter, if not closer to 100%. it is very scary. and of course the reality check on top of everything you have just said, reality check on top of everything you havejust said, sarah, is that it is over the next few days, because of this timelag, but they think the pressures will be at their greatest. and that of course is what people so often forget. so, we have seen this average of 60,000 cases per day. i remember being on this programme about a week before christmas and saying, gosh, we are getting close to 25,000 cases per day. this is really worrying. now we are at 60,000 cases a day. that's up 30%. but we are now, as you so rightly say, starting to see that lag. so admissions have been up 35% in the last week and unfortunately death rates are also up almost 50%
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in the last week. let's talk about your practice and the vaccination programme. because i know that right now, you are vaccinating people. what has happened so far? the good news is that quite a lot of, well, it is not individual practices, what is called the primary care network, a network of several practices, will come together. one practice will act asa hub come together. one practice will act as a hub and vaccinating might done at the practice, if it is big enough, or it might be done at a local hotel or a local sports centre, somewhere like that, where it is big enough, where there is enough room for us to vaccinate everybody and under the current vaccination, the pfizer vaccination, observe everybody for 15 minutes afterwards. the good news is, with the astrazeneca vaccine coming on stream, we're not going to have to observe everybody and other good news is that unless you have had a history of anaphylaxis, the most severe kind of allergy, to the vaccine, or one of its ingredients,
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you are now going to be able to have it. that is great news and we are also now just it. that is great news and we are also nowjust starting to roll out, firstly to care homes, as we get our firstly to care homes, as we get our first astrazeneca vaccines, lots of practices have not had them yet, but the care homes are definitely coming next and really importantly, the one that everybody forgets, people who have not had vaccination so far, housebound people who live on their own, because with the pfizer vaccine that wasn't feasible because you couldn't give a pfizer vaccine to one person when in fact you had a 975 dose rack. can you try to break this down for us, i'm not sure if you can. you will know in your practice how many people fall within those top four categories, where they are having to reach in the shortest time. i mean, is it realistic? even within your practice, that those people, who you know should be getting it, will get it? well, it isn't an individual practice. as i say, it will be a group of practices. i think it is much more dependent at the moment and whether we get the vaccine. i
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have had lots of areas, lots of gp friends and colleagues around me who have said, well, i've been told on five dates that we are going to get the vaccine and it hasn't arrived yet. we are ready to go so please give us the vaccine. at the moment it is the vaccine availability which is the challenge. going forward, it is the challenge. going forward, it is going to be the vaccinating ability. if we get another vaccines we really need to get enough people up we really need to get enough people up and running to vaccinate. so our practice nurses and healthcare assista nts practice nurses and healthcare assistants are already doing an amazing job, we have stjohn's ambulance volunteers stepping up, it won't be at local practices of course but rather at the cubs, of which there are now 223, and seven super vaccinated hubs. we've got to get pharmacists on board, with the astrazeneca vaccine, because it doesn't come in these huge packs, will be able to get pharmacists on board. at all of those together and if we get enough supply of the
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vaccine, it will be feasible, but it is going to be a stretch. keep us posted. will speak to you again soon. thank you. and we will be talking about scams around coronavirus after eight o'clock, and also policing, why police are really concerned that not enough people are following the guidelines. time for the weather now. if you are heading out to your daily bit of exercise, which is still allowed, how is it working? cold, ina cold, in a word. cold and foggy in the south and increasingly cloudy in the south and increasingly cloudy in the north. much better than what is going on further south. this is storm philomena bringing a once in a 20 or 30 year event of snowfall to parts of spain. our snow fell yesterday, didn't it? stay with us, headlines coming up. parts of spain. our snow fell yesterday, didn't it? we are underneath high pressure for today. weather fronts are starting to come in. i'll change lifting on what they have been. bitterly cold to start this morning and i surreal concern
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as well as freezing fog for stopping fa ct, as well as freezing fog for stopping fact, in the far north—west, we have that weather front coming in. cold est that weather front coming in. coldest night for a decade for northern ireland. not far shy of that. western northern england and scotla nd that. western northern england and scotland as well. freezing fog is an issue for central and southern england towards merseyside as well, seeing fog patches there, but also have the change towards the north—west today bringing rain, hill snow, clouding overfor northern ireland. so a different feel all look to this area today but still hanging onto dry and bright weather east of the grand —— grampians. dry weather for many places coming through. as it clears, thickening up again, but not as widely and a cold night, you can see elsewhere we have a bit more cloud around so as not saying you will be cold because we have lying snow but it won't be as hard frost as we have seen this
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morning was still some wintry showers coming back into the northern isles as we can see elated today and overnight tonight so tomorrow, the main difference is that we sat underneath this weather front across parts of scotland, northern england, perhaps northern ireland, it is likely to push northwards and again southwards. it doesn't know what it is doing. but once the freezing fog clears in the south, dry and bright weather to convert perhaps a few showers but this will be the main rainmaker through the day. heavy rain pushing back again and just allowing that slightly milder at lactic influence to affect more parts and that will be what we're seeing, this gradual warming, thawing of the ground, thawing of the snow, so with those whether fronts are still continuing to come into the north—west in particular and milder air, you have that double whammy of the rain and the snow to content with so yes, pretty icy this morning, a few wintry showers but some sunshine to enjoy as well. thanks, helen, see later on.
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we'll be back with the headlines at 8:00. now, aleem maqbool takes a look at the dramatic events in the us this week — in 'storming the capitol‘. i know that everyone here will soon be marching over to the capitol building. your life is going to pure hell every minute that you're here. you'll never take back our country with weakness. the 6th of january 2021. all: (chant) usa, usa! the day that shook the foundations of american democracy. where hundreds stormed the seat of government... this nation was founded on revolutionary activity. ..to try to overturn an election result. police are now finally pushing people off the ground and away from the capitol building. we'll be back when they're hanging them from gallows up there, how about that?
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but this assault didn't come out of the blue. i call on president trump to go on national television now and demand an end to this siege. it was by people who felt they were carrying out the wishes of the sitting us president, wishes they felt he signalled to them loud and clear. this is the story of one of the most tumultuous weeks in living memory in washington, a city that had already started to feel like one dreading the next move of a cornered donald trump. as he returned from his christmas break, it was becoming clear that any avenues he thought he had to cling to power were closing.
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and things got worse for the president. he was caught pressuring an official to somehow recalculate the votes in a state he lost in the november election. republican candidates lost two senate races in georgia, so his party lost control of the senate. but wednesday, 6 january was always going to be the day it came to a head. madame speaker, members of congress... congress was due to do what is normally just procedural — formalise the results of the election against the futile demands of donald trump, who stationed his forces outside. all: (chant) fight for trump, fight for trump, fight for trump! "fight for trump." at the request of the president, thousands of his supporters had gathered from over the country. well, we hope people see that things aren't right
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with the election system the way it is today. violence happens, like, it happens, but we're not going to start it. like, we're here defend ourselves. the spark was lit by the president himself in his midday address to the crowd, when he called the outcome of the election an egregious assault on us democracy. we're going to walk down to capitol because you'll never take back our country with weakness. you have to show strength, and you have to be strong. it was all his supporters needed to hear. even before his 70—minute speech finished, they started to march up to capitol hill where that session to confirm the election result was in progress. soon what looked like the entire crowd was heading that way. there were some attacks on journalists, another consequence of the rallying cries of the president. within 20 minutes of the end of his speech, donald trump supporters were surrounding the capitol building.
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handfuls of officers tried to fend them off as best they could, but they were overwhelmingly outnumbered. clashes went on, but protesters were now breaching cordons all around the grounds, climbing platforms that had been set up forjoe biden's inauguration exactly two weeks later. and then, in barely believable scenes, they started scaling the walls of this historic seat of american legislative power. it didn't stop there. with little to stop them, the crowd became intent on storming the building. all: (chant) usa, usa! within a matter of minutes from the initial breach, scores of people were inside in what would eventually become hundreds who made their way to the doors of the chamber where the session had been about the halted.
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many politicians had been rushed to safety. others took cover where they were. i've never had a panic attack but i think that's what i was having. my heart was pounding, very, very hard. i was having a little bit of trouble catching my breath and i felt almost paralysed. in the melee outside the chamber, a single shot was fired by police. one protester, 35—year—old ashlee babbitt, dropped to the ground and died. in another part of the building, a us capitol police officer, brian sicknick, was violently confronted by protesters and later died of his injuries. both of the dead on opposite sides of this battle in the heart of washington had been military veterans. with the assault still under way, the president—elect couldn't hide his disgust and dismay. i call on president trump to go on national television now and demand an end to this siege. but inside and outside the us
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capitol, protesters were now giddy with excitement and in jubilant mood. brian solesky from virginia had been one of the first to get in. i met him as he emerged from the building. then i realised, i was like, if we overwhelm them, we can push through, because we just wanted to be inside. so we made it up the stairs, we started knocking on individual doors, hoping somebody would come out, and then we made our way to the chamber. that is just not how things are done in this country. lawlessness, storming buildings even. and that's what happened today. this nation wasn't founded on stability. ——civility. this nation was founded on revolutionary activity. we became civil after the government realised that they got overwhelmed. so what happens now? i guess now we wait and see if they take us the seriously because they saw how easily we were able to breach their defence. the president did speak, but still couldn't help repeating his
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claims of vote rigging. this is a fraudulent election but we can't play into the hands of these people. we have to have peace. so go home, we love you, you're very special. some of those special to the president are now being arrested for violent entry, remaining in restricted areas and theft of public property. and these infamous images will live long in the memory. the capitol building was eventually secured and only in the evening, the area around it was as well. well, after hours of allowing protesters to remain on capitol grounds, with a curfew now in place, riot police are now finally pushing people off the grounds and away from the capitol building. while there were some scuffles, many point to the relative restraint shown by security forces as compared to some of the scenes we saw at black lives matter protests last summer. we will be back when they are
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hanging from the gallows up there. the demonstrators here felt their actions had somehow been heroic. all over the world is looking at washington now, they saw people storming the capitol... i hope they keep watching it. we are the last hope for the world. at least in my mind, with everything i've seen, we are free. but what was it all for? because into the night, with parts of the capitol still laying in disarray, the session to confirm the election results defiantly resumed, with strong words from all sides. to those who wreaked havoc in our capitol today, you did not win. violence never wins. this president bears a great deal of the blame. this mob was, in good part, president trump's doing. the house of representatives object to the counting of electoral votes... senior republicans may show their disgust now but for weeks, they didn't
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acknowledgejoe biden's election win either and even though nearly 150 republicans still objected, in the early hours, joe biden was confirmed the election winner. through an aide, donald trump tweeted: given the scenes in the capitol building that the us was waking up to, that statement was the bare minimum he could have done, and did not show the humility needed from someone who instigated all this. that was certainly the message ofjoe biden. the past four years, we've had a president who has made his contempt for our democracy, our constitution, the rule of law clear in everything he has done and yesterday was the culmination of that unrelenting attack.
