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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 25, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy live at westminster. today at 2.00pm — on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson has predicted a golden age for britain after brexit. good morning everybody and it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here in respect of the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party. and, as you all know, we have a momentous task ahead of us, a pivotal moment in our country's history. we are now committed, all of us, to leaving the after addressing his first cabinet meeting he tells the house of commons, he wants to leave the eu with a deal but there must be preparations for a no—deal brexit. today is the first day of a new approach which will end with our exit from the eu on the 31st of october. the uk heads towards the highest temperature ever recorded
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as councils step up visits to the elderly — and doctors warn of the risk of heatstroke. meanwhile, rail passengers are told to stay at home, with the risk of rail tracks buckling. sarah is at our weather centre. it is officially the highest temperature in july on it is officially the highest temperature injuly on record but there is a chance today we could beat the all—time temperature record which is set at 38.5 celsius. the heat is rising and so is the humidity, it is not going to cool down ina humidity, it is not going to cool down in a hurry. i will bring you all the details in about half an hour. england's cricketers are slowly repairing some of the damage from yesterday's collapsed. they have a rather unlikely hero to thank so have a rather unlikely hero to thank so far. more later in the hour.
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hello everyone, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the temperature here at westminster has soared in recent days both outside and inside the houses of parliament where earlier boris johnson addressed the commons for the first time as the uk's new prime minister. promising a "new approach" to domestic policies, he told the house he would prefer to leave the eu with a deal. "we will throw ourselves into negotiations", he said. but mrjohnson said a priority for the new government would be to prepare for a no—deal scenario. labour leaderjeremy corbyn told him no one trusted him. earlier, in downing street, mrjohnson addressed his new cabinet ministers for the first time telling them they had, "a momentous task ahead", as he repeated his commitment for the uk to leave the eu on 31 october. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. good morning everybody and it is
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wonderful to see this new team assembled here today, irrespective of the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party. a site to get used to, a new prime minister in new bataan, a new plan for government, a team time to meet rhetoric and reality. —— in number 10. we are going to leave on october the 31st or earlier, no ifs, no buts. around the cabinet table, whether this excites you fills you with dread, things are looking different in downing street. boris johnson isn't hanging around. after chairing cabinet he was after parliament, welcomed to the chamber by his new leader of the commons, jacob rees—mogg. by his new leader of the commons, jacob rees-mogg. triumph after triumph and we've only had our prime minister for 2h triumph and we've only had our prime ministerfor 2a hours. triumph and we've only had our prime minister for 24 hours. prime minister for 24 hours. prime ministerjohnson, he had to tell the commons what he will do with power.
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order, statement, the prime minister. more important than anything, brexit. the current deal, he says, is dead. the withdrawal agreement has been three times rejected by this house. its terms are unacceptable to this parliament and to this country. no country that values its independence and its self—respect could agree to a treaty which signed away our economic independence and self—governance as this backstop does. the insurance policy to avoid a hard border in ireland has to go. he urged the eu to be negotiated and if not, we will have to leave the uk without a deal. the uk is better prepared for the situation than many believe. but we are not as ready yet as we should
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be. in the 98 days thus remain we must turbo—charge our preparations to make sure that is as little disruption as possible to our national life. i believe that is possible with the kind of national life at the british people have made before. the message for those who say he can't deliver. these are the sceptics and doubters, they are. time and again by their powers to innovate and to adapt, the british people that showed the doubters wrong. this prime minister isn't short of enthusiasm. we will be able to look back on this period, this extraordinary period as the beginning of a new golden age for out beginning of a new golden age for our united kingdom. that enthusiasm excites many in his party. today, the eu will have listened and realised the days of supplication
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are over and that we are intent on a policy to leave the european union. but he leaves others deeply worried, unconvinced he can deliver. the house will have both a sense of deja vu house will have both a sense of deja vu and of trepidation as a prime minister setting out the right lines and an artificial timetable. there is something eerily familiar about a prime minister marching off to europe with demands to scrap the backstop. labour are worried about his priorities. we have a hard right cabinet staking everything on tax cuts for the few and reckless race to the bottom brexit. the snp think it could mean the end of the uk.|j should welcome the prime minister to his place, the last prime minister of the united kingdom. there are
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many battles in here to come. boris johnson has his own team around the cabinet table, ministers fully signed up to his brexit strategy but he faces many of the fundamental problem is theresa may had. the eu who say they won't renegotiate, a wafer thin majority in parliament and after sacking key ministers, potentially a number of backbenchers who could make life difficult. but in downing street and in british politics many things are changing. and for those of you messaging me is telling i am mad to wear a jacket, you are right, it is gone. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in the central lobby of the houses of parliament. it is pretty hot over here as well! it is pretty hot over here as well! it was a typical borisjohnson performance. hated by the opposition parties, lapped up by most conservatives as he talked again
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about optimism, not doing the country down and trying to be positive and seize the opportunities of brexit and reiterating yet again he is determined the uk will leave the eu by the end of october in any circumstances. that is what is new cabinet have signed up to and that is what ministers will sign up to. one of the outstanding issues, the rights of eu citizens are leaving in that —— living in the uk. he did touch on that. tell me what you want touch on that. tell me what you want to hear from boris johnson, touch on that. tell me what you want to hearfrom borisjohnson, he gave a commitment that he was determined eu citizens welcome to this country should have the right to stay. what you want him to do next? he didn't say they should have the right to stay, he said in a quiver lately, i absolutely guarantee the rights of eu nationals to stay. that was the vote leave promise me three years ago. three years ago i was
