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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 29, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... borisjohnson visits the faslane naval base in scotland — he's calling for unity and says there is scope for a brexit deal. what we want to do is to make it absolutely clear that the backstop is no good, it's dead, it's got to go. the withdrawal agreement is dead, it's got to go, but there is scope to do a new deal. as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount, one car industry boss says his company's ready to pull out of the uk if brexit hits its profits. but the minister in charge of no—deal, michael gove, insists britain will be prepared. there won't be any delays. we are determined to ensure we leave on october 31 and it's myjob to make sure the country is ready. they're shooting! panic at a food festival in california as a gunman opens
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fire, killing three, including a child. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. that is with gavin. we will hear from liverpool managerjurgen klopp, as he prepares for what he calls the site's first cup final before the season site's first cup final before the season begins. that and plenty more coming up. thanks. and ben rich has the weather. remember the heat of last week, things have changed significantly, flooding rain in places over the weekend, pretty unsettled over the next few days, and that transition to something more unsettled has brought some really severe weather gci’oss brought some really severe weather across some parts of europe. we will be looking at that plus all the weather news just before half past. thanks, ben. also coming up — trapped up to his neck in water for several hours — the man who got stuck in rocks as the tide came in — and had to be freed by firefighters.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. boris johnson is in scotland this afternoon — on his first visit there as prime minister. he's after unity — with a call to "renew the ties that bind the uk". but he faces a tough audience — later this afternoon he meets first minister nicola sturgeon — she has pointed out already that scotland voted remain, didn't vote for a conservative government, and is against a no—deal brexit — she's said to be ramping up preparations for another independence referendum. before meeting the first minister, mrjohnson is seeing ruth davidson — leader of the scottish conservatives. things won't be much easier there — she didn't vote for him in the leadership contest and she too is opposed to leaving the eu without a deal. let's cross to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon, who is in glasgow. it isa it is a tough crowd. yes, it is. there has been no walkabout here in scotla nd there has been no walkabout here in scotland for borisjohnson, but those two meetings scheduled for this afternoon could be a little bit
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tricky. as you say, ruth davidson, the leader of the scottish conservatives, did not vote for borisjohnson in the leadership contest. within the last hour or so, though, he has been talking about her, he says he is her number one fan, he says he admires her brand of scottish conservatism and says their core philosophy is the same. but of course there is that issue of brexit, and in particular a no—deal brexit. ruth davidson says she could not support such a scenario. boris johnson, the prime minister, talking about that as well during his visit to faslane, the home of britain's nuclear deterrent. he says he is confident he will get a deal, he is aiming fora deal, confident he will get a deal, he is aiming for a deal, preparing for a no deal, and he says the renegotiations on the terms of the deal are required. what we want to do is to make it absolutely clear that the backstop is no good, it's dead, it's got to go, that would agreement is dead, it's got to go, but there is scope
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to do it's got to go, but there is scope todoa it's got to go, but there is scope to do a new deal. do you have proposals for a new deal that you will take to brussels?” proposals for a new deal that you will take to brussels? i have made it very clear to our friends, we are talking to the irish today, what the limits are, what we want to do, and we are very confident that with goodwill on both sides, two mature political entities, the uk and the eu, can get this thing done. why will you be able to achieve something theresa may could not? there are several reasons, the first is that how we want to come out of the customs union, out of the single market, to make sense of brexit, and the funny thing is for the last three years it hasn't really been at all clear that was the position of the uk government. there is no point in coming out of the eu if you're going to end up being run by the eu, and that was the result of the backstop. so i think to a large extent, brussels was a bit baffled by what the uk position really was. there was no clear decision. and is there now a clear uk position on
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what you would want and what a deal would look like? that's right, and you have heard me say it many times, what we need to do is to build a new partnership with all the things that matter to us, sharing co—operation oi'i matter to us, sharing co—operation on defence, on security, on intelligence, cultural, scientific collaboration. everything that you would expect, and at the core of it all, a new free trade deal that allows us to take back control of out allows us to take back control of our tariffs and our regulations and to do things differently where we wa nt to do things differently where we want to. that's the essence of it. i think our friends and partners to understand that, and believe me, they've now got i think 29 members of the brexit party sitting in strasbourg, not exactly full of the ode tojoy, they strasbourg, not exactly full of the ode to joy, they are strasbourg, not exactly full of the ode tojoy, they are not going to wa nt ode tojoy, they are not going to want that situation to continue. there is a big incentive on both sides to get this thing done, and we are going to come out, deal or no deal, on october the 31st. deal or
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no deal, come october 31 is likely to concern scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon. she says she has profound worries about boris johnson's premiership. this morning she said scotland did not vote for the conservative government, didn't vote for the new prime minister, didn't vote for brexit and didn't vote for the no—deal brexit, which she said mrjohnson's government is now working on the assumption that there will be. so that will be an interesting meeting too. of course, her government is putting in a lot of work on plans for a second independence referendum, although the right to hold that referendum has to be given to the scottish parliament by the government at westminster. so the scottish government has a lot of hurdles to get through to the point where they can hold a second referendum is reached. on the idea of a second poll, borisjohnson said the confidence of the public would be undermined if he was to go back on the promise that that referendum was
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once—in—a—lifetime, once in a generation. one other point of interest from those comments he made at faslane about an hour ago or so, he was asked by one journalist why he was asked by one journalist why he was asked by one journalist why he was so unpopular in scotland. to that, the prime minister replied, if i believe the polls, i wouldn't be here. lorna gordon, thank you. let's cross to perth now, where we can speak to snp mp pete wishart. nice to talk to you. just picking up on what lorna was saying, what do people in scotland think of boris johnson, do you think? a curious mixture of a number of things, like first of all we absolutely and utterly reject his no—deal brexit, the plan he has in place for us come october. secondly, i think october —— scotland doesn't ta ke to i think october —— scotland doesn't take to this blustering buffoon act, it jars take to this blustering buffoon act, itjars again scottish experience, we have a real difficulty that, but the thing that will cause boris most difficulties today is more or less
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projected by the scottish conservatives. they know how disastrous a no deal is. ruth davidson is singularly refusing to sign his do or die no—deal brexit pledge. i think he is going to have a really, really tough afternoon today, and i really can't see how he will make much progress at all in scotland. but he will make the point that on 31st of october, we are leaving, because that is the legal default. yes, we will do all we can to stop him. you heard ian blackford on your programme today really working across party to try and ensure that we have the legislative mechanism in place, this is all shaping up to be the mother of all parliamentary battles, we will play our part as the third party, to do everything possible to stop him, and stopping we must. he is in scotland today, if this goes ahead, 100,000 jobs will be lost, the impact of 2300 on every single person in scotland. we did not vote for this,
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we wa nt scotland. we did not vote for this, we want nothing whatsoever to do with it. hardly any mps were for this and were against triggering article 50, but yet we are subjected to this. you mention scottish independence, the prospect of boris becoming prime minister was enough to ta ke becoming prime minister was enough to take independence to 53% in the polls. i think we will see a number of opinion polls that show if anything positive could come out of this, it could be a great recruiting place for scottish independence. this, it could be a great recruiting place for scottish independencem there an acceptance perhaps more generally now that as part of the united kingdom we are where we are, and we've just got to make the best of this? no, because we got options in scotland. we didn't want anything to do with this, we voted overwhelmingly against it. we, thank goodness can have the lifeboat of scottish independence which will secure a place in the european union, to be sure we are not going to go down with the good ship boris and britannia, and the disaster of brexit. we are looking at these options and more importantly the
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people of scotland are properly having a real assessment of what is available to them. they are making up available to them. they are making up their mind, do we seriously want to go down with this buffoon's brexit, or do we want to make sure we can have our own relationship with europe and do what is in the best interest of our country? every now and again, a meeting comes along where you just wish you are a fly on the wall and i suspect the meeting between nicola sturgeon and boris johnson would be one of those. absolutely, they are quite enticing meetings today in scotland. the one with the first minister will be cordial and good, i'm sure, with the first minister will be cordialand good, i'm sure, but with the first minister will be cordial and good, i'm sure, but the one he has to worry more about is the one with ruth davidson, because ruthis the one with ruth davidson, because ruth is famous for her flip—flops, she takes certain positions which can be overturned, but ijust cannot see her buying into this do or die buffoon brexit deal that she is forced to sign up to. what has
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happened is the conservatives in scotla nd happened is the conservatives in scotland are in opposition notjust to boris but to his man in the scotla nd to boris but to his man in the scotland office who has bought into the do or die pledge, maybe even existential difficulties with the scottish conservatives. that is not a good place for them today. good to talk to you, ian wish it. meanwhile, there've been warnings today from business leaders at the cbi that neither the uk nor the eu are prepared for no—deal — and it's today published practical steps that firms can take. the uncertainty surrounding brexit prompted the french owner of vauxhall to say it could move all car production from its ellesmere port factory in cheshire — if it becomes unprofitable. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. vauxhall‘s plant in ellesmere port employs 1,000 people and faces an uncertain future. last month, parent company psa said it wanted to build a new version of its astra model, but only on condition a suitable brexit deal was reached. now it's post says if there is no deal, there will be no new production line. the chief executive said
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in a newspaper interview, but the man charged with preparing for no—deal seemed to take that right in his stride. we are doing everything we can to make sure we can leave the european union on october the 31st, there won't be any delays, we are determined to ensure we leave on october the 31st, and it is myjob to make sure the country is ready. no—deal would bring major changes to the way we do business across the channel, affecting everything from lorry traffic to financial services. exports would be subject to tariffs overnight, border controls would be tightened up, and a swathe of industries which currently rely on eu rules and standards could be left in legal limbo, unless emergency measures are put in place. yet the confederation of british industry says neither the uk nor the eu is ready
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for a no—deal scenario and much more needs to be done. we absolutely do think a deal is essential, for all the preparation we do, it is like putting up sandbags to prevent floodwaters, we will probably still lose the kitchen but we might save the bedroom. every effort, just as we put effort into preparation, every effort needs to go into getting a deal, and that means flexibility from both sides, because neither side is ready. the cbi says that although many big businesses have well thought through contingency plans, a number of smaller companies do not, and it says much of the official advice firms are being given is outdated. yet the government points out that some car—makers have been happy to announce new investments. in recent weeks, we have seen amazon, ntt, the big japanese tech firm, and indeed jaguar land rover
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announce fresh investment into the uk, so it is not all one way, or all the risks are downward, there are opportunities here, and we need to be ready to mitigate that. the government still insists it would prefer to leave the eu with a deal but has to operate on the assumption that won't happen, and that means companies have little choice but to prepare for a deeply uncertain future. theo leggett, bbc news. i am joined by businessman and economistjohn mills — founder and chairman of the consumer product companyjml and a supporter of the pro—brexit group leave means leave. and also a donor to the labour party. can i just and also a donor to the labour party. can ijust ask and also a donor to the labour party. can i just ask you and also a donor to the labour party. can ijust ask you what and also a donor to the labour party. can i just ask you what you think has happened since boris johnson became prime minister, has there been a change of emphasis towards a no—deal brexit that you suspect, i don't know what, was already the plan? yes, i think there has been. i think it has been realised for a long time that if you are going to get the eu to change their negotiating stance, you need a
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no deal walk away position to do that, but the government up to now has been relatively half—hearted about saying that, and i think the big difference is the new government has made it much more explicit that thatis has made it much more explicit that that is their policy. it is quite a gamble, isn't it? it is a gamble, but everything is a gamble in the sense that we need to find some solution to the impasse we are in and it does seem to me that what the government is doing at the moment is probably as good a way as any of trying to break the ice and find a solution. does that help businesses like yours, who for years have said since the referendum result it's the uncertainty that is causing real problems? we are going to be uncertain pretty much until something gives or doesn't give on sist something gives or doesn't give on 31st of october. i think that's right, but i think if we come out of the eu on 31st of october that there will be then a further period of negotiation very probably on a variety of different issues to be confronted, but at least there will bea confronted, but at least there will be a lot more certainty about the
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general direction of travel. be a lot more certainty about the general direction of travelm there is a no deal, for agriculture, ta riffs there is a no deal, for agriculture, tariffs will be imposed that will be very difficult. i think they are going to be difficult but not necessarily in superbly so. the ta riffs necessarily in superbly so. the tariffs are much higher on eu to the uk than ours to the eu, so it works again for the uk than ours to the eu, so it works againforthe uk uk than ours to the eu, so it works again for the uk there. it is a different paper work system but not radically different, there is money to be collected but that applies to a large amount of our trade anyway, soi a large amount of our trade anyway, so i don't think these problems are insuperable. there will be checks at borders, queues, difficulties. hmrc have certainly said they will give priority to flow over checking and i think there must be right while the whole system settles down. i suspect there won't be queues of lorries at there won't be queues of lorries at the port. i think there will be some lorries that come along with the wrong documentation that will be put to one side, but most of the other truckloads of goods i guess would go straight through. what do you make
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of the cbi and others basically saying, we've really now, we're running out of time, we've been hearing that for a long time. but more practical help is being offered. i think this is very welcome move. the cbi has now said i think they have got a couple of hundred issues that need to be faced up hundred issues that need to be faced up to to make a no deal departure work reasonably well, and i think that's a very welcome development, better than just saying it is all going to be chaotic, which doesn't help anybody. but you would share boris johnson's help anybody. but you would share borisjohnson's optimism, help anybody. but you would share boris johnson's optimism, is help anybody. but you would share borisjohnson's optimism, is how many people are saying it, there are other words being used as well. but you feel this is the right direction, still? i think it you feel this is the right direction, still? ithink it must make sense, really, for the uk and the eu to reach some sort of accommodation, and actually when you really boil down to it, the dividing lines between the two sides are there and they are very substantial but they are not in superbly large. we know the eu have said they are
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not going to change their view, the deal is the deal, there is no further negotiation. deal is the deal, there is no further negotiationlj deal is the deal, there is no further negotiation. i think that is a very unhelpful stance, if i may say so. if we are going to reach a deal, there has to be some negotiation, not necessarily putting the withdrawal agreement to one side but doing something that will ove rco m e but doing something that will overcome the very real problem is that the british have had with the withdrawal agreement. john, good to see you, john mills. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. borisjohnson visits the faslane naval base in scotland — he's calling for unity and says there is scope for a new brexit deal. 0ne car industry boss says his company's ready to pull out of the uk if brexit affects its profits — michael gove insists britain will be prepared. panic at a food festival in california as a gunman opens fire, killing 3, including a child. in sport, liverpool managerjurgen klopp claims the season's
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traditional opener of the community shield is a final worth winning. liverpool play man city in the match on sunday. bolton and bury could find their opening league 1 fixture suspended, the afl say concerns remain over their ongoing financial problems. and the murray brothers are teaming up for the first time since the rio l in is in 2016. they are in doubles action in washington. the pair have been training ahead of their match tomorrow. i will be back, more on those stories later on. more on those headline stories. the shooting at a garlic festival in california. — three people were killed, including a six—year—old boy — and 15 others wounded. the gunman was shot dead by armed officers, although police are investigating reports that a second suspect may still be at large. the shooting happened in gilroy, around 80 miles south of san francisco. from there, dave lee sent this report.
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0h, bleep! what's going on?! the gunfire began at 5:41pm on sunday evening, as families were starting to head home. they're shooting! as the shots rang out, there was at first confusion and then panic, and eventually disbelief. who'd shoot up a garlic festival? a food festival — one that obsessively celebrates the garlic grown here — has become the scene of the 246th mass shooting in america this year. as soon as the gunfire started, everybody scattered, and they were yelling for their kids. it sounded like 30 rounds to me, and then we heard a little lapse in time, and then another 30 rounds. it sounded like automatic fire. we just heard a pop — pop, pop, pop — and we just went behind some tents and took cover, and we knew right away when we saw a lot of people just running away from there. police said they took less than a minute to shoot dead the man once he opened fire, but even with that rapid response, the gunman was able to cause carnage — a six—year—old boy among the dead.
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the suspect was shot and killed. we have several witnesses reporting that there may have been a second suspect, but we don't know if that suspect was engaged in any shooting, or whether they may have been in some sort of support role for the person that we have accounted for. witnesses described the man as being white and in his 30s, though this has not yet been confirmed. around 80,000 people descend on this small city for this festival every year, but now it will become known as yet another instance of everyday american life that's been torn apart by gun violence. dave lee, bbc news, in gilroy, california. firefighters have rescued a man whose foot became trapped in rocks on the north norfolk coast. he'd fallen while trying to help his child on the beach at sheringham yesterday evening. the man was stuck in the sea for nearly four hours, and at one point, was submerged up to his neck.
