Skip to main content

tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  July 25, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

7:00 pm
you're watching beyond 100 days. boris johnson uses his first appearence in parliament as prime minister to challenge the eu on the brexit deal. but europe's leaders hit back, saying the withdrawl deal is the best and only possible agreement. mrjohnson said the current deal couldn't stand and again promised to leave the eu by the october deadline, come what may. robert mueller — he came, he testified, now what? also on the programme: protestors in puerto rico are celebrating. last night, they got what they wanted — the governor's resignation. plus a flying start ends in disappointment as a french inventor fails to cross the english channel on his
7:01 pm
jet—powered flyboard. hello and welcome. i'm christian fraser in london and jane o'brien is in washington. a day after clearing out the old cabinet, boris johnson appeared at the commons dispatch box today with a new team behind him and a bold plan in front of him. with energy and enthusiasm, the new prime minister painted a picture of a better brexit britain — the beginning, he said, "of a new golden age". the confident style of leadership reflects the settled decision of his new cabinet, and it is recognised in brussels. in an e—mail to officials, the eu's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, wrote, "pm johnson has stated that, if an agreement is to be reached, it goes by way of eliminating the backstop. this is of course unacceptable and not within the mandate of the european council." as suggested by his rather combative
7:02 pm
speech, we have to be ready for a situation where he gives priority to the planning for no deal partly to heap pressure on the eu." today, the conservative benches lapped it up, but there is a sizable minority on the conservative back benches who were nervously looking on. our mission is to deliver brexit on the 31st of october for the purpose of uniting and the energising our great united kingdom making this country the greatest place on earth. the prime minister wants to reopen the legally binding withdrawal agreement and is betting the threat of witholding £39 billion will force a rethink in brussels. but eu leaders say things must be done in sequence. the problem with the irish border, says mr barnier, cannot be deferred to a date when the uk is no longer a member. so let's explore some of this with anand menon,
7:03 pm
director of the uk in a changing europe. nice to see you. what do you think the strategy is? there are three alternatives. the first is that the prime minister genuinely thinks that bya prime minister genuinely thinks that by a mixture of getting ready for no deal, talking tough, he can force the eu to move, you can get the backstop removed in the deal through parliament, either that or he realises which i think most people who know the eu suspect, which as they will not renew the backstop, so he either thinks, i won't get a deal, i will show i have tried but ta ke deal, i will show i have tried but take us out of the eu would no deal, oi’ take us out of the eu would no deal, ora take us out of the eu would no deal, or a tantalising third option which is he will posture with the eu, he might go to dublin, berlin, come back to parliament, say, they would not give in, we have to do no deal, and if parliament tries to stop him call a general election on the back of singh, i've tried, parliament is stopping me, give me a majority.” stopping me, give me a majoritylj got stopping me, give me a majority.” got a tweet last night from somebody who said, you have got to explain to
7:04 pm
people the sequencing because it was a row through the summer of 2017. when they first sat down to talk, the eu said what it was doing was in keeping with the usual, so long as the uk was a member state it could not negotiate a trade deal, you had to bea not negotiate a trade deal, you had to be a third party member. so the question is, is there scope to go back to the eu and negotiate both at the same time, but the withdrawal agreement and the future arrangement? that you have said they are willing to talk about what is called a political declaration that spelt out their ambitions for the future relationship. they have made that clear and will do it now with prime ministerjohnson, but they have also said they will not open that withdrawal agreement under any circumstances though are still open there. if the european council, heads of state and government want to revisit that they construct the commission to do so so that is why i said he might go to national capitals. the eu have also said, we
7:05 pm
won't talk about the next phase, our future relationship, until we have signed off on the past. 0ne future relationship, until we have signed off on the past. one is legal, we don't negotiate trade deals with the member state because it is against eu law to do that, the second is more political, we will not negotiate the future with you until you have signed off in the past, and you mentioned the 39 billion contained in the withdrawal agreement, what the eu is keen to stress is that from their perspective 39 billion is not a down payment for a trade deal but a payment for a trade deal but a payment of liabilities that we owe them so they will accept no linkage between the two. i want to come to another thing, i want to pick up something iain duncan smith said today. he was close to the prime minister. he mentioned that in the event of no deal, there were arrangements already in place. the number one priority, which is what he's put michael gove in to do — get ready to leave, full stop,
7:06 pm
deal or no deal. that's really important. there are already 17 mini deals available. there will be more to do. they have to have an arrangement. 17 mini deals, ready to go. they are not mini deals, they are 17 bits of planning the eu has put in place, they will reserve the right to pull them, they are arrangements they are making to cope with no deal, if it comes to that. you get the impression listening to all of this it will bow down to who blinks first, who will give way? because somebody has to. there are several coterminous games of chicken going on at once, one between london and brussels. the eu is making it clear at the moment that it has no intention of removing the backstop, the irish prime minister said the same on tv yesterday, and bear in mind they have politics in ireland two, the irish prime minister has created a political consensus around the backstop and is very unwilling to try and unpick that, but the other game of chicken going on is between boris johnson