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repeatedly saying to the then prime minister theresa mayjust to go ahead and give that unilateral undertaking to guarantee the rights of all eu nationals legitimately here. in orderfor of all eu nationals legitimately here. in order for the eu to give rights to british nationals in the eu. what has happened today is, as i say, he is given a welcome repetition of that absolute guarantee but the devil is in the detail. what i will now be doing is scrutinising how that guarantee comes forward. right now, we've got this thing called that this —— settle status scheme. people will say, i thought this has been settled before. a million eu citizens have applied for it so white he wants more than that? the scheme itself is a guarantee. it isn't enshrined in law. we are awaiting the second reading of the immigration bill in april and it didn't come. theresa
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may resigned. the settle status schemes has a number of problems with it. number one problem is it is at the whim of the home office, it isn't enshrined in law. as boris has said, those rights should be. secondly, it requires eu nationals to register for the rights. if you don't register by the deadline you can automatically lose all your rights. what i've been saying to the government now is we should have what is called a declaratory system. the state guarantees your rights, you don't need to apply for them. you would only register for than if you need an id document. we don't need to register with the states that if you want to pass but you need to apply for it. the rights are declared given as british citizens and that is what i'd like to see for eu nationals. have you had any indication from boris johnson eu nationals. have you had any indication from borisjohnson that is the row they are willing to go
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down? and when? parliament is about to pack up for six weeks. boris has said he wants to honour the commitment he gave during the vote leave campaign and he has repeatedly used the phrase, enshrined in law. that means we need an act of parliament. there was an immigration bill making its way through the commons but it is dropped and theresa may resigned. where we are right now is an extremely welcome pledge by borisjohnson right now is an extremely welcome pledge by boris johnson and right now is an extremely welcome pledge by borisjohnson and i welcomed it today in the house of commons, i thanked welcomed it today in the house of commons, ithanked him welcomed it today in the house of commons, i thanked him for giving that an equivocal absolute, using his words, but we have to see the legislation that underpins that pledge and generally delivers on a guarantee for all eu nationals. can i tell you what it is important? if we do this the eu member states, if we do this the eu member states, if we come out with no—deal, eu states like spain, that will only be
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reciprocated if we have passed in the united kingdom primary legislation to protect eu nationals. it is important for british citizens living in the eu that you protect eu nationals here. thank you very much indeed. parliament about pack up for the summer. i don't think boris johnson will be going on holiday any time soon. thank you very much. i was just hearing that borisjohnson and jean—claude juncker are going to hearing that borisjohnson and jean—claudejuncker are going to be talking on the phone in the coming hours. he hasjust talking on the phone in the coming hours. he has just finished talking on the phone in the coming hours. he hasjust finished in the house of commons and addressing the issue of brexit and europe straightaway. joining me now is scottish conservative mp ross thomson. nice to see you. i want to redo a tweet. this is not a proper cabinet looks like and they will deliver brexit and unite the country.|j
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think people across the country were getting frustrated that we had a cabinet which has broken down. not abiding by collective responsibility, not voting with the government when appropriate and required and it was dysfunctional. we are looking for a strong cabinet. let's look north of the body because there are issues here. nicola sturgeon rating last night, she was to talk to boris soon. you have his ear, you are going to recommend he goes to scotland soon?|j ear, you are going to recommend he goes to scotland soon? i wouldn't have to recommend it because boris is keen to get up to scotland as $0011 is keen to get up to scotland as 50011 as is keen to get up to scotland as soon as possible, notjust to meet with the first minister but to speak to communities in scotland and to show he cares about the union and to talk about the things he will do to strengthen it. yet, your party north of the border with his appointments, the rumour is it is in disarray. there are talks about an away day where they are going to break away from the party here. an away day is
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a regular thing and from the party here. an away day is a regularthing and i'm from the party here. an away day is a regular thing and i'm not aware of that on the agenda. aren't you? it was discussed in 2012 when ruth davidson became our leader, and she stood on the platform in keeping the conservative party with the central party. the arguments then i write 110w. party. the arguments then i write now. we need to show that we can pool resources and that is why we other unionist parties that believes in sharing resources across the uk. theresa may depended on ruth davidson, looks at the way ruth davidson, looks at the way ruth davidson was cajoling the party north of the border. borisjohnson, very different, has a very different relationship with ruth davidson a problem, isn't it? they have a good relationship but boris can compliment what ruth is doing and he will allow ruth to do the important
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work she is doing. it is only because of her hard work and approach to politics that we have had a resurgence in scotland. boris could help boost that. i have seen in aberdeen talking to people, seeing them clamour for selfies, stardust he has. i believe he has an ability to connect with voters in scotland. that was last week, he is 110w scotland. that was last week, he is now prime minister of the uk, there are some serious issues to address. this ends in scotland is he is the wrong person to address them. there has been a false narrative in scotla nd has been a false narrative in scotland as borisjohnson is the wrong effect but there is no evidence of that. i have worked with him and had a meeting and seeing the reaction to that. he is prime minister now, he's going to be in scotland, he will prove that he can deliver for scotland. what does that mean, deliverfor deliver for scotland. what does that mean, deliver for scotland ? when will the people of scotland say it, he has delivered. i've only been
