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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 1, 2021 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... a new era in the uk's relationship with the this is bbc news — european union, as the formal these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. separation is completed. there'll be changes to travel, a new era in the uk's relationship trade, immigration with the european union, and security co—operation. people are being warned to expect as the formal separation some disruption in the coming weeks is completed. as the new rules bed in. there'll be changes to travel, trade, immigration and security co—operation. the uk's chief medical officers people are being warned to expect some disruption in the coming weeks defend the plan to leave 12 weeks between coronavirus vaccine doses, as the new rules bed in. after criticism from doctors. and bringing in the new year — from new york to scotland countries adjust their celebrations iam i am live in dover where the lorries to fit their covid conditions. are arriving, the ferries are sailing to france but everyone is getting used to a new regime. the uk's chief medical officers defend the plan to leave 12 weeks between coronavirus vaccine doses, after criticism from doctors. now on bbc news, as the world reacts bringing in the new year — and deals with the fallout from new york to scotland, from the death of george floyd countries adjust their celebrations in the united states, to fit their covid conditions. sporting stars around the world have
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made their own contribution to the debate. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a new era has begun for the united kingdom, after completing its formal separation from the european union, leaving the single market, and the customs union at the end of the brexit transition period. under the new arrangements, there will be no import taxes on goods crossing between britain and the continent. the government has warned there will be some disruption in the coming weeks as new rules bed in for travel, trade, immigration and security co—operation. northern ireland will remain in the eu single market for goods, and will apply eu customs rules
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at its ports. borisjohnson said the uk had "freedom in our hands" and the ability to do things "differently and better". france's president macron said britain would remain a friend and ally, but he described brexit as the child of "many lies and false promises". let's begin with this report from jessica parker. big ben chimes. big ben marking the hour last night. boris johnson described it as an amazing moment for the country. it is one that some will regard with huge optimism, others with deep regret. but for brexit supporters, a long fought cause coming to fruition. all decisions will be made in the house of commons through a system of transparency and accountability. i used to say to my constituents, i'll give you £100 if you can name me any of the members of the european parliament that represent you, and haven't lost a penny. the last ship leaving dover before
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the new rules kicked in. the uk left the eu last january, but it was yesterday evening that the transition period ended and largely brought that departure into effect. new border checks are coming in. change is here. unfortunately, because of the late negotiation of the deal, many of the actual details of how these checks will be done, and what the documentation looks like, have still not really reached those who are going to be working under them, and still worse, those who are going to enforce them. on new year's day there is expected to be relatively little freight traffic. the immediate impact of brexit in some areas may be less instant or obvious than others. nevertheless, significant changes are here, whether on trade, travel, immigration or security. civil servants of my generation have spent the last 40 years trying to remove obstacles to working, living, travelling to europe. and tonight, those obstacles, many of them, are coming back. life will get more difficult,
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more expensive, more cumbersome, dealing with europe. muted new year celebrations across the uk last night. and while coronavirus continues for now to shut down much of society, those changes brought by brexit could well become more apparent in the months ahead. jessica parker, bbc news. under the new arrangements, there will be no import taxes on goods crossing between britain and the continent. but customs checks will return and there will be more paperwork for businesses and people travelling to eu countries. our correspondent simonejones is in dover and we can speak to him now. hello to you. so, tell us what it is like there today with these new rules coming in to force. well, here in dover, in some ways it seems like it is business as usual. we have seen lorries arriving at the port, getting on ferries and heading over
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towards dunkirk and also to calais. but in other ways it isn't quite normal because there is a new bureaucracy, there are new check so lorries coming in to the port need to have a bar code. that bar code will show they have the right permissions to import goods into the eu, so that bar code is scanned, the lorries then get on the ferries and was there on the ferries, the details will be checked by the french customs and if all is in order once they arrive in france they will be allowed to drive off they will be allowed to drive off the ferry to continue their journey into the eu. if things are not quite right, the lorries may be pulled overfor right, the lorries may be pulled over for further checks. right, the lorries may be pulled overforfurther checks. heading in the opposite direction when you have ferries coming from calais over to dover, the british government says there will be a light touch for the first six months so limited checks, so first six months so limited checks, so things should run smoothly. if there is likely to be delays or disruptions, they are likely to be seen disruptions, they are likely to be seen on disruptions, they are likely to be seen on the british side of the channel. add into the equation