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0ur correspondent robby west sent this update from sheringham. it was very dramatic and this is where the man was trapped. he was walking up these steps off the beach with his family when a wave came in from the left. he stepped in front of his children to protect them and he was knocked back onto these big slabs of granite. first on the scene was the local lifeguard and he told me what he saw when he arrived at the scene. the patient had his foot wedged down in between the rock and the structure here. when i arrived on scene, he was getting hammered by pretty severe tidal waves. and so i basically came in with a rescue tube, to wedge it between him and the rock and then sheltered him with my body when waves were impacting. well, firefighters eventually freed him from the rocks using brute force but he was in the water for over three hours. police say today that his injuries are not thought to be serious,
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and just before we came on air, i spoke to members of his family, who wanted to thank all of the emergency services for saving his life. the duchess of sussex has been revealed as the first guest editor of british vogue's september issue — seen as the most important edition of the fashion year. meghan has chosen to feature 15 so—called "change makers" on the cover of the edition, which focuses on female empowerment and diversity. the duchess declined to appear on the cover herself, telling the editor she felt it would be "boastful". 0ne flood warning and six flood alerts are in place in england, after a month's rain fell in less than 2a hours. greater manchester was one of the worst—affected areas. the manchester airport relief road is still closed because of flooding. five flood alerts are also in place in scotland. on this day 70 years ago, the bbc revived the tv weather report, something it had originally introduced at the start of the second world war. the way we get the latest predictions has changed dramatically over the years, as our presenter matt taylor has been finding out. it's going to be a dull and wet start to the day...
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the way we consume the weather forecast has changed immensely. from simple hand drawn charts and magnetic symbols... there's some... oh, dear! let's do it again. there's the heavy and persistent rain... ..to 3d graphics and sophisticated mobile phone apps. we now have more weather information at our fingertips than ever before, but how exactly does that information get there? it all begins at a weather station like this. the radcliffe observatory has been recording data for over two centuries, making it one of the oldest and longest running in the world. we've been taking temperature observations here on a daily basis since 1814, and then we've got daily rainfall observations as well from the 1820s. so, everything that's used here to measure the temperature and the rainfall has been issued by the met office, so it's all standard kit. and so what's measured here will be measured likewise in other parts, notjust in the uk but right around the world ? absolutely. but with the atmosphere stretching kilometres above us, we also need weather balloons,
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radar and satellite data. and all that information gets fed into weather organisations, such as the european centre for medium—range weather forecasting here in reading, where supercomputers like these ones, doing trillions of calculations every single second, churn all that weather observational data and create the forecast. this is planning for food, for transport, for health, for energy, for anything that's part of society, that's making society. agriculture needs to know when to borrow, buy, rent equipment. they need to know what crops to use when. that up—to—date, personalised information is crucialfor all of us. since the bbc weather app launched in 2013, it's been downloaded 15 times a minute, with up to eight million people using it every single week, and it continues to innovate and evolve. well, the technology and the amount of information available may have changed greatly in the last 70 years, but for me personally, you can't beat getting in front of the camera and communicating the forecast and its uncertainties verbally.
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now, if you don't mind, i have a job to do! see you soon! he has been replaced by someone else now, ben rich is bringing us the weather today. a lot of weather around, not just here weather today. a lot of weather around, notjust here but in europe as well. the big changes we had in our weather at the end of last week, not that long ago you and i were standing at college green. very hot. 37, 30 standing at college green. very hot. 37,30 8 degrees, standing at college green. very hot. 37, 30 8 degrees, that extraordinary heatwave. you were wearing shorts. i wasn't wearing shorts, i probably could have got away with it with the camera shot. let's move on. that is not the story but the point has it changed. a lot of thunderstorms and rain over the changed. a lot of thunderstorms and rain overthe uk changed. a lot of thunderstorms and rain over the uk at the weekend but not just here rain over the uk at the weekend but notjust here things have changed dramatically, parts of europe have changed much more unsettled and dramatically so actually in italy. a couple of pictures from italy, we
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saw lots of downpours and thunderstorms that broke out during the weekend, and not only thunderstorms, a tornado as well, quite close to rome. now, u nfortu nately, quite close to rome. now, unfortunately, a lady lost her life in this in the early hours of this on sunday morning, a carjust picked up on sunday morning, a carjust picked up by on sunday morning, a carjust picked up by this tornado and dropped, and you can see the kind of damage that this storm caused across those parts of italy. so they've had a really rough weekend, and you can see on the satellite picture it is essentially all the same weather that we had, it has all moved eastwards but it has spun up an area of low pressure here across the alps and northern italy, so that's why they have persistent torrential downpours, and the odd tornado as well. how weird, how unusual is this, given that we are now, what, just approaching august? we are in the hottest time of the year, the intensity of these storms is always driven in part by the heat. it obviously gets very hot in that part of europe, it has been particularly hot lately, then what you get is
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much colder air digging down high up in the atmosphere, it pushes its way in and that warm air with a cold air on top of it will rise very rapidly. so you get these severe storms, not that unusual, even tornadoes. you don't hear about them in europe in the same way we do in the usa, we don't get as many in europe but we don't get as many in europe but we do get some, as we do here in the uk from time to time as well. not that unusual but still with huge impacts. we are suffering with rain in parts of the country. let me show you the rainfall from the weekend, this is the radar sequence from the whole weekend from saturday into sunday. it was this very slow moving weather front, it rained in the same places for hour upon hour upon hour, and one place that was particularly badly affected was the north west of england. i will show you some pictures sent to us from manchester, from levenshulme in manchester, it looks like a sort of flash flooding where you get a lot of rain and it powers up in underpasses and badly drained bits of the roads, but you
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can see there, rochdale, 117 millimetres of rain over the weekend. the average is something like 70 or 80 millimetres for a month. so that is more than a month's rainfall in the space of just weekend, and plenty of other places not too far behind. a pretty 5°99y places not too far behind. a pretty soggy end to the week —— heatwave we had last week. and several flood alerts out now, but is that it then, have we had some? that's the big question! there is no sign in the forecast for the next few days of any return to anything like the heat we had, in fact if anything, there are going to be more scenes like this with some more heavy downpours in the forecast. having said all of that, there is a bit of sunshine around for some of us today. beautiful for the moray coast in north—east scotland, but down in the south—west, near plymouth earlier on, a lot of cloud, you can see on the satellite picture here, this pinwheel of cloud. this is an area of low pressure, and this will be our big weather maker through the next few days, it will be drifting
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its way quite slowly north—eastwards, this sequence runs through a couple of days, you can see in the centre of the lower, some pretty heavy downpours, some thunderstorms likely, and with that some strong and gusty winds as well. these downpours have been quite hit and miss, not everywhere will see them but the places that do could have some travel disruption and perhaps localised flooding. this is the forecast through the rest of the afternoon, one or two thunderstorms across north—western parts of scotland. then down to the south—west can an approaching area of low pressure, bands of rain, and those are your temperatures as we in the afternoon. this evening, the area of low pressure rolls in, a band of rain moving across wales, northern england, northern ireland, but the really wet weather will be in the centre of the low here. some heavy downpours, some thunderstorms breaking out, quite a muggy night as well, minimum temperatures between 11 and 17 degrees. tomorrow we continue to track our area of low pressure slowly north—eastwards, heavy downpours and strong winds with that. a few showers breaking up
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further north, the odd thunderstorm across these north—western parts of scotla nd across these north—western parts of scotland but the most unsettled weather, the most turbulent will be found across the south—west, into wales, the midlands, printed north west england through the afternoon, where of course we could do without more heavy downpours, and very strong winds. wind gusts of 50 mph up strong winds. wind gusts of 50 mph up the english channel coast line, pretty unusual for this time of year. 2a degrees in hull but many places around the low 20s at best. into wednesday, an area of low pressure setting about here by the stage, you can see it is moving very slowly, that would drive showers across east anglia, print northern england, heavy downpours in scotland as well. at the same time should be drawing upa as well. at the same time should be drawing up a little to the south—west, those temperatures still well down on where they were last week, 19 to 22 degrees. quite a few showers around on thursday in eastern areas but these will tend to ease as we have through friday. there is some dry weather to come at least for the start of the weekend. but before we get there, some pretty hefty downpours in the forecast, a
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risk of flash flooding and travel disruption.
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this is bbc news, our latest headlines. borisjohnson this is bbc news, our latest headlines. boris johnson has this is bbc news, our latest headlines. borisjohnson has visited the faslane naval base in scotland calling for a renewal of what he calls the ties that bind our united kingdom. as concerns over no—deal brexit mount, the chief executive of vauxhall says his campaign could pull out of the uk if brexit hits profits. a gunman has opened fire at a food festival in california killing three people. including a six year boy. in a rare intervention, china has condemned the recent anti—government protests in hong kong as horrendous. a man who became trapped in rocks for several hours after saving his child from the incoming tide has been rescued on the norfolk coast. and coming upa rescued on the norfolk coast. and coming up a group of mps who have been on a fact—finding trip to canada predict the uk will fully legalise cannabis use within five or ten years. time for the sport. we go over to gavin at the bbc sport centre. we are now talking about football already. it seems like no time at all, simon. less than two weeks until the start of the season.
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a lot of the talk is about tra nsfers, a lot of the talk is about transfers, how the teams are doing in preseason games and liverpool have decided to get under way on friday in the premier league season, having lost three of their last four friendlies. they've had a lot of players missing. they missed out on winning the premier league title last season by a single point. that's who they face in the season traditional opener. the community shield and it's this sunday. jurgen klopp has to miss talk the clash of man city as a curtain raiser and has described it as a final. liverpool lost in preseason yesterday. this time of 3—0 defeat in edinburgh following defeats against brassier dortmund and seville in the usa. jurgen klopp says the community shield is a game well worth winning. nothing to do with me for the rest of the season. it's a game. if we play with eight players available for example, i would like to try to win it. it's the final. the first time i realised nobody seesit the first time i realised nobody sees it like that, to be honest. a
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curtain raiser, unbelievable. we think constantly about the game and how we can prepare. first time liverpool have been involved in this match since 2006. but klopp also said the result has nothing to do with the rest of the season. here we are, before a ball is kicked in the new season, and some clubs are in financial trouble. yes, absolutely. yes, absolutely. there are still doubts over whether two clubs in league one will be able to fulfill their opening day fixtures this weekend. bolton and bury have been told they are "likely" to be suspended if they do not meet a new efl deadline to meet outstanding commitments. bolton have been in administration since the middle of may, with a proposed takeover of the club still not completed. bolton are supposed to start the season at wycombe on saturday, but wycombe have already confirmed they have suspended ticket sales to wanderers fans. both clubs have until 5pm today to prove they can meet their obligations. manchester united's preseason plans aren't settled yet. romelu lukaku has been left out of their squad that has travelled to norway this morning.
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the belgian striker has been heavily linked with a move to inter milan throughout the summer and posted a picture with his agent on social media yesterday with the message: "soon to be continued." and that united squad that has travelled will face kristiansund tomorrow night. paul pogba, another player linked with a move away has travelled. and just one other football line for you — former manchester united defender patrice evra has announced his retirement from the game. the 38—year—old former french international won ten major trophies with the club. news away from football. andy and jamie murray have been training together ahead of their doubles partnership at the washington open this week. the brothers will face edouard roger—vasselin and nicolas mahut in their opening round match tomorrow. the pair played together to help great britain win the davis cup in 2015. the tournament will be andy murray's fourth since having hip resurfacing surgery injanuary and his first on a hard court. he won the queens doubles title
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with feliciano lopez injune. egan bernal is celebrating becoming the youngest rider in more than a century to win the tour de france. the 22—year—old finished hand—in—hand with his team—mate and last year's winner geraint thomas, who finished second overall. team ineos general maanger sir dave brailsford was understandably pretty happy afterwards on the champs—elysees. these are colombia. the tour de france what more can you want? we got a new champion, what a brilliant ambassador. at the moment i think you need to enjoy the moment. have a party, celebrate. and then try and realise what he has achieved. it's something historic for colombia. very, very important, i think, something historic for colombia. very, very important, ithink, and i'm very, very happy to help him achieve this. there were also some pretty impressive scenes in colombia. this was in zipa—quira, hometown of bernal, now the first south american to win the world's most famous bike race.
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located on the outskirts of bogota, the streets packed with people dressed in yellow and waving colombian flags. absolutely loving it there, aren't they? phenomenal success of the. that's all the sport for now. great, gavin, iwill see great, gavin, i will see you later on. let's go back now to the news that the french parent company of the car—maker vauxhall says it could move all production from its factory at ellesmere port in cheshire if brexit makes it unprofitable. more than a—thousand workers are employed at the plant. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent — colletta smith — has been there today, and she told us he news hasn't come as a big shock to unions representing the workforce at the site. welcome to the home of vauxhall astra here in the uk. at ellesmere port. this car park is normally absolutely full of cars and workers toing and froing as they start their shift but the moment we are in a two—week summer shutdown of the whole plant, so was workers head off on their summer holidays they will certainly be concerned by the developments that we are hearing
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today so four weeks ago, the company said they wanted to build the new model, the next model of the vauxhall astra here from 2021. but they said that was contingent on the deal the government gets for brexit. now we have a little bit more meat on that decision, they are saying that they got alternatives that in fa ct if that they got alternatives that in fact if they don't make enough money here at ellesmere port that they will close the plant and move it elsewhere. john is from the unite union. john, that's obviously very worrying for workers to hear but not necessarily a surprise? no, it's just reiterating what was said last week for the lunacy of brexit, it's notjust for ellesmere week for the lunacy of brexit, it's not just for ellesmere port week for the lunacy of brexit, it's notjust for ellesmere port but week for the lunacy of brexit, it's not just for ellesmere port but for the whole of manufacturing. but there's more to it than that. we now work for a company, opel vauxhall that in the past 15 months have made 1.3 billion euros profit. it's about profit and loss. if they can maximise their profits by moving to southern europe they will do it. the workforce here stands ready to fight any threats to the closure of this
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plant and there are a thousand people working today plus another 7000 in the supply chain. we will not let that go away. we were hearing to michael gove this weekend saying in fact a new deal is potentially the most likely option that the government are planning for. is that the final nail in the coffin for this? no, i don't believe it is. the workforce, the committed workforce here has made sacrifices over the past two or three years and we demand a commitment from psa to produce cars here in the longer term. asi produce cars here in the longer term. as i say, we stand ready to fight tooth and nail to make sure the car production is maintained at ellesmere port. thank you, john. what could have been really good news for weeks ago for the workers hear about that new model being built here has now been tinged with this negative news that potentially the outcome of brexit may ruin that for the workers here. "cannabis will be legalised in the next 5—10 years" —
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that's the claim from a cross party group of mps who've just returned from a fact—finding trip to canada. the drug was legalised for recreational use in canada just last year. the government here says it "has no intention of changing the law" on cannabis legalisation. newsbeat‘s jim connolly went with the politicians to canada — here's his report. these buds will probably get about four times larger by the time this plant is ready to harvest. currently, canada is the only g7 country to allow recreational use of cannabis. i've got no hair, do i still need this on my head? so is it time for the uk to follow suit? even a few years ago, this would have seemed unimaginable — three mps from across the political spectrum here in canada looking at how the legalisation process has been implemented. we're following the liberal democrat sir norman lamb, the conservativejonathan djanogly and labour's david lammy. you could go to prison for a very long time in britain if you had anything like this. the trip has been organised by a london—based campaign group, volteface. it wants the uk to legalise weed.
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it's sponsored by a big north american cannabis company called mpx, which runs this facility. scott boyes is the ceo, and i put it to him that he was trying to use his money to influence british politicians. we've been happy to be a host to them, to give them some exposure to the business and give them an understanding of what's happening here in north america. if that helps make the right decisions in the united kingdom, it's money well spent for us. canada's prime minister justin trudeau came to power promising to legalise cannabis. it's been available here for medical users since 2001, but, as of last october, recreational users could use it too without fear of breaking the law, meaning places like this have been springing up all over the country. investors know there could be billions to be made from the industry, but the uk mps admit there's a lot to get their heads around. have you ever seen this volume of cannabis yourself? i never saw any volume of cannabis! so this is your first experience of it?