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here for a couple of years and i've seen how in whitehall decisions can be made policies introduced that don't take into account the impact on scotland directly. he is going to set upa on scotland directly. he is going to set up a union at the heart of number 10 to make sure protecting the union is at the heart of decision—making and whitehall understands devolution. an hour ago you were asking him a question in the house of commons and he answered you by saying, the only thing nicola sturgeon is going to achieve is handing over the fisheries to brussels. that is an old argument, he never seems to answer the question. the fishing industry is a totemic industry for scotland. we feel they were betrayed in the 70s. coastal communities in scotland voted to leave the european union. this is our opportunity to deliver for them. he has said, even today, he wants a new immigration system
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that will allow us in scotland to get skilled workers we need into agriculture, into the fishing sector. he's talked about boosting scottish whisky as our greatest export. he is going to back the scottish oil and gas industry. export. he is going to back the scottish oil and gas industrylj scottish oil and gas industry.” know you are going home later tonight. will you be asking the question whether borisjohnson is prime minister has reinvigorated the snp. we heard he was welcome today as the last prime minister of the united kingdom. i think they've got a lot to be worried about. the reason why you get so much heat a blister from the snp is because they know boris was the only one with the strength of personality that could ta ke strength of personality that could take them on. in seats like perth, we will see snp losses on tory gains. you are not worried that the liberal democrats? jo swinson is a very strong leader and good for
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scotla nd very strong leader and good for scotland to have a scottish leader but i believe the people of scotland will look at the clear two parties which are the snp and the conservatives. the conservatives are saying no to another independence referendum. i'm sure they will come to the scottish conservatives and return more mp5. to the scottish conservatives and return more mps. what about those who say, conservatives north of the border are rather better with boris johnson. we have a hustings in perth. the commentator said scottish conservative grassroots members like jeremy hunt but they love boris johnson. they are with boris and seeing the emphatic result he had in the leadership election shows he won scotla nd the leadership election shows he won scotland and in england, wales and northern ireland. boris johnson brings you this afternoon and says what can i say to scotland? i'd say
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talk about what the union means to you. he is very passionate about protecting scotland puzzling place in the uk. notjust talking about the emotion in the belief, he can articulate it. ross thomson, good to talk to you. thanks forjoining us. britain is set for record—breaking heat today, as temperatures are predicted to rise beyond 39 degrees celsius. this thermometer here says it is 106 fahrenheit. it is not scientific, it is not fact, but it is hot. while for families enjoying the school holidays, the heatwave is a chance to bask in tropical temperatures, for others the extreme weather could mean disruption or danger to health. public health england has issued
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a heat—health warning. but first the temperature could be so high that rail operators have warned that tracks could buckle, and they're imposing 60 mile per hour speed limits. our transport correspondent tom burridge has more. travelling today is a sticky and thirsty affair. i have got a little hand fan and lots of water. you get off the train and onto the platform, it's like going into a hot house. if the air on the platform feels hot, the steel on the tracks will be potentially 20 degrees hotter. just as a coin left in the sunshine heats up, the track does the same and as the metal gets hotter it expands and can buckle when a train goes over. this is what a buckled rail line looks like. this train derailed in california because of a buckled line. so now, speed restrictions are in place across much of our railways. a blanket 60 mph limit for all services travelling in the
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southern half of england. trains in between london and the north of england, scotland and wales will also be affected. our railway is geared up to run under the norms of uk temperatures, and therefore when we go outside of that which is happening today we have to put in special measures to accommodate the difference in circumstances. with only seven in ten services running, the commute this evening is likely to be a slow and crowded affair for many. what we are saying to people is only travel if you need to. if you need to make thatjourney, consider another mode of transport other than the train but if you are travelling on the train, bring water with you, check with the operator you will be travelling on that there is an disruption and listen to the announcement. tracks reinforced with concrete slabs are not the norm in britain because it is four times as expensive. the majority of the network is not built to withstand the record temperatures expected
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today and so there is a risk that lines could buckle in the heat. tom burridge, bbc news. to talk more about that heat—health warning, i'm joined by deborah turbitt, the deputy director for health protection at public health england. just explain, what is it our bodies are doing that process and distress in this weather. when it is as hot as this we need to sweat and evaporate that sweater cruel our bodies down. in order to be able to do that, our heart and lungs are working a bit faster than the normally answer that is why people are feeling the effects of this unusually hot weather. most people would say, common sense kicks in. but when we're talking weather temperatures as they are now, what are the precautions we should be taking? people will do all the right things because this isjust taking? people will do all the right things because this is just a reminder to those who might not have
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heard the messages. to keep out of the sun during the height of the temperatures during the middle of the day. make sure you drink adequate amounts of fluid, drink plenty of water that is important. what you mean by drink plenty of water? drink more than usual. every half an hour? you really can't drink too much. he will stop drinking when you stop feeling thirsty. as soon as you stop feeling thirsty. as soon as you feel thirsty have another drink. it is important people who can't get access to drinks very easily, people who are stuck in their own homes, perhaps vulnerable elderly people, ensure somebody‘s popping in to see them and make sure they got an adequate supply. also for babies and young children who can't go and help themselves to drinks, make sure pa rents themselves to drinks, make sure
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parents and carers offer them drinks frequently. a lot of people are at work today and they've got to get to wear, got to get home, they don't regard the hot weather as a reason not to. i suspect your advices, if you don't have to get on a train, don't. if you can work from home and your employer is happy for you to work at home, that is great, not everybody can and they will have to travel into cities and towns to do that. on heavily congested commuter trains and buses, if you have to do that, they will be hard and make sure you take water with you and wear loose clothes. a heat health emergency, that is what we have been hearing. what does that mean? are you prepared to do with people who will die you prepared to do with people who willdie in you prepared to do with people who will die in this period because we've seen that previously in france? i very much hope people will have been able to take heed of the warnings to keep their houses cool by keeping curtains and blinds