7:07 pm
other game of chicken going on is between borisjohnson and his own mps. introducing the earlier show to parliament he mentioned there was unease on conservative backbenchers on remain minded mps on the direction of travel, they have a lot of thinking to do over summer and have to decide what they liked least, the prospect of making a jeremy could more government more likely or the prospect of leaving the eu would no deal, and that is a difficult choice for them to make. ——jeremy difficult choice for them to make. —— jeremy corbyn government. joining us now from our westminster studio is the conservative mp george freeman, who backed borisjohnson late in the contest. what has actually changed, listening to boris johnson's what has actually changed, listening to borisjohnson‘s speech, apart from his style? two big things have changed, firstly, there can be no doubt in the corridors of europe or indeed the corridors of parliament 01’ indeed the corridors of parliament or in the country that we have a prime minister who is absolutely committed to seeing through the
7:08 pm
referendum result and to leaving and is playing hard ball, referendum result and to leaving and is playing hardball, and if europe do not come to terms, then under the terms of the withdrawal agreement, we will leave without a deal. it is not what any of us want or what borisjohnson once, not what any of us want or what boris johnson once, but not what any of us want or what borisjohnson once, but he has understood in order to get the right deal and understood in order to get the right dealand in understood in order to get the right deal and in order to break out of this terrible cycle, that dishwasher laundry politics, round and ran for three years, undermining faith in the economy and dividing national unity, we have to break out of the cycle. and secondly, for me, finally, we are hearing really positive, ambitious, global long—term vision about what brexit is supposed to be about. we have spent three years without that vision obsessing on the only thing people could deal with which is the legal terms of the withdrawal agreement. with clarity on what nation we want to be, what vision for ourselves we have, for other global rollers, then we cut some
7:09 pm
slack on the withdrawal agreement. and i hope this will break us out of that cycle and break us out into a new period in our history where we are in the european cultural, scientific collaboration soon but not in the political union and free to shape our own destiny. but if push comes to shove and you end up on the 31st of october with no deal, are you fully on board with that, would you vote for that? yes, i have made clear the new prime minister needs a new mandate, we need to reload the weapon for the negotiation. i supported theresa may setting out no deal for three years as the backstop to a negotiation but u nfortu nately as the backstop to a negotiation but unfortunately it was a negotiation in which she failed to get a deal that was able to get to parliament. and in the end, we signed the withdrawal agreement, the article 50 agreement with europe, and it says, if you can't find an agreement you have to leave without a deal. i think it would be a very difficult
7:10 pm
period. politically for the conservative party it is a huge gamble, but boris johnson conservative party it is a huge gamble, but borisjohnson has taken the view that the public have had enough and want us to find a way through this. i think you will pull of the negotiation that theresa may failed to get but more importantly he will pull the country together. and i think the tone of what he has been saying in the last 2a hours is, britain is ready to make a success of this, and for me on the agenda i ca re of this, and for me on the agenda i care passionately about our science and innovation, and i think you will surprise people by signalling he gets the need for open immigration for scientists and entrepreneurs to come here, but we need an open border policy for talent and expertise for our universities and research base. britain exporting our science around the world to help sustainable development, for me that is key. i admire your confidence,
7:11 pm
but we have heard from michel barnier today who said what he has had from borisjohnson today is unacceptable, and i want to play you what leo varadkar said last night on the evening bulletin in ireland. confidence and enthusiasm is not a substitute for a european policy or a foreign policy, so we'll need to hear in detail what he has in mind. listening to what he said today, i got the impression that he wasn't just talking about deleting the backstop. he was talking about a whole new deal, a better deal, for britain. that's not going to happen. that doesn't sound to me like the irish are ready to blink. it sounds to me like the opening shot in a negotiation. the irish have rather overplayed their hand in the last three years with michel barnier‘s help. the irish realise it but not to leave without a deal, the worst hit country would be ireland, and i think the irish are looking at this borisjohnson think the irish are looking at this boris johnson cabinet in think the irish are looking at this borisjohnson cabinet in government and thinking, oh, my god, it looks as though they are prepared to
7:12 pm
leave, and you are beginning to see negotiating positions being put out. this is real poker now and the gun is loaded. i regret that that is where we are, but that is where the failures of the last three years have left us, and where i think boris is right is we cannot go on, round and round, is trust in politics collapses, we have got to have the guts and vision, take a stand, and if we succeed the british public will return us to office with a majority. if we fail, we will be out of office. these are high—stakes and that's why i think boris needs to assemble the government with all the talents to signal we are serious about making this a moment of renewal for about making this a moment of renewalfor britain, as about making this a moment of renewal for britain, as good european neighbours and citizens pa rt european neighbours and citizens part of science in defence and other collaborations, but no longer in the political union. noticeable that conservative mps were staying quiet,