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in spite of night—time curfews, life was starting to return to normal in washington, but many americans described feeling numb at the events of the previous day. david hartfield, jr works at the capitol building and lives close by. it was scary, and when i got up this morning, i was like, "maybe i should stay inside all day," i really had that sort of feeling, like, "am i really going to be attacked for just going and paying bills?" like, that's a scary thought to wake up with in the morning. but many of those who'd been involved in the unrest could be found sightseeing in the capital city. yesterday had to happen. here, there were no regrets and no remorse. how do you feel about it all? i feel very privileged that i was a part of yesterday. ifight forfreedom and democracy. even with everything that happened ? yes, even with everything that happened. we had the greatest president in our lifetime doing everything he could do, sacrificing his golden years
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to make this country what it should be and what it always has been, he sacrificed so much and that's why you've seen so many people here, they realise that. i'm holding the line. rick sarmiento from florida, who'd been part of it all, was one of many who, on reflection, feels this is the beginning of a movement, not the end. i firmly believe this is our 1776. i firmly believe this country — two things were going to happen, either another revolution or civil war. but in spite of everything we saw with our own eyes, a lot of those protesters who laid siege to the us capitol insist that it is the other side that is trying to seize power and subvert democracy. among them, there's very little sense of embarrassment at the events here. if anything, a sense of pride. good is a way to describe it. democrats are adamant donald trump needs to leave office immediately. the president of the united states incited an armed insurrection against america.
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the gleeful desecration of the us capitol, which is the temple of our american democracy, and the violence targeting congress are horrors that will forever stain our nation's history. my only goal was to ensure the integrity of the vote. and it took deaths and unprecedented condemnation of his actions for this, the most basic requisite of his position. my focus now turns to ensuring a smooth, orderly and seamless transition of power. this moment calls for healing and reconciliation. but whatever he does now, donald trump will forever be that us president who inspired his supporters to storm his country's own seat of democracy.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: act like you have the virus. that's the advice in a new campaign urging people to abide by lockdown rules. donald trump is banned permanently from twitter because of worries his tweets could incite more violence. a warning over coronavirus scams after a 92—year—old woman was injected with a fake vaccine. good morning. dropped off by their parents to tackle mo salah and co. and as the fa cup third round weekend, started sprinkling its magic, aston villa's kids, gave a strong liverpool team a scare, before the champions eventually went through. good morning. another cold start for many and given we have had a bit of
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snow, ice is a concern, as is freezing fog. more in 15 minutes. it's saturday the 9th of january. our top story. people in england are being urged to behave like they are infected with coronavirus as part of a new public awareness campaign encouraging people to stick to the rules. the message — which will be shared on tv, radio and social media — comes as the uk reported the highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. our correspondent dan johnson has more. covid—19, especially the new variant, is spreading quickly across the country. this puts many people at risk of serious disease. a new campaign with a clear message. once more, we must all stay home. the stark warnings come in response to the intense pressure hospitals, which are getting close to capacity, especially in london and the south—east. london's mayor declared a major incident yesterday, saying the virus was out of control.
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many doctors are frustrated. i'm very worried that we've reached the peak and we're really not seeing the kind of behaviour that we saw in the first wave. and i and many of my colleagues in medicine are extremely worried that the peak, this surge, wave, isjust going to carry on rising and rising, and that we'll reach a point where the nhs simply won't be able to cope with it. yesterday's record figures showed 1,325 people died within 28 days of a positive covid test, the the most in a single day during the entire pandemic. the total number of deaths now stands atjust short of 80,000. there are more record figures. another 68,000 cases were recorded yesterday, and 31,624 patients are being treated in hospitals across the uk. one in three people with covid don't show symptoms, so the message is, act like you have the virus. don't go out and don't
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mix with people. there are signs that policing of the rules will get tougher, with government sources saying the time for engaging, explaining and encouraging is now over, giving way to more strict enforcement. the next few weeks look bad. vaccines give clear hope for the future, but for now we must all stay home, protect the nhs, save lives. dan johnson, bbc news. let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. there is a sense people are not taking this as seriously as they should and that is why this message is needed? i think that's right, a lot of the focus of the campaign is on urging people to follow the rules that were put in place when the lockdown was announced, emphasising that stay at home message that we saw back in march last year and telling people that it is important to follow that. it is interesting,
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because we have seen some comments from the prime minister to go along with the campaign, clearly real concern in downing street about the pressure being put on the nhs, about the number of people in hospital, about those record number of deaths we saw yesterday and the message from borisjohnson we saw yesterday and the message from boris johnson is, we saw yesterday and the message from borisjohnson is, your compliance is now more vital than ever, which i think reflects that view that some have that people maybe aren't taking the rules as seriously as they did this time last year. i think we are only going to hear more of that that people need to ta ke hear more of that that people need to take the rules seriously, because things are in a dangerous place. thank you. derbyshire police are reviewing its lockdown fines policy following citicim for its approach to two walkers. the woman said they were surrounded by police after driving five miles from their home for a walk, and fined £200 each.
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current guidance says you can travel for exercise in england as long as it is in your "local area". the force said all of its fixed penalties issued during the new national lockdown will be reviewed. people are being warned to stay vigilant about scams in which criminals offer covid vaccines for a fee. in one case, a pensioner was injected with a fake covid—19 vaccine and charged £160 by a man pretending to be a health worker. city of london police say it's "crucial" he is caught as soon as possible as he "may endanger people's lives". in about ten minutes we will be speaking catherine hart from the trading standards institute, they have seen a rise in the number of scams, they have seen a rise in all sorts of scams. so we will get more on that. twitter says it has permanently banned president trump from the site — following a review of his account.
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the social media platform said that his tweets were highly likely to encourage more violence. david willis reports. the most powerful man in the world no longer has access to one of his most valued assets — twitter. donald trump's preferred platform for picking fights, settling scores and promoting conspiracy theories has blocked him for good, citing what the company called: "the risk of further incitement of violence". president trump has been blamed for fomenting the protest that led to the death of five people at the us capital on wednesday and twitter believes his continued use of its platform could stoke further violence in the run—up tojoe biden's inauguration in 11 days' time. the president's son donjunior on his twitter account said: "free speech no longer exists in america". and called the ban "orwellian". in a tweet swiftly deleted from his official white house account, mr trump said he was now looking into the possibility of creating his own social media platform.
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facebook, having already banned donald trump for the remainder of his term in office, the president is looking increasingly isolated. facing multiple resignations and with members of his own party deserting him, some are concerned about what he might do next. in the final tweet before his account was closed, he said one thing he won't be doing is attending his successor swearing in, breaking with a tradition stretching back more than 150 years. joe biden said he was fine with that and called mr trump a national embarrassment. he has been an embarrassment to the country, embarrassed us around the world, not worthy to hold that office. there are those who believe the president should also be denied access to the nuclear button. the house speaker nancy pelosi is actively seeking his removal. democrats plan to introduce an impeachment resolution on monday. sadly, the person running
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the executive branch is a deranged, unhinged, dangerous president of the united states. and with only a number of days until we can be protected from him. but he has done something so serious that there should be prosecution against him. more than a dozen people have now been charged in connection with wednesday's protest, among them this man, richard barnet, who was pictured with his feet up on nancy pelosi's desk. but, after a week of unprecedented turbulence, it is difficult to know what will affect donald trump's fortunes more — impeachment, if it happens, or the lack of access to the social media soap box that's been so effective in building and rallying his mass band of supporters. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. prince william has paid tribute to nhs staff working on the covid frontline and thanked them for their continued efforts during the pandemic. in a video call with staff
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at homerton university hospital in east london, he heard about the challenges that they are facing — following the recent rise in patients with the virus. a huge thank you to all of you for all the hard work, the sleepless nights, the lack of sleep, distress, the anxiety, the exhaustion and everything you are doing, we are so grateful. you are in my thoughts, and catherine and i and the children talk about you guys every day. so we are making sure that they understand the sacrifices that all of you are making. the director michael apted, known for his long running "7 up" series, has died aged 79. the documentary followed the same group of people every seven years, from childhood into their 605. he also directed films — including gorillas in the mist and the 1999 bond movie the world is not enough. you've heard of a fireman's lift — well, here's a story that gives a whole new meaning to the phrase. this pet iguana, leaped
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onto the firefighter‘s helmet whilst they were tackling flames at a house in northamptonshire. apparently he didn't even realise it was on his head — he thought it was a colleague's hand! what is this creature? an iguana. it is enormous. the iguana escaped unhurt and the property only sustained minor damage. if you're wondering why rachel's making such a big deal about me saying the word iguana, earlier in a misspeak, i said saying the word iguana, earlier in a misspeak, isaid igana. ithink saying the word iguana, earlier in a misspeak, i said igana. i think i have always said that. i don't think i've said it that often, it is not a regular word i need to use. i'm corrected and we have got it right now. that is the main thing. we are
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grateful to you for that. we are grateful to you for that. we are grateful to you at home. because of the awful statistics around coronavirus. but it is important we bring you some positive news and we will be talking about the vaccines later. but let's find ute what is happening in the nhs now. "my heart is broken". those are the words of a doctor working on the frontline of the fight against coronavirus. the number of patients in hospital is now higher than at any other time in the pandemic. in london, half of all hospital beds are occupied by covid patients. allie sherlock's whole family tested positive on christmas day. she recorded this message from the intensive care ward where she's being treated. i was fine, healthy, young family, just getting on with my life and
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this is completely floored me. i was told two days ago if they didn't put me on told two days ago if they didn't put meona told two days ago if they didn't put me on a ventilator, i would die. this is happening and this is serious. this nhs will not be able to cope if people do not take this seriously. i have seen two people die in beds either side of me while i have been in this hospital. people with families. children. how will they ever be able to explain to theirfamilies what they ever be able to explain to their families what has happened to them? this is so important, keep your distance, stay at home. protect your distance, stay at home. protect your loved ones. we thank ally and herfamily for sending your loved ones. we thank ally and her family for sending on that message. maybe an illustration of the problems. in london, a major incident has been declared with the mayor — sadiq khan — warning that hospital beds could run out within a couple of weeks. dr simon walsh is an emergency care doctor in london. he's also the deputy chair of the british medical association
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consulta nt‘s committee. thank you for your time. i appreciate it is so busy at the moment. we hear the situation in london according to the mayor is out of control, what is it like in your hospital? good morning. yes, i mean at first acknowledge that story from ally, who brings home the reality of the effect of covid—19 on those patients who are most severely affected by it and unfortunately, as you have reported, the numbers of patients needing treatment in hospital and indeed on intensive ca re hospital and indeed on intensive care has been soaring over the past few weeks. and in my hospital, like all london hospitals, we are really effectively we have been working in major incident mode for the last couple of weeks and the declaration of the major incident by the mayor
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isa of the major incident by the mayor is a reflection of the fact it is notjust one hospital, but all hospitals and the pressure has been felt notjust in london, but across the south—east and many other parts of the country. it is really unprecedented in terms of the numbers of patients that require intensive care being put on a ventilator at one time and most hospitals have reached, have expanded their intensive care capacity to that he times. we don't have three time it is number of staff, so our staff are being spread more thinly in an effort to deliver that vital care to save lives. but it is extremely pressurised and the staff are doing their utmost, but they're being worn down by the pressure and suffering health and mental health problems as a result. you talk about already operating in
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major incident mode, when a major incident is declared, it means emergency services cannot guarantee their normal level of response. so what happens to the people have an accident, the slips, the falls, the accidents, are you able to take in those patient and care for them? so the people that i work with and across all hospitals in london, have been putting into place plans to ensure we can still deliver the essential care, not only to patients with covid—19, but to victims of accidents, all sorts of trauma, and i want to assure people we are still open for providing emergency care. we don't want people to not access emergency departments when they have a true emergency. we saw that in the first and second waves and that has led to harm to people of course. but
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so we have managed to maintain those essential services by restructuring our department, bringing additional staff, by staff working extra shifts and often working without breaks and thatis and often working without breaks and that is one of the effects the cause of the effects of the ill health. we are maintaining the services, but the critical care in particular we are having to spread more thinly, putting patients on ventilators in wards which are less busy, because we have had to scale down the routine care. that means spreading the staff more thinly and my colleague was on earlier, telling you about his concerns, that is about the, we are having to provide ca re about the, we are having to provide care with less... fully trained staff than we would normally have. so rather than one intensive care