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so two or three of those balls are worth $60. so that's quite a valuable amount. he describes himself as an open book when it comes to legalisatioon, but norman lamb from the liberal democrats is convinced it's the best way forward. which do you tend to use? i've done this one. so convinced, in fact, he decides to buy some. thank you very much. he wants to know what it feels like, and takes some before bed. so now i'm supposed to put it under my tongue. he said it helped him sleep and he took somme more before his flight home. for one of the mps, the trip has lead to a significant change of view. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs. young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated. but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. the home office told us there will be no change to the law
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on recreational cannabis, but all three mps think there will be and that the drug will be legal within five to ten years. jim connolly, bbc news. let's speak now tojim connolly. he is in soho in london's west end for us. i'm in a cannabis lifestyle shop which basically means it sells lots of cannabis products like this cbd oil, but the difference being it doesn't have thc in it, which gets you high. but could not be about to change? that was the message we were hearing about video we just played out a minute ago because a group of mps have told me that they reckon that within five to ten years, that could be about to happen. we could see products like this with the thing that gets you high in it on sale in this country. so obviously that would be a major shift in uk policy. the trick we were on was organised by paul from volteface.
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you organised the trip. you must think as someone who backs legalisation, organised this trip, you must feel this is about to happen, isn't it? yes, ifeel like we are moving towards a regular cannabis market here in the uk. if you think about the growing evidence around the world, you can go to canada and see first—hand the changes happening, in many ways we could be much nearer to a regulated cannabis nearer than brexit. sorry to bring it up. at least with regulated cannabis you can see what it looks like. with brexit, we don't have all the answers. when we were in canada, we saw some quite strong exa m ples of in canada, we saw some quite strong examples of how their system was ultimately not working. whether you like the idea or not, legalisation, ta ke like the idea or not, legalisation, take that to one side, their system was failing in the sense that most of the products available in the shops according to users, was pretty poon shops according to users, was pretty poor. the products available was often very, very strong because it links to mental health issues we a lwa ys links to mental health issues we always talk about when we talk about
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cannabis, so why should we copy the canadian system which ultimately looks to have failed? canadian system which ultimately looks to have failed ?|j canadian system which ultimately looks to have failed? i think that's harsh. 47% of the market is in regulated industry, a hell of a lot better than the uk. millions and millions of pounds are made by drug dealers every single year. here in the uk, young people got people can access it better than alcohol and tobacco which shouldn't be the case. yes, there still a black market in canada which they need to eliminate. what we learned from going out there, and the mps echoed us, they need to look at their taxation more, make it a better product, cheaper products, to tempt those users away from the black market in two regulated ones, but this is the great thing about regulated models. you can evaluate the evidence, make changes. you touched on in there, there is a lot of money to be made out of cannabis. you guys are part funded by a north american cannabis company. are they trying to
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influence british politicians to make change so they can cash in when the change happens here? listen, i worked in drug treatment for nine years becoming into this field, and i saw first— hand years becoming into this field, and i saw first—hand how drug policies are impacting young people, and adults causing devastation, reducing peoples life chances, causing great stigma. it has that evidence which led me to the point where i thought we need to our cannabis policies and a regulated market looks like the best way to do this. that's in the industry is interest as well but that doesn't mean we have do not bring them into that because we welcome the industry to support us and we have lots of systems in place to make sure the work continues to be evidence—based and is not ideological conjecture. thanks ever so much and, simon, it feels like we are ata so much and, simon, it feels like we are at a point when you discuss cannabis policy of some kind of big change about to happen. it's going to bea change about to happen. it's going to be a big step for the uk to leap forward on the site to legalise cannabis, and the government says it's not happening, but behind—the—scenes there's definitely a softening around the edge, i would
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say. jim, thank you very much for that. and you can see the extended documentary on the bbc iplayer. it's called "legalising weed — canada's story". you're watching afternoon life on bbc news. china has made a rare intervention in the affairs of hong kong, condemning the recent anti—government protests as ‘horrendous incidents' that have caused ‘serious damage to the rule of law'. the demonstrations began over a planned extradition law but have since broadened into calls for full democracy. 0ur correspondent celia hatton sent this update from beijing. i think beijing wanted to address the ongoing turmoil in hong kong by offering its own viewpoint on what's gone wrong there and it blamed the ongoing violence on a small group, it said, of radical protesters who are being influenced by overseas forces, but it went on then to underline its trust in the hong kong authorities and its respect for the hong kong police. now this is the same police force that's been come under a lot of criticism elsewhere because of its use of force against unarmed protesters,
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so i think the underlying message it is that beijin isn't ready to step in directly. it's not going to be sending chinese troops onto the streets of hong kong. in fact, that was the one question during a press conference today that it appeared, the spokespeople tried to bat away, they didn't want to answer it. they simply told reporters to look up the relevant laws for themselves. a look at the headlines on afternoon live. on a visit to faslane naval base in scotland, borisjohnson calls for unity — and says there is scope to do a new brexit deal. as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount, one car industry boss says his company's ready to pull out of the uk if brexit affects its profits. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people — including a six—year—old boy. normally at this point our business presenterjamie robertson would be here with me in the studio, but this afternoon he's in plymouth,
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where one of the regional hubs planned by maritime uk is being set up to help boost the uk's maritime economy and prepare it for the challenges of the future. and there he is. jamie. hello, simon. yes, i'm in turn travelled north, in plymouth, the river flowing just over there. it's an interesting place. they used to build boats for the admiralty, there was a royal marine base at one point. a few years ago, it got taken over as an industrial site, a maritime industrial site for commercial sites, so companies like the french defence manufacturer making submersibles there, remote submersibles, autonomous submersibles, autonomous submersibles, princess yachts over there, one of the biggest yacht manufacturers in the world and small entrepreneurs so this is the kind of
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environment that the coastal powerhouse wants to encourage. interestingly enough, there's a shortage of this kind of land around because most of it, over there, in the distance, most of it is residential. you have a plot of land on the coast, what happens to it? people want to build houses on it and live there. there is a shortage, not much of this land which can be used commercially. that's another thing the coastal powerhouse is going to address. i'm joined by tim morris from the uk major ports group. how do you think the coastal powerhouses will address problems like shortage of land on the coast for commercial development and also some of the lacklustre investment we've seen recently? one of the absolute key things about the coastal powerhouse packages and development rules. what we want to see is a much a much closer, much firmer relationship between the port
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and the local strategic spatial planning approaches put in place by local councils and local authorities to really recognise ports as an important economic drive that they are. notjust for the important economic drive that they are. notjust forthe nation important economic drive that they are. notjust for the nation as global gateways for trade but also in terms ofjobs, prosperity and prosperity for local people. what you think will happen in the future because plymouth is trying hard to get investment here and has a huge amount of people coming here. plymouth is a great example of where things can work well for them if you look around you can see a site which has been put into substantial economic use, employing good people, good businesses big and small here, so good businesses big and small here, so this is a great example of what can happen. what we want to see is more of this, more consistently applied throughout the uk. we are a coastal nation with opportunities to do this sort of thing all around the uk. people are talking about free ports. is that just uk. people are talking about free ports. is thatjust complicating the matter or can it blend into this idea of a coastal powerhouse? free
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ports are potentially transformational opportunities, but where there are the right characteristics for that particular opportunity. you need land, potential for manufacturing and business and strong local support. where those are in place they can be transformational but are not a silver bullet, not appropriate for all sites, so what we need to see freeport as one club in a whole bag of different clubs. not necessarily ina of different clubs. not necessarily in a coastal powerhouse perhaps, some are different. the two things don't seem to be quite the same. free ports could be an important pa rt of free ports could be an important part of the coastal power element, but not the only part because there isa but not the only part because there is a range of planning and development changes you can look at to drive opportunity and investment and jobs. let's talk about what's been happening here. ryan is the manager of the site. what do you think something like a coastal powerhouse could do to a place like this? well, as you can see here, we have developed this site five years ago, lots of investment and major
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transformation. we have now a state—of—the—art shoreside facilities, lifting facilities, laboratories, offices, workshops, companies have come in, princess, boudreau, although the way down to small local companies and they support each other. does it work? when you say support each other, are you trying to get a particular mix of companies? i think it's important to get a mix of companies. we got the bigger companies, and the smaller companies like engineers, who can fix the vessels, but don't necessarily have to be major engineering firms. we've got a good mix, from local companies at international companies, global companies all on one site. we saw over there, a local lad. lewis, you started your own business here, didn't you, elite marine services. what do you think doctor i beg your pardon, getting my words mixed up. a
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coastal powerhouse, how does a coastal powerhouse, how does a coastal powerhouse, how does a coastal powerhouse really affect you, do you think? it's marine networking, i guess. you, do you think? it's marine networking, iguess. i've you, do you think? it's marine networking, i guess. i've been doing leisure craft and things like that but also commercial craft. any sort of major refits. any sort of networking in the marine trade is beneficial and it goes around. one big network basically. what about big network basically. what about big companies around here, how do they affect you? they don't, as such. they are very self—sufficient. they do have smaller boats that maybe we can help out with and things like that the future. what about in terms of competition? there are other business is of course around here but we just have a different approach, really, a more modern proactive approach we like to think. what kinds of things do you do differently? we offer a breakdown service on the sea so we have a rig which can recover somebody much like
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the rac or something like that. we get a follow—up work from that and it'sjust been get a follow—up work from that and it's just been a get a follow—up work from that and it'sjust been a bit of a different approach. thanks very much, lewis. that's the kind of environment we have got down here, a lot of different types of companies or looking for more business which is what, it is hoped, these coastal powerhouses want to do, attract more business, so businesses like lewis's and hopefully they'll have more customers and more profits and more business. jamie, fascinating stuff. thank you very much. talk to you later on. time now for a look at the weather. simon, thank you very much. i'm not going on with the weather over the last week. we had the intense heat, some of us had some flooding over the weekend. quite a lot going on over the next few days as well. sunshine for some of the moment but
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for others this picture taken from most to plymouth where jamie was a moment ago. cloudy skies overhead and it's because of this you can see this pinwheel of cloud on the satellite picture. this is an area of low pressure and this will be driving our weather throughout this week. moving quite slowly north eastwards over the next few days and in the centre particularly we will have some really heavy downpours and quite strong and gusty wind as well. there is a potentialfor localised travel disruption and perhaps even a little bit of flooding from his hit and miss heavy downpours. the rest of this afternoon, many places, hazy sunshine. a few thunderstorms across north—west scotland and then an area of low pressure starting to show its hand across the south—west into south west wales. a bit of rain here and increasingly strong winds and those are the temperatures at the end of the afternoon. tonight, we continue to track our area of low pressure. the wind swirling in like a water down the plug hole, that's what you have a centre of the low
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pushing its way and had a mid range of the north as well. many places in dry weather through the night but quite a warm night particular towards the south. 11—17. tomorrow, no pressure, swirling, drifting north eastwards. further north, a decent amount of dry weather and some spells of sunshine. southern scotland, northern ireland, england and wales, we will see some of these heavy, thundery hit and miss downpours which could dump a lot of rain ina downpours which could dump a lot of rain in a short space of time including across north—west england where we saw flooding through the weekend and gusty winds to go with it. 40-50 weekend and gusty winds to go with it. 40—50 miles an hour close to the english channel coast, unusual for this time of year. temperatures, perhaps 2a in hull. wednesday, you can see the low pressure still here focusing showers across parts of eastern and northern england and up into scotland, with heavy, thundery downpours. a lot of rain in a short
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space of time. further south and west, things drying out a little by the state and then towards the end of the week, plenty of downpours on thursday, particularly in the east, tending to clearfor thursday, particularly in the east, tending to clear for most by friday. and it will be a slightly and it will drier start to the weekend.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm... borisjohnson visits the faslane naval base in scotland — and calls for a strengthening of the uk's ties ahead of a meeting with scottish tory leader ruth davidson. these are tangible benefits from the union, but i don't think that we have done enough to talk up. so ruth andi have done enough to talk up. so ruth and i are absolutely at one in wanting to do that. a warning from vauxhall that it could move all its production from ellesemere port — if brexit hits its profits. they're shooting! panic at a food festival in california, as a gunman opens fire, killing three, including a child. gavin is here with all the sport. yes, we will hear from liverpool
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bossjurgen klopp who says this week on's traditional season's open of the community show should be thought of as the community show should be thought ofasa the community show should be thought of as a final. more on that later. thanks, and ben rich has the weather. we said farewell to our exceptional heat with some flooding rain in places over the weekend, we will be seeing some pictures of that and also answering the question, where did that heat go? it actually went quite a long way northwards, asi as i will show you just before half past. thanks, ben. also coming up — trapped up to his neck in water for several hours — the man who got stuck in rocks — and had to be rescued. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. boris johnson is in scotland this afternoon — on his first visit there as prime
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minister. he‘s after unity — with a call to ‘renew the ties that bind the uk‘. but he faces a tough audience — later this afternoon he meets first minister nicola sturgeon — she has pointed out already that scotland voted remain, didn‘t vote for a conservative government, and is against a no—deal brexit — she‘s said to be ramping up preparations for another independence referendum. before meeting the first minister mr johnson is seeing ruth davidson — leader of the scottish conservatives. things won‘t be much easier there — she didn‘t vote for him in the leadership contest and she too is opposed to leaving the eu without a deal. let‘s cross to our political correspondent nick eardley in edinburgh. so yes, he has a tough afternoon. he does indeed. this is nicola sturgeon‘s official residence in edinburgh. we are expecting boris johnson here in about an hour‘s time. i think you would expect those talks to be tough, a conservative prime minister talking to a first minister from prime minister talking to a first ministerfrom the prime minister talking to a first minister from the snp prime minister talking to a first ministerfrom the snp is or was going to be a tough challenge, they will never see eye to eye on brexit andi will never see eye to eye on brexit and i suspect there will be some harsh words exchanged there. what is
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more interesting is that he will probably have just as tough a time when he meets the scottish tory leader, ruth davidson, round about now. she is somebody who disagrees with his brexit strategy, who thinks that no deal would be a disaster. yes, once they get another deal with the european union, but he will make it clear we are told in that meeting with him this afternoon that under no circumstances is she prepared to accept a no—deal brexit, if that‘s what boris johnson decides accept a no—deal brexit, if that‘s what borisjohnson decides to go for. now, he‘s been in scotland for a few hours now, we heard from him a little earlier and he was asked specifically about whether the relationship with ruth davidson had broken down completely. lama i am a number one fan of ruth davidson and what she has done for scottish conservatives. that is she who is taking the fight to the scottish nationalists, those who would destroy the union. she's been fa nta stically would destroy the union. she's been fantastically successful and i admire her brand of conservatism very much. and indeed, she and i share a huge range of political
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beliefs, and our core philosophy is the same. i also think that right to think that we should be going for a deal, not no deal. that's where we should be trying to end up, but it is the responsibility of the government, of a government of the united kingdom, to make sure that we are prepared for every eventuality, and if our partners won't move, and they won't take out the backstop, they won't take out the backstop, they won't take out the backstop, they won't even begin to change that withdrawal agreement, they won't compromise at all, then of course we've got to get ready for no deal. but could you possibly put strains in your party, north and south of the border, even split your party if she says she cannot stomach a no deal settlement? don't forget that ruth herself, and i repeat my admiration for her, has said she doesn't want to see any such outcome, she has seen it repeatedly, and she is dead right. we stand together, we stand for things that are so together, we stand for things that are so important for our country,
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the value of the union and the united kingdom. look at where we are, you know the figures, £1.7 billion of investment flowing directly from scotland's membership of the uk into defence alone. the second biggest employer in scotland is the mod. these are tangible benefits from the union that i don't think we've done enough to talk up. so in public anyway, borisjohnson very much praising ruth davidson. i expect it will be a more difficult conversation when they meet this afternoon, for a couple of reasons, not just brexit and afternoon, for a couple of reasons, notjust brexit and the prospect of leaving without a deal, she is also furious that the former scottish secretary david mundell was sacked in that cabinet carl last week. borisjohnson is in that cabinet carl last week. boris johnson is here in that cabinet carl last week. borisjohnson is here talking about the strength of the union, adding some money into the pot for regional
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projects and saying we can use brexit to strengthen the uk. but as is often the case with these things, it is easier said than done. earlier, i spoke to the snp mp pete wishart and i asked him about the response in scotland to mrjohnson‘s brexit plans scotland doesn‘t take to this blustering buffoon act, itjars again scottish experience, we have a real difficulty that, we have a real difficulty with that, but the thing that will cause boris most difficulties today is more or less projected by the scottish conservatives. they know how disastrous a no deal is. ruth davidson is singularly refusing to sign his do or die no—deal brexit pledge. i think he is going to have a really, really tough afternoon today, and i really can‘t see how he will make much progress at all in scotland. but he will make the point that on 31st of october, we are leaving, because that is the legal default. yes, we will do all we can to stop him.