7:13 pm
the only one who seemed to stand up was 0liver lech when. the others, the so—called squad, david cork, theresa may, greg clark, they were watching another tussle with ireland, they were at lord's watching the cricket, where england we re watching the cricket, where england were fighting back after a rather lamentable start. i'm not sure if thatis lamentable start. i'm not sure if that is a metaphor, or maybe it is? they are all smiling. how long will they be smiling? we shall see. be careful what you wish for. the democrats got what they wanted — the former special counsel, robert mueller, on the stand. but his halting performance and his one—word answers yesterday left many wondering what exactly they had gained. there's little evidence that his response to questions about his two—year investigation into russian election meddling and president trump's conduct has changed any minds and, on the big question of impeachment,
7:14 pm
he doesn't seem to have given democrats any extra ammunition to start procedings. a short while ago, i spoke to democratic senator chris coons about yesterday's hearings. thank you very much forjoining me. did robert mueller‘s testimony yesterday have any impact on the debate going on within your party over whether or not to start impeachment proceedings against the president? i think the most important part of his testimony yesterday was his first full reassertion of the fact that russia continues to try and interfere with the upcoming american elections. i don't know since i don't serve in the house how it will ultimately impact the debates within our caucus, but when members have asked my advice, i have said to them i think it is simple, we already know who the jury would be in an impeachment proceeding, it is the currently seeded members of the senate, and we already know what the outcome would be, not one republican would vote to remove president trump, soi would vote to remove president trump, so i have urge my colleagues to focus instead on accountability
7:15 pm
through the 2020 election to change thejury and through the 2020 election to change the jury and to instead focus on showing the american people how democrats in the house are passing week in, week out important pieces of legislation that affect things like health care or securing our next election that the leader here in the republican—controlled senate is refusing to take up. the current fbi director today has reiterated what bob mueller warned about in his testimony, that america's adversaries are testimony, that america's adversaries a re relentless testimony, that america's adversaries are relentless and cyber attacks will continue into 2020. is america better prepared than it was in 2016? we are better prepared than in 2016? we are better prepared than in 2016 but we have shown a spotlight on the ways in which our infrastructure has flaws and challenges, and one of the outcomes of so many public hearings on this issueis of so many public hearings on this issue is that i suspect it has drawn the intention in engagement of other adversaries in addition to russia.
7:16 pm
the fbi director testified in front of the committee on which i serve earlier this week and i am concerned that we are not moving forward bipartisan bills that are already tabled here in the senate and should be taken up and voted on. and joining me now is former assistant us attorney kim wehle. she's author of the new book how to read the constitution and why. this hearing, this testimony, was supposed to be the biggie, so where did the various legal proceedings and other investigations go from here? nancy pelosi mentioned there are subpoena fights pending in the courts where they have asked witnesses the testimony, witnesses have said no, but i don't think that's a barrier to continuing with oversight in general or even impeachment proceedings, we are getting closer to the 2020 election, i think there is a good argument to be made that even if impeachment
7:17 pm
we re be made that even if impeachment were to start, there would not be time to do it in a thorough, thoughtful manner, so 2020, the election itself, might become pivotal, not just for election itself, might become pivotal, notjust for purposes of choosing a president but for purposes of determining whether the american presidency is above the law 01’ american presidency is above the law or if there's any accountability for wrongdoing in office. but if the president being held to a different legal standards and ordinary americans, particularly over this notion of the presumption of innocence? because his own lawyer has said that he should be assumed to be innocent until proven guilty and the report did not actually prove him enough to bring charges. the presumption of innocence is badly misunderstood. it implies one someone badly misunderstood. it implies one someone actually goes to trial, and the idea is that person is considered totally innocent unless the government proves their case. the burden is on the government. the presumption of innocence does not
7:18 pm
apply to mrtrump presumption of innocence does not apply to mr trump just presumption of innocence does not apply to mr trumpjust in his office as president and in this instance he is the only person on the planet who is the only person on the planet who is in the position of being immunised from any prosecution while he is in this particularjob, so it is really difficult to apply common criminal concepts to the president in this particular moment. meanwhile, while all this was going on yesterday in congress, you have a federaljudge who moves to stop the administration from denying asylum to those who are coming to the border having tra nsited to those who are coming to the border having transited through a third country, was the rationale for that? here we have an act of congress that sets forth the various criteria for allowing asylum, and they are fairly broad. what happened here was a federal agency issued a regulation but not even pursued it to the statute, the bells and whistles that have to be followed, to produce this particular regulation, they used an exception to essentially amend the statute, so this is a bridge too far. you should
7:19 pm