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nurse per patient, it is two or three patients per nurse. that is why it is difficult to maintain the highest quality of care, by bringing in additional staff. so staff are stretched and i'm sure feeling the pressures at the moment. how are you managing them and taking care of them? well, i work in a strong team, we're very supportive and aware of each other's stresses and you know people are looking out for each other, but of course there is only so much we can do. when it comes down to it, when there are queues of ambulances waiting for hours at a time, because there is no space to bring a patient into, everyone of my colleague wants to do everything they can to get that next patient in to deliver the treatment to the highest standard. so i'm afraid that
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nhs staff are, have a habit of working themselves into the ground, they won't give up. the government needs to recognise that and support staff. it needs to make sure that they're vaccinates, all health care workers who have a risk of getting infected and that is why the bma has called for that programme to be ramped up to protect those who need to be healthy to be able to protest the rest of the population. we have the rest of the population. we have the vaccination programme, we have lockdown, although it doesn't seem to be as strict as the spring lockdown, but it is in place, the stay at home message, we have new treatments, at what point do we start to see the pressures you're describing there being relieved, or is this going to get worse before it gets better. all of us on the front line believe that it is going to get worse before it gets better. the
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chief medical officers have warned of the situation worsening over the next two to three weeks and i'm afraid that is the, that is what the epidemiology tells us from the previous waves of pandemic. of course it is important that people follow the advice and stay at home. wear masks and wear masks effectively. halting the spread of the virus is the key, but the government needs to ensure that health care workers are are able to go into work, rather than being affected by the virus themselves, both by ramping up the vaccination and ensuring that the right ppe, that equipment that is there to protect us in environments where covid—19 is a risk to us, they need to ensure that that ppe is supply is there when we need it. because we
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we re there when we need it. because we were let down in the first wave by that and so you know our confidence needs to be restored by the government in vaccinating and ensuring the people items are in place. it is interesting that we are back to ppe. that that is something we will take up when we speak to those from the government. thank you very much indeed. we can't go to spain at the moment. let's show you these pictures from spain. this is madrid, which has experienced its first snowfall in ten years. the region has been put on red alert with more snow forecast. here's helen with a look at this morning's weather. i seem to remember matt saying yesterday in spain they're expecting temperatures to minus 37 they were saying. yeah, they had
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record—breaking temperatures as well. this is like a one in 20,30, 40 year avent. they have not seen snowfall in that amount since the 70s. snowfall in that amount since the 705. it snowfall in that amount since the 70s. it is down to storm philomena. that started to push its way east. we had a month's worth of rain in two days in gibraltar. it will become a player across italy and the balkans. another day for spain and madrid in that red alert area for more snow. another 20 centimetres in the next 24 hours. almost unheard of weather and it stays cold once philomena has moved away. closer to home we have high pressure with us. so it is a drier picture, although we had a fair dusting of snow in some parts. but that sort of snowfall is seen in the uk at times. this picture is in buckinghamshire,
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showing the fog. it is quite dense in places and may linger all day in some places. further north we have seen the coldest day for a decade in northern ireland and minus ten this morning. the temperatures will lift, but it will take a while. and the freezing fog may linger in the south. and we have some rain and hill snow falling on to frozen surfaces, so ice is an issue. temperatures on the whole will be on the up for scotland. not as cold as it has been here, but certainly cold for many other parts. but this is because we have an atlantic influence that will introduce more cloud tonight for scotland and northern ireland and northern england. it won't stop temperatures from getting down to freezing, we
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have all that lying snow, so it will be frosty and ices and the cold air comes back into the northern isles with some wintry showers. but it is showing a trend of what is due to come over the next few days. we still have that weather front and more cloud, particularly for the northern half of the uk. early morning fog and frost in the south lifting and a few showers. but generally sunshine. just look at that feed that, moisture coming into the west of scotland. temperatures higher, a little less cold tomorrow. but this with general feed into next week with weather front after weather front and introducing week with weather front after weatherfront and introducing milder air, we have got rain becoming an issue in the north—west of scotland, but snow thaw as well. we are op the change —— we are on the change. but then the concern for some flooding. thank you.
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the rollout of the covid vaccine has given fraudsters another opportunity to target vulnerable people. warnings have been issued about scams in which criminals offerjabs in return for money. in one case, a pensioner in london paid £160 to a man pretending to be a health worker. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. moments before this image was captured, this man injected a 92—year—old with a fake covid vaccine. he claimed to be from the nhs. and then administered a jab in the arm, what has been described as a dart like instrument, charged £160, took the money from the lady, and then disappeared. and just to add insult to that injury, then we attended several days later to try to solicit an extra £100. so this has been a horrendous experience for the victim. it is not known what was injected into the pensioner, but a hospital check found her unharmed.
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this is an absolutely disgusting crime. it is unacceptable, assault, fraud, and it will not be tolerated. we will do everything we can to try to track down and catch this person before they carry out this offence on anyone else. it is thought over £22 million has been lost to covid related scams. these images show a makeshift laboratory set up in a kitchen in west sussex. fake covid cures had been made and sold to people in america and france. frank ludlow was caught in his local post office as he tried to send more. he was convicted injuly. how significant a problem is this? how many fraudsters are there, trying to cash in on the crisis? i mean, it is extensive stop since the first lockdown in march we have had about half a million people come to us with advice online, it has doubled
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since october, the number of people coming directly to us. it is notjust a small group. one in three people, in our research, have been targeted by some form of covid related scams since the pandemic began. today police advised that nobody from official vaccination programmes will ever turn up unannounced. they will never ask for bank details. and nobody will ever be charged for the vaccine. but with a vaccination programme rolling out across the country, today there is a warning. beware the criminals trying to exploit those who desperately want protection from the deadly virus. jane mccubbin, bbc news. we're nowjoined by the lead officer of the chartered trading standards institute, katherine hart. i know you have been tracking the all kinds of scams during this pandemic. but that particular one, about the 92—year—old who was given this fake vaccine is absolutely shocking isn't it? absolutely. i mean, i have seen so many different
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instances of criminals using this pandemic asa instances of criminals using this pandemic as a platform to defraud, but this is shocking. it is despicable that somebody can do that to anybody. we have known about the possibility of fake text messages andi possibility of fake text messages and i notice on what's app groups it was being shared, people saying look out for this, but someone going up, knocking on a door, saying i can give you this vaccine, was that anything you had prepared for in your organisation or seen anything like before? well, unfortunately we have seen so many different lines of this sort of thing. we have had people knocking on the door, or selling testing kits over the phone, or offering vaccinations, or that sort of thing. it's constant. even right at the beginning we were hearing about rogue treatments offering to disinfect driveways and door bells. it is ongoing. every
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time that there seems to be an opportunity that the criminals are on their trying to exploit that. opportunity that the criminals are on their trying to exploit thatm is important that, i mean it is often in the case of this latest scam, ithink often in the case of this latest scam, i think that the lady who was involved was in her 90s, 92, they often involved was in her 90s, 92, they ofte n target involved was in her 90s, 92, they often target vulnerable people, what are the golden rules of avoiding the scam. some are more familiar with the online scams, what are the golden rules of trying to make sure that you are not victim to a scam? first, if it comes out of the blue, be suspicious. always take five minutes, look at what they're asking you to do. a lot of links, what they're wanting is your personal details to harvest your information or your bank details so they can exploit you financially. it is
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important that we actually speak out about it and share this. speaking to neighbours, putting messages on social media, and asking people who know about it. but we as enforcement agencies actually need that information as well. we need that intelligence, so we are able to work with our partners to try and stop it. one of the things that often occurs to me, in terms of people who come to me, in terms of people who come to your door, people who are vulnerable, i know that they are pretending to be covid marshals, may be wearing high viz vests, there is fa kery around that. be wearing high viz vests, there is fakery around that. one of the things people are often reluctant to do isjust say things people are often reluctant to do is just say no and close the door. you don't have to engage. and pa rt door. you don't have to engage. and part of the problem is, before you know it, you're in conversation and you've already started to divulge information. i think we've got to be very cautious about this time
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anyway, because we don't want people coming to our door, we don't want strangers, so i think we've got to be on ourguard, strangers, so i think we've got to be on our guard, and don't engage, we are kings of our castles. we can be strong enough to say no. if anybody knocks on our door out of the blue, go and find out about them. close the door. we at trading standards would always say never engage with any traders at the door, so particularly when it comes down to people saying they have got the vaccine or they are from the nhs, check, be suspicious and to check. and some of the websites that these scams send you too can look really genuine. but notjust testing and vaccines, katherine, you have seen scams involving puppies, romance, netflix, tell us about those. these criminals are exploiting the situation we are in at the moment. a
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lot of it is lockdown loneliness. people are bored or working from home, so people are looking for some sort of opportunity to make their lives better. so things like the romance scams, for example. people wanting companionship one way or another, so they are likely to engage with somebody that perhaps they wouldn't do normally. i am the lead officer, and i nearly fell for a puppy lead officer, and i nearly fell for a puppy scam. i have been looking for a puppy for over a year, i'm clicking on these things, and i ended up engaged in conversation with somebody who was potentially a scammer, fortunately i realised, but it could happen to anybody. the point is that at this moment in time, we are all vulnerable. it used
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to be stereotypes of elderly vulnerable people, but actually i'm vulnerable, you're vulnerable, everybody is vulnerable at this moment in time. katherine, do you mind if! moment in time. katherine, do you mind if i ask about your situation can be talked about there. a lot of people will be thinking, you are from the trading standards institute, and it happens to you. do you mind detailing? when you realised it was a scam, and you are involved in communication, did you call it out? what has happened since that moment in time to the person you believe is trying to scam you? this particular scammer, it turns out he was based in cameroon, although i didn't realise that at the time. i responded to an advert, and he was showing me a lovely stock photographs, i didn't know that at the time either, of this wonderful little puppy called sophie, and straightaway i realise that there was not quite right. but because he isa scammer,
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was not quite right. but because he is a scammer, he got confused about his own story, so first of all he told me he lived in newcastle. then he told me he lived in south wales, then he told me he lived in newcastle in south wales, and then he said he lived in australia. so all of those things, i started to realise straightaway, but if i was to question him, he was able to give mea to question him, he was able to give me a plausible story of the situation of why he was telling me these things, so it was quite funny. it was almost like a romance scammer anyway, because every time he sent mea anyway, because every time he sent me a text, he would send me a little kiss as well, so i thought, this is a bit weird! it is really interesting, hearing that your personal experience as well as your wider advice, people can get caught out. katherine hart, lead officer from the chartered trading standards
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institute. thank you. a friend of mine was scammed buying a new horse, similar situation, via facebook, and she was someone who would be very careful about due diligence, so it can really happen to anyone, be careful. stay with us, mike is coming up with a sport shortly. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. let's return to our main story — we're being urged to "act like we've got coronavirus" to try to stop the spread of the illness. it comes as the uk recorded its highest number of daily deaths since the pandemic began. in london, the mayor sadiq khan has declared a major incident
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to try to protect hospitals, some of which are close to running out of beds. professor kevin fenton is the regional director of public health for london. a very good morning to you, professor. thank you for your time this morning. people may find themselves a little weighed down by some of the statistics, and we have been going through quite a bit of it in relation to hospitals, admissions in london and the pressure. what picture can you paint for us of the reality of how it is for hospitals in the london region right now? good morning, and thanks for the invite. we are in the midst of a very severe epidemic in the city. nearly one in 30 londoners are infected with the coronavirus, and in some parts of the city that goes up to one in 20 londoners have the virus. this high level of infection means that our rates are high and admissions to hospital are also high as well. in
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fa ct we hospital are also high as well. in fact we saw a 27% increase in the numbers of people in hospitals over the past week, and we are seeing increases in people on icu beds as well, so this pressure of this high level of infection is driving the pressure on the nhs, and that is why we had to call the major incident, to really focus partners, to focus the public on what we need to do now to control the virus. professor, we have talked for some time now, as you have, about the pressures on the system. and there are different forms of language go around about this, about the tipping point, the breaking point. where are we with that? what is the point at which in london for example, the area you look after, where genuinely you will be saying that patients who are coming to hospital are unable to get treated or are at risk? we will be
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working to avoid that happening, but that does not mean that there isn't severe pressure on the system, so what the nhs has been doing since the autumn is ensuring that we have plans in place to make sure that we can manage the surges, and that means using a wider range of beds in hospital to take care of covid, expanding them into facilities we have, looking at provision outside the nhs that we have that capacity, and of course bringing the nightingale hospital is on board as well. so that process is in place, but what we don't want to be doing is doing this consistently without any end in sight, so we really need to ensure that we drive the rates of infection down, which is why we are all being told to stay at home, and then reduce the ongoing pressures in then reduce the ongoing pressures in the nhs so that they can take care of patients with high quality and begin to take care of staff as well.