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you heard ian blackford on your programme today really working across party to try and ensure that we have the legislative mechanism in place, this is all shaping up to be the mother of all parliamentary battles, we will play our part as the third party, to do everything possible to stop him, and stop him we must. he is in scotland today, if this goes ahead, 100,000 jobs will be lost, the impact of 2300 on every single person in scotland. we did not vote for this, we want nothing whatsoever to do with it. hardly any mps were for this and were against triggering article 50, but yet we are subjected to this. you mention scottish independence, the prospect of boris becoming prime minister was enough to take independence to 53% in the polls. i think we will see a number of opinion polls that show if anything positive could come out of this, it could be a great recruiting place for scottish independence. is there an acceptance perhaps more
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generally now that as part of the united kingdom, we are where we are, and we‘ve just got to make the best of this? no, because we‘ve got options in scotland. we didn‘t want anything to do with this, we voted overwhelmingly against it. we, thank goodness, have the lifeboat of scottish independence, which will secure a place in the european union, to be sure we are not going to go down with the good ship boris and britannia, and the disaster of brexit. we are looking at these options and more importantly the people of scotland are properly having a real assessment of what is available to them. they are making up their mind, do we seriously want to go down with this buffoon‘s brexit, or do we want to make sure we can have our own relationship with europe and do what is in the best interest of our country? meanwhile, there‘ve been warnings today from business leaders at the cbi that neither the uk nor the eu are prepared for no—deal and it‘s today published practical
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steps that firms can take. the uncertainty surrounding brexit prompted the french owner of vauxhall to say it could move all car production from its ellesmere port factory in cheshire — if it becomes unprofitable. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. vauxhall‘s plant in ellesmere port employs 1,000 people and faces an uncertain future. last month, parent company psa said it wanted to build a new version of its astra model, but only on condition a suitable brexit deal was reached. now it‘s post says if there is no deal, there will be no new production line. the chief executive said in a newspaper interview, but the man charged with preparing for no—deal seemed to take that right in his stride. we are doing everything we can to make sure we can leave the european union on october the 31st, there won‘t be any delays, we are determined to ensure we leave on october the 31st,
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and it is myjob to make sure the country is ready. no—deal would bring major changes to the way we do business across the channel, affecting everything from lorry traffic to financial services. exports would be subject to tariffs overnight, border controls would be tightened up, and a swathe of industries, which currently rely on eu rules and standards, could be left in legal limbo, unless emergency measures are put in place. yet the confederation of british industry says neither the uk nor the eu is ready for a no—deal scenario and much more needs to be done. we absolutely do think a deal is essential, for all the preparation we do, it is like putting up sandbags to prevent floodwaters, we will probably still lose the kitchen but we might save the bedroom. every effort, just as we put effort into preparation, every effort needs to go into getting a deal, and that means flexibility from both sides, because neither side is ready. the cbi says that although many big businesses have well thought through contingency plans, a number of smaller companies
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do not, and it says much of the official advice firms are being given is outdated. yet the government insists it will be ready, and points out that some car—makers have been happy to announce new investments. in recent weeks, we have seen amazon, ntt, the big japanese tech firm, and indeed jaguar land rover announce fresh investment into the uk, so it is not all one way, or all the risks are downward, there are opportunities here, and we need to be ready to mitigate the risk. the government still insists it would prefer to leave the eu with a deal but has to operate on the assumption that won‘t happen, and that means companies have little choice but to prepare for a deeply uncertain future. theo leggett, bbc news. let‘s return now to that shooting at a garlic festival in california — three people were killed, including a six—year—old boy —
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and 15 others wounded. the gunman was shot dead by armed officers, although police are investigating reports that a second suspect may still be at large. the shooting happened in gilroy, around 80 miles south of san francisco. from there, dave lee sent this report. 0h, bleep! what‘s going on?! the gunfire began at 5:41pm on sunday evening, as families were starting to head home. they‘re shooting! as the shots rang out, there was at first confusion and then panic, and eventually disbelief. who‘d shoot up a garlic festival? a food festival — one that obsessively celebrates the garlic grown here — has become the scene of the 246th mass shooting in america this year. as soon as the gunfire started, everybody scattered, and they were yelling for their kids. it sounded like 30 rounds to me, and then we heard a little lapse in time, and then another 30 rounds. it sounded like automatic fire. we just heard a pop — pop, pop, pop — and we just went behind some tents and took cover,
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and we knew right away when we saw a lot of people just running away from there. police said they took less than a minute to shoot dead the man once he opened fire, but even with that rapid response, the gunman was able to cause carnage — a six—year—old boy among the dead. the suspect was shot and killed. we have some witnesses reporting that there may have been a second suspect, but we don‘t know if that suspect was engaged in any shooting, or whether they may have been in some sort of a support role for the person that we have accounted for. witnesses described the man as being white and in his 30s, though this has not yet been confirmed. around 80,000 people descend on this small city for this festival every year, but now it will become known as yet another instance of everyday american life that‘s been torn apart by gun violence. dave lee, bbc news,
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in gilroy, california. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. on a visit to faslane naval base in scotland, boris johnson calls for unity and says there is scope to do a new brexit deal. as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount, one car industry boss says his company‘s ready to pull out of the uk if brexit affects its profits. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people — including a six—year—old boy. and in sport, liverpool manager jurgen klopp claims the season‘s traditional opener, the community shield, is a final worth winning. liverpool play manchester city in the match on sunday. bolton and bury could find their opening league 1 fixtures to spend this weekend. the football league says concerns remain over their ongoing financial problems, and the murray brothers are teeing up for the first time since the 2016 rio will in washington in washington. they have
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been training ahead of their match tomorrow. more on those stories later. firefighters have rescued a man whose foot became trapped in rocks on the north norfolk coast. he‘d fallen while trying to help his child on the beach at sheringham yesterday evening. the man was stuck in the sea for nearly four hours, and at one point, was submerged up to his neck. 0ur correspondent robby west sent this update from sheringham. it was very dramatic, and this is where the man was trapped. he was walking up these steps off the beach with his family when a wave came in from the left. he stepped in front of his children to protect them and he was knocked back onto these big slabs of granite. first on the scene was the local lifeguard and he told me what he saw when he arrived the scene. the patient had his foot wedged down in between the rock and this structure here. when i arrived on scene, he was getting hammered by pretty severe tidal waves. and so i basically came in with a rescue tube to wedge it
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between him and the rock and then sheltered him with my body when waves were impacting. well, firefighters eventually freed him from the rocks using brute force but he was in the water for over three hours. police say today that his injuries are not thought to be serious and just before we came on air i spoke to members of his family who wanted to thank all of the emergency services for saving his life. a former engineer at the us aerospace company, boeing, has told bbc news that work on the production line of the 737 max passengerjet was not adequately funded. the entire fleet has been grounded worldwide since march because of two fatal crashes. boeing denies the claims by its ex—employee, and says it‘s committed to making the 737 max one of the safest aircraft ever to fly. richard bilton reports. the 737 max has been a commercial triumph for boeing. 5,000 have been ordered.
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but two of the aircraft crashed, after being forced down by the plane‘s computer software. 346 people were killed. adam dickson ran a team of engineers who worked on the max. he says they were under constant pressure to keep costs down and the production line was under resourced. certainly, what i saw was a lack of sufficient resources to do thejob in its entirety. the culture was very cost—centred, incredibly pressurised. engineers were given targets to get a certain amount of cost out of the aeroplane. there were no such cost concerns in the boardroom. the chief executive, dennis muilenburg, has been paid more than $70 million. boeing has also paid $17 billion in dividends to shareholders and has spent a further $113 billion buying its own shares — a spending spree that has helped boeing treble its share price in just five years.
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critics say boeing‘s executives have been too focused on making money. if you supercharge the incentives of top executives and tell them that theirjob is to get the stock price up, they‘re not going to pay the kind of attention they need to pay to ensuring they produce a safe plane. boeing says it balances investment with returns to shareholders. it denies that corners were cut on the max and says it‘s always held true to values of safety, quality and integrity. richard bilton, bbc news. and you can see more on this story on tonight‘s panorama — "boeing‘s killer planes" — which is on bbc one at 8.30pm. it‘ll be available shortly after on the iplayer. downing street has dropped an investigation into the mp mark field. the former foreign office minster grabbed a greenpeace
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activist who had made her way in to a reception at mansion house injune, where the former chancellor philip hammond was giving a speech. a downing street spokesman said the incident was a matter for the previous prime minister. mark field has apologised for his behaviour. from camp‘s bay beach to table mountain — the city of cape town in south africa is well—known as a popular tourist destination for millions of people every year. but it‘s also one of the world‘s most divided and dangerous cities. on average, eight people have been murdered there every day in the first six months of this year. the bbc‘s voldi carolso and cameraman christian parkinson spent a weekend with the police, and spoke to some of the bereaved families. first on the scene — the metropolitan police‘s law enforcement officers are out on patrol in a dangerous part of cape town. jerry grew up on these streets.
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it‘s a never—ending story — "you killed my dad, i will kill yours, you killed my brother, i will kill yours." i call it a curse because everyone is willing to pick up a knife or gun to avenge someone else‘s death. often the guns are turned against police. six members of the anti—gang unit were shot and injured last month. over the weekend we were filming, three more were shot. one of them died. we got a glimpse of the danger they face every day. is that sort of weapon something you‘d normally find? no, we normally find handguns but that's a big weapon. i was quite shocked. this is my thinking, if i get one gun off the streets,
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i‘m saving hundreds of lives. 0ne gun, that‘s how many hijackings, how many murders? but policing can‘t fix the social and economic inequality in these areas. this area is home to over 20,000 people. sprawling townships like these are a legacy of apartheid. a month ago, five men were shot, execution style, in this shack. 15—year—old mohammed peterson was one of the victims. his little sister and brother watched as he died. the violence has gotten more and more daily now. the children are not safe in that place, truly, they are not even safe in the park and that's supposed to be... if you're not even safe
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in your own house, how can you be safe outside? to make these streets a little safer, the army has been called in. the army is meant to reinforce the police, who are thin on the ground. with more than 1,000 soldiers on the streets of some of the trouble hotspots, theirs is a temporary deployment, a stopgap measure to help halt the killings. mohammed‘s mother hopes she won‘t have to bury another son. after the murder of the family had to leave and now they are hoping for a fresh start. i know violence is everywhere, but i already lost one son and i don't want to lose another. on this day 70 years ago, the bbc revived the tv weather report, something it had originally introduced at the start of the second world war. the way we get the latest predictions has changed dramatically over the years,
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as our presenter matt taylor has been finding out. it‘s going to be a dull and wet start to the day... the way we consume the weather forecast has changed immensely. from simple hand drawn charts and magnetic symbols... there's some... oh, dear! let's do it again. there's the heavy and persistent rain... ..to 3d graphics and sophisticated mobile phone apps. we now have more weather information at our fingertips than ever before, but how exactly does that information get there? it all begins at a weather station like this. the radcliffe observatory has been recording data for over two centuries, making it one of the oldest and longest running in the world. we‘ve been taking temperature observations here on a daily basis since 1814, and then we‘ve got daily rainfall observations, as well, from the 1820s. so, everything that‘s used here to measure the temperature and the rainfall has been issued by the met office, so it‘s all standard kit. and so what‘s measured here will be measured likewise in other parts, notjust in the uk but right around the world ? absolutely.
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but with the atmosphere stretching kilometres above us, we also need weather balloons, radar and satellite data. and all that information gets fed into weather organisations, such as the european centre for medium—range weather forecasting here in reading, where supercomputers like these ones, doing trillions of calculations every single second, churn all that weather observational data and create the forecast. this is planning for food, for transport, for health, for energy, for anything that's part of society, that's making society. agriculture needs to know when to borrow, buy, rent equipment. they need to know what crops to use when. that up—to—date, personalised information is crucialfor all of us. since the bbc weather app launched in 2013, it‘s been downloaded 15 times a minute, with up to eight million people using it every single week, and it continues to innovate and evolve. well, the technology and the amount
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of information available may have changed greatly in the last 70 years, but for me personally, you can‘t beat getting in front of the camera and communicating the forecast and its uncertainties verbally. now, if you don‘t mind, i have a job to do! see you soon! that was matt taylor. now ben rich is doing the weather for us here this afternoon. who was your great influence? there was a couple, really, the quirky once i enjoyed, ian mccaskill, remember him, and then later a guy called daniel corbett who presented it here. for now. that's exactly right, that's the weather, for now. he is in new zealand now. the quirky ones i a lwa ys zealand now. the quirky ones i always looked up to. we do miss them. yeah, i know! i do try to live up them. yeah, i know! i do try to live up to them every day. they never brought their holiday snaps...
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anyway... brought their holiday snaps... anyway. . . these brought their holiday snaps... anyway... these aren't mine, but it would not have been a bad place to be on holiday. really? it looks awful. well, the weather looks nice, where do you think this was? shetland. we are getting to shetland ina minute, shetland. we are getting to shetland in a minute, you‘re spoilt that bit. this is not shetland. i‘m not sure this is what the beaches of shetland look like a very beautiful, but this was actually from 0slo over the weekend. oh, really? the heat that you and i had last week that we know all too well about has shifted over the weekend, we had a lot of rain, and the heat, the deep orange colours has been shifting its way northwards towards scandinavia and... shetland. shetland, yes, but that‘s coming, i‘ll tell you when it‘s about to arrive. in northern norway, they had a temperature of 35 degrees on saturday, very close to the all—time record for norway. degrees on saturday, very close to
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the all-time record for norway. is that in the arctic? i think that particular place is not quite, there is another place just further north that had about 34.5, which may be certainly one of the highest temperatures recorded in the arctic circle, but this is not far south of there. helsinki, 33 and a bit, just edged its city record for an all time temperature over the weekend as well. that‘s where the heat went. now. has something been happening in shetland? i am just now. has something been happening in shetland? i amjust going now. has something been happening in shetland? i am just going to spin the globe, shetland is a long way north, about as far north as southern norway and it has been very hot here. look at this yesterday, a beautiful picture. that's the sort of place you go. that is where you will be going. there is a whip round going on now, yes. and it is probably not going to be as warm as this if you do go that way, because
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23.4 degrees at baltasound yesterday, that was the warmest day they have had in 20 years, since august 1999. doesn‘t sound like much for those who live in the south of the uk, but that far north, a temperature like that is pretty unusual. you had better tell us what‘s in store. unusual. you had better tell us what's in store. i have some pictures to show you first of all of the other side of the coin of the weekend weather. as we mentioned earlier in the programme. manchester and the north—west had a lot of flooding, this band of wet weather really set in place throughout, and we saw some travel disruption, some significant flooding. i will show you some of rainfall statistics, the average monthly rainfall, about 70 or 80 millimetres at this time of year, rochdale got 117 millimetres through the weekend, and this week they could be some more scenes like that because there are some more heavy downpours on the way. you better give us some more. heavy downpours on the way. you better give us some morelj heavy downpours on the way. you better give us some more. i well, the details for the next few days, quite a lot going on, you might be hoping for a quieter spell after all the weather we‘ve had recently, the heat and the rain ijust showed you, but actually think starting to go
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downhill again down to the south—west. you can see the cloud on our weather watcher picture from devon, this swell, pinwheel of cloud on our recent satellite picture. what we have right in the middle is an area of low pressure, and as that d rifts an area of low pressure, and as that drifts its way north—eastwards as we head through the next few days, the centre that they will act as a focus for some hit and miss heavy thundery downpours, could be enough rain to cause some localised disruption and with that some unusually strong and gusty winds as well. a pretty u nsettled gusty winds as well. a pretty unsettled week, to say the least. this is how things pan out over the next few hours as we head through the afternoon, one or two thunderstorms in western scotland, this is our area of low pressure approaching the far south—west, a little bit of rain thrown ahead a bit, and temperatures as we end the day, 18 in belfast, 23 in hull at 6pm. deep into the evening, we can see where the wind arrows swell inwards a bit like the water down a plug hole, that is where the centre of the low will be commute you will be able to follow that as we go through the forecast, franks and wet
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weather into the south—west of the uk, particularly through the night, quite warm and muggy out there, and then into tomorrow. further north you are, yes, some showers, areas of cloud but some sunny spells as well but our area of low pressure, the centre of it about here by this stage tomorrow will be driving some heavy, thundery downpours. across the south—west into wales, the midlands, northern england, including north west england where of course we could do without some more heavy rain, some into southern scotland, some really heavy thundery downpours and brisk winds, gusts of 50 mph potentially for english channel coasts. not too great if you have plans to get out and about, and those temperatures 21 to 24 degrees for many. the area of low pressure on wednesday, you can see it, the wind arrows swelling about here, so that shifts the shower is a bit further east, east anglia, into northern england, into scotland, heavy, thundery downpours, further south and west, something a little dry are starting to show its hand, temperatures around the low 20
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celsius. showers move eastwards, by thursday, by friday most of them will be gone, they will be one or two showers but the emphasis is on dry weather and that is the story as we head into the start of the weekend. a lot of fine weather and some spells of sunshine but nothing like the heat we had during last week. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. borisjohnson has visited the faslane naval base in scotland.