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anyone heading from the uk over to france needs to have a negative covid test, that'll continue for the first week of the new year at least before being reviewed by france, so thatis before being reviewed by france, so that is another layer of bureaucracy deal with. i think this morning the authorities will be happy with how it has gone so far both here and in calais but being new year's day we are expecting traffic to be relatively light so the real test might be in the coming days and weeks as people get used to this new system and what we are not entirely clear is how many businesses are properly prepared for this because what people don't want our businesses and lorries turning up at ports like this one without having the right paperwork and permissions to travel because that is when we could see problems developing. 0k, simon, thank you very much for that. simon, thank you very much for that. simonjones in simon, thank you very much for that. simon jones in dover. our correspondent bethany bell gave us the view from the other side of the channel, in calais. lots of new custom checks
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and a new regime is in place here. and of course it is quiet this morning, new year's day, the french authorities say they don't expect things to be very busy here over the next few days but they will be watching very carefully to see how the new customs formalities, the whole new system is working because what they don't want to see is disruptions. if individual companies don't have the correct paperwork, the correct documents when they arrive here, there could be delays as extra checks have to take place. the french authorities here say they are prepared for this new system, they've built 6000 new parking places for lorries to go to if they need to have extra checks. but of course it'll be down to the individual companies as to how they manage to deal with this in the french authorities as well say there is a big impetus
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for them to make sure this system works smoothly. millions of lorries pass through calais every year. and if things don't go too well here, there is the concern some companies may transfer their business to other ports in belgium or the netherlands. so everybody saying they want to make this as smooth as possible. but we will see how it works out over the next few days and weeks. bethany bell in calais. the uk's chief medical officers have defended the covid vaccination plan, after criticism from a doctors' union. the uk will give both parts of the oxford and pfizer vaccines 12 weeks apart, having initially planned to leave 21 days between the pfizerjabs. the british medical association said cancelling patients booked in for their second doses was "grossly unfair". meanwhile some hospitals in london and the south—east of england say they are now under "extreme pressure" because of rising coronavirus cases. they say some seriously ill patients are being moved to intensive care
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units in other parts of the country. i'm joined by our health correspondentjim reed. let's talk about the various aspects of what is happening with covid so let's start with a vaccination plan. interestingly we have the four chief medical officers coming out and defending this plan to separate the jabs because there was a lot of concern certainly initially from people who had expected to get their jabs, the pfizer jabs, people who had expected to get their jabs, the pfizerjabs, three weeks apart. concerted push from the four different chief medical officers across different chief medical officers a ci’oss every different chief medical officers across every nation of the uk this morning because there has been this slight controversy around the pfizer/biontech vaccine in particular. this is the one that has been given to around about1 million people in the uk. originally the plan was to space the two doses out by 21 days. this week the decision was made to extend that's rather than one dose and a second 13 weeks later, it is one dose and a one 12 weeks later. the office advantages
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you get to give one dose of the vaccine to more people more quickly and what the chief medical officers say there is a lot of evidence that first vaccine, just one shot, is already very effective, perhaps up to 90% effective. doctors union is very critical of the plans this week partly because they've already told 1 million people come back in three weeks' time for your second jab. then i have to contact all those people to read book. office are quite distressing for those people, often quite elderly and vulnerable patients, can be quite confusing for them. they say it should have been donein them. they say it should have been done ina them. they say it should have been done in a different way. we had a letter from the chief medical officers last night. professor david salisbury, the former director of immunisation at the department of health, he says, if we do it this way the number vaccinated is realistically going to go from a trickle to a flood which is what is needed so you can see the idea behind this battle some difficulty