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we have to protect our staff, and ensure other patients get access to nhs care. the infrastructure is one pa rt nhs care. the infrastructure is one part of this in terms of the hospitals, and the other is the staff, and we know, as in all areas of society at the moment, they are affected by may be a family member, they are having to self—isolate for a period of time, staffing levels are almost as big a problem as the infrastructure itself, as i understand it. yes, and this is one of the things again we have been tracking for the autumn and certainly moving through this wave of the pandemic, taking care of our staff. and this isn't only nhs staff who are at the forefront of this. our police, ambulance drivers, people who work within a hospital who may not be in direct patient care, but we need them for the hospital to work effectively. and of course other key workers. and it is for that reason that as we are now in lockdown and we have key workers
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circulating and working across the city, we are really promoting testing for key workers to help them to protect themselves, to reduce their risks, so that they are safer on thejob, there their risks, so that they are safer on the job, there are less staff absences and we have a more resilient workforce. so taking care of key workers now in the middle of the lockdown is really important, testing, and again reinforcing those preventative messages of hands, face, space, wearing yourface covering, will be key, both the key workers as well as for all of us too. and on a personal note, if you are speaking to someone who was saying to you, even within the london region, they are saying, i'm not seeing it. may in hospitals and i understand they are struggling it, but i'm not quite getting the sense, the scale of the problem that we are in. what would you personally say to convince someone that they have to adhere to the rules and there is a reason why? you know, one of the things we are learning in all of
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this is that there are always going to be descent to find alternative voices, so whether it is the scammers that we just heard about, people who are denying covid, or people who are denying covid, or people who are denying covid, or people who don't believe that the vaccines will work, but the reality is different. so i would encourage people to read, look at the programmes you are running on tv where you are interviewing doctors, we are interviewing patients who have had the severe disease and are suffering from the long—term effects. this is the reality and thatis effects. this is the reality and that is the truth, so the advice would be, listen, read but stay at home, protect yourself, protect your family, the strain that we are dealing with at the moment is highly infectious, and it means many more londoners are infected, many more people across the country will be infected, and the burdens of the health service and unfortunately for death are likely to be great. professor, we thank you for your time this morning, professor kevin fe nton time this morning, professor kevin fenton with public health england. time for some sport now.
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it is fa cup third round weekend, and this is a story of our times, scrabbling together a team, mums and dads helping with the lifts. yes, this is the photo they tweeted last night from the family album, going forward! this is the youth team, basically, going home on the bus to the academy. most of the team couldn't drive, they are not old enough. the under 18s, some under 23s, so they were driven by mum and dad picked up on the bus. and they did really well, the kids of aston villa. because of an outbreak of coronavirus in the first team, they had to field the youth team. this was a new kind of fa cup third—round magic, and in the face of adversity the aston villa kids impressed against a strong liverpool side. the premier league champions took the lead, but before half time. how about this brilliant moment for villa's17—year—old louis barry — he was born just down the road from villa park. a p pa re ntly apparently his family were screaming at the tv last night as they were watching! and it was 1—1 at half time.
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liverpool clicked into gear in the second half, though, with three goals in five minutes. mo salah rounding it off. but it was certainly a night to remember for villa's youngesters. what was it like playing against these superstars? did you find yourself saying, there's fabinho, there's mo salah? yes, of course! that is what you are going to do. thiago, all of them, i've got them in my fifa ultimate team. the night's other third—round tie was all premier league, and wolves knocked out crystal palace 1—0 nil. adama traore's wonder goal was worthy of a place in the fourth round. when the third round draw was made, one of the stand—out ties involved chorley town of national league north. notjust because of theirjourney to this stage of the tournament for the first time, but also for this. # someone like you...
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that's right, they‘ re the team who sing adele after winning matches. they take on championship club derby county. wayne rooney and co were supposed to be coming to town, but a covid outbreak means it'll be a team full of kids, just like aston villa. it's not dampened the spirits of defender and personal trainer andy halls, who hopes the game will give his team another reason to keep singing. something they're now famous for. it's probably something people will talk about our slides for year to come, more than the football itself, but i suppose that's just the way it is. it's something to enjoy and get together, and it shows i togetherness, i suppose, together, and it shows i togetherness, isuppose, especially the fa cup is a bit special. it's something that we should enjoy, and make it last as long as possible.
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and much more build—up to that with dan walker on football focus starting at 12. now we reported on breakfastjust yesterday the fresh doubts, over the already delayed tokyo olympics. they're set to go ahead injuly this year, despite a third wave of cases in the japanese capital. so how are athletes coping with the uncertainty? they are still allowed to train in this lockdown, but doing that is one of many challenges, asjoe lynskey reports. you've won, kelly, you've won! mo farah, gold for great britain again. tokyo still waits to make olympic memories. the 2020 games are on hold, and british athletes have to reach their peak in a lockdown. so, dai greene's way to the far east is through a farm in the east midlands. he has turned it into his own gym. we have got a shed here, i was doing a biometric session next to jcb diggers and a big pile of grain, with layers onjust diggers and a big pile of grain, with layers on just to try to keep
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warm. the motivation is still strong with all the athletes that i see, everyone has that goal and ambition. athletics' indoor season is mostly cancelled, and track races are hard to find. so too are hockey matches. gb's women won gold in rio, but they have played four games since march. they can still train together, and that helps them stick together. you've got 26 individuals in our squad, and that each particular time somebody will be having a struggle ora somebody will be having a struggle or a low point, and that is where you lean on your team—mates. i think we've all realised how lucky we are. but cases injapan are rising again. tokyo but cases injapan are rising again. to kyo we nt but cases injapan are rising again. tokyo went into a state of emergency this week, and so much is still uncertain. it could be that these games are postponed or cancelled altogether, so how does that affect you as athletes? i guess it affects mea you as athletes? i guess it affects me a lot, because i'm going to be 35 inafew me a lot, because i'm going to be 35 in a few months, so i haven't got too many years left. to be honest i try not to think about that too much, it wastes a lot of negative energy inside my head thinking about
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the what ifs. in my head, it is going ahead. this weekend, elite athletes will keep training, but the tokyo finish line is still some way off. joe lenski, bbc news. just before i go, if you score 44 points ina just before i go, if you score 44 points in a rugby match, you expect to win. bath did get 44, but they lost 52—44, wasp scoring seven tries to continue their winning run. tom cruise, ina to continue their winning run. tom cruise, in a leading role sealing the win, and he doesn't believe his pa rents the win, and he doesn't believe his parents when they deny that they chose his name after watching top gun but he was bornjust chose his name after watching top gun but he was born just after that film came out, so he is a bit suspect about it. it was a great moment, sport happening, everybody playing. incredible, what a game. we will be talking later on about the computer.
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yes, maro itoje will be talking to us later on about access to education, youngsters who haven't got la pto ps education, youngsters who haven't got laptops or internet connections are all that kind of stuff. it is time for a look at the weather today. a lot of people will be wanting to leave their homes if only for a short walk, so how is it looking for everyone today? same old story, it is cold. this is the fog in buckinghamshire at the moment. some of this fog in southern areas of england and wales could linger all day, but if it is not freezing fog, it is ice, and freezing fog, it is ice, and freezing fog, it is ice, and freezing fog gives the risk of ice too. rain falling onto frozen services further north, ice elsewhere after we have had all that snow yesterday. gradually sliding up the skies for northern ireland, with some rain in some hill snow coming in here, but still some brighter weather east of the grampians, much brighter and drier for northern england, northern and eastern wales.
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still a few wintry showers, close to the south—east of england, and for the south—east of england, and for the channel islands, so still cold and particularly where the low cloud linkers, temperatures barely above freezing. the fog will perhaps reduce a little overnight, but it sickens up and a few spots become dense again. lowest temperatures in the satellite because this weather front introduces slightly less cold air, but the ground is still frozen, we have that lying snow and there could well be ice around once again overnight, then the problem becomes atla ntic overnight, then the problem becomes atlantic air bringing in rain to the north, wet for the coming few days and a gradual snowmelt, so a risk of flooding. helen, thank you very much. i know this is a story a lot of you will have to say something about. two friends who went for a walk, at their local beauty spot. they were then fined for breaking lockdown rules. they said they were shocked. following criticism, derbyshire police have said they will now review
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all fixed penalties. the women had each driven five miles from their homes for a walk when they were questioned by police. and when we pulled into the car park, we were greeted by a police van and a police car. there were several policemen and women stood around, and at first i thought, gosh, what has happened? has there been a murder, a freak accident? i was thinking, this is the most remote, quietest place. so as we park ourcars, we remote, quietest place. so as we park our cars, we look at each other and then the next thing all these policemen and women surround the car and start questioning as to why we we re and start questioning as to why we were there. for some people this is a lifeline, seeing their friends one to one, it is the one thing we've been allowed to do, and to then be told that we weren't allowed to do that either, i think that could have been the breaking point for some people. luckily we have got each other and friends and family for support, but that might not be the case for other people, it was really quite scary and intimidating experience. let's speak now to mike barton, former chief constable of durham police.