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he‘s calling for a renewal of what he calls "the ties that bind our united kingdom". as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount, the chief executive of vauxhall says his company‘s ready to pull out of the uk if brexit hits its profits. a gunman has opened fire at a food festival in california, killing three people, including a six—year—old boy. in a rare intervention, china has condemned the recent anti—government protests in hong kong as "horrendous". a man who became trapped in rocks for several hours after saving his child from the incoming tide has been rescued on the norfolk coast. sport now on afternoon live with gavin. good afternoon, gavin. there‘s been so much sport going on this summer but the build—up has started today to the beginning of the football season? that‘s right, it‘s flown by. less than two weeks until the start of the season. less than two weeks till the start of the season. liverpool, who came to within a point of last season‘s
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winners manchester city — get the season under way, a week on friday. they‘ve not been enjoying the best preseason so far. lost three of their last four friendlies. but they have the chance to get one over, on city, this weekend in community shield. jurgen klopp has dismissed talk that the clash with manchester city is a curtain raiser and has described it as a final. liverpool lost again in preseason yesterday. this time a 3—0 defeat against napoli in edinburgh. it follows defeats against borussia dortmund and sevilla in the united states. nothing to do for me with the rest of the season. it‘s a game. even if we have eight players available for example, i would like to try to win it. it's example, i would like to try to win it. it‘s a final. the first time i realised nobody sees it like that, to be honest. a curtain raiser, unbelievable. we think constantly about the game and how to prepare. first time liverpool have been involved in this match since 2006. but klopp also said the result has no bearing, on what happens with the rest of the season.
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a couple of weeks ago a before a ball is kicked but some clubs are already in financial difficulty? yes, simon. there are still doubts over whether two clubs in league one will be able to fulfill their opening day fixtures this weekend. bolton and bury have been told they are "likely" to be suspended if they do not meet a new efl deadline to meet outstanding commitments. bolton have been in administration since the middle of may, with a proposed takeover of the club still not completed. bolton are supposed to start the season at wycombe on saturday, but wycombe have already confirmed they have suspended ticket sales to wanderers fans. both clubs have until 5pm today to prove they can meet their obligations. manchester united‘s pre—season plans aren‘t settled yet. romelu lukaku has been left out of their squad that has travelled to norway this morning. the belgian striker has been heavily linked with a move to inter milan throughout the summer and posted
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a picture with his agent on social media yesterday with the message: "soon to be continued." and that united squad that has travelled will face kristiansund tomorrow night. paul pogba, another player linked with a move away has travelled. and just one other football line for you — former manchester united defender patrice evra has announced his retirement from the game. the 38—year—old former french international won 10 major trophies with the club including five premier league titles, and a champions league. tennis now. andy and jamie murray have been training together ahead of their doubles partnership at the washington open this week. the brothers will face edouard roger—vasselin and nicolas mahut in their opening round match tomorrow. the pair played together to help great britain win the davis cup in 2015. the tournament will be andy murray‘s fourth since having hip resurfacing surgery injanuary and his first on a hard court. he won the queens doubles title with feliciano lopez injune. egan bernal is celebrating becoming
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the youngest rider in more than a century to win the tour de france. the 22—year—old finished hand—in—hand with his team—mate and last year‘s winner geraint thomas, who finished second overall. team ineos general maanger sir dave brailsford was understandably pretty happy afterwards on the champs elysee. tour de france, what more could you want? we‘ve got a new champion, a new ambassador. what a brilliant ambassador. at the moment i think you need to enjoy the moment, have a party, celebrate, and then try and realise what he has achieved. i think of something historic for colombia. very, very important, i think, and i‘m very, very happy to help him achieve his goal. there were also some pretty impressive scenes in colombia. this was in zipaquira, hometown of bernal, now the first south american to win the world‘s most famous bike race. located on the outskirts of bogota, the streets packed with people dressed in yellow and waving
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colombian flags. and finally — some fun to finish on from the south of spain. one of the most bizarre events you‘ll see. the greasy pole game locally known as ‘cucana‘. competitors have to try and run up a six—metre long slippery pole in order to try and claim flags for money. if you fail you fall into the sea below. a few got close, but no one managed it this year. perhaps because organisers decided to make the pole longer. the game in roquetas de mar is part of the santa ana festival. look how close he gets there. so near yet so far. that‘s all the sport for now. simon, i think you should enter that next year. i think you should get out more! yes, greasy polls. let‘s
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talk politics. the cabinet committee that will focus on preparing for a no—deal brexit is having its first meeting in the cabinet offices in whitehall this afternoon. during a visit to scotland, borisjohnson said the existing withdrawal agreement negotiated with european leaders was "dead" and had go. let‘s talk to our political correspondentjessica parker who‘s at westminster for us. who was on the committee and what will they be doing? it's chaired by michael gove this afternoon. it is supposed to be chaired by the prime minister, this particular one, but he is in scotland and it‘s all in the name of preparing for a potential no—deal brexit. preparing for that 0ctober potential no—deal brexit. preparing for that october the 31st deadline. there are various committees being set up that will meet some of them daily, some of them biweekly, and i think what‘s going on is the government, yes, they are trying to prepare, but also sending a message that the uk will be ready to leave on the 31st of october and that appears to be part of the strategy
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of borisjohnson appears to be part of the strategy of boris johnson and appears to be part of the strategy of borisjohnson and his government to make the eu take them seriously when they say that the uk is prepared to leave on the 31st 0ctober deal or no deal, although, interestingly, gove has said the government are working on the assumption that we could end up with assumption that we could end up with ano assumption that we could end up with a no deal on the 31st of october. that was put to boris johnson a no deal on the 31st of october. that was put to borisjohnson in scotla nd that was put to borisjohnson in scotland this afternoon and decent no, we are working on the assumption we will get a deal, so there seems to bea we will get a deal, so there seems to be a change of emphasis sometimes, but the overall message seems to be prepared to leave without a deal but we want to get one if we can. we remember those pictures of the mp mark field at the mansion house dinner, hustling a woman out and there was an enquiry launched. now it has been dropped, is that right? correct, mark field was seen is that right? correct, mark field was seen back injune on video footage leading a greenpeace activist out of this dinner at mansion house and there was
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subsequently calls for an investigation. he referred himself to the cabinet office and the party and we learned the cabinet office enquiry has been dropped. the reason for that, the government are saying is because all of this happened under theresa may‘s government and mark field is no longer a foreign office minister following that reshuffle. the labour party are not impressed today saying this is actually a test on borisjohnson‘s attitude towards women. it was a controversial piece of footage at the time and ijust heard from mark field who says he is usually relieved that the cabinet office enquiry has been dropped and it‘s worth mentioning he also referred himself to the conservative party and we are trying to find out if an enquiry is going on there, but city of london police today also confirming that no further action will be taken by them. jessica parker, thank you very much. "cannabis will be legalised in the next 5—10 years" — that‘s the claim from a cross party group of mps who‘ve just returned from a fact—finding trip to canada.
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the drug was legalised for recreational use in canada just last year. the government here says it "has no intention of changing the law" on cannabis legalisation. newsbeat‘s jim connolly went with the politicians to canada — here‘s his report. these buds will probably get about four times larger by the time this plant is ready to harvest. currently, canada is the only g7 country to allow recreational use of cannabis. i've got no hair, do i still need this on my head? so is it time for the uk to follow suit? even a few years ago, this would have seemed unimaginable — three mps from across the political spectrum here in canada looking at how the legalisation process has been implemented. we‘re following the liberal democrat sir norman lamb, the conservativejonathan djanogly and labour‘s david lammy. you could go to prison for a very long time in britain if you had anything like this. the trip has been organised by a london—based campaign group, volteface. it wants the uk to legalise weed. it‘s sponsored by a big north american cannabis company called mpx,
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which runs this facility. scott boyes is the ceo, and i put it to him that he was trying to use his money to influence british politicians. we've been happy to be a host to them, to give them some exposure to the business and give them an understanding of what's happening here in north america. if that helps make the right decisions in the united kingdom, it's money well spent for us. canada‘s prime minister justin trudeau came to power promising to legalise cannabis. it‘s been available here for medical users since 2001, but, as of last october, recreational users could use it too without fear of breaking the law, meaning places like this have been springing up all over the country. investors know there could be billions to be made from the industry, but the uk mps admit there‘s a lot to get their heads around. have you ever seen this volume of cannabis yourself? i never saw any volume of cannabis! so this is your first experience of it? so two or three of those balls are worth $60.
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so that's quite a valuable amount. he describes himself as an open book when it comes to legalisatioon, but norman lamb from the liberal democrats is convinced it‘s the best way forward. which do you tend to use? i‘ve done this one. so convinced, in fact, he decides to buy some. thank you very much. he wants to know what it feels like, and takes some before bed. so now i'm supposed to put it under my tongue. he said it helped him sleep and he took somme more before his flight home. for one of the mps, the trip has lead to a significant change of view. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs. young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated. but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. the home office told us there will be no change to the law on recreational cannabis, but all three mps think there will be and that the drug
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will be legal within five to ten years. jim connolly, bbc news. let‘s speak to jim now. yes, this is a cannabis lifestyle shop, that‘s what the owner has told me to say. it‘s basically a shop which sells products like this, a cbd oil, and you may have seen these things on high streets up and down the country. the difference between these products on the products we saw on sale in shops which look like this in canada, this contains no thc, which is the compound in cannabis which gets you high. if you believe those mps, that might be about to change. you might be seeing about to change. you might be seeing a big shift and we may see shops like this are selling products like this, but with thc in them. someone who doesn‘t want to see that happen is adrian, from the centre for socialjustice. i think tank which is written a report recently saying it‘s not time to do what these mps
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say is inevitable. who was right and who was wrong and is it inevitable? is there more to be discussed? there is more to be discussed and firstly we need to look at whether or not the question of whether it inevitable is even relevant. we need to know whether there is social harm involved here. what‘s the best thing for the community? the science is not clear on the repercussions of long—term use and that‘s what we should be concentrating on, rather than looking on whether there is a timeline for legalisation. across the world, though, there has been a move from medical cannabis, where it is legalised, recreational use following a few years down the line, we‘ve just seen last summer the case where it became legalised for medical use. isn‘t itjust inevitable than that we are going to creep towards something else? is that not what you want to see happen? that's a question i'm delighted to be able to answer
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because that may well be the commercial strategy, to start with a medicinal cannabis and move on. the home secretary did the right thing because it was worried about the welfare of people who need this particular therapeutic treatment. that‘s an entirely separate consideration. look at recreational cannabis, the elements involved in that conversation are different and it‘s important we draw a line between the two and have a grown—up conversation about whether recreational cannabis is right for our country. realistically, ifi recreational cannabis is right for our country. realistically, if i was to go onto the streets now and buy some cannabis, it would be incredibly strong, high potency cannabis, skunk, which is not really skunk, but a different strain, but a very strong stuff with links to mental health. at least in canada i could go into a regulated shop and buy a lower strength cannabis, balanced out of products like this. surely that is a better model than the kind of madness we have on the
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street at the moment? you're touching on the quality control. absolutely an issue we need to think about. while you could walk into a shopin about. while you could walk into a shop in canada and buy something, a known value, and potency, you are also exposing that same society to a flourishing illicit market. in your documentary i think you sat down with somebody and ordered illicit cannabis delivered by a career ten minutes later on the internets, and there were a shop selling illicit cannabis, unlicensed shops, selling it for half the price of the licensed shops, which is deeply concerning. you have no effective control over quality in that scenario. and secondly, if the illicit market is undercutting, the cheapest possible cannabis is the illicit stuff, arguably the stuff that isn‘t regulated. so it is the poorest in society who have access to the worst quality cannabis. you
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regulate middle—class cannabis. that utterly inappropriate. when we look at this country now and see the state of the treatment centres, people who don‘t have the means to pay for their own treatment suffer and we won‘t stand by and watch people buying drugs in this country illegally and then being left to the dogs to fight for themselves. the agm, thank you. this may be a debate that rumbles on for many, many yea rs. that rumbles on for many, many years. while the mp so we could see legalisation within ten years it probably means we will see this debate repeated for the next five to ten yea rs debate repeated for the next five to ten years and maybe beyond. jim connelly, thank you very much for that. on a visit to faslane naval base in scotland, borisjohnson calls for unity — and says there is scope to do a new brexit deal as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount, one car industry boss says his company‘s ready to pull out of the uk if brexit affects its profits. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people, including a six—year—old boy.
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normally at this point our business presenterjamie robertson would be here with me in the studio, but this afternoon he‘s in plymouth, where one of the regional hubs planned by maritime uk is being set up to help boost the uk‘s maritime economy and prepare it for the challenges of the future. jamie, afew jamie, a few hours ago, it looks lovely but it‘s changed a bit? simon, it had come to us five minutes ago, it would have been fine. the sun was shining and suddenly the heavens decided to open. literally, about a minute or so open. literally, about a minute or so ago. i‘m getting soaked! we‘ve taken refuge in this restaurantjust behind turn chapel wharf which is where we‘ve been filming today and one of the places where investment could come as a result of these coastal powerhouses. we talked to people about the money which could get invested into these areas and had businesses talking but the other
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side of the equation as you can pour money into these places but unless you have got the people to employ and actually do the work and have the brains to do the work, you‘re not going to get very far. it‘s all very well if you have the money but if you don‘t have a peabody you won‘t get that far, education, the way people will be attracted to this area and will be powering this area, where will they come from and how will they be educated ? where will they come from and how will they be educated? jackie is from the city college of plymouth, principal, and also by professor kevin jones from the university principal, and also by professor kevinjones from the university of plymouth. executive of science and engineering. jackie, first, how are you actually getting people up and trained for the kind of businesses which maritime engineering environment is going to require? we have been taking students for marine for over 20 years now and we work
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really closely with the employers for a tailor—made innovative curriculum to work to be employers needs, making students jobs curriculum to work to be employers needs, making studentsjobs ready, so needs, making studentsjobs ready, so don‘t adopt when you say you work to employers needs, how do you know what those needs are? how do you find out about that and how do you find out about that and how do you find employees who say we want people to work this august? something unique about the city of plymouth as it works as a community and works collaboratively together and works collaboratively together and whether it‘s the council, the schools, the educational organisation or and local stakeholders and employers, we all work together through various boards to ensure that we have a bespoke provision to that employers needs, employer forums that the employers say what they need. give me an example, what sort of things today say? they would need a particular subject in a practical skill, and if that was something we didn‘t deliver right now we would actually change a curriculum to deliver that practical skill. so we would work with the awarding bodies to do that.