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and confusion. what is driving this change of strategy is the pressure hospitals under which we have been hearing more about today. this pressure is not across the united kingdom by any stretch. at the moment it is in the south east of england, london, bits of northern ireland is now under pressure on beds. this morning, a professorfrom intensive care medicine says it appears we are seeing this pressure starting to spread out over some parts of the country which is a concern for doctors and hospitals. we have seen some hospitals already starting to transfer patients, seven south end they were transferring some patience to cambridge and we've seen some patience to cambridge and we've seenin some patience to cambridge and we've seen in parts of london, transferring to plymouth and bristol overnight so you can see the pressure there are on services. nhs providers, representing the trusts, saying the problem is and what is happening now but what will happen in the coming weeks, sing it'll be
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now bitingly difficult for parts of the nhs when we see this current spike in cases reflected in hospitalisations in three weeks' time. 0k, thank you very much. a new era has begun for the united kingdom after it completed its formal separation from the european union. the uk has stopped following eu rules, as replacement arrangements for travel, trade, immigration and security co—operation came into force. this was the reaction of some people on the streets of brussels to the uk's departure. it's a shame. big shame that it has had to go down like that. kinda feel sad about it. yes, don't know what the relationships are going to be in future. it is a shame that we won't be able to travel or go to england as easy as we could have done before. i respect the british
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people's decision. but at the same time, i think it's a pity. today we are getting the reaction of a range of different people here in the uk and the eu to all of these changes. with me is laura sagen, founder of the hair fuel, a subscription—based hair growth mask. alsojoining me is andreas schneider, co—founder and managing director at vimcar vehicle tracking. and eleanor durdy, a farmerfrom the uk. a very warm welcome to all of you, thank you for your time today joining us on bbc news. laura, tell us joining us on bbc news. laura, tell usa joining us on bbc news. laura, tell us a bit more about how you have grown your business because you lived in the uk and left around 2017-18 to lived in the uk and left around 2017—18 to go to the netherlands and
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now your business is based both in the uk and there. correct. so, we have founded our uk arm in 2018 and oui’ have founded our uk arm in 2018 and our dutch arm has been founded around 2019—20 and that is ahead of brexit. and also makes sense because as brexit was unfolding we realised we need to make sure that our supply chain can withstand what is coming up, so making sure that we have suppliers here on this side of the channel, mainland europe, and also making sure that our uk market is also catered for in an appropriate way. this way we split our attention a little bit, invested time and effort in this supply chain and going ahead. so, the changes that have been driven by brexit in many
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ways, has that been healthy for the business? has it helped it to grow, in your opinion? yes. i mean, it definitely had some growing pains, i won't deny or sugar—coat it but, actually, it pushed us to look beyond the uk and notjust ignoring that, not at all but rather expand and think how we can cater our european market, how we can cater oui’ european market, how we can cater our worldwide market and that meant looking up multilingual content we can offer and it has and still has and we will anticipate growing pains in the future but it enabled us to expand our business, expand our business model and strengthen it. so, yes, growing pains but strengthening. andreas in berlin, first will tell us what is vimcar.
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we are a tech company offering a syste m we are a tech company offering a system that helps companies to track their vehicles on the road so it is a little piece of hardware you plug into your business, it allows you to follow the car, it warns you if the car is stolen and our customers are small and medium businesses so businesses like plumbers, electricians, pharmacists.” businesses like plumbers, electricians, pharmacists. i know you chose the uk, you are looking at a number of different options and countries but you chose the uk as your first base outside of germany during the brexit process, so tell us during the brexit process, so tell us about that decision making process. it was in 2018-19, we were the market leader in germany and we asked ourselves what is the most attractive market in europe in the long run and as you mentioned we shortlisted different countries, it was france, italy, poland and the uk, and brexit was already going ahead but, despite this, we chose the uk as our first market because
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we believed that it is the most vibrant and we believed that it is the most vibra nt and attractive we believed that it is the most vibrant and attractive market in the long run from a purely economic prospect, more attractive in comparison to italy, for example. you said long run a couple of times so you said long run a couple of times so you you said long run a couple of times so you are you said long run a couple of times so you are looking ahead and beyond any immediate teething issues. so you are looking ahead and beyond any immediate teething issuesm so you are looking ahead and beyond any immediate teething issues. it is more paperwork on our side, so we are... and ouremployees more paperwork on our side, so we are... and our employees and logistics are in berlin, we ship every single package from here to the end customer in the uk and so it is more paperwork on our side, but thatis is more paperwork on our side, but that is fine, if the paperwork is on out that is fine, if the paperwork is on our side because i was afraid for more paperwork for the customer on the doorstep which would have been ugly but as of today it is not going to happen. let's go to eleanor in south yorkshire. you are an arable farmer so tell us about what short—term pain or indeed possible