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was this a bit extreme, the way the police handled it? well, ijust want to start by saying, i saw the news yesterday, and another 1300 people died, so we are in the middle of a pandemic, and what we are reaping todayis pandemic, and what we are reaping today is what happened to three weeks ago in the run—up to christmas, so whatever is happening now socially, we are going to see what happens in two or three weeks in terms of deaths, and let's hope that they go down considerably. so that's the backdrop. what we've got here is the police in the last nine months have had hundreds of different rules sent to them. in my day, when i was policing, we would have one piece of legislation a year, maybe a couple, and then we would have a training programme, this is how we need to enforce it. and that space hasn't been given to
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police, so unfortunately there are going to be wrinkles out there, and this is all based on the word local. i have never seen that in legislation before, where it says you have got to be local, and you've got to specify whether that is your village, town, part of your city. none of those issues have ever been described by the law before, so it is no wonder there is a bit of confusion. and everyone's interpretation of local seems to be different, and in fact the bbc contacted the cabinet office, the home office, the college of policing, the national police chiefs council, to ask for clarification over what they define as your local area, and no one was able to do that. so this is why we are in the position we are in. reading a couple of tweets on this, it shows how it divides people. stephen says, people just don't seem to get it. so many think they are an exception, they wa nt to think they are an exception, they want to go for a walk, then open the front door. well done to derbyshire police for taking action to enforce
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this. while stewart says it is utter rubbish, i have to drive 50 miles to work each day from england to wales, thatis work each day from england to wales, that is allowed, two people travelling five miles in their local area to walk in a secluded area is acting sensibly. some people have to drive further to a supermarket. police brutality is how he describes it. that is probably going a bit far for most people. but is there something here about sending a message out, is that what it is? well, if it is sending a message out and that was the intention behind it, then there is only derbyshire police that can answer that question. but i thinkjust a cut to the chase, you are spot on with all of those desperate, conflicting m essa g es of those desperate, conflicting messages that you have got there, because what is crucial in this pandemic is that the messaging is clear. so for example, you have asked the cabinet office, you have asked the cabinet office, you have asked the cabinet office, you have asked the people who wrote this, because it is whitehall that has written this. it is the government that has written local. in scotland,
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when they talked about people not travelling, they said you can't cross a local authority area. every body knows what that means. whereas here, we have suddenly dream up this word local. i spent two hours last night trawling through these hundreds of statutory instruments, and it is not there, and actually what it says is exercise can be done outside and done locally wherever possible. so i think personally that derbyshire will row back from this position, but sadly they will be a bit of damage done here, because for the public to comply with the law, they've got to think and see that they've got to think and see that the police are acting fairly, and it is called proceduraljustice. so if the police aren't seen to be acting fairly, the public won't comply. so it is all very well some people in whitehall sabre rattling and banging the table but the police are going to enforce these rules, that doesn't bring about compliance. the public
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seeing fairness does. probably worth giving derbyshire police's statement, which initially said this: driving to a location where exercise could easily have been taken closer to a person's home is not in the spirit of the national effort to reduce our travel. but they later issued a statement which said all fixed penalties will be reviewed. so as you say, they clearly feel there needs to be a little bit of room to grow back here. ijust wonder if keeping the public on board, where confidence is at the moment in terms of policing this pandemic. what are you picking 7 this pandemic. what are you picking up? what is your sense? police officers are caught between the devil in the deep blue sea, because they need to stay safe, them and theirfamily. and they need to stay safe, them and their family. and that is why this story is such an issue, because in winter, the reason why flu gets worse is because we stay indoors, so
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that's why i was a bit confused about the story, because we should be encouraging people to exercise outside, and the police have got the biggest problem where there are house parties and where people are congregating more than just their household in the house, drinking and things like that. that is really tricky for the police to intervene with, and i have a great deal of sympathy for the police, but equally i have a great deal of sympathy for these two women who were exercising in what they considered to be a safeway. so i think what i would ask for is politicians stop changing the rules as much and let's keep the messaging simple. so by all means stay home, but it is a perfectly a cce pta ble stay home, but it is a perfectly acceptable for people to exercise outside. ok, thank you very much indeed, mike barton, former chief cost of a durham constabulary. and already somebody has got in touch to say, five miles isn't local, keep
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issuing fines, driving is not exercise. people are very divided on that. 8.56. good things are happening in a difficult times. smiling at a stranger or donating to a cause, may not seem like a big deal — but it's these small acts of kindness that can really brighten someone's day. the charity 52 lives has been making a big difference to people every week since it was lauched in 2013 — and now its founder, jaime thurston, is encouring us all to be a little kinder. shejoins is now. good morning. good morning. how can we ex press good morning. good morning. how can we express that kindness, what are the simple things we can do? there are so many simple things we can do. at the moment, we are all locked down and in the middle of a pandemic. i think it is about not feeling like you have to do grand gestures. it is doing the small stuff well, being patient with the people in your life, trying to be supportive instead of judgmental, giving people your full attention, things like that can make a difference to your household. you
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started 52 lives quite some time ago, but it can rarely be more releva nt tha n ago, but it can rarely be more relevant than it is now, and the idea is that you find someone, or you hear of a story, one a week, and then someone who needs something, whatever it is, and then you put it out there, that is the idea, isn't it? and then people come forward and say, i can help. that's right. every week we share a story of somebody in need of help on our website and social media pages, and all of our supporters, we have got almost 100,000 people who follow us on social media, provide what that person needs. sometimes it is donation so we can buy things, sometimes we set up wish lists to provide goods for people, it might be donating services and sometimes it is just be donating services and sometimes it isjust sending be donating services and sometimes it is just sending people kind m essa g es it is just sending people kind messages and moral support.” it is just sending people kind messages and moral support. i was going to ask that, because in some ways, buying stuff for a person who needs something is necessary, but possibly more straightforward, but you do have people sometimes you are just saying, i'm lonely, i'm
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struggling at the moment. you have those kind of stories as well. we do, and we also run kindness workshops in primary schools, and we also have a kids kindness club, so through those projects as well we help children who have been affected by bullying and sometimes people who are going through a serious illness who are just having a difficult time, because sometimes when you are going for a tough time, just knowing there are people out there who care about you can make a big difference, and even each week we give people tangible help, we give them stuff, but all the people we help say the same thing, that it is not necessarily the thing we are giving them that changes their life, it is that kindness and the fact that people care about them.” that kindness and the fact that people care about them. i love the range of stories come you put teeth for a range of stories come you put teeth fora man in range of stories come you put teeth for a man in alabama, range of stories come you put teeth fora man in alabama, builta sensory shed for a toddler in london it was losing her sight, you have made video messages for a young boy being bullied, you have help the homeless mother and her son into a flat, amazing achievements, even one of those, to make a difference to people's lives, but where do you feel we are on the kindness curve at
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the moment? and has that gone up and then plummeted a bit as people have just lost the will and grown more fed up during this pandemic?” just lost the will and grown more fed up during this pandemic? i think when normal life gets stripped away, which it has done for everybody, i think we are left with what really matters, and i think there has been a real sense of community spirit and compassion and kindness, and i remember during the first lockdown, just doing that clap the carers, because there was that sense of us all coming together, and there are a lwa ys all coming together, and there are always going to be ups and downs, i think. when we are going through difficult times. but people are innately kind, and people do want to help one another. sometimes we just get caught up in our own worries and problems, and forget that, but i think generally people are kind and i think there has been an incredible sense of community spirit in helping each other. that is a good note to end on. thank you very much indeed, jamie
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thurston, behind the 52 lives charity. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "act like you have the virus." that's the advice in a new campaign urging people to abide by lockdown rules. donald trump is banned permanently from twitter, because of worries his tweets could incite more violence. a warning over coronavirus scams after a 92—year—old woman was injected with a fake vaccine. good morning. in the sport, there's nothing like the fa cup third round, to rouse spirits.
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especially for non—league chorley, who're in dreamland, as they try to cause another huge upset, against derby of the championship. another bitterly cold start for many and given we have had a bit of snow, ice is a concern, as is freezing fog. more in around 15 minutes. it's saturday 9th january. our top story: people in england are being urged to behave like they are infected with coronavirus as part of a new public awareness campaign encouraging people to stick to the rules. the message — which will be shared on tv, radio and social media — comes as the uk reported the highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. our correspondent dan johnson has more. covid—19, especially the new variant, is spreading quickly across the country.
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this puts many people at risk of serious disease. a new campaign with a clear message. once more, we must all stay home. the stark warnings come in response to the intense pressure hospitals, which are getting close to capacity, especially in london and the south—east. london's mayor declared a major incident yesterday, saying the virus was out of control. many doctors are frustrated. most hospitals have expanding their intensive care capacity to three times, but we don't have three times as many staff, so our staff are being spread more thinly to provide that vital care. yesterday's record figures showed 1,325 people died within 28 days of a positive covid test,
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the most in a single day during the entire pandemic. the total number of deaths now stands atjust short of 80,000. there are more record figures. another 68,000 cases were recorded yesterday, and 31,624 patients are being treated in hospitals across the uk. ally is one, her whole family tested positive on christmas day.” ally is one, her whole family tested positive on christmas day. i was fine, a young family getting on with my life and this floored me. i was told two days ago if they didn't put me on told two days ago if they didn't put meona told two days ago if they didn't put me on a ventilator i would die. i have seen two people die in beds either side of me while i have been in this hospital. one in three people with covid don't show symptoms, so the message is, act like you have the virus. don't go out and don't mix with people. there are signs that policing of the rules will get tougher, with government sources saying the time for engaging, explaining and encouraging is now over, giving way to more strict enforcement.