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skill. so we would work with the awarding bodies to do thatm skill. so we would work with the awarding bodies to do that. is that the same sort of thing happening in higher education in the university of plymouth? it certainly to almost every programme in science and engineering will have an employer liaison board, who help us shape the curriculum so they are fit for purpose specifically giving the students the education to be able to meet the needs of the employers have at the end of their programme so very much so. what about in terms of the way in which academia, the universities, cooperate with industry when you‘re talking about research and development and coming up research and development and coming up with new ideas, things to use it see? from the university of plymouth market was point of view, we've been doing marine research for a very long time. the university started in the 1860s as a marine navigation school. we've got a long history of that kind of collaboration. today, many of our projects are varying. we work with local industries, trying
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to solve some specific problems that we can see technology, that they will need to drive the kind of business and they are looking to do. how keen are people to work in marine engineering? and areas like that? in this part of the world marine is everywhere you look so we find a lot of the students come to plymouth because they have been inspired at an earlier point in theircareerand we inspired at an earlier point in their career and we reach out to schools, as do other organisations within the city, to try to make people realise the marine economy is a great way forward for them looking for high—value jobs, so everyone from the city to the universities, colleges, schools, are trying very much to tell the story of what this kind of technology and engineering can do for us. jackie, give me an impression of where you‘ve worked. 0ther impression of where you‘ve worked. other places around the country. how does this differfrom other places around the country. how does this differ from elsewhere?m is the community feel of the city,
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the city working together to produce the city working together to produce the future workforce for the future of plymouth and those ranging of skills from level one onwards, so we developed every individual student and theirfull developed every individual student and their full potential for the future. what about in terms of actually getting people excited about the marine environment? many people live in plymouth and have never been to the beach. some of them, even though the sea is all around them, they don‘t realise it. one of the things plymouth is doing very well, and i was trying to reach right down to primary schools to inspire children, we had an event a could go out at the victorian logo in which we brought along science and engineering to the children, schools and bus to the children, schools and bus to the children, schools and bus to the children, schools and bust like the example we allowed them to drive an underwater remote operated vehicle. we had science stands and got employers to come in and show what they do. trying to get that age group really
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excited about what the future could look like if they go that way. so i think it's something we have to do actively but here we are doing it, and we are really getting excitement. if you see their kids walking out of that carrying souvenirs, and saying i want to be a scientist, an engineer, this is really good. we are actually doing that almost on a weekly basis throughout the summer. thank you both very much indeed. i will hand you back now to simon. i‘m about to get soaked again because the rain is approaching. i‘m so sorry to hear that. talk to you later. you feel for me. no, i don‘t. we will return to plymouth later on. china has made a rare intervention in the affairs of hong kong, condemning the recent anti—government protests as ‘horrendous incidents‘ that have caused ‘serious damage to the rule of law‘. the demonstrations began over a planned extradition law but have since broadened into calls for full democracy. 0ur correspondent celia hatton sent this update from beijing. i think beijing wanted to address
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the ongoing turmoil in hong kong by offering its own viewpoint on what‘s gone wrong there and it blamed the ongoing violence on a small group, it said, of radical protesters who are being influenced by overseas forces, but it went on then to underline its trust in the hong kong authorities and its respect for the hong kong police. now this is the same police force that‘s been come under a lot of criticism elsewhere because of its use of force against unarmed protesters, so i think the underlying message it is that beijing isn‘t ready to step in directly. it‘s not going to be sending chinese troops onto the streets of hong kong. in fact, that was the one question during a press conference today that it appeared, the spokespeople tried to bat away, they didn‘t want to answer it. they simply told reporters to look up the relevant laws for themselves. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich.
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good afternoon. after last week‘s heat and the flooding that some of us heat and the flooding that some of us enjoyed over the weekend, there‘s still a lot going on with the weather over the next few days. sunshine for some today, but further south and west, across the uk, we have got increasing amounts of cloud because, as you can see from a satellite picture, we have this pinwheel of cloud rolling its way in our direction. now this is an area of low pressure drifting quite slowly north eastwards across the country over the next few days and, as it goes, the centre of the low, we will see heavy, thundery downpours which could bring some localised flash flooding issues. certainly travel disruption. strong and gusty wind as well. as we head towards the end of this afternoon we will see cloud and outbreaks of rain pushing toward the south—west with the wind starting to pick up. some showers and thunderstorms across north—western parts of scotland. elsewhere, good spells of sunshine and temperatures still holding up in
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the high teens or load to mid 20s. through this evening, low pressure continues to roll its way in. a band of rain rolling in. in the centre of the lower we will see heavy and thundery downpours, gusty wind, and it will be a warm and muggy night for many with temperatures between 11-17 for many with temperatures between 11—17 so we go through tomorrow and we will see some showers. breaking out across the northern half of scotland. plenty more where you are close to this area of low pressure rolling its way north eastwards across the south—west of england, wales, parts of the midlands, north—west england where we had flooding over the weekend, we will see scattered heavy thundery downpours which could give enough rain ina downpours which could give enough rain in a short space of time to cause localised flooding. winds, across the south coasts blowing up to 50 miles an hour. may be 24 across eastern england. wednesday, low pressure rolling eastwards
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focusing the showers across northern england, east anglia, lots of downpours across scotland. some of these causing localised disruption. the further south and west you are, turning drier at this stage. towards the end of the week, plenty of downpours on thursday in eastern areas. we will lose the showers. more dry weather by friday.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4pm... borisjohnson visits the faslane naval base in scotland — and calls for a strengthening of the uk‘s ties ahead of a meeting with first minister nicola sturgeon. a warning from vauxhall that it could move all its production from ellesemere port — if brexit hits its profits. they‘re shooting! panic at a food festival in california as a gunman opens fire, killing three, including a child coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with gavin. yes, we hear from jurgen yes, we hearfrom jurgen klopp, as he hopes to win the early—season bragging rights, and the football league clubs facing an uncertain start to the season. thanks gavin, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past.
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ben rich has all the weather. after the heat of last week and some flooding rain over the last weekend, still quite a lot going on with our weather over the next few days, some really hefty downpours for some of us, all the details coming up. also coming up — trapped up to his neck in water for several hours — the man who got stuck in rocks as the tide came in — and had to be freed by firefighters. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. boris johnson is in scotland this afternoon — on his first visit there as prime minister. he‘s after unity — with a call to ‘renew the ties that bind the uk‘. but he faces a tough audience, mrjohnson met ruth davidson — leader of the scottish conservatives — she didn‘t vote for him in the leadership contest and is strongly opposed to leaving the eu without a deal. soon — he‘ll meet first minister nicola sturgeon —
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she has pointed out already that scotland voted remain, didn‘t vote for a conservative government, and is against a no—deal brexit — she‘s said to be ramping up preparations for another independence referendum. let‘s cross to our political correspondent nick eardley in edinburgh. 0utside bute house. you are awaiting the arrival of the prime minister? yeah, we expected him to be here around about now. no sign yet, simon. he has been in with ruth davidson for about 50 minutes at the scottish parliament a couple of miles from here. that could be quite a tough meeting, normally as prime minister you might expect to come and have a tough conversation in that building behind me but not so much with your own party. ruth davidson in an article over the weekend made it pretty clear, yes, she will work with borisjohnson, despite their differences in the past, but she was pretty clear as well that she is not going to come under any circumstances, back a no—deal brexit, if that is what mr johnson ends up opting for at the end of october, because he can‘t get
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a new deal with the european union. no sign yet that the european union is going to even think about offering him that new deal that he wa nts, offering him that new deal that he wants, and there are many at westminster who just think that is the direction of travel now. we are heading in the direction of no deal. we did catch up with borisjohnson this morning when he was on the other side of the country at the faslane naval base. here is what he had to say about his relationship with miss davidson. lama i am a number one fan of ruth davidson and what she has done for the scottish conservatives, it is she who is taking the fight to the scottish nationalists, and i admire her brand of conservatism, she and i share a huge range of political beliefs, and our core philosophy is the same. i also think she is right to think that we should be going for a deal, not no deal. that's where we should be trying to end up, but it is the responsibility of the government, of a government of the
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united kingdom, to make sure that we are prepared for every eventuality, and if our partners won't move, and they won't take up the backstop, they won't take up the backstop, they won't take up the backstop, they won't even begin to change that withdrawal agreement, they won't compromise at all, then of course we've got to get ready for no deal. but could you possibly put strains upon your party, north and south of the border, could you even split your party if she says she cannot stomach a no deal settlement? don't forget that ruth herself, and i repeat my admiration for her, has said she does not want to see any such outcome and she is dead right. we stand together, we stand for things that are so important for our country, the value of the union in the united kingdom. look at where we are, you know the figures, £1.7 billion of investment flowing directly from scotland's membership of the uk into defence alone. the second biggest employer in scotland is the mod. these are tangible
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benefits from the union, but i don't think that we've done enough to talk up. borisjohnson talking to bbc scotland. 0f borisjohnson talking to bbc scotland. of course ruth davidson agrees with him on that bit, that the uk is a good thing, but they have big differences on brexit and it will be interesting to see exactly what comes out of that meeting they are having at the moment. there are meetings where you just wish you are a fly on the wall, he has just had just wish you are a fly on the wall, he hasjust had one and i would quite like to be a fly on the wall of the next one. yeah, i'm not sure we will get into this one. nicola sturgeon, you might remember theresa may came up here to meet nicola sturgeon on herfirst may came up here to meet nicola sturgeon on her first day as prime minister, and said some of the same things that borisjohnson said in that clip we just played, that the union is important, that we need to do more to talk about the benefits of it, and how to get the most out of it, and how to get the most out of the relationship between scotland and the rest of the uk. the problem
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is that sometimes the reality doesn‘t always match the rhetoric, and there are some in the scottish conservative party who just think that if it does end up a no—deal brexit, it will give nicola sturgeon and the snp more of an arsenal to fight the uk government and to call for another independence referendum. i should just point out as well the recent polling on independence has changed a wee bit. 45% back in 2014 when the referendum was held, more recently in the last few months it has gone up to about 48%, so there are some in scotland who think that are some in scotland who think that a no—deal brexit could change the dial on scottish independence. nicola sturgeon will be making the case whenever borisjohnson arrives that he should move away from no deal, but the uk government has made clear time and time again, since borisjohnson took office, that the threat of no deal is real and he will do it if he has to. don't go too far away, we are expecting him quite soon, i will return as soon as we see his car pull up. let‘s speak now to anthony salamone
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from the scottish centre on european relations think tank whojoins us from edinburgh... good afternoon to you. hi, simon. i just wonder what sort of reception you think you will be getting. just wonder what sort of reception you think you will be gettinglj think borisjohnson‘s visit to scotla nd think borisjohnson‘s visit to scotland is very much a campaigning visit, an introductory visit, and a change of tack from theresa may in respect of a no—deal brexit is really what it comes when it comes to scottish public opinion. we know that people in scotland aren‘t in favour of brexit generally but especially not in favour of a no—deal brexit, and that comes across people who support independence and those who oppose it, and all the parties in the scottish parliament, including the scottish parliament, including the scottish conservative party. so borisjohnson is setting out proposals in respect of strengthening the union, scotland‘s place in the union, but it remains to see what substance he will put on the sentiments. those emotions can all be well and good, and the commitments he has made today, but i think people want to see what
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substance is put into back that up. what do you make of his visit to faslane? well, he certainly reduced the scope of the audience to meet with him. putting a commitment on defence i suppose it is logical for people support the union. the defence and the base of faslane, the royal navy, it all links very strongly with those who support the conservative party and the union but it doesn‘t connect with people who don‘t support those things. the faslane naval base in particular, nuclear arsenal, a huge bone of contention for snp and independent supporters who don‘t want to see nuclear weapons in scotland or anywhere else in the world. while he might draw support with his pace as it were in scotland, it hardly seems likely to make connections with people in scotland who are not in favour of what he is advocating already. there is a view certainly within the snp that borisjohnson‘s approach is ramping up the pressure for another independence referendum. is that bourne out by the facts?
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well, i think it could do, it could do, because as i say, there is very little support here for a no—deal brexit. borisjohnson has said today he does not want a no—deal brexit to happen, that he is going to try to find a deal but the condition see a setting out our extremely stringent, and we know what the response from the european union will be, so in sum, the practical outcome seems to be we‘re heading towards a no—deal brexit, and as nick was mentioning, support for independence has increased recently when we know the main drivers of that of boris johnson becoming prime minister at the prospect of a no—deal brexit, so it is certainly possible he will try to push for a referendum at some point and will be guided by whether or not this increase for independence continues. we will have to wait and see. there is a ratcheting up of the language, certainly from the eu, a sense they will not be changing their minds. but is that what borisjohnson wa nts, but is that what borisjohnson wants, because he can then turn round and blame them if there is a no deal? well, that certainly
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possible, isn‘t it? obviously he lived in brussels, he was a correspondent for the telegraph there, he knows how the european union works and he also knows it is very unlikely to compromise on the way he wants, for instance removing the backstop, the eu clearly won‘t do that, because it doesn‘t want to politically but it is also a very legalistic institution, they can‘t do it under their treaties. so i am sure he is very aware of what he is doing but when it comes to support in scotland for that course of action, i think it is relatively limited and once we know the tension between him and ruth davidson, the leader of the scottish conservatives, she does not agree with that approach. she is concerned it might increase support for independence and it might proceed along the track if the uk crashes out with no deal. scottish tory mps have an away day soon and part of that agenda is the thought they might actually break away from the london based conservative party. how realistic is that? i don't think we are at that stage just yet. this has been an issue for some years in scotland, indeed ruth davidson when
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she stood as leader of the scottish party, her platform was knocked in breaking away. her opponent murray fraser was one thing to do that at the time. it has certainly made things difficult. scottish politics are slightly more to the left than uk politics, and ruth davidson is a good campaigner, has managed to refashion her party but her weak point has always been when people in scotla nd point has always been when people in scotland don‘t agree with uk government policy, conservative uk government policy, conservative uk government policy, conservative uk government policy, and she is forced to defend it. so while i don‘t think it is likely the scottish party will move away from the uk partyjust yet, if they ever did, it would certainly make things a lot easier for them here. great to talk to you, thank you for your time. meanwhile, there‘ve been warnings today from business leaders at the cbi that neither the uk nor the eu are prepared for no—deal — and it‘s today published practical steps that firms can take. the uncertainty surrounding brexit prompted the french owner of vauxhall to say it could move all car production from its ellesmere port factory in cheshire — if it becomes unprofitable. our business correspondent theo leggett reports.
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vauxhall‘s plant in ellesmere port employs 1,000 people and faces an uncertain future. last month, parent company psa said it wanted to build a new version of its astra model, but only on condition a suitable brexit deal was reached. now its boss says if there is no deal, there will be no new production line. the chief executive said in a newspaper interview... but the man charged with preparing for no—deal seemed to take that threat in his stride. we are doing everything we can to make sure we can leave the european union on october the 31st, there won‘t be any delays, we are determined to ensure we leave on october the 31st, and it is myjob to make sure the country is ready. no—deal would bring major changes to the way we do business across the channel, affecting everything from lorry traffic to financial services.