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gain that is on your mind right now. i think, to be honest, gain that is on your mind right now. ithink, to be honest, especially out ithink, to be honest, especially ourfarm, we sit ithink, to be honest, especially our farm, we sit on the fence with the pros and cons on both sides. i think in the long term, it might be a benefit, we'd like to think it'll promote british farming and that the potential problems that might arise with any exports, it might encourage the country to back british farming more than it arguably does currently. but also there is a lot of problems that will be faced imminently. it is inevitable that the price of chemicals will go up and inevitably therefore the price of food will have to go up to make room for those deficits we will have to deal with. room for those deficits we will have to dealwith. how room for those deficits we will have to deal with. how much would you produce at the moment, how much of it goes to the eu? i couldn't say. i couldn't put a figure on it myself.
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the way we work is we provide our grain toa the way we work is we provide our grain to a grain merchant who sells it on. that might remain in the uk, it on. that might remain in the uk, it might go abroad but, hopefully, now that we are leaving the transition period, that fluctuation of prices might be able to settle somewhat. it is difficult to say. it is out of our hands once it has left the farm. just to finish up because we're almost out of time, i could talk to you all for ages butjust a brief thought from all of you on how you are feeling after tortuous political process of the last few yea rs. political process of the last few years. how are you feeling today on day one of this relationship about where you are and where it is going, laura, to you first. i would say we are feeling as ready as we can be. i think excited is maybe not the right word but definitely ready and looking forward to how it is going to unfold, looking forward to the
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opportunities that it might bring us and everybody else. andreas? not excited from a personal perspective. from a business perspective we have to deal with it and somehow it will work out. and eleanor? i am optimistic and looking forward to hopefully being able to back british farming, andl hopefully being able to back british farming, and i think it is an exciting opportunity that will come out exciting opportunity that will come our way now. 0k, eleanor durdy in yorkshire, andreas schneider in berlin and laura sagen in amsterdam, thank you very much for your time today. the new relationship has meant an end to free movement of people between the uk and europe. in 2019 — before covid — british travellers made more than 66 million european trips. our correspondent anna holligan is in amsterdam's schiphol airport this morning — what kind of changes will travellers now face? this time last year if you wanted to
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spend new year in amsterdam you could have done. if you are in the uk this year you can't. and that is a combination of brexit and covid—19. so, movement into the ear from all non—eu member states is currently restricted to essential travel only. those rules now apply to british citizens, too. anyone who does arrive here at schiphol airport must be in possession of a negative covid—19 test declaration. after all of this is over, british passports will still be valid, providing they are will still be valid, providing they a re less will still be valid, providing they are less than ten years old and have six months left on them before they expire. british passengers may be asked to show a return ticket, they matt have their passports stamped, they might be using different cues and you might even have to show you have enough money to cover the duration of your stay, plus you can't take most meat or dairy
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products on board. pet passports issued in the uk will no longer be valid here in the eu so instead you will have to get hold of an annual health certificate from your vet every time you want to travel. freedom of movement is over. that means uk citizens no longer have the automatic right to live and work in the eu and vice versa. the uk is introducing a points—based immigration system. here in the eu, the rules vary from country to country so you will need to check the national rules. anyone who wants to travel from the uk can stay for up to travel from the uk can stay for up to 90 days in any 180 day period without a visa. and it may be many more months before we really see the impact of these changes. as you can see, the departures at schiphol
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airport in the netherlands is a lot quieter than it would normally be. around the world, the new year is being welcomed in many different ways. in many countries affected by coronavirus, streets were empty of the usual crowds. but, in other parts of the world, it was fireworks and celebrations as usual. here's paul hawkins with a round up. normally rammed, time square this year was closed to the public. instead, only vips and a0 front line workers and their families were allowed. forget the crowds, new york cut back massively on its new year celebrations because of covid. likewise on rio's famous copacabana beach, the new year's eve party was cancelled, a few private fireworks instead let off by the few locals allowed access. one hour after leaving the eu behind, the uk left 2020 behind.