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the next few weeks look bad. vaccines give clear hope for the future, but for now we must all stay home, protect the nhs, save lives. dan johnson, bbc news. let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. nick, the prime minister is clearly concerned about the current situation, what has he said? it is clear what they're trying to do, some may question the timing, whether the messaging wasn't clearer earlier on, but they're concerned the message is not getting through? that's right. although we hear these worrying stats pretty much daily about the number of hospitalisations and the number of deaths, the number of new cases, there is a view in downing street that they need to be stronger injust downing street that they need to be stronger in just enforcing how severe the problems are. so this morning you have the prime minister saying that hospitals are under real strain. you have him saying that cases are continuing to soar across
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the country and the message coming from government to the public really is that we can't afford at this stage to be complacent and reiterating it is essential that everybody follows these rules as strictly as they can. we are going to hear a lot more i think about that over the next few weeks. not necessarily because government is worried no one is listening, but perhaps that people just aren't being as strict as they were back in april last year. now, that needs to come back. thank you. derbyshire police are reviewing its lockdown fines policy following citicim for its approach to two walkers. the women said they were surrounded by police after driving five miles from their home for a walk, and fined £200 each. current guidance says you can travel for exercise in england as long as it is in your "local area". the force said all of its fixed penalties issued during the new national lockdown
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will be reviewed. people are being warned to stay vigilant about scams in which criminals offer covid vaccines for a fee. in one case, a pensioner was injected with a fake covid—19 vaccine and charged £160 by a man pretending to be a health worker. city of london police say it's "crucial" he is caught as soon as possible as he "may endanger people's lives". twitter says it has permanently banned president trump from the site — following a review of his account. the social media platform said that his tweets were highly likely to encourage more violence. david willis reports. the most powerful man in the world no longer has access to one of his most valued assets — twitter. donald trump's preferred platform for picking fights, settling scores and promoting conspiracy theories has blocked him for good, citing what the company called: "the risk of further incitement of violence". president trump has been blamed for fomenting the protest that led
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to the death of five people at the us capital on wednesday and twitter believes his continued use of its platform could stoke further violence in the run—up tojoe biden's inauguration in 11 days' time. the president's son donjunior on his twitter account said: "free speech no longer exists in america". and called the ban "orwellian". in a tweet swiftly deleted from his official white house account, mr trump said he was now looking into the possibility of creating his own social media platform. facebook, having already banned donald trump for the remainder of his term in office, the president is looking increasingly isolated. facing multiple resignations and with members of his own party deserting him, some are concerned about what he might do next. in the final tweet before his account was closed, he said one thing he won't be doing is attending his successor swearing in, breaking with a tradition stretching back more than 150 years. joe biden said he was fine
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with that and called mr trump a national embarrassment. he has been an embarrassment to the country, embarrassed us around the world, not worthy to hold that office. there are those who believe the president should also be denied access to the nuclear button. the house speaker nancy pelosi is actively seeking his removal. democrats plan to introduce an impeachment resolution on monday. sadly, the person running the executive branch is a deranged, unhinged, dangerous president of the united states. and with only a number of days until we can be protected from him. but he has done something so serious that there should be prosecution against him. more than a dozen people have now been charged in connection with wednesday's protest, among them this man, richard barnet, who was pictured with his feet up
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on nancy pelosi's desk. but, after a week of unprecedented turbulence, it is difficult to know what will affect donald trump's fortunes more — impeachment, if it happens, or the lack of access to the social media soap box that's been so effective in building and rallying his mass band of supporters. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. the director michael apted, known for his long running "7 up" series, has died aged 79. the documentary followed the same group of people every seven years, from childhood into their 605. he also directed films, including gorillas in the mist and the 1999 bond movie the world is not enough. take a look at these weather pictures. this is the spanish capital, madrid, which has had its first snowfall in a decade. hundreds of drivers were left stranded and the city's airport was closed as storm philomena hit.
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the region has been put on red alert with more snow forecast. when they were looking at the temperatures, obviously very cold there with the snow, but some parts of spain they were talking of temperatures of up to minus 36. but some of the youngsters there, the pictures there, helen, they were loving it. wouldn't theyjust? it is giving a lot of disruption and it is not just giving a lot of disruption and it is notjust spain. philomena is making its way across southern europe and could give 50 centimetres of snow in italy and the balkans will see an exceptional amount of snow. red warnings in force in central spain. that is the top level, the red
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warning. similarto our that is the top level, the red warning. similar to our levels with the yellows and ambers and reds. here we have had some snow and the freezing fog is still with us in the south. it has been the coldest night in northern england and northern ireland now for ten years. so we have got some cold air with us. that fog may just hang have got some cold air with us. that fog mayjust hang around for a wee while longer. some areas could linger all day. after the snow, it is icy out there and we have rain on this front starting to come into north—west scotland, falling on to frozen surfaces. some snow over the hills. still a few wintry showers close to the south coast. otherwise a lot of dry weather. more sunshine for northern england. but this fog still around. it is here where we will see the coldest weather. we have this front moving south,
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bringing some rain on to certainly temperatures close to freezing on the roads and pavements. a frosty night, but not as harsh as we have just had. snow showers return to the northern isles later. on sunday, the difference is we have that front us with across the northern and it is going to has been hanging around, high pressure in the south keeping things drier. a brisk wind in the north. that will carry the rain in tomorrow. a lot of cloud around the area of high pressure. more cloud in northern england and northern ireland and western wales. but once the fog and the frost lift in the south, here it looks as if temperatures will be higher than they have been and like they will be for most, that is because of a westerly breeze, we are changing our influence to the atlantic and that means fronts coming in and low pressure and rain, but milder air. it won't be as cold, but that mean 5 the snow will melt and there is more
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rain to come. so there are met office warnings for rain in knot west scotland. many parts will see their first west scotland. many parts will see theirfirst rain for some west scotland. many parts will see their first rain for some time. but quite a lot of uncertainty on the detail. don't make this the last forecast you see. thank you. there's been some more welcome news on the vaccine front. the uk has approved a third coronavirus vaccine, after the american drug company moderna was given the green light. so far, around 1.5 million people across the uk have had at least one dose of either the pfizer or astrazeneca vaccines, which are already being rolled out. the approval comes as the uk recorded its highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. we're joined now by virologist chris smith and linda bauld, professor of public health at the university of edinburgh. you're both very welcome. let's
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first of all reflect on the awful figures that we had through christmas yesterday on coronavirus on deaths, on cases, on hospitalisations, itjust looks terrible at the minute doesn't it? yeah, very sad obviously and my heart goes out to people who are losing loved once. this is a consequence of the fact that we have had high levels of case and cases turn into people who become unwell and a proportion will lose their lives. this is a reminder to us why we're doing what we are doing to try to keep the numbers as low as we can can and relieve the pressure from the nhs, because some of the people who are also losing their lives are not losing their lives to coronavirus, but to the fact that the nhs is so overwhelmed it can't provide the care that people need for other kinds of problems. so it is important that we fight this on multiple fronts and do our best to
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keep the numbers as low as possible to prioritise those primary and secondary deaths. we talked about the impact on hospitals, it is worth saying, chris, that those 60 plus thousand cases, people say, well, not everyone who has coronavirus gets severely ill, but in fact the positivity rate is high as well. can you explain that? the problem we have got here is that this virus, a good proportion, perhaps as many as half of the people who catch it may have no symptoms, or they will have sufficient trivial symptoms they will regard it as irrelevant. when we have people being advised to seek a test, isolate themselves and follow u p a test, isolate themselves and follow up their contacts s, if that is based on people having symptoms and half the time they don't have
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symptoms, it is difficult to find the other cases, that leads to a lot of spread. most of the spread occurs within the domestic settings, people's homes, we share living spare and a bed with each other and we share conversation, all these factors, prolonged contact in household settings lead to more transmission. you only knee one transmission. you only knee one transmission to bring in the virus and you have more people down the stream. this is why it is difficult and continues to climb. linda, very good morning, your expertise is public health, what we know, you knew before, a lot of us knew before, but now more than ever, that messaging matters and what we have is this new message from government about sticking to the rules. but as is often the case, just on the day when they're is often the case, just on the day when they‘ re announcing is often the case, just on the day when they're announcing the worst
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ever death, the numbers of people who have died, you have at the same time news about another vaccine coming down the road. and that can be challenging in the way that people are receiving things? be challenging in the way that people are receiving things7m be challenging in the way that people are receiving things? it is andl people are receiving things? it is and i think it is important that we get clear messaging from government about the public health response in partnership with the vaccine roll out. so we are hearing from politicians about the vaccines and obviously the very worrying case numbers, hospitalisation, people in icu, but we need to hoer two things. there is evidence from the literature that adherence to public health behaviours or following guidance might be reduced if people think they're going to be vaccinated. there is evidence from that from flu and from a few other vaccine that from flu and from a few other vaccine programmes. that from flu and from a few other vaccine programmes. it is important that people know and that they
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cannot let up in terms of physical distancing and face coverings, one of the reasons for that, we don't yet know in relation to the vaccines whether they prevent transmission of the virus. we can't let up in the public health response. chris, maybe you can pick up on that and a question from one viewer, it is a simple question, how much protection do people have if they have received the first dose of the vaccine. that along with the point that linda made there, about whether people's attitude change and given what we don't know. there has been much confusion and speculation, because of the announcement by the government they were going to change the way that we are vaccinating people from what was clinically trialled, waiting four weeks and giving a second dose of pfizer's vaccine and they're going to move that to 12 weeks. many people said does this leave me unprotected. most of the heavy lifting of vaccination
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certainly for this vaccine is done by that first dose. you can think of it almost like a building a house. it is not like the first dose gives you the foundation and the walls and you're roofless, that first dose builds you a habitable house of your response. the second dose that comes along will weather—proof that house and storm test it. but it is still a good house and most of the protection is conferred by that first dose. the second dose will just consolidate it. that is how the immune system has evolved to work, thatis immune system has evolved to work, that is why experts are comfortable with the strategy that has been proposed, which seems a good compromise between limited doses of vaccine rather than superserve a people already with a degree of protection. we can wide hear the protection. we can wide hear the protection to a bigger group while vaccines are in short supply. sol
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think that is a good strategy. and in the meantime, we willjust have to try to maximise the number of people who have access to it, because there are people that will if they catch this with no protection come off a lot worse than if they have had a dose of vaccine. on the the transmission point and this is a good point, jonathan van—tam was asked this question a week ago, and he pointed out that we are still building the data at the moment. we don't know for sure what the consequences of vaccination are in terms of your ability to contract the infection, although the trials have tested the protection again public sector getting severe disease, they have not tested whether people can still pick up the infection and still pass it on. until we are sure about that, and we
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have limited data, it is safer to regard yourself as still susceptible, still capable of passing on the infection. the next question, chris you have in part a nswered question, chris you have in part answered it, just how careful do people need to be if they have had the first dose? they need to be very careful. the immune response does build up, starting around ten days and we know about 21 days after there is a good level of protection. but people need to behave the same way, there is no difference. the guidance still needs to be followed. that means even if somebody has had the first dose and is waiting for that you are second, they need to look around at what is happening and make sure they are keeping themselves, but also more importantly other people safe. so
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that means unfortunately for really quite some months into the future, we are going to be having to live with physical distancing, face coverings and hygiene and also think about the things that your programme has been covering around international travel and quarantine and self—isolation. i know it is difficult for people to hear, but the vaccines are brilliant news and offer a route to a brighter future, but the public health response remains for the foreseeable future. chris do you want to pick up on that, you might be, maybe you have grandparents who have been isolating and maybe they have just had in the last week or ten days have had their first dose, you're thinking that is good, they must be safer, and give ita good, they must be safer, and give it a few weeks and we can think differently about how we might go in the house. what will change and
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linda said stay the same, but what has to change outside of that immediate environment in order that you can live a different life if people have been vaccinated.“ you can live a different life if people have been vaccinated. if you cast your mind back to last june and july when the weather was better and the numbers were rosier and we were saying one person in every 2,000 has the virus, it is at a low level and we eased many of the restrictions. now we seeing alarming numbers like the onf figures showing that perhaps one person in 50 in some parts of the country, maybe as one in 30 has this infection. so the difference now is your chances of running into somebody in your immediate friendship group, family group, what has the infection is high. this means that vaccine or no vaccine, because we don't know whether or not you can still transmit the infection, even when you have been
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vaccinated, you need to resort to the same measures to defend yourselves and other people, because as borisjohnson said, your mild cough could be somebody else's death del, because it —— knell because it goes from to symptoms to ending up death. so you can't take the risk and it is more sensible to do the best you can to minute maze the chances —— minimise the chances that you pass this on. even if you have had the vaccine you could do that. when we get levels back to low levels like they were last summer and we have protected the 14 million people on the priority list, we can relax things and we will feel safer. another question, linda, something that has been rattling around in my head, we are mobilising huge resources for the vaccination, will we have to do it again next year?