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exports would be subject to tariffs overnight, border controls would be tightened up, and a swathe of industries, which currently rely on eu rules and standards, could be left in legal limbo, unless emergency measures are put in place. yet the confederation of british industry says neither the uk nor the eu is ready for a no—deal scenario and much more needs to be done. we absolutely do think a deal is essential. for all the preparation we do, it is like putting up sandbags to prevent floodwaters, we will probably still lose the kitchen but we might save the bedroom. so every effort, just as we put effort into preparation, every effort needs to go into getting a deal, and that means flexibility from both sides, because neither side is ready. the cbi says that although many big businesses have well thought through contingency plans, a number of smaller companies do not, and it says much of the official advice firms are being given is outdated. yet the government insists it will be ready, and points out that some car—makers have been happy
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to announce new investments. in recent weeks, we have seen amazon, ntt, the big japanese tech firm, and indeed jaguar land rover announce fresh investment into the uk, so it is not all one way, or all the risks are downward, there are opportunities here, and we need to be ready to mitigate the risk. the government still insists it would prefer to leave the eu with a deal but has to operate on the assumption that won‘t happen, and that means companies have little choice but to prepare for a deeply uncertain future. theo leggett, bbc news. let‘s go to edinburgh now where borisjohn is visiting the scotland first minister nicola sturgeon‘s residence, bute house. nick eardley is standing outside. we know he is on his way, so duck when he gets there. this is a meeting
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thatis he gets there. this is a meeting that is perhaps less difficult than the one he hasjust that is perhaps less difficult than the one he has just had with ruth davidson, and that‘s ironic because she of course is the leader of the conservatives in scotland. absolutely, they don‘t have a great relationship. she was furious the scottish secretary david mundell was sacked in that cabinet cull last week and she is also really uncomfortable with the possibility uk could leave the european union without a deal, so there hasjust been what we think a tense conversation a couple of miles from where i am at the scottish parliament. he is now on his way here with his police outriders, so here with his police outriders, so he shouldn‘t be too long, but he will go into that meeting with nicola sturgeon with a lot of questions to be answered. the biggest one, of course, will be what the impact potentially of leaving without a deal would be in scotland. it is something the scottish government are really opposed to. nicola sturgeon has consistently said she thinks that if there were to bea said she thinks that if there were to be a no—deal brexit, it would make the case for scottish
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independence more likely. i think they will probably have a discussion as well about whether that independence referendum could happen. remember, it was only five yea rs happen. remember, it was only five years ago the last one was held. in the aftermath of the eu referendum, nicola sturgeon went to theresa may and said, look, i think this is a disaster. scotland voted to remain so we disaster. scotland voted to remain so we want to hold another independence referendum, theresa may said no. boris johnson independence referendum, theresa may said no. borisjohnson was asked about this this morning when he was at the naval base in faslane on the other side of scotland, and he said, look, it was a once in a generation vote, we don‘t need other referendums. really interestingly he wasn‘t rolling it out though, and the sacked scottish secretary david mundell was in the papers at the weekend, suggesting that perhaps the 2021 scottish election here could be the one that decides whether there is another independence referendum, perhaps if the snp got a majority. but first things first that will be discussed today between nicola sturgeon and boris johnson discussed today between nicola sturgeon and borisjohnson is that issue of brexit. i‘m going to give
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you a quick exclusive here, they are not going to see eye to eye. i‘m sure afterwards there will be a lot of briefing about the disagreements they have, about the various different parts they have that wall think they will work for the uk, because they could not disagree on this more. boris johnson because they could not disagree on this more. borisjohnson thinks no deal has to happen if needs be, nicola sturgeon says it will be a disaster. is there any personal relationship, do they know each other well at all? i don't think they have a particularly strong personal relationship. i do know they once met in the house of commons by accident when nicola sturgeon was waiting to go on to theresa may‘s office in the house of commons for their chat they have every six months. nick... i am seeing the outriders coming into charlotte square where you are, and i know... let me move out the way. i know there will be question shouted as he gets out of his car, so we will keep an eye on that motorcade. imean, will keep an eye on that motorcade. i mean, what are the questions that will be shouted at him, do you
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think? i suspect he has big questions to answer about what impact he thinks a no—deal brexit would have on the relationship between scotland and the rest of the united kingdom. remember, in theresa may‘s cabinet, there were some really senior ministers who were worried that if you left without a deal, you could increase support for scottish independence, and also for a potential border poll in northern ireland as well. theresa may was one of them. we heard from her chief of staff recently that was an issue. this is boris johnson just staff recently that was an issue. this is borisjohnson just arriving now, his car pulling up to bute house. booing you can probably hear some of his opponents here, nicola sturgeon out on the step. a big moment, this, the two of their meeting for the first time in thisjob. he has a whole new scottish team who he put into his cabinet last week, some controversy about that, alisterjack, a new scottish secretary, very different
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from david mundell, he is with boris johnson there. booing will you be the last prime minister of the uk, mrjohnson? booing so there they go into bute house, thatis so there they go into bute house, that is nicola sturgeon‘s official residence in scotland. a big entourage behind them, advisers and the like. i suspect borisjohnson has a lot to discuss with nicola sturgeon, but perhaps a fair bit to learn as well about some of the intricacies of scottish politics. it can be quite a world up here, in terms of, you know, small things you can say in scotland can have a big impact on the political debate. i should just say, we are expecting to
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hear from ruth davidson should just say, we are expecting to hearfrom ruth davidson quite should just say, we are expecting to hear from ruth davidson quite soon as well, so we will bring you that as well, so we will bring you that as soon as we as well, so we will bring you that as soon as we get it, on how her meeting with borisjohnson went. but this is the second of a day of tense meetings for the new prime minister. you through that question at him, and of course that was the accusation in the house of commons from the snp, that he would be the last prime minister of a united kingdom. yes, i mean, it is not quite as simple as that. so the argument as we have heard a few times over the last few days is that if you go for a no—deal brexit, it could increase support for scottish independence. there is some polling evidence that suggest that is the case. it is more complicated for the simple reason that the snp aren‘t com pletely simple reason that the snp aren‘t completely committed to holding another referendum, and they don‘t have the power to do it. so nicola sturgeon needs to work out some strategy to get firstly the power to hold another referendum from the uk government. she has made clear that is what she wants to do, she doesn‘t wa nt to is what she wants to do, she doesn‘t want to hold a wildcat referendum like they had in catalonia, we all know that didn‘t end well. the
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second thing she needs to then do is to make sure the case is completely ready, because one of the big criticisms of the scottish independence campaign last time was that the economic case is not com pletely that the economic case is not completely sound. there has been a lot of work done on that. but that has not been the full prospectus put forward yet as to what exactly that economic case for a new independent scotland, if it ever happen, would look like. so yes, absolutely, of course the snp are going to say some of borisjohnson prospect decisions could lead to more support for independence, but as is often the case with these political debates, it is more completed than that. for now, nick eardley, thank you very much, outside bute house in edinburgh. we will be back in edinburgh. we will be back in edinburgh shortly in our macro nationwide segment as well. downing street has dropped an investigation into the mp mark field. the former foreign office minster grabbed a greenpeace activist who had made her way in to a reception at mansion house injune, where the former chancellor philip hammond was giving a speech.
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a downing street spokesman said the incident was a matter for the previous prime minister. mark field resigned from his post and has apologised for his behaviour. let‘s return now to that shooting at a garlic festival in california — three people were killed, including a six—year—old boy — and 15 others wounded. the gunman was shot dead by armed officers, although police are investigating reports that a second suspect may still be at large. the shooting happened in gilroy, around 80 miles south of san francisco. from there, dave lee sent this report. 0h, bleep! what‘s going on?! the gunfire began at 5:41pm on sunday evening, as families were starting to head home. they‘re shooting! as the shots rang out, there was at first confusion and then panic, and eventually disbelief. who‘d shoot up a garlic festival? a food festival — one that obsessively celebrates the garlic grown here — has become the scene of the 246th mass shooting in america this year. as soon as the gunfire started, everybody scattered, and they were yelling
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for their kids. it sounded like 30 rounds to me, and then we heard a little lapse in time, and then another 30 rounds. it sounded like automatic fire. we just heard a pop — pop, pop, pop — and we just went behind some tents and took cover, and we knew right away when we saw a lot of people just running away from there. police said they took less than a minute to shoot dead the man once he opened fire, but even with that rapid response, the gunman was able to cause carnage — a six—year—old boy among the dead. the suspect was shot and killed. we have some witnesses reporting that there may have been a second suspect, but we don‘t know if that suspect was engaged in any shooting, or whether they may have been in some sort of a support role for the person that we have accounted for. witnesses described the man as being white and in his 30s, though this has not yet been confirmed. around 80,000 people descend
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on this small city for this festival every year, but now it will become known as yet another instance of everyday american life that‘s been torn apart by gun violence. dave lee, bbc news, in gilroy, california. firefighters have rescued a man whose foot became trapped in rocks on the north norfolk coast. he‘d fallen while trying to help his child on the beach at sheringham yesterday evening. the man was stuck in the sea for nearly four hours, and at one point, was submerged up to his neck. 0ur correspondent robby west sent this update from sheringham. it was very dramatic, and this is where the man was trapped. he was walking up these steps off the beach with his family when a wave came in from the left. he stepped in front of his children to protect them and he was knocked back onto these big slabs of granite. first on the scene was the local lifeguard and he told me what he saw when he arrived at the scene. the patient had his foot wedged
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down in between the rock and this structure here. when i arrived on scene, he was getting hammered by pretty severe tidal waves. and so i basically came in with a rescue tube, to wedge it between him and the rock and then sheltered him with my body when waves were impacting. well, firefighters eventually freed him from the rocks using brute force but he was in the water for over three hours. police say today that his injuries are not thought to be serious, and just before we came on air, i spoke to members of his family, who wanted to thank all of the emergency services for saving his life. the duchess of sussex has become the first person to act as the guest editor of british vogue‘s september issue — seen as the most important edition of the fashion year. meghan has chosen to feature 15 so—called ‘change makers‘ on the cover of the edition, which focuses on female empowerment and diversity. but she decided not to appear on the cover herself, telling the editor she felt it
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would be "boastful". 0ne flood warning and seven flood alerts are in place in england, after a month‘s rain fell in less than 24 hours. greater manchester was one of the worst—affected areas. the manchester airport relief road is still closed because of flooding. five flood alerts are also in place in scotland. how many stinging nettles can you eat in an hour? it‘s an annual event in dorset and took place at the weekend. the contest began in the 1980s, when two farmers argued over who had the longest stinging nettles in theirfield. it evolved into the world nettle eating championships when one of the farmers promised to eat any nettle which was longer than his. janine jansen reports. three... two... one... go! it‘s an acquired taste. 19. 20. competitors are served up two foot long stalks.
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23. the aim is to chomp as many nettles as possible in one hour. i think a heavy soak is key, personally. all about the heavy soak. i can feel it sizzling in my mouth. i think it might be the nettles that i'm eating. rolled up, delicious. frankly, it doesn‘t matter how you do it, as long as you keep munching. 45 minutes to go. and there was one clear winner. eating 58 feet of stingers. this, ladies and gentlemen, is the world champion. 0ne burning question, then. do they sting? no, they don‘t actually. i got one or two stings in my mouth but not too bad. it is the first time i‘d ever eaten nettles, yeah. what made you do it? i only live down the road. it‘s a local event. got to participate or lose it.
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thanks for that. no injuries to report. just a few sore tummies and some very green tongues. i‘m sure we should put out a warning about don‘t try this at home, anyway, don‘t try that at home. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon, after last week‘s cosmic heat and the flooding rain some of us endured over the weekend, still a lot going on with our weather over the next few days. some scattered, heavy downpours, accompanied by strong and gusty winds. in an area of low pressure beginning to spin its way in from the south—west, and as it moves its way north—eastwards over the next couple of days, it will provide a focus for some torrential downpours and thunderstorms. this evening and tonight, the area of low pressure sta rts tonight, the area of low pressure starts to working from the south—west, some rain thrown across wales, northern england and northern ireland ahead of the main centre of
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the low. some clear spells elsewhere but it will be a pretty warm and muqqy but it will be a pretty warm and muggy night for many, 11 to 70 degrees. tomorrow, showers and thunderstorms moving across southern england, wales, the midlands come up into northern ireland and southern scotland, some pretty gusty winds. hazy sunshine elsewhere, temperatures of 21 or 22 degrees, plenty of heavy downpours continuing to drift eastwards, wednesday and thursday.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. on his first visit to scotland as prime minister boris johnson is meeting the first minister nicola sturgeon. she‘ll tell him that scotland didn‘t vote for in her words a "catastrophic no deal brexit." as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount,
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the chief executive of vauxhall says his company‘s ready to pull out of the uk if brexit hits its profits. a gunman has opened fire at a food festival in california, killing three people — including a six—year—old boy. in a rare intervention, china has condemned the recent anti—government protests in hong kong as "horrendous". a man who became trapped in rocks for several hours after saving his child from the incoming tide has been rescued on the norfolk coast. and coming up — a weather anniversary. we step back in time 70 years since the revival of tv forecasts. sport now on afternoon live with gavin. good afternoon, gavin. there‘s been so much sport going on this summer but the build—up has started today to the beginning of the football season? yes, the new premier league season gets under way in less than two weeks. when liverpool play newly promoted norwich, a week on friday. before that though they have the chance to show
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the rest what they‘re made of, when they play champions manchester city, in the community shield this weekend. it‘s the first time liverpool have been involved in the match since 2006 and whilst it‘s not usually taken too seriously over the years, liverpool bossjurgen klopp has described it as a final. liverpool have lost three of their last four friendlies . and klopp feels this game is important to his side. nothing to do for me with the rest of the season. it‘s a game. even if we have eight players available for example, i would like to try to win it. it‘s a final. the first time i realised nobody sees it like that, to be honest. a curtain raiser, unbelievable. we think constantly about the game and how to prepare. there are doubts over whether two clubs in league one will be able to fulfill their opening day fixtures this weekend. bolton and bury have been told they are "likely" to be suspended if they do not meet a new efl deadline to meet outstanding commitments. bolton have been in administration since the middle of may,
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with a proposed takeover of the club still not completed. bolton are supposed to start the season at wycombe on saturday, but wycombe have confirmed they have stopped ticket sales to bolton fans.both clubs have until 5pm today to prove they can meet their obligations. both will start their campaigns with 12—point deductions due to their financial problems. manchester united‘s pre—season plans aren‘t settled yet. romelu lukaku has been left out of the squad, that travelled to norway this morning. the belgian striker has been heavily linked with a move to inter milan throughout the summer and posted a picture with his agent on social media yesterday with the message: "soon to be continued." the united squad that travelled will face kristian—sund tomorrow night. paul pogba, another player linked with a move away has gone with them. and just one other football line for you — former manchester united defender patrice evra has announced his retirement from the game. the 38—year—old won five premier league titles and a champions league at the club. studio: england‘s cricket fans, if
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they‘ve got any fingernails left, we are now winding up for the ashes. just a few weeks after their dramatic win in the cricket world cup final, england now must ready themselves for a home ashes series against australia. ashley giles, england‘s director of cricket, says they need to raise their game, for the first of five test matches on thursday. england lost the last ashes series 4—0, so they‘ll be hoping for revenge. but they‘ve just finished a long one—day campaign to win the world cup and struggled in their test win over ireland last week. the bbc‘s dan roan has been talking to giles, ahead of the test at edgbaston about how england can maintain their momentum. hopefully we can take from that win into this tournament, it‘s important, i don‘t know how we will pick these players up if we hadn‘t got over the line on that sunday evening, but do you ever really need lifting for an ashes series? at edgbaston, it‘s a fantastic grand, great atmosphere, we are a couple of
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days away from another ashes series, there‘s nothing quite like it in cricket. tennis now. andy and jamie murray have been training together, ahead of their doubles partnership at the washington open this week. the brothers will face edouard roger—vasselin and nicolas mahut in their opening round match tomorrow. the pair played together to help great britain win the davis cup in 2015. the tournament will be andy murray‘s fourth since having hip resurfacing surgery injanuary and his first on a hard court. andy won the queens doubles title with feliciano lopez injune. and finally some fun to finish on from the south of spain. one of the most bizarre events you‘ll see. the greasy pole game locally known as ‘cucana‘. competitors have to try and run up a six—metre long slippery pole in order to try and claim flags for money. if you fail you fall into the sea below. a few got close, but no one managed it this year. perhaps because organisers decided to make the pole longer.