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closed when the sun is shining on that side of their home and that people are able to drink the extra water they need to. i hope the warnings we have given out will mitigate it. we can't be sure nobody will die, people are dying of other things. the one thing people are worried about his sleep, it is difficult to sleep in this weather. what is the advice? do you keep windows open? you can keep windows open during the night if you can generate a breeze through your home because the sun is not out during the middle of the night and it is and is creating more heat. that is the best way. if you have a fan, you can put that on and that might help. otherwise, just be sensible. be sensible and make sure you drink plenty of fluids. thank you very much forjoining us. north korea has fired two short—range missiles into the sea, according to officals in south korea. they say they believe that
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north korea was testing a new type of weapon. it's the first time north korea has fired missiles since its leader kimjong—un met donald trump late last month. boeing has warned it may have to halt production of its 737 max aircraft — if it remains grounded for much longer. the plane was taken out of service in march, following crashes in ethiopia and indonesia which killed nearly 350 people. yesterday, the company reported its largest ever quarterly loss of almost two and a half billion pounds. two teenagers have beenjailed for offences relating to the fatal stabbing of grammar school pupil yousef makki. yousef was stabbed in the heart with a flick knife in the village of hale barns in greater manchester in march. both boys are 17 — and can not be named for legal reasons. our correspondentjudith moritz sent us this update from outside manchester crown court. the boys being sentenced were being sent is for offences relating to the
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stabbing, the fatal stabbing of 17—year—old yousef makki who was a scholarship boy at manchester grammar school, he was fatally stabbed on the 2nd of march in a village in south manchester which is in an area popular with footballers and celebrities. the court heard as pa rt and celebrities. the court heard as part of sentencing this was evidence of knife crime affecting all aspects of knife crime affecting all aspects of our society. this had happened after yousef makki was involved in a row with two boys, also both 17. a row with two boys, also both 17. a row over a failed drugs deal. we can't name the 217 euros, they are young. they were sentenced today, boy a was acquitted of both murder and manslaughter but he had been carrying the knife that had stubbornly stabbed yousef makki. he was acquitted of both of those charges. he did admit possessing the knife and perverting the course of justice, lying to the police after
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the crime and for that he was sentenced today to 16 months. by b having possessed the flick knife as well. he was sentenced to four months in total and sentencing, the justice said knife crime is a cancer on our society. he said both boys, the backdrop to your offending is depressingly all—too—familiar. he said they were part of a warped culture in which the possession of knives were seen to be cool and pleasing he told them both that by sending them to prison he hoped that other young people in this situation would be put off from carrying knives. i am taking my thermometer. this is not scientific. we've got on in the shady and this is that the moment it is 104, which is 40 celsius. we've got one in the sun
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but it is too far for me to reach. ifi but it is too far for me to reach. if i can show me the view of westminster, it is a beautiful day although cloud is beginning to form for temperatures we are waiting to hear if the approach that record breaking temperatures later on. nobody is more interested than that van sarah keith lucas. it is the hottestjuly day on record and we could well break the all—time temperature record. that stands at 38.5 celsius. i was sat in five in august backing 2003. today, temperatures not too far off that all—time temperature record and the heat concentrated across central and eastern part of england. it is to the west of london or cambridgeshire that we could see 39 celsius out there. the reason for all this heat is we've got low pressure out
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towards the west, higher pressure in the east of that is drawing in the south to south—easterly winds so it has been very hot across many essential parts of europe, broken records in germany, belgium and the netherlands, all that hot air drifting across the uk today it isn't just the humidity drifting across the uk today it isn'tjust the humidity but drifting across the uk today it isn't just the humidity but we've gus and thunderstorms that having taken out across parts of eastern england, eastern wales as well, a few miles further south. some heavy showers and thunderstorms. they will be drifting northwards but as is the nature of these heavy downpours they will be hit and miss. take a look at these temperatures, widely offer in these temperatures, widely offer in the 30s, 38 or 39 possible towards the 30s, 38 or 39 possible towards the south—east. pretty hot across eastern parts of scotland, northern ireland as well at about 24 celsius. with all the heats, that is going to be kicking off some big thunderstorms this evening. frequent lightning, gusty winds and really
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heavy downpours. the position of these are hard to pinpoint but they are initially far northern england, eastern england and eastern scotland. i'm afraid it is going to be another uncomfortable night for sleeping. those temperatures in the high teens, possibly the low 20s right through the course of the night. some good news for tomorrow if you are not a fan of this heat, it is turning fresher. the conference it is turning fresher. the c0 nfe re nce m oves it is turning fresher. the conference moves in and it will bring some outbreaks of rain. still some heavy showers and thunderstorms across eastern england through friday morning. later in the day, we start to see more of an influence of the westerly winds moving on so that is good news, we won't have the record—breaking temperatures. 10 degrees cooler tomorrow compared to what we've got out there through the course of this afternoon. the humidity will be falling as well. friday night into the weekend, we've got this cold front and it will stall across eastern parts and we could see heavy persistent rain through the course of the weekend,
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lingering over eastern england and eastern scotland. that could bring some flooding problems. today, we've got the heat but a different feel to the weather tomorrow and into the weekend. things will be turning more u nsettled. weekend. things will be turning more unsettled. listen fresher weather on the cards. do we want things are very hot out there for many of us.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit todayis today is the first day of a new approach which will end with our exit on the 31st of october. the uk sees the hottestjuly day on record as council step up visits to the elderly and doctors one of the risks of heatstroke.