have gone through the process required which is generally what we call notice in common, the public race and, it is a long laborious process , race and, it is a long laborious process, number two it is so far afield from what the statute itself says and in general acts of congress trump so to speak regulations, and the court said this is trying to get too far around congress and is illegal. but i assume it will be challenged? yes, because there is another court that found the other way, and that is a typical reason why the supreme court might take a legal issue, we have got one federal court going one way, another federal court going one way, another federal court going one way, another federal court going another way, and this most court going another way, and this m ost rece nt court going another way, and this most recent court that struck down regulation, that decision functions as an injunction, stopping it from being implemented, so it has an immediate effect, and my guess would be that that is something the court would seriously consider because it has such broad national and constitutional implications because
7:20 pm
it isa constitutional implications because it is a clash between the president and congress, this time over immigration. puerto rico's governor has announced his resignation after days of mass street protests in the us territory. mr rossello, who only on sunday insisted he would stay on, said he would continue working until 2nd august to allow an orderly transition. mr rossello, who only on sunday insisted he would stay on, he has been at the centre of a group text message scandal that has already forced two of his top officials from office. within the leaked messages were sexist, profane, homophobic comments. i guess it was inevitable that the governor would have to go because we had 11 consecutive days of protest? last night was the 12th night of protests a nd last night was the 12th night of protests and there was a moment yesterday when there was so much uncertainty about what would happen we could not get a straight answer out of the office. they called us and said, somebody would make an
7:21 pm
announcement but would not say what it was. then after an hour of waiting, they said, we want to talk to you. nobody knew what was happening and people started saying, wait a happening and people started saying, waita minute, happening and people started saying, wait a minute, may be he is backtracking, maybe he is not going to resign. so the protest was building last night, tension was rising. some law enforcement officers were concerned it was a tender box, with the governor come out and not resign? and with that sent protesters into a tailspin? and sure enough the speech aired, the governor was patting himself on the back and highlighting what he thinks of the good things his administration had done, and then there was a moment where the video paused, and the thousands of protesters were like, what did he just say? then they heard, resignation, and went wild. trump has been... president trump has been
7:22 pm
very insulting about the governor, do you think his departure will fundamentally alter the relationship between washington and puerto rico? it could. puerto rico's resident commissioner, the representative and co m press commissioner, the representative and compress but has no voting power, has asked president trump to appoint a federalfinancial has asked president trump to appoint a federal financial monitor, so puerto rico has asked for upwards of $90 billion to recoverfrom hurricane marina, they have got nowhere near that, the president has said they have got more than 19 billion, he is wrong, they have got less tha n billion, he is wrong, they have got less than 20 billion so far, but now you have hair who was an ally of the governor, saying president trump, will you appoint a federal watchdog to come in and look over how we spend federal dollars? it could change the relationship i think president trump is likely happy with how the relationship will change
7:23 pm
because he was no fan of ricardo rossello. we have had a couple of resignations from the administration in puerto rico, who is likely to ta ke in puerto rico, who is likely to take over and with that person be a cce pta ble take over and with that person be acceptable to those on the streets? the person who will take over is the number three. she is the secretary ofjustice. here is what she is taking over. the number two resigned because he was caught up in a scandal so in the order of succession as is thejustice secretary. this week she is the acting governor and she will officially take over at 5pm, the 2nd officially take over at 5pm, the 2nd of august. we are outside the capital here, we came here because the house of representatives met a short time ago to decide whether or not they would continue with an impeachment process which basically started and finish it, and they decided that since the governor submitted his resignation letter they will not do that so the resignation letter was read, and the
7:24 pm
meeting was adjourned, so they accept his resignation. japanese carmarker nissan has announced that it will cut twelve thousand five hundred jobs worldwide over the next three years — nearly 10% of its workforce. profits for the three months to june fell 95% as nissan struggles with poor sales and the fallout from the arrest of its former chief executive carlos ghosn. a french inventor has failed in his attempt to cross the english channel on a jet—powered flyboard. frankie zapata, a formerjet—ski champion, had been hoping to fly from calais to dover injust 20 minutes. the attempt took place exactly 110 years after louis bleriot made the first powered flight across the channel.
7:25 pm
unfortunately, the ao—year—old fell into the water halfway across as he tried to land on a boat to refuel. if it is so hot here in the uk, may be that is the option? if the tracks are melting, that is the way to commute. but then i thought given the full story over electric scooters we are not ready for hover boards just yet. scooters we are not ready for hover boardsjust yet. i was about scooters we are not ready for hover boards just yet. i was about to scooters we are not ready for hover boardsjust yet. i was about to say, here in dc, you cannot move for scotus, i don't think i would like one of those things flying around as well. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news: how politicians deploy catchy phrases to bring voters on side. we'll be looking at two leaders on both side of the atlantic, borisjohnson and donald trump, who've got it down to a fine art form. and paris, germany, the netherlands and belgium break temperature records as a heatwave sweeps through europe.