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this guy gets really close, almost. the game in roquetas de mar is part of the santa ana festival. i reckon that i might have a go at entering that next year. it looks pretty fu n. entering that next year. it looks pretty fun. you‘ve just got to make sure you don‘t land on the pole, i guess. that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. laura maciver is in glasgow for us today talking about the prime minister, boris johnson‘s visit to scotland. and in bristol is david garmston who‘s got his two feet firmly back on the ground after spending a morning in the air. we‘ll come back to him injust a moment. but first. let‘s talk about what is happening today. throughout the day we‘ve been covering the prime minister boris johnson‘s visit to scotland. his trip was planned to talk
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about strengthening the union, but brexit has very much been on the agenda as well. so how‘s it going? the new prime minister began by visiting faslane naval base on the clyde, the home of the royal navy in scotland and also the royal navy in scotland and also the uk‘s nuclear deterrent, as well. he had said i had a business that he wa nted he had said i had a business that he wanted to renew the ties that bind the united kingdom. he used his visit to set out how the latest growth deal plans will help communities here in scotland as well as in wales and northern ireland. he said every decision he makes as prime minister will promote and strengthen the union. however, there was another union people wanted to talk about today of course, the european union, and it was brexit which dominated the questions mr johnson received from the porters. it will have been the main thrust of the separate meetings this afternoon with the first minister nicola sturgeon and before that with a leader of the scottish
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conservatives, ruth davidson, both taking place in edinburgh. let's talk about the one with ruth davidson. this is intriguing because on the face of it, it should have been relatively simple but of course, they have real differences. absolutely. ruth davidson did not back borisjohnson as tory leader, initially backing sajid javid for thejob and initially backing sajid javid for the job and has also been very clear on her opposition to a no—deal brexit. and also outspoken about mr johnson like a boss decision to sack david mundell as the scottish secretary so this afternoons meeting was bound to be interesting between these two very big characters. just yesterday ruth davidson said while mrjohnson had herfull yesterday ruth davidson said while mrjohnson had her full support yesterday ruth davidson said while mrjohnson had herfull support in his efforts to secure a withdrawal agreement with the eu, she didn‘t agreement with the eu, she didn‘t agree with a no—deal brexit and today on brexit borisjohnson did say that the existing withdrawal agreement negotiated with european leaders was dead and had to go. however, he also said he wanted the
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uk to be very outward going and there was every chance that we could get a deal. he also said it was responsible for any government to prepare for a no deal if it absolutely had to. we've just seen him arrive at bute house and 0 to be a fly on the ball at that meeting with nicola sturgeon. absolutely, this was their first face—to—face encounter between the two leaders. they had a telephone conversation on thursday and nicola sturgeon was said to have reiterated his strong opposition to a no—deal brexit. she urged the prime minister to change his course on this. just 20 minutes ago, mrjohnson arrived at the first ministers‘s residence, bute house, alongside the new scottish secretary alistairjack. his choice for that job. today‘s visit, ahead of it the first minister did say the people of scotla nd first minister did say the people of scotland did not vote for this tory government, didn‘t vote for the new prime minister and didn‘t vote for brexit and certainly, she said, didn‘t vote for a catastrophic
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no—deal brexit which borisjohnson, she said, was now planning for. the first minister said immediately after mrjohnson became prime minister last week that an independence referendum in scotland was no more essential than ever, so that issue will no doubt are featured in this afternoons meeting, as well. after this trip, boris johnson also plans to go to wales to meet members of the farming community there and also northern ireland where he will discuss ongoing efforts to restore devolution of stormont but on reporting scotland tonight will have more on today‘s story. reporting scotland tonight will have more on today's story. i'm sure you will. great to see you. let‘s go to bristol. you‘ve been flying high this morning. ever busy. i was a very early this morning for a trip in hotair very early this morning for a trip in hot air balloon. the bristol balloon festival starts next week. every flight is a bit of an adventure but, you know, once you are up there, it‘s very peaceful and this morning the weather was
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glorious with near—perfect flying conditions. some people say flying ina conditions. some people say flying in a balloon is like life, you take off, you don‘t know where you‘re going, and then you come back to earth with a bump. but it was a beautifully serene day today. my pilot is an interesting guy, who used to wonder up to the balloon festival when he was a lad and help them pack the balloons away but now isa them pack the balloons away but now is a full—time professional pilot, so is a full—time professional pilot, so it‘s been quite a journey for him. i grew up in bristol and i grew up in safefields so i always had balloons flying over as a child. i grew up with it so to fly is a childhood dream really. and all the other pilots feel the same? yeah, i think so. from all over the country really. bristol fiesta is one of the biggest in the country now so to fly there with so many balloons is just fantastic. i grew igrew up i grew up in bristol as well and i remember when that fiesta started. this year is basically special for them, isn‘t it? this year is basically special for them, isn't it? those with a very
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early days, simon! the slowest form of transport is saluting the fastest. concord, celebrating its 50th anniversary, it hurtled along that runway you saw at 250 miles an hour, our take—off was brisker then we settled down to 80 miles an hour, which is more my scene. this is the 4ist which is more my scene. this is the 41st year of the british bristol balloon festival and it was smaller. bristol has become the centre of bloomington, the majority made anywhere in the world today is made here in the city. the organisers are backing the mother and it‘s a free event so making it all a struggle, but it‘s all about promoting the city you and i love. and of course it‘s not all pleasure. 0nce city you and i love. and of course it‘s not all pleasure. once you once you land you have to pack it away andi you land you have to pack it away and i was able to give the crew some guidance on how to do that today from a safe distance. a big attraction this year, they are crowdfunding to bring the darth vader —shaped balloon back to bristol. it was made here but never flown across the city, so if you are
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planning a trip to the west of england, it starts on the 9th of august and it would be great to see you there. and you are able to advise them on producing lots of hot air, i would advise them on producing lots of hot air, iwould imagine. advise them on producing lots of hot air, i would imagine. plenty advise them on producing lots of hot air, iwould imagine. plenty of it. great to see you both. thank you, both. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 430 here on afternoon live. a former engineer at the us aerospace company, boeing, has told bbc news that work on the production line of the 737 max passengerjet was not adequately funded. the entire fleet has been grounded worldwide since march because of two fatal crashes. boeing denies the claims by its ex—employee, and says it‘s committed to making the 737 max one of the safest aircraft ever to fly. richard bilton reports.
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the 737 max has been a commercial triumph for boeing. 5,000 have been ordered. but two of the aircraft crashed, after being forced down by the plane‘s computer software. 346 people were killed. adam dickson ran a team of engineers who worked on the max. he says they were under constant pressure to keep costs down and the production line was under resourced. certainly, what i saw was a lack of sufficient resources to do thejob in its entirety. the culture was very cost—centred, incredibly pressurised. engineers were given targets to get a certain amount of cost out of the aeroplane. there were no such cost concerns in the boardroom. the chief executive, dennis muilenburg, has been paid more than $70 million. boeing has also paid $17 billion in dividends to shareholders and has
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spent a further $43 billion buying its own shares — a spending spree that has helped boeing treble its share price in just five years. critics say boeing‘s executives have been too focused on making money. if you supercharge the incentives of top executives and tell them that theirjob is to get the stock price up, they're not going to pay the kind of attention they need to pay to ensuring they produce a safe plane. boeing says it balances investment with returns to shareholders. it denies that corners were cut on the max and says it‘s always held true to values of safety, quality and integrity. richard bilton, bbc news. and you can see more on this story on tonight‘s panorama — "boeing‘s killer planes" — which is on bbc one at 8.30pm. it‘ll be available shortly after on the iplayer.
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police in germany have arrested a man suspected of pushing a mother and her son into the path of a high speed train at frankfurt station. the eight—year—old boy was killed and his mother is in hospital. police are unaware of any connection between the 40—year—old man and the victims and a spokeswoman said the motive remained unclear. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. in edinburgh — the prime minister meets the first minister nicola sturgeon. she‘ll tell him that scotland didn‘t vote for — what she calls — a "catastrophic no deal brexit." as concerns over a no—deal brexit mount, one car industry boss says his company‘s ready to pull out of the uk if brexit affects its profits. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people — including a six—year—old boy.
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normally at this point, our business presenter jamie robertson would be here with me in the studio, but this afternoon he‘s in plymouth, where one of the regional hubs planned by maritime uk is being set up to help boost the uk‘s maritime economy and prepare it for the challenges of the future. i‘m trying to keep out of the rain. the last time you came to me it was pouring i didn‘t have time to get my jacket on. now the sunshine has come out. i can‘t win. we are talking about coastal powerhouses. the postal power of plymouth, which the government wants to create around the country. five of them, one of them in plymouth, a way of attracting investment, businesses, education, training, all of that sort of stuff into hubs like plymouth. and what they want to do is really to sort of kind of reenergise these places. plymouth really has quite an impressive economy. they want to create a blue economy, a maritime economy. its
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ships, i suppose. economy, a maritime economy. its ships, isuppose. i economy, a maritime economy. its ships, i suppose. i think it‘s a bit more complex than that. tudor evans is the leader of the plymouth council and he can explain in more detail. it‘s not just council and he can explain in more detail. it‘s notjust about ships and marinas and more than that. detail. it‘s notjust about ships and marinas and more than thatm is, we are here now and we can see what's going on around here and advanced technology and engineering withjust over there is advanced technology and engineering with just over there is the advanced technology and engineering withjust over there is the largest naval base in western europe, babcock international, and it is a huge industry for us. the blue economy is already huge in plymouth and could get bigger. what kind of innovation do you come up with when you‘re talking about a blue economy? give me some examples. on one scale at the moment, we are trailing devices on fishing nets to prevent them from becoming ghost dear. that's where the fishing nets are out there and nobody knows where they are until they wrap themselves
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around a turtle or some wildlife. and it's very costly for fishers, as well so by having deacons on a new contract, you can track ghost to gear. that's one example. around the corner, princess yachts are trialling equal moorings so they don't damage the sea bed. these are the kinds of things we keep doing. 0ut there, i know you‘re in charge of what‘s on land but you‘re also in charge of smart sand and area of water, plymouth sound, out there, a thousand kilometres, it‘s not a tester bed but something else, a proving ground ? tester bed but something else, a proving ground? that's right. the idea is way past the test stage. we are into proving the seaworthiness at this point, but there are six you need —— unique platforms out there
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measuring everything to do with, for example, an environmental record which dates back over 100 years, the most complete environmental record anywhere in the country, so it's not just vehicles. there's a whole range of possibilities for testing out there. and inside plymouth sound we've also got this fully instrumented area as well, which is perfect if you're doing autonomous stuff. so we've got loads of kit already in place, smart sand put it together with ocean skate, our marine technology business and to comment and this array of private investment, we have a fantastic emerging high—tech leading—edge blue economy right here in the south—west of england. and then you have got a national marine pod. we haven‘t got one of these in the uk. what is that? 0k, one of these in the uk. what is that? ok, just over there there is
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the dome of dartmoor, the dartmoor national park ten minutes away from plymouth, and what we are trying to do is to create the first uk first national marine parkjust over there. that will be a fantastic thing notjust for there. that will be a fantastic thing not just for plymouth there. that will be a fantastic thing notjust for plymouth but there. that will be a fantastic thing not just for plymouth but for the uk. we are behind the rest of the uk. we are behind the rest of the world at the moment but there is no better place to do this than plymouth. we have basking sharks, paddle boarders, nuclear submarines, the motor vehicles, we have a lot. making sense of all the space and getting access to this space is a fundamental function of a national marine park. a huge advert for the city, for tourism, for business. how do you coordinate these things and make them live together, the military, tourism, people playing around onjet military, tourism, people playing around on jet skis? military, tourism, people playing around onjet skis? how military, tourism, people playing around on jet skis? how about porpoises. seagulls. normal ordinary commercial life. how does it all fit
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together? how do you do it? that's why we have been working with defra and the mmo. it's not about stewardship. we got a naval base commander who has priority at the moment and we've got the cream is harbour master and various things like this but actually, making sure that this is a safe place, a playground, an adventure playground, as well as industrial space and environmental space, it is the overcoming of conflict and we need to make sense of it. so we won't be using a set of rules because none exist at the moment and our offer to the government is that we write the rule book and it should be done in partnership and it should be glorious, because we have precedence around the world, but we need to set the tone here in the uk. plymouth can do that. thank you very much indeed. that‘s a really interesting good picture of what a blue economy could be like. and the kind of
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challenges and opportunities it presents. we are standing here on the wharf, a place which a few years ago was a military base. now it‘s been turned into an industrial base, a marine industrial base, somewhere which hopes to take advantage over the next years and months of a blue economy. back to you, simon. jamie, thank you very much. enjoy the seaside. i want to take you to bute house, this of course is the official residence of the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon and these are pictures of her first meeting with borisjohnson as prime minister. the cameras are then asked to leave. we believe they were talking about her opposition to a new deal brexit. she‘s already said it would cost 100,000 jobs and plunge the scottish economy into recession. she‘s also that the people of scotland did not vote for the tory government, this new prime minister, didn‘t vote for brexit and certainly didn‘t vote for
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a catastrophic no—deal brexit which borisjohnson is a catastrophic no—deal brexit which boris johnson is now a catastrophic no—deal brexit which borisjohnson is now going for. plenty to talk about for them and we will hear from them a little later on. we are hearing now from the scottish conservative leader ruth davidson who had a meeting with borisjohnsonjust davidson who had a meeting with borisjohnson just before he went to bute house. she says we had an incredibly constructive meeting. there was some discussion as to whether it would be harder than the one that nicola sturgeon given that she had not wanted borisjohnson to win the leadership contest. anyway, she‘s saying they talked about brexit, the need to make sure they could get a deal across the line and she supports the prime minister wholeheartedly and getting the deal and they talked about how to continue to have the uk government deliver in scotland for scotland and how we can build on that delivery and also how we can continue to take on nicola sturgeon and oppose her obsession with another independence referendum. so the mood music from that meeting as far as ruth davidson is saying, was positive. plenty more of that later on this evening on bbc
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news. on this day 70 years ago, the bbc revived the tv weather report, something it had originally introduced at the start of the second world war. the way we get the latest predictions has changed dramatically over the years, as our presenter matt taylor has been finding out. it‘s going to be a dull and wet start to the day... the way we consume the weather forecast has changed immensely. from simple hand drawn charts and magnetic symbols... there's some... oh, dear! let's do it again. there's the heavy and persistent rain... ..to 3d graphics and sophisticated mobile phone apps. we now have more weather information at our fingertips than ever before, but how exactly does that information get there? it all begins at a weather station like this. the radcliffe observatory has been recording data for over two centuries, making it one of the oldest and longest running in the world. we‘ve been taking temperature observations here on a daily basis since 1814, and then we‘ve got daily rainfall observations, as well, from the 1820s. so, everything that‘s used here to measure the temperature and the rainfall has been issued by the met office,
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so it‘s all standard kit. and so what‘s measured here will be measured likewise in other parts, notjust in the uk but right around the world ? absolutely. but with the atmosphere stretching kilometres above us, we also need weather balloons, radar and satellite data. and all that information gets fed into weather organisations such as the european centre for medium—range weather forecasting here in reading, where supercomputers like these ones, doing trillions of calculations every single second, churn all that weather observational data and create the forecast. this is planning for food, for transport, for health, for energy, for anything that's part of society, that's making society. agriculture needs to know when to borrow, buy, rent equipment. they need to know what crops to use when. that up—to—date, personalised information is crucialfor all of us. since the bbc weather app launched in 2013, it‘s been downloaded 15 times a minute, with up to eight million
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people using it every single week, and it continues to innovate and evolve. well, the technology and the amount of information available may have changed greatly in the last 70 years, but for me personally, you can‘t beat getting in front of the camera and communicating the forecast and its uncertainties verbally. now, if you don‘t mind, i have a job to do! see you soon! now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. after last week‘s heat and the flooding rain which some of us enjoyed over the weekend, there still a lot going on with our weather over the next few days, with scattered heavy downpours accompanied by strong and gusty winds, an area of low pressure beginning to spin its way in from the south—west and as that moves its way north eastwards over the next couple of days it will provide a focus for some torrential downpours and thunderstorms so, as we go into tonight, no precious not to work its way up from the south—west. rain
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across wales, northern england, northern ireland, ahead of the main centre of the loan. southern clear spells elsewhere but it will be pretty warm and muggy for many. 11-17. pretty warm and muggy for many. 11—17. tomorrow, we will see showers and thunderstorms across southern england, wales, the midlands, northern england, northern ireland and southern scotland. gusty winds particularly close to the south coast. hazy sunshine elsewhere, 21-22. coast. hazy sunshine elsewhere, 21—22. plenty of heavy downpours continuing to drift eastwards on wednesday into thursday.
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today at five — boris johnson visits scotland where he faces opposition from both the snp and his own party over his brexit policy. the prime minister called for a strengthening of the uk‘s ties, ahead of a meeting with first minister nicola sturgeon. these are tangible benefits from the union, that i don‘t think we have done enough to talk up. we‘ll have the latest on the prime minister‘s visit to scotland and we‘ll be speaking to the scottish conservatives. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: a warning from vauxhall that it could move all its production from ellesemere port — if brexit hits profits from the plant. "informers will be shot," say signs in londonderry.
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three months afterjournalist leera mckey was killed,

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