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meanwhile, rail passengers are told to stay at home, with the risk of rail tracks buckling sport now on afternoon live with adam wild — and an unlikely figure riding to england's rescue after an embarrassing first day of the test against ireland. we of the test against ireland. finally have a successt for we finally have a successful opener for england, jack leach. he has made his highest ever first class go. england's cricketers of steady things just england's cricketers of steady thingsjust a england's cricketers of steady things just a little as they try to claw back that embarrassing deficit in their one—off test against ireland at lord's. remember they we re ireland at lord's. remember they were all out forjust ireland at lord's. remember they were all out for just 85 yesterday. certainly not the kind of form they wa nted certainly not the kind of form they wanted to show with just a week before the start of the ashes series. somerset‘s jack leach is still there, into the 70s now. not bad for a number 11 and a half century for one day specialist jason roy down at the other end on his test debut. england currently 155—1.
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things go much better than yesterday, simon. let's talk swimming and britain's adam peaty has come out with some pretty forceful comments about the big doping controversy at the world championships this week. yeah, it really has cast a long shadow over the world aquatics championships taking place in south korea. the controversy over the chinese swimmer who served a three—month drug ban in 2014. he was heard calling britton's duncan scott a loser as the pair left the port yesterday. scott won bronze in the 200 metre freestyle but refused to share the podium with the controversial gold medallist. is not the only want to do so this week and now adam peaty has had his say as well. pt has told the bbc he supports the actions of some of his fellow at the championships who have protested. scott was warned after refusing to share the podium after a
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similar demonstration by an australian swimmer. now pt has said he would do the same if the situation arose. absolutely, absolutely. and i think being british that is one of our best qualities, we will stand for what we think is right on the rest of the world is with us. you know when the protesters came back in the dining room everyone was clapping them. we know cheating has no place in sport and it never has but it is getting that message out for us and getting that message out for us and getting that message out for us and getting that message out. massive applause to dunks. a repeat, ten times a day to dunks. a repeat, ten times a day to the media, doping has no place in sport and people who win, even if you cheat and when you have not won. that lays with them for the rest of their life. hopefully dunks will smash you out of the water next week. manchester united have beaten
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totte n ha m week. manchester united have beaten tottenham to— one in a pre—season friendly in china. spurs levelled after the break. united regained the lead just ten minutes before the end. this goal securing the victory. now, after shane lowry‘s open championship victory at the weekend there is more good news for irish golf. it will host the limerick course will host the ryder cup. the last time it was staged in ireland was in 2006. now, melissa reid is in contention after the opening round of the opening major of the year. the englishwoman is joint of the opening major of the year. the englishwoman isjoint fifth on five under par, two shots behind the leader. at the ever young
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championship in france. and that is all us but for now. on his first day in thejob, borisjohnson has promised to "work flat out" to get a new withdrawal deal with the european union — insisting that theresa may's agreement is dead. the new prime minister also said the uk was better prepared for a ‘no deal‘ than many believe. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. what sort of things has he been saying? i think one source of thing is is to boxed himself into the rocks over the 31st date. his leg which was so stark even on the backstop that even a time limit was not acceptable it just backstop that even a time limit was not acceptable itjust has to go. that seems to me by that by boxing himself into that and the 31st of october the chances, potentially, himself into that and the 31st of octoberthe chances, potentially, of no deal, if we believe that that really is the policy, have gone up. now obviously one of the new
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government's determination is to say yes, this really is the policy and so they're going to do some preparation to show that is the case. i think we can this into a clip of boris johnson case. i think we can this into a clip of borisjohnson explaining what those nay no deal preparation would be. in the 98 days that remain to us we must turbo—charge our preparations to make sure there is as little disruption as possible to our life. i believe that is possible with the kind of national effort that the british people have made before and will make again. in the circumstances, we would of course have available £39 billion in the withdrawal agreement to help deal with any consequences. i have today instructed the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster to make these preparations his top priority. i have asked the cabinet secretary to mobilise the civil service to deliver this outcome should it become necessary. and the chancellor
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has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. now, that claim, £39 billion, jeremy corbyn i think the same 33. what is the figure? it is actually 33. we have been guilty of this as well, we have been guilty of this as well, we have been guilty of this as well, we have been using this £39 billion figure because that was the original estimate of the budget for fiscal responsibility but that was on the assumption originally made that we would leave on the 29th of march and then there would be a transition period until the end of december 2020. so our bill since then has gone up? no, it has gone up. 33 is less tha n gone up? no, it has gone up. 33 is less than 39! so obviously at the moment we are still paying the money but we are paying the money between the 29th of march and the 31st of october as we normally whirred into the eu budget. so the potential divorce bill has gone down because thatis divorce bill has gone down because that is 6 billion of it has already been paid as normal budget
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contributions. but of that 39 hasn't some of it got to be paid because thatis some of it got to be paid because that is for commitments that have been committed to europe in the past? yeah, that only the argument on the european side and i think a lot of people within government would say there are some things in that we really should pay. there are things like pension contributions for eu officials who have serving within european institutions while britain was a member. more controversial possibly i guess our commitments which have been made for projects which haven't started yet. but i think the eu position would certainly be if you don't pay the whole of that we are not going to be talking to you about any kind of free trade agreement to lie settle. will we expect to hear anything more about eu citizens here? well, we did hear a bit about eu citizens but it wasn't much beyond what we already knew. i think there are backbench mps who hope that there would be a commitment to legislate for the fact that under any circumstances eu citizens here would be guaranteed