7:26 pm
that's still to come. we have seen very extreme temperatures across north—west europe over the last few days. it has all been caused by this area of low pressure pulling up hot airfrom spain, working across france and moving into parts of the netherlands, belgium, western germany and our shoes as well. temperature records have been set, these are new national temperature records. and as far as here in the uk, we have seen the highestjuly temperature ever. temperatures have peaked at 38.1 celsius in cambridge, there could be further revisions to this, but we think that is the second highest temperature ever recorded in the uk with temperatures for tents away from the all—time
7:27 pm
record. we would have smashed that record. we would have smashed that record were it not for this cloud that drifted across eastern england which stop temperatures rising by several tenths of a degree stop the focus now is shifting from the hot weather to the big thunderstorms which are already breaking out in across england and wales those storms will move northwards and eastwards over night, reaching scotla nd eastwards over night, reaching scotland as well. the storms could bring localised flash flooding and lots of lightning as well. it would bea lots of lightning as well. it would be a very warm night and sleeping. temperatures, 11pm we are at 26 celsius in norwich, so it will be an uncomfortable night ahead. heading on into friday, we will see changes in the weather picture, more cloud than we are used to, sunny spells, but showers will develop, a few more country once across eastern areas in particular. temperatures will come down in many areas, but another pretty hot day across eastern england and northern scotland where temperatures will still reach the high 20s but otherwise more co mforta bly high 20s but otherwise more comfortably temperatures into the low to mid 20s. this weekend, this
7:28 pm
weather front will move in, becoming heavy and slow moving with thunderstorms extent, meaning we could see localised flooding issues with the rain heavy and long—lived across scotland, northern england, lincolnshire, but it is properly across wales and south—west england that we will have the best of the dry weather and sunshine and weather sunshine comes that it will feel pleasa ntly sunshine comes that it will feel pleasantly warm. 0vernight, more co mforta ble pleasantly warm. 0vernight, more comfortable sleeping, but our weather front is still continuing to bring heavy downpours around so we could see a few more problems for me to the weekend. that is your weather.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
this is beyond 100 days, with me, jane 0'brien, in washington. christian fraser is in london. our top stories: on his first day as prime minister, boris johnson promises mps the "beginning of a golden age". europe calls the speech "combative". north korea fires two missiles into the sea according the south koreans, barely a month on from mr trump's impromptu meeting with kimjong un. coming up in the next half—hour: there have been record breaking temperatures across europe as a heat wave swee ps temperatures across europe as a heat wave sweeps to the continent. and, say cheese on three — orjust don't bother. the photographer who captures
7:31 pm
weddings from the not—so picture—perfect angle. we got a taste today of what the boris johnson style is going to be. at times, the new prime minister took the tone of a fiery, evangalist preacher, eschewing the values of the brexit he helped bring about, enthralling his supporters, and enraging his detractors in equal measure. it has sent social media into a frenzy. here is the times sketch writer matt chorley. let's bring in henry newman, director of open europe. iam going i am going to put some familiar phrases on the screen for our viewers, from either side of the atlantic, and you might guess where
7:32 pm
i'm going to go with this, because they are instantly recognisable. something in this language, any style, these phrases, they stick and i don't think they come about by accident. what do you think?m should not be a huge surprise. politicians want to use language in a careful way, ways that work. people trying to draw analogies between the president and the new prime minister, on more thanjust their hair colour, it should not be a surprise. we just got so used to a very robotic style of governments where theresa may sort of repeated these mantras of strong and stable leadership and try to say that nothing has changed and that brexit meant brexit but actually when you have so many who is of a character, performing these, it seems a total change of... it is notjust about the phrase, it is about how you deliver them as well. absolutely.
7:33 pm
watch the exchange betweenjeremy corbyn and boris johnson. watch the exchange betweenjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. i think when borisjohnson corbyn and borisjohnson. i think when boris johnson did corbyn and borisjohnson. i think when borisjohnson did best, he flipped the script and sort of responded tojeremy flipped the script and sort of responded to jeremy corbyn. the labour party had not really had that sort of direct challenge to jeremy corbyn for quite a long time, perhaps since the confidence debate. we sort of got used to the house of commons being a little bit stilted rather than scenes of pardon entry drama. the reason i say is not annexing because people watch the channel 4 film — brexit, annexing because people watch the channel afilm — brexit, the uncivil war — dominic cummings... he aligns on the phrase take back control, which was brilliant, and it was effective. i wonder if we are going
7:34 pm
to see more of this as dominic cummings starts to pull the strings behind borisjohnson.” cummings starts to pull the strings behind boris johnson. i think that is likely. equally, any political advisers worth their salt, they should be doing exactly that — working out the messages, testing them with the public in many ways. dominic cummings did not come up with "take dominic cummings did not come up with "ta ke back dominic cummings did not come up with "take back control," by taking infinite domain focus groups. two taking in focus group. it was doing lots of variations of the same post from a different colours, differing branding different messages, and see which ones get the most pick—up and reception. politics is publicised now. we saw tony blair, going back a few decades, using language and sound bites that they had very
7:35 pm
carefully crafted as well. it is something donald trump uses, jane. it is indeed. he is past master of that, but there is a word i learned yesterday, glimpsed her. —— gloomster. i am yesterday, glimpsed her. —— gloomster. iam not yesterday, glimpsed her. —— gloomster. i am not sure it is in the dictionary! it is divisive language. i'm not sure that is new in politics. you had jeremy corbyn and the labour party draw different divisions of society as well. i do nothing it is surprising... is it a because, a lot of people of said today, it is not a government for 2022. it is already in campaign mode. do you believe that? yes, it looks like that is the case. the conservative party much, much more