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some fireworks were live, some pre—recorded. no crowds, no parties, the message — stay at home. it's been very strange because obviously i'm used to, like, the fireworks, big crowds but it's been very, like, quiet, and there's police everywhere so it'sjust, like... it's not like the usual. in scotland, they opted for this. not fireworks but, like fireflies, they were hogmanay drones, 500 foot in the air, perfectly synchronised at 25 miles an hour. in france, they had music maestro jean—micheljarre live from his studio playing in a virtual notre dame cathedral. the reality, however, was somewhat different. megaphone message in french.
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translation: it's too bad because, especially in this neighbourhood, we are used to having a great atmosphere, and we don't see that today. it's too bad. australians also stayed indoors. their fireworks were cut to seven minutes. while the uae did it like this. and in the place where coronavirus began... it was new year like usual. the chinese reaping the rewards of tough lockdowns and a zero tolerance approach. no more social distancing. instead, socialising and parties. remember that? paul hawkins, bbc news. hip—hop star mf doom has died at the age of a9, his family confirmed on social media. the musician, real name daniel dumile, was known for his rhyme style and his performances in which he always wore a mask. in a post on the rapper's instagram
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account on thursday, his wife jasmine paid thanks to the greatest husband, father, teacher, student, business partner, lover and friend. this is bbc news. it is time now for the weather, let's catch up with the very latest for new year's day. hello. it was an especially cold start to the brand—new year across parts of south—west england. temperatures across wiltshire, dorset and hampshire as low as —6, —7 seven degrees earlier on. —3 across parts of southern scotland. could be a cold night for you tonight. notice kirkwall, 5 degrees. same sort of temperature across some eastern parts of northern england, too. even though we've had the northerly wind, slightly less cold air has been drifting down with it. the air will get colder as we go to the day. more in the way of sleet and snow, mainly over the hills in scotland later. it's rain showers and a bit of sleet mixed in across england and wales. plenty of cloud, brightening up to north—west england later on. in fact scotland, northern ireland, compared with yesterday, a much sunnier day. with the grey conditions dominating
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across england and wales, where the mist and fog were this morning and grey clouds linger, temperatures may struggle to get above freezing for one or two. it will be a damp evening and night across southern and south—eastern parts of the uk. a few showers for eastern scotland. showers return to northern ireland as well. and still some sleet and snow in the north of scotland. temperatures, well, widely below freezing. could be some ice around. temperatures at their lowest in southern scotland into saturday morning. this is the set for saturday. around high pressure, the wind flows clockwise. so, with high pressure to the west, low pressure to the south and east, it is a northerly flow with us still. that continues to bring showers in northern scotland. a few more to northern ireland. showers mainly wintry across scotland. but we could see sleet and snow mixed with the showers, in eastern counties of england through the day, particularly over the hills. showers also return to the far west of wales and across cornwall. but for many of you, over most of you on saturday, it will be a dry, bright and crisp day. temperatures 2—5 celsius at best. so, a chilly one out there. as we go through saturday night into sunday, a high pressure shifts to the north of us.
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low pressure so to the south and east. an increasingly easterly airflow will develop. that means showers that start on eastern coasts will drift a little further westwards. it could turn to sleet and snow over high ground. we lose the early showers in wales and south—west england. many western areas finish the day on sunday staying dry and sunny. temperatures up a degree or so on saturday's values. once the easterly wind sets in, it will be with us into much of next week. quite windy conditions at times for england and wales. that will make you feel cold. there are little areas of less cold air around that. a lot of what falls from the sky in the form of showers will be of rain but it could turn to sleet and snow at times, particularly over the hills. the main story, look at the temperatures, 00:28:46,654 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 it stays on cold side.
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