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the right to stay. now, what seems to have happened and it is not really much of an advance from what theresa may's government has said is we will make sure you can stay, it doesn't need to be legislated for. we will need to be here, we will welcome you. interestingly enough also, as well as his words on eu citizens, mrjohnson was asked about an amnesty for illegal immigrants and for that he said i do think it is wrong for us to try and deport people potentially have been living and working here, paying their taxes for yea rs and working here, paying their taxes for years and years and years and we suddenly say actually, 20 years ago you came here illegally, you have to go. so he certainly didn't rule out the possibility of an amnesty for illegal immigrants. he said basically the law already suggests that they should stay and can be allowed to work and do whatever they want. yes, there was a slight comment to his predecessor saying i have raised this once in cabinet predecessor as prime minister didn't
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seem to want to listen to that much. so it is something he has a reputation for being fairly liberal on immigration. that is something which is going to be interesting to watch. the balance within his cabinet between those who do favour a more liberal immigration policy and those who actually say one of the messages of the referendum campaign is we want to decrease immigration. i think his argument would be necessarily decrease but control the way that immigration happens. let's pick up on that because one of the more eye—catching pledges made by the new prime minister is that we will hire an extra 20,000 police officers by 2022 and that announcement comes as 16 prisons in england and wales were rated as having performance of serious concern today. the highest proportion since ratings began. let's go to danny sure because the issue of immigration, as chris was just saying, what does this actually mean? well i think what he is saying is it
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isa well i think what he is saying is it is a real priority for him to sort of reshape the law nor the agenda —— the law and order agenda and get back some of that traditional tory policy that was lost in theresa may. in of policing he has reaffirmed that pledge to recruit an extra 20,000 officers across forces in england and wales by 2022. priti patel the new home secretary is said to be working on that, working on the details around that. that is going to be a tall order. it is by no means going to be straightforward because for many police forces they are not used to recruitment on this scale. it is a little bit like getting an old car out of the garage, you are not sure if there is any petrol in it, you have to wipe away the cobwebs and when you put the key in the ignition it may stall for a bit. that is a bit like the recruitment system in policing. there aren't, i have been told, enough courses, enough instructors,
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for all these new recruits. also the other problem is in some areas of the country there is a very competitive labour market. and so for some forces, having to step up their recruitment when you are paying police officers around about £20,000 and you are saying to them you need a degree or you need to get a degree while you are on the job is going to be quite tough to do it in that timescale. also, remembering as well that where are you going to put all of these police officers? they need police stations. hundreds of police stations have been closed over the last few years. the other impact of course is on the criminal justice system and borisjohnson today were saying that he wants to see tougher sentences for violent criminals and for six offenders —— and for sex offenders. at the same time he was saying he would like a more liberal policy and is obviously conscious of the situation prison so square in those two it will be interesting to see. talking of the
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practicalities of the police, politically he is saying i will have more bobbies on the beat and that will play well with the police services themselves won't it? absolutely. they welcome the fact there is going to be a big recruitment drive, they have been calling for it for years but when you get away from the rhetoric you have to look at the detail and there is no doubt that this is going to be a tough challenge for policing. and there is also the argument that it is not just about the there is also the argument that it is notjust about the number of officers for what the police service needsis officers for what the police service needs is investment in equipment, in it and specialist skills as well. they are desperately short of investigators and people with the skills to be able to interrogate and examine smartphones and other devices quickly and so on. so i think what really the police service is asking for is a more nuanced approach than simply say and write 20,000 officers, there you go, all the problem solved. danny shaw, thank you very much. here's your business
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headlines on afternoon live. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. nissan cuts 12,500 jobs worldwide. as yet, the location of those cuts is unknown. the carmaker suffers a 95% fall in profits in the first three months of the year. boeing may stop making its best—selling jet, the 737 max. it's been grounded since march after two fatal crashes. the company is reporting its largest ever quarterly loss. if regulators keep the model grounded, boeing said it would consider reducing or shutting production down of the plane. facebook shares jump after reporting a 28% rise in revenues. on wednesday facebook announced that will pay a record $5 billion dollar fine to settle privacy concerns. from what you just said
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ben, it seems like these are incredibly turbulent times for boeing — and it's really now feeling the financial hit from the grounding of the 737 yes — so much so that it's talking about reducing — or even completely stopping — production of that model. why? because a number of airlines have put orders on hold until a software fix has been comprehensively tested and approved by regulators. the jet has been grounded worldwide since march because of fatal accidents in ethiopia and indonesia which killed almost 350 people. boeing's boss says he thinks the 737 max will be back in the air by october. but that is still far from certain. the crisis has seen boeing rack up its biggest ever quarterly loss. our new business correspondentjoins us now. our new business correspondentjoins us now. michelle, how much patience do you think investors will have with boeing over all of this?” think there is some degree of understanding that when you are dealing with a crisis, and this is a