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what is your thought on that? so we, imen what is your thought on that? so we, i men chris will have something to say on this as well, that is one of the unanswered questions. if you imagine the speed at which the vaccines have been developed, tens of thousands of people in trials, those people in the trials are vaccinated for many months, but still not for long enough to know how long protections lasts. so we don't know in terms of vaccines that have been approved how long they will provide protection for. it is possible that we will have to have booster doses or programmes that happen annually. the vaccines can be tweaked and modifies. that means that the four pillars of what we have got to do for big vaccine programmes, the supply, the workforce to deliver them, the places to deliver the vaccination
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and then the people, encouraging patients to come forward. those things might be something we need to continue to do. chris? there are a couple of things that may well change that we need to learn more about. one we have heard a lot in the news in the last week or two and thatis the news in the last week or two and that is the new variant. so on the one hand the virus may change, necessitating a change in the vaccine, on the other our immune response may change. with time, the immune response may dwindle. we have groups who are under 18 that are not being vaccinated, was because they we re being vaccinated, was because they were not represented in the clinical trials and we are not giving the vaccine to children, those people will turn into over 18s and be vulnerable and there will need to be a programme to top up vaccination in those people. all of those things remain to be determined and the key thing that we cannot tell at the
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moment, because we don't have a time machine, is how robust the immune response will be and how long lasting it will be. that we will learn in coming months to weeks and then we will have a clearer idea as to what the shape of the vaccine programme and booster programme in the future will be, but we have got pa rt of the future will be, but we have got part of the headache solved, because we do this effectively each year for flu and that is at the scale of millions of people, usually 15 millions of people, usually 15 million people. so there is a plan in place, there is a precedents for doing this, but that doesn't make it easier. chris, you know! keep an eye on your background, you talked and messaging, linda has a flower vase and messaging, linda has a flower vase going on there. chris you've stung with the tech —— stuck with the technical equipment and machinery. messaging is important
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isn't it? it is. which do you prefer? one thing i was pleased, i got tulips. yesterday i saw daffodils for the first time. what i'm trying to channel, it is a box room and i don't have a book case. i'm looking ahead to the spring and i'm looking ahead to the spring and i'm sure many of us are. there you go chris. i will make more of an effort, i didn't have dvd collection, but will try and find something floral. stay you as you are, i'm loving the tank top. that brings us enough joy! are, i'm loving the tank top. that brings us enoughjoy! thank are, i'm loving the tank top. that brings us enough joy! thank you. there are a lot of questions. the thing is if you're thinking it, somebody else is thinking it. we have the headlines coming up in a moment.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. the main news stories.
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people in england are being urged to "act like you've got" coronavirus as part of a new campaign. the message will be shared on tv and radio adverts, as well as on social media in a bid to encourage people to abide by lockdown rules. it comes as the uk reported the highest daily death toll since the start of the pandemic. a major incident has also been declared in london, with fears hospitals could be overwhelmed within weeks. president trump has been permanently suspended from twitter. the company said the decision was made after a review of his account — adding his tweets were highly likely to encourage more violence. mr trump was locked out of his account for 12 hours on wednesday after he called the people who stormed the us capitol building "patriots". people are being warned to stay vigilant about scams in which criminals offer covid vaccines for a fee. in one case, a pensioner was injected with a fake covid—19 vaccine — and charged £160 by a man pretending to be a health worker. city of london police say it was "crucial" he was caught as soon as possible as he "may
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endanger people's lives". and it is all about the fa cup third round today in sport, and mike can tell us everything that is going on. clu bs tell us everything that is going on. clubs have so much to can end with at the moment. yes, not just at the moment. yes, notjust coronavirus but the weather as well. we will be going to chorley in a moment, they have been up chorley in a moment, they have been up all night to make sure the weather doesn't put paid to that match, they have done brilliantjob camping out all night on the pitch. it isa camping out all night on the pitch. it is a special weekend, the third round. 20 matches in the fa cup today. somewhere there will be a part timer an unknown hero who will be on the back pages this weekend. and because of the coronavirus and the congestion, there will be no replays, so it is all decided today. so let's talk about the lancashire town of chorley. made famous through
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peter kay's phoenix nights, if you remember that. britain's got talent finalist steve royle. but until recently the football team has been the butt ofjokes among local rivals. today, though the non league side from the 6th tier of english football, take on championship club derby county. and chorley in the 3rd round for the first time are determined to have the last laugh. they like a chuckle in chorley, as much as they have been enjoying their fa cup goals this season. just ask britain's got talent finalist steve royle who is smile is broader now that his beloved chorley are hitting the big time in the third round of the fa cup today. you are talking about a third round in chorley, but even a year ago you we re chorley, but even a year ago you were doing triple chorley cakes, that was the third round! all i can say is, i came third in britain's got talent, and ijust hope that chorley can take it that one step
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further. i used tojoke chorley can take it that one step further. i used to joke about them in my stand—up routine, and this is a true story, when i first moved here 20 years ago there was an advert on the local radio station that said, come to chorley this christmas where the train station is near the shops, and that was it. so the fact that we are now talking about bigger things, it's crazy. # never mind, i'll find someone like youthey like to sing in chorley too. their version of this adele song went viral after the previous giant—killing heroics. one day five or six years ago, ijust put this someone after a big game, and since thenit someone after a big game, and since then it has just stuck, and when we have a moment, someone puts it on and we give what we think is a good
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rendition. # i wish nothing but the best for you too... it was a real feel—good moment to see the fa cup still alive. what was your reaction at school? the first was my little boy who said, don't ever do that again, especially not on telly. at the school kids love it. unlike in more normal school times, before the latest lockdown, it has been a week like no other for jamie, sorting out school and preparing for the big cup match. it's been one of the busiest weeks i've lived through, it is extremely cathartic for us. we've got this release, and i feel very cathartic for us. we've got this release, and ifeel very fortunate to have that. the vast majority of my staff have got school and then they go home, and they are living in their lockdown, whereas for me and their lockdown, whereas for me and the players, we are more lucky in the players, we are more lucky in the sense that we've got our day jobs and then we've got something else to look forward to and the pinnacle of that is saturday against derby, which is great. as chorley
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welcomed derby here today, jamie won't find himself standing alongside his hero wayne rooney, who is self—isolating with his first—team squad after a covid outbreak. so chorley will now play derby's youngsters which has elevated the ambitions of their captain, who is a lift engineer. we ofa captain, who is a lift engineer. we of a thing not got the chance to see the big stars, even on the bench, playing against the youngsters, it might give us more of a chance, and that would be an amazing chance to play a premier league team in the next round. despite there being no fans, steve royle thinks there is still a way to get behind the team. a plea to everyone in chorley right now, watch the match with your windows open, so we can get some of the atmosphere in the town. while delivering a final one—liner to wayne rooney. i will be perfectly honest, he is one of my heroes, and i feel awful saying this, but yeah.
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i hope he had a good christmas, and a good new year. 2021 were supposed to bea a good new year. 2021 were supposed to be a better year, but u nfortu nately, to be a better year, but unfortunately, not for you, to be a better year, but unfortunately, not foryou, my friend! # sometimes it hurts instead... if you are going up the m6 today, you mightjust if you are going up the m6 today, you might just hear if you are going up the m6 today, you mightjust hear it if they do all open their windows, whether you can hear them all singing at around two o'clock. but credit to both clu bs for two o'clock. but credit to both clubs for putting this on, because derby are already sending a youth sidejust derby are already sending a youth side just like derby are already sending a youth sidejust like villa derby are already sending a youth side just like villa because of the pandemic and coronavirus outbreak. they have had more positive cases in the squad that were to chorley, but the squad that were to chorley, but the game is still going ahead. 1—person's misfortune, another person's opportunity, that is often the way. 20 fixtures today. i know neither of you slackers will be here tomorrow,
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but i will be. how many of them will go to penalties? iam going go to penalties? i am going to go for six. all facing lower league teams, all potential ba na na lower league teams, all potential banana skins, i will go six. three. they play extra time, right cosmic it will be three. i was going to go five, that is what i would go for. come back to us tomorrow. i think roger is here alongside me and we will revisit that particular subject then. 9.38 the time now. from seeing friends, to finding jobs — the pandemic has not only changed young people's day—to—day lives, but also their plans for the future. john maguire has been speaking to four people, turning 21 in 2021, about how they've been affected and their hopes for the year ahead. hi, my name's vanessa and i am a third year maths student.
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my name's greg and i live in aberdeen. hello, my name is helen, i'm a student, model and a football player. adam, currently 20 and i'm turning 21 in may. i'm turning 21. 20 years old from liverpool. in 2021, i want to graduate university. start a new course and hopefully maybe even getting a job. i am wanting to graduate. my aspirations and goals for this year is to hopefully find some sort of stability and to hopefully take the next step to a better day. they share their age but also a frustration at how the past year contained and thwarted their ambitions. 2020 was a very tough year for me. i had this really fantastic year the year before — i guess the academic year before where i was able to go to my talks, i was able to go and visit schools and inspired kids to do technology and things like that. but then i couldn't
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do that any more. i felt as though may reach suddenly got really, really small. inspired by the black lives matter movement, vanessa persuaded her university to offer scholarships. a scholarship for bame students, that's massive because that would mean that someone who wouldn't normally have the opportunity now has it and not miss out because of, i guess, factors that tend to impact the black community the most. so yeah, that was probably one of the bigger achievements that year. greg had hoped to take a course, paving the way to a job. it was quite hard going at times, because i was told that i was going to be starting a course injanuary, but then it was put off and put off and put off because of lockdown. i'm registered blind. my mum and dad say i've got useful vision but not good vision. because some people aren't too aware of my vision difficulty even though i have a cane.