7:36 pm
explicitly gearing up for a campaign to mother that has been the big secret in politics. we have been overdue the general election. they know that their position in parliament is extremely precarious, since the 2017 election with the taurus lost their majority —— when he tories lost their majority. they are likely to lose another by election in wales. they are really hanging bya election in wales. they are really hanging by a string, election in wales. they are really hanging bya string, and election in wales. they are really hanging by a string, and they need to go over to parliament mode. theresa may said afterwards, she had taken the theresa may said afterwards, she had ta ken the conservative theresa may said afterwards, she had taken the conservative party by surprise. i think borisjohnson is absolutely determined not to have that. he also wants to use the election sends, the campaigning sense, as you drive is downing street —— to drive his dentistry. if you have got to be ready for an election, you might as will make sure your government machine is ready for that is all. i hope you're
7:37 pm
right. if we have 0ctober ready for that is all. i hope you're right. if we have october 2020, a general election as well, mrs fraser is going to be... laughter this time last month, president trump was posing for photos with kim jong un on the armistice line of the two koreas — proudly announcing that nuclear talks would resume "within weeks". we're not sure how far they got, but what did happen "within weeks" was that north korea returned to testing. yesterday, according to the south koreanjoint chiefs of staff, they fired two short—range missiles into the sea. officials say at least one of the missiles travelled just over 400 miles and appeared to be a new design. the north is reportedly angry over the planned annual military exercises between south korea and the us. let's bring in dr balbina hwang, who formerly served as served as a state department adviser for east asian and pacific affairs. thank you very much forjoining us. this is the fourth missile test
7:38 pm
since the collapse of the summit in vietnam. what is going on? is this an escalation? not quite. these are short range missiles. some may view this as not a distinction without a difference, but there's other events that are going on at the same time which are frankly more important. first of all, national security adviser bulletin is in south korea, and what is far more significant and more dangerous in my view is that north korea also reportedly, kim jong un visited the site of a launch ofa jong un visited the site of a launch of a new submarine based initial launch. this is actually far more dangerous because this means that north korea is developing the means of launching other missiles from other bases. this is always, in my view, far more dangerous. even more significant, two days ago, russia
7:39 pm
violated the so—called adi zone of south korea's defences. this was done with the cooperation of chinese air forces, done with the cooperation of chinese airforces, and even done with the cooperation of chinese air forces, and even more significant, this was right over the disputed islands ongoing withjapan and recently, we have seen a flare—up of the so—called historical animosities between japan and flare—up of the so—called historical animosities betweenjapan and south korea. very significant. you're talking about almost a global conspiracy here. how should the us be responding, because it's conspiracy here. how should the us be responding, because its response so farfrom be responding, because its response so far from the turbine ministration has been pretty muted? —— trump administration. the entire united states administration is entirely internal, mueller, and we are now facing the phase of us elections. this is that a time when the united states has turned inwardly and there
7:40 pm
is chaos with the allies and, really, the united states any future where our interests are going in asia. i was just where our interests are going in asia. i wasjust thinking of where our interests are going in asia. i was just thinking of the situation, north korea and iran, where iran is being squeezed. the same is true, isn't it, of north korea? they are really starting to struggle. and by the way commit there is actually cooperation between iran and north korea, not only under nuclear programmes, but as well on other weapons of mass distraction. there is a lot of connection here, and we have to remember that china and russia are on the un security council, and their cooperation in the international community matters. all of these issues are absolutely all connected. and by the way, japan and south korea are two of the most
7:41 pm
important importers of oil from iran, so anjapan and south korea are very important players in the global economy. these issues are all complete the interconnected. when we talk about international cooperation, we talk about international security issues. they cannot be ignored and they cannot be looked at in isolation. balbina hwang, thank you very much. here is alina breaking news, boat leave —— vote leave have been fined and deferred to the police. we'll see if there is action on that. if there
7:42 pm
is, we'll bring that to you. the world bank group is mobilising $300 million to support the fight against the deadly ebola outbreak in the democratic republic of congo. they say the funding would meet about half the needs of a new ebola response plan, which is due to be agreed by the congolese government and an international consortium. the situation is becoming increasingly urgent. since august last year, there have been 2,612 ebola cases in the democratic republic of congo. and of those cases, 1,756 people have died. and that's according to the world health organisation. about 12 new cases are being reported every day. earlier, when i spoke to senator chris coons, we also disscused the ebola crisis and i started by asking him what america's response should be. it is the second—worst ebola outbreak in world history. i'm the only member of the united states congress who went to liberia, in west africa, during the last ebola outbreak. and ultimately, we literally
7:43 pm
spent billions of dollars in response because it spiralled so far out of control and threatened an entire region. so far, there's only roughly 2,500 cases and about 1,600 fatalities in the drc. only two cases, i think, have crossed the line over into uganda, but it is in one of the world's most violent, most underdeveloped and most disorganised regions of the world. so, first, ithink we need to continue to provide financial assistance, technical support, volunteers. this is a global challenge, and something that all of us should be engaged in. second, i think we need to ask some of our partners and allies to step up to this. i recently had a meeting with a chinese leader where i pointed out that china has a robust presence across the continent and is stepping up to peacekeeping obligationd, yet is not actively engaged in this work against ebola. it will be wonderful if we could do this in partnership with our long and trusted and close allies,