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crisis for the airline, that it is going to take some time and it is also going to cost a lot of money. given the size of the plane maker, it is money that so far it is able to absorb but there are questions about what it means for the company's about what it means for the compa ny‘s long—term future. about what it means for the company's long—term future. and i think that is where you start to see wall street getting a little bit rattled. at the moment boeing's share price is only down three points. so there is an element of despite the fact that this was a bad quarterfor despite the fact that this was a bad quarter for the company, it despite the fact that this was a bad quarterfor the company, it had already warned investors it was going to take a $5 billion hit related to the costs associated with the 737 max problems. the question is how much will it cost overall and will display and get back in the i think that is the crucial question, at least for investors. and on that point, michelle, any indication from the regulators yet as to house boats they are to been satisfied to sign
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off this software fix? i mean, it was interesting because if you look back to sort of the aftermath of the plane crash in ethiopian there was a lot of questions about the ffa, that is the american aviation regulator, did it do a good enoughjob? and as a result of that they have been, in some ways, playing catch up. so you have the department of transportation saying recently that there was no set time line for the 737 max to be granted permission to get back in the air. i think they are trying to show that they are on thejob and are trying to show that they are on the job and that they are taking seriously their task of certifying this plane. for boeing though i think the key new bits of news that we haven't heard before was the admission for the first time that they may have to slow down production, then after potentially halting altogether. and just to give you an idea, the last time boeing did that was in the 1990s. ok,
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michelle for is there in new york. thank you very much indeed. that's all the business news. you're watching pot. —— you're watching afternoon live. a french inventor has failed in his attempt to cross the english channel on a jet—powered flyboard. franky zapata, a former jet—ski champion, had been hoping to cross the channel injust 20 minutes. crowds gathered at sangatte beach, near calais, to watch the inventor as he took off at 9 o'clock this morning — heading for st margaret's bay in dover. the attempt took place exactly 110 years since louis bleriot made the first powered flight across the channel. our correspondent duncan kennedy was waiting at saint margaret's bay near dover where franky zapata was supposed to land.
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it was going so well he made it 12 miles over the channel and he was supposed to hover over the refuelling boat. in the end, for a variety of reasons, they decided to put down on the boat to refuel and it was during that exercise, some sort of miss coordination between the swell of the boat going up and down that he fell into the water. we are not quite sure what happened. franky zapata himself is ok but the tea m franky zapata himself is ok but the team are incredibly disappointed. as his colleague told me. when he was coming to the boat, he did hisjob perfectly. and when you want to land the boat was moving a little bit. that is always the problem to land on the boat. he did that many times but the most important time. he did it in florida and he did it's perfectly into metre waves. but this time perhaps he wanted to go too
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fa st time perhaps he wanted to go too fast and the he lost the balance and fell into the water. and they told us that he feels really, really bad now. i can understand because we feel the same. yes, they offer really bad now, especially on this day because the anniversary flight took off and land on the cliff here. what franky zapata will do now is go back to his workshop in marseille, clean it up and try again. he says it is not his only aim in all this. his aim is also to impress the french defence services who are part funding this and he said it is for them long term that he wants to impress that he can show that long—term it is a viable machine. you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. tributes have been paid to the actor, rutger hauer, whose death at the age of 75 was announced yesterday. the director guillermo del toro described the blade runner staras an ‘intense, deep, genuine and magnetic actor
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who brought beauty to his films‘. andy beatt reports. the role that catapulted rutger hauer into hollywood history. upstaging harrison ford as menacing android anti hero. his speech substantially rewritten by rutger hauer himself the night before filming. i have seen things you people wouldn‘t believe. attack ships on fire. i watched... glitter in the dark. his charisma and striking looks helped him win roles in more than 100 movies, often as the villain. regularly seen on the red carpet, in 1988 winning a golden
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globe for best supporting actor. and more recently appearing in sin city, batman begins and the hbo series trueblood. film—makers and actors led tributes on social media. all those moments will be lost in time. like tears. in rain. fans too will miss a man who, away from the camera, led a quiet life in the netherlands. using his money and fame to promote awareness of hiv aids and back the environmental group greenpeace. remembering rutger
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hauer. whenever you get an announcement of a death every now and again it hits you and certainly his death did that for many of us, i know. you are watching afternoon live. with all that cloud around there was some uncertainty still about whether we are going to beat the all—time temperature record. today is already the hottestjuly day on record. we could see those temperatures peaking above 38.5 celsius. that record was set in fashion back in august 2003. we have already got temperatures up above 37 celsius. the areas where we could potentially see that record—breaking heat with temperatures as high as possibly 39 degrees across central and eastern england, especially to my towards the west of london, that is where we could potentially see those temperatures as we head on through the afternoon. the reason for the
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heat is the low pressure out towards the west, the high pressure to the east. drawing in these southerly winds. it has been very hot across continental europe and those temperatures continue to rise. if you are not a fan of the heat and humidity you will be pleased to know that the today is the last day of the heatwave. heavy showers and thunderstorms across england and wales in recent hours. we will continue to see heavy showers and thunderstorms across england wales. they could just peg back those temperatures by a few tenths of a degree but for many others it is up in the 30s. the mid to high 30s across the south—east of england. further north looking at 29 possibly 30 degrees and the mid 20s across northern ireland. as we head through the course of tonight we are likely to see more of those showers and thunderstorms, frequent lightning, gusty winds, hail and very heavy rainfall. pushing across northern england through the course of this