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for example, when i'm in the shops, i might be looking at something and right before i go up to the shelf, i'll be looking to make sure it's safe for me to go. so i'll be looking at, say, the milk, and i'll look to my left and someone's come and stood right next to me. some people just don't grasp it at all. helen is a football coach, a student and a model. diverse pursuits, but all hindered by the pandemic. it's been a frustrating year. it's been a hard year. not just only the coronavirus, but there's been a lot of things that have come with that, so it has really affected me, i think, in terms of university, sport, justjobs, everything. 2021's going to be a better year, it's gotta be, it can't get any worse than 2020. so i think that's what's motivated
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me to try and stay on track, and the back of my mind, i'm just thinking every time, you know, this isn't going to go on forever, and things are going to get better. adam has set his sights on a creative career — film, music, dance. but last year was stifling. same experiences as everyone else. it was a very difficult year, confusing. for someone like myself coming from this community, i guess it's a bit challenging because there's lack of opportunities. it's like you're constantly stuck and don't know where to go, who to speak to and what to do next. it's like you're in a maze you have to figure everything out yourself. i found it challenging in so many different ways — financially, constantly battling my mental issues, my mental health. getting that mentality of there's better days coming, you're not always going to have bad days. so as they turn 21, what does this
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year have in store for them and what do they have in store for 2021? once i graduate, which is the big thing on my radar at the moment, i'll have some more time, a bit more resources, to continue to push for the things i'm passionate about and i think i can and i definitely well. first of all, i'd like to see covid come to an end because it's just been an absolute nightmare for everyone. it's been something else, i would say. and the second thing, i'd like to see employment rates rise. i'd like to work in an office because i can touch type. i'm very much a team player. i like speaking to people. i like to play a part. i'm notjust one that sits back and asks everyone else to do the work for me. especially in 2021, i want it to be a special year. i want to make sure i get through university, i'm on top of everything.
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i grab every opportunity i get, even with modelling and stuff. some things come along with that, i feel like just because it's not 2020, i'll be in a better position. this year, turning 21 is the most important year of my life. i'm hoping i can find some sort of stability where i can find some sort of income so i can save and move up. i hope that maybe i can be in a way better position financially and in my career, or at least taken the steps forward, that i've wanted last year. so it's pretty much a catch—up game for me. as they come of age, there remains the optimism of youth. john maguire, bbc news. and we will be following their year here on bbc breakfast. best of luck to all of them, and thank you for being so honest about what they have been facing and looking ahead over
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the next 12 months. the time now is 9.44. you might rememberjohn lister. the 101—year—old whose story captured the hearts of many around the world. we metjohn last month when he told us how lonely he felt after losing his wife. his words moved us all, and led to the delivery of tens of thousands of christmas cards. sadly we are reporting this morning thatjohn has sadly we are reporting this morning that john has passed sadly we are reporting this morning thatjohn has passed away. we will be speaking to his carer in a moment, but first, graham satchell has his remarkable story. we first metjohn on this programme last month. he was an artillery man, a veteran of the d—day landings. john told us about his wife, how they had been married for 17 years, how he misses her after she died of covid—19. how he misses her after she died of covid-19. i do get lonely. how he misses her after she died of covid-19. ido get lonely. lonely. you feel lonely? i'm getting used to
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it. the care home asked people to send john a christmas card. they arrived from all over the country, all over the world, more than 15,000 in total. dearjohn, we saw you on breakfast tv, and we thought we would send you a card to cheer you up. christmas is a very difficult time for lots of people. sending hugs. what do you think to all the cards that you've had, john?” hugs. what do you think to all the cards that you've had, john? i just thank people, that's all i can do. and that's enough, john. just to see you smiling again, that's enough. thank you for your service. john
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died in hospital last week. he was 101. his carer so he was deeply moved by the cards and gifts he received, and would read them until late at night, and that he wasn't lonely at the end. we're joined now byjohn's carer, marcia hughes, along with binu augustine. binu augustine is the manager at the ca re binu augustine is the manager at the care home. i appreciate it is an emotional time for you, care home. i appreciate it is an emotionaltime foryou, marcia, care home. i appreciate it is an emotional time for you, marcia, and we are grateful that you brought the story to us in the first place. how are you feeling? it has been a very upsetting time for everybody. he was a great gentleman. can you just give us an idea about what those last few weeks of his life were like when he started to feel the kindness and good wishes coming in from all over
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the world and seeing the response to your initial appeal? he described himself as feeling elated. he was very, very moved and touched by some of the messages that were in the letters a nd of the messages that were in the letters and cards from children, from the older generation as well. he wasjust so from the older generation as well. he was just so touched by everybody‘s thoughts and well wishes. we are seeing are some of the images there, and i can only imagine what it must‘ve been like for him to see seal those messages. was there a point where, the story went out there and you never know how people are going to react, do you? and then suddenly these m essa g es you? and then suddenly these messages start coming in, these bags of cards and well wishes start coming in. what was that like when you realise something quite extraordinary was happening?m
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you realise something quite extraordinary was happening? it was quite a shock. it was amazing to feel the love that poured in through those cards, and their wishes. people's stories, people's own troubles. it has been a real eye—opener, it has been amazing. binu, it puts a spotlight on loneliness, and it is clear that your staff at the care home go the extra mile to look after your residence, but even in that kind of caring environment, people can still feel lonely, particularly with the loss of their loved one, their best friend. and it's how you manage that, it's a real challenge. yes, john came to stay with us in late 2019. sadly we lost ella during the march covid outbreak, and it has
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beena march covid outbreak, and it has been a challenge to look after everybody, but what we have done is offer one—to—one care in their rooms when they are in isolation. unfortunately there are restrictions on visiting which we managed quite well. going back tojohn, john was and still is an inspiration in all of our lives. he touched so many of us during his stay with us. as marshall said, it is a really sad week for us. i tell you what i'm thinking, as well, marcia. asjohn passes away, i don't know what you are passes away, i don't know what you a re left passes away, i don't know what you are left with in terms of your memories. i know it's a very sad time, and then you start to think, i'm looking for about his life, that extraordinary life he had with ella who sadly died shortly before him. but married for almost 70 years, they were together, and living to
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that amazing age, it is lonely right at the end, and these letters and m essa g es at the end, and these letters and messages will have helped a lot, it is worth celebrating a life. we can see the pictures of him there. it is a time where you have to think about what an extraordinary life he had as well. yes. it's. .. his life what an extraordinary life he had as well. yes. it's... his life was amazing. he had a fantastic life. he lived life to the full. i'm just so proud to have been part of that life, even just a very short little pa rt life, even just a very short little part of it. and for him to be able to tell his story now in this way is just wonderful, it is a fantastic legacy for him to leave behind, sharing his wisdom and his life like this, and i'm so proud to be part of it, sad as well but very proud. lots
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of tributes for him, but you and your fellow staff in that home, you deserve the tributes as well, because everyone knows that you are doing extraordinary work for people at the most difficult time, so eve ryo ne at the most difficult time, so everyone is full of respect for you too, marcia. thank you. and binu, thank you very much for your time this morning, we really appreciate both of you taking the time to talk to us. thank you very much. i think it is that enduring love for him and his wife that really got me, and the kind of way you look at that as somebody compared to the early stages of a marriage and thinking, wow. i'm looking at the notes here, there was a comment from his nephew who is also called jon lester, and he says his carer say he was deeply moved by the cards and gifts he received, would read them until late at night, and this is the line that got me, his nephew said he wasn't lonely at the end.
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and that is the point, isn't it? thank you to anyone who is watching right now who was part of that response, we really appreciate it. it is 9.52. in the days since the bbc‘s make a difference campaign started there has been a huge response from so many of you. thousands of pounds have been raised and hundreds of laptops and tablets have been donated to help get children, who are learning from home, online. let's take a look. thank you, jonathan and everyone else. it's amazing! here is the holgate family in swindon, as they face the latest lockdown. we met them six months
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ago, when they were home—schooling six children on one device. one high—profile supporter of the campaign is england rugby star maro itoje, who joins us now. why was it that this digital divide in particular really bothered you?” think with the digital divide, it is so important because education is fundamental to the future of the children, education is fundamental to my life and to how i continue to wa nt to to my life and to how i continue to want to learn and get better both in my sport and outside of it, so the digital divide, what was really concerning me was not only the short term effects of it, but the long term, and how it has the opportunity or the potential to affect social
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mobility and the life chances of these children. and one of the films we showed this week, and there has been a huge response to this, there was young man, charlie, shares my name which is why it stands out in my mind, he was trying to do all his coursework and i think he was doing a level studies on a mobile phone. trying to write essays and respond to tutors and all of that stuff in his bedroom on a mobile phone with a dodgy signal, and even if you've got limited devices, that's really hard to try and do things properly or learn. it is very tough, and we are making these children almost try and succeed and excel in life with one arm tied behind their back, you know. learning from home already is not ideal, it's not the most desirable of outcomes, but given the
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situation it's understandable. but i think the very least we can do is make sure everyone does have quality access to data and quality access to devices, because those two things make a fundamental difference. and again, the worrying thing for me is i think we're going to see as a result of the gap between those who have had those who have not widen and widen and widen, and i think we need to do everything we can to help or at least minimise the damage it causes. maro, you are in a brilliant position to promote education, because despite your enormous rugby talents, you stuck at university, didn't you? i don't know where you are, did you complete that degree? yes, i have completed that degree, i am onto my second degree. it was mainly because my parents wouldn't allow me to do anything else, to be honest! but yes, i think education
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is so important, and it's not necessarily, i'm not necessarily just speaking about formal education, whether it is learning a trade or reading a book, education, you never stop learning, you can't have all the knowledge in the world, so it is really important for us to keep on pushing it and hopefully help and to try and give these kids the best chance they can. maro everybody needs something to keep them going in these difficult times. are you playing rugby at the moment? your saracens team is not in the first run of rugby at the moment because of what happened last year, but are you are already playing, and it's that kind of your go to thing that keeps you going? well, we've got some games coming up. we've got some preseason games coming up, so we will see if i get selected for
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those. and of course depending on selection as well we've got the six nations. so i'm deep in training at the moment, i've still got other things going on but deep in training, and that's what i'm trying to get myself right for. and if you are having a difficult day, is that you're kind of thing? you work that much harder in the training, and thatis much harder in the training, and that is your way to keep yourself sane? you know, i find rugby, i find training, is enjoyable for me, so it doesn't really feel like work. so whenever i go to training or go to by, whenever i go to training or go to rugby, it's a release. but in other ways, i love pod cast, i love listening to podcast. i've recently started liking going on walks as a result of lockdown and stuff, so there's a number of different things that i do to try and relax. good to catch up with you today. the giant clock behind you tells us it is time
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fetish this interview, u nfortu nately. really fetish this interview, unfortunately. really nice to see you, thank you very much. ifi you, thank you very much. if i get selected is probably one of the funniest lines i've heard for a while! i don't think there is any doubt about that. thank you very much to maro itoje, and to you for listening as well. i will be back tomorrow morning on the sofa with roger, but for the time being, goodbye, have a lovely weekend.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. donald trump is banned permanently from twitter, because of concerns his tweets could incite more violence. democrats reveal the draft of a new impeachment resolution against president trump — the president elect accuses him of inciting an insurrection and endangering the security of the us. he's been an embarrassment to the country, embarrassed us around the world. not worthy, not worthy to hold that office. "act like you have the virus." that's the advice in a new campaign in the uk urging people to abide by lockdown rules. and snow in spain leaves hundreds of drivers trapped in their cars as roads are blocked and madrid airport remains closed.

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