7:44 pm
like the united kingdom, with others who are taking more of a place on the world stage like china, and find a way to deliver the resources we need to contain and end this latest ebola outbreak. why is it so difficult to get ahead of this disease? well, partly because it lives in an animal reservoir, what's called a zoonotic disease. what that means is, there are animals like fruit bats and chimpanzees that carry the disease but are not harmed by it, and they can migrate widely in the equatorial forest belt. so there can be outbreaks of one year in uganda, and congo, and the next year in central or western africa. they infect people when they either bite people, if it's a bat, or people eat an animal, if it's a chimpanzee. and it's unlike... unlike diseases like polio that only exist in humans, it's impossible to eradicate it through vaccination. we're also seeing an outbreak in the democratic republic of the congo because there
7:45 pm
is so much disorder and violence, lack of government control, lack of basic health services. that's partly why we're seeing such a deadly outbreak. senator chris coons, thank you very much indeed forjoining us. thank you. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — it's getting hot, hot, hotter. the uk has had its hottest july day on record — and temperatures are still soaring. it's hot! one of boris johnson's first acts as prime minister was to guarantee the rights of eu citizens living in the uk, but that's already caused problems within his own party — with some insisting it requires a change in the law. the bbc‘s mark easton has more. with politics so volatile, many eu nationals living in the uk watch on anxiously. today, borisjohnson offered an unequivocal guarantee
7:46 pm
that they would be allowed to remain, even in the event of a no—deal. but a conservative mp who's been campaigning on the issue is worried there are no plans to make it the law. some member—states like spain have already passed legislation to protect british citizens living, working, studying and retired there, but it's entirely contingent on our passing first legislation to protect their citizens. controlling immigration was one of borisjohnson's battle cries during the brexit referendum. in suggesting an australian style point system... but hold on, australian style points system? haven't we heard that before? everyone coming to work in britain will need the right amount of points to prove they have something to give. in 2007, an australian style system was announced for non—eu migrants
7:47 pm
coming to the uk, and migrant workers still need to satisfy a point system to get a visa. once out of the european union, the conservatives' immigration proposals would extend those rules to all nationals. mrjohnson wants to sound tough and conciliatory at the same time, appealing to both sides on the migration debate, to those from the brexit party and those in business and public services who argue britain needs a reliable source of foreign labour. what does he really think? we need to see the small print. the records are being smashed — and the temperatures keep rising. western europe's second heatwave in as many months is reaching its peak. temperature records have been broken in germany, belgium and the netherlands for the second time in 2a hours. while many have been enjoying the hot weather in france, it has led to wildfires,
7:48 pm
with farmers experiencing crop failures and struggling to provide enough grass for lifestock to graze on. and here in britain, temperatures reached 38.1 celsius in cambridge — a record forjuly but still below the uk's all time high of 38.5 degrees. the weather has led to travel misery for commuters in britain. conditions so extreme, rail operators warned of railtracks buckling and passengers told to stay at home. here's bbc weather‘s sarah keith lucas to show us how the sweltering heat has spread across europe. temperatures have been building across much of europe through the course of this week. and on thursday, i think we have seen the peak of the heatwave. record—breaking temperatures, in fact, have been recorded for several countries. in the netherlands on thursday, we recorded temperatures of 40.4 celsius. another place that broke records, all—time highest temperature recorded in belgium was 40.6 celsius. and in germany, just take a look at these temperatures — 41.5 degrees celsius, the hottest temperature ever
7:49 pm
recorded in germany. and it felt even hotter with the humidity around 2. now, the good news is that we are slowly going to see that heat subsiding over the next few days, as some cooler and fresher air works in from the atlantic. and we won't see those record—breaking temperatures as we head on into the weekend. balmy, i think is the word to describe that one. so let's hear from three of our correspondents who have been out and about in the sweltering conditions in london, paris and in belgium. this is the village of kleine brogel, one of the many villages in the past 24 hours that have broken the record setting the highest temperature belgium has ever recorded. now it currently stands at 40.7 celsius. and the town in the west of the country called beatam has beat them so far, but we're expecting that temperature to continue to rise until those temperature levels of peak. this is really the epicentre around here. it's the northeast province of belgium.
7:50 pm
this heat, and this second heat wave, actually, the reality is, it is very unbearable to cope with. there was one family, and an elderly man with them, who collapsed in front of our camera crew a short while ago and had to be helped by paramedics. they were dehydrated. these are pretty uncomfortable times. for the second time in four weeks, paris is waking up to temperatures which are more worthy of cairo and casablanca. the difference between this heatwave and the one of the end ofjune is that this time around, the tendency is focused not in the south but in northern france — here in paris. the authorities have placed paris region in a state of red alert, which means that the authorities can cancel sporting events and other kinds of gatherings, nurseries are closed, and the government is saying that in temperatures like these, it's not just the old and the fragile who are vulnerable. everyone is vulnerable and needs to moderate their behaviour. the good news is that it's not going to last. this time tomorrow, there'll will be rain and much cooler temperatures arriving from the west. but in the meantime, the advice is, stay in the shade, do what you can to cool off.