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evening, eastern england and scotla nd evening, eastern england and scotland feeling the brunt of those heavy downpours. many waking up to a 5°99y heavy downpours. many waking up to a soggy start. another hot night ahead. pretty uncomfortable and sticky for sleeping with temperatures in the high teens or low 20s. better news on the horizon, we have got fresher air moving in on the cold front tomorrow. today, the heat of the peak wave, tomorrow things will turn fresher. but thing still hot and humid. cloud and patchy rain move in on the cold front from the west. temperatures still in the mid to high 20s across eastern england and scotland but for most of us it is about 10 degrees cooler tomorrow than it is out there today. so all the heat and humidity pushing away towards the east, something fresh and moving in from the low front will stall over the uk over the weekend so potentially some very heavy rain across eastern
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england and eastern scotland too. it is looking pretty unsettled as that front lingers into saturday and sunday for some of us. flooding in parts of scotland for instance. temperatures back at 19, perhaps 20 celsius through the weekend. do be prepared for the heat and humidity out there this afternoon.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live, i‘m simon mccoy live at westminster. today at 3.00pm — on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit good morning everybody and it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here in respect of the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party. after addressing his first cabinet meeting he tells the house of commons he wants to leave the eu with a deal — but there must be preparations for a no—deal brexit. today is the first day of a new approach which will end with our exit from the eu on the 31st of october. the uk sees the hottestjuly day on record as councils step up visits to the elderly and doctors warn of the risk of heatstroke. meanwhile, rail passengers
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are told to stay at home, with the risk of rail tracks buckling. and sarah keith lucas is in our weather centre. temperatures still rising over the next hour or so but we've also got some torrential showers and thunderstorms to contend with. we will keep you up—to—date with all of that through the rest of the afternoon. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with adam wild. england‘s cricketers are preparing some “— england‘s cricketers are preparing some —— repairing some of the damage after yesterday passed my collapse against ireland. they have a rather unlikely hero to thank. more later in the hour.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i‘m simon mccoy. the temperature here at westminster has soared in recent days both outside and inside the houses of parliament, where earlier boris johnson addressed the commons for the first time as the uk‘s new prime minister. promising a "new approach" to domestic policies, he told the house he would prefer to leave the eu with a deal, "we will throw ourselves into negotiations", he said. but mrjohnson said a priority for the new government would be to prepare for a no—deal scenario. labour leaderjeremy corbyn told him no one trusted him. earlier, in downing street, mrjohnson addressed his new cabinet ministers for the first time, telling them they had "a momentous task ahead", as he repeated his commitment for the uk to leave the eu on 31 october. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. good morning everybody and it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here today, in respect of the depth and breadth of talent
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in our extraordinary party. a sight to get used to, a new prime minister in number10, a new planfor government, a team trying to make rhetoric a reality. we are committed, all of us, to leaving the eu on october the 31st or earlier, no ifs, no buts. around the cabinet table, listening to the new boss, whether this excites you or fills you with dread, things are looking different in downing street. borisjohnson isn‘t hanging around. after chairing cabinet he was off to parliament, welcomed to the chamber by his new leader of the commons, jacob rees—mogg. triumph after triumph achieved by this government and we‘ve only had our new prime ministerfor 24 hours. it‘s amazing. prime ministerjohnson, here to tell the commons what he will do with power. order, statement, the prime minister. more important than
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anything, brexit. the current deal, he says, is dead. the withdrawal agreement negotiated by my predecessor has been three times rejected by this house. its terms are unacceptable to this parliament and to this country. no country that values its independence and its self—respect could agree to a treaty which signed away our economic independence and self—governance as this backstop does. the insurance policy to avoid a hard border in ireland has to go. he urged the eu to renegotiate and if not — we will have to leave the uk without an agreement under article 50. the uk is better prepared for the situation than many believe. but we are not as ready yet as we should be. in the 98 days that remain we must turbo—charge our preparations to make sure that there is as little disruption as possible to our national life.
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i believe that is possible with the kind of national effort the british people have made before. the message for those who say he can‘t deliver — these are the sceptics and doubters, they are. time and again by their powers to innovate and to adapt, the british people have showed the doubters wrong. this prime minister isn‘t short of enthusiasm. we will be able to look back on this period, this extraordinary period, as the beginning of a new golden age for our united kingdom. that enthusiasm excites many in his party. today, the eu will have listened and realised the days of supplication are over and that we are intent on a policy to leave the european union. but he leaves others deeply worried,
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unconvinced he can deliver. the house will have both a sense of deja vu and of trepidation at a prime minister setting out rigid red lines and an artificial timetable. there is something eerily familiar about a prime minister marching off to europe with demands to scrap the backstop. labour are worried about his priorities. we have a hard right cabinet staking everything on tax cuts for the few and a reckless race to the bottom brexit. the snp even think it could mean the end of the uk. i should welcome the prime minister to his place, the last prime minister of the united kingdom. there are many battles in here to come. borisjohnson now has his own team around the cabinet table, ministers fully
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signed up to his brexit strategy but he faces many of the fundamental problems theresa may had. a european union that says it won‘t renegotiate, a wafer thin majority in parliament and after sacking key ministers, potentially a number of backbenchers who could make life difficult. but in downing street and in british politics, many things are changing. with me now is our chief political correspondent, vicki young. there correspondent, vicki young. is talk about the mom it there is talk about the mood today. it is the last day of term for many of them. it had a surreal feel to it. it's just of them. it had a surreal feel to it. it'sjust the change, the stylish difference from theresa may. borisjohnson does stylish difference from theresa may. boris johnson does bring stylish difference from theresa may. borisjohnson does bring that energy and all the mps getting up saying, his optimism, this is