7:51 pm
passengers really are facing a difficult time after what had already been a difficult day. there are cancellations and restrictions put in place this morning because of the heat, posing a risk that the rail lines would buckle and that trains could derail. that risk did not materialised or done actor in the day but it already disrupted services, and then with the further expansion of the mental involved in the overhead wires, that seems to have watched, got tangled in the top of the trains, brought the trains... the only person who looks like he is remotely enjoying herself here is theice remotely enjoying herself here is the ice cream man set up around the corner. i bet he's doing good business, the ice cream man! or business presenter, a fan of this programme, he was telling me — looking very smug — that he has new air conditions in his home. where do we
7:52 pm
stand in terms of air conditioning in this country? we don't have a tradition for that because it always rainy day. there we are, right at the bottom of the pile. look at your country, jane. 90% of households with air—conditioning. having spent some time in washington last week, can hardly begrudge them — subhuman. it is. -- i can hardly begrudge them —so it is. -- i can hardly begrudge them — so humid. summertime here in the us — like many other places in the world — is prime season for weddings. and a central feature of most ceremonies is the wedding photographer. he or she is responsbile for capturing those all intimate moments — though often a tad staged. so the uk—based photographer ian weldon takes a different approach. he prefers to film weddings as they are, warts and all. the result? a set of snaps that certainly aren't short of personality.
7:53 pm
i would describe i work as a documentary approach to wedding photography. my new book, but i'm not, if you know what i mean. as a documentary photographer, it is the real life i want to capture. if you have everything staged and we have everything approaching every wedding with the template, no wedding looks any different to any other, and they are such fruitful ground for photographs and emotion and gesture, and real—life, and the absurdity of life, that it seems rather silly to me to approach it in a stylised way. the photograph of the child pulling a funny one of my earlier wedding photographs that wasn't, i believe,
7:54 pm
and expected photograph. what he really enjoyed about that image was the irreverent nature and the child and everybody from and proper. that image, along with another image shot at the same wedding, a picture of the bride and behind her is a couple, like, really going forwards, and it was those images that may be realise it was more to a wedding than the bride and groom. it was the just position of the utterly serious situation and the ridiculous thing happening at the same time that i found incredibly interesting and i feel that it brings levity to the photographs, and there's not a great deal of that within wedding photography. everybody's deal of that within wedding photography. eve rybody's in deal of that within wedding photography. everybody's in on it from the start. it's not can pretend to be one thing and doing something else. if some of the once some thing other than that, if they want the traditional shot, the bright— groom portraits of their people out there that are her better at doing that than me. the response that i get is
7:55 pm
always positive. i think it's because people don't know what they're doing that i get such a positive response. ithink they're doing that i get such a positive response. i think it's a bit of a travesty that or photographers aren't applying their own unique perspective of what photography is. i would like to think that this is what all weddings really look like but it's not often we see that. i love those photographs next next those photographs i would like! i love those photographs! this picture here of this grandma drinking remind me of this grandma drinking remind me of my grandma, who was plied with peach baleen knees with our wedding and she thought it was peach juice —— peach bellinis. i have never seen her look so lively! and then she threw up in the left! nearly on my
7:56 pm
mother's new shoes! the faces we could have had! we'll see you next week. thanks very much for watching. hello there. we have certainly seems a very extreme temperatures across northwest europe over the last few days, all caused by this area of low pressure pulling up hot airfrom spain, working across france and moving into parts of the netherlands, belgium, western germany and across our shores as well. temperature records have been set. these are new national temperature records in germany, the netherlands and belgium as well. and as far as here in the uk, we have seen the highestjuly temperature ever, temperatures to 38.1 celsius in cambridge. they could be further revisions
7:57 pm
to this but we think that is the second—highest temperature ever recorded here in the uk. i think we would have smashed that record were it not for this cloud that tripped across eastern england and thatjust stopped temperatures rising byjust several tenths of a degree. the focus now is from the hot weather to the big thunderstorms already breaking out. those storms will continue to move northwards and eastwards overnight, reaching scotland as well. the storms will bring some localised flash flooding and lots and lots of lightning as well. it's going to be a very warm night for sleeping, temperatures, 11pm, still at 26 degrees in norwich. an uncomfortable night ahead. heading on into friday, some changes in the weather picture. bit more cloud than we have been used to. again, some sunny spells but showers will develop. thundery ones across eastern areas. going to be another hot day across eastern
7:58 pm
england and northern scotland, where temperatures will still reach the high 20s but otherwise, more comfortably, temperatures into low and mid 20s. this weekend, a weather front moves in. going to be heavy and slow moving. we could see some localised flooding issues this weekend but the rain, particularly heavy and long—lived across parts of scotland, down towards lincolnshire as well. it is across wales and southwest england where there's the best weather. where the sunshine comes out, it will feel pleasantly warm. overnight, more comfortable sleeping saturday night and the same for sunday as well. heavy downpours around, so we could see some more problems over the weekend.
7:59 pm
8:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 8pm... the uk experiences its second hottest day on record, as councils step up visits to the elderly and doctors warn of the risk of heatstroke. train passengers are told to stay at home, as the extreme temperatures cause chaos on the rail network, with problems on overhead lines. we're not the only ones. extreme heat has gripped much of western europe, with paris experiencing its hottest day ever more than 42 degrees. in other news, on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit, and welcomes in his new cabinet. he then set off for the commons, where mrjohnson told mps while he wants to leave the eu with a deal, there must be preparations, for a no—deal brexit

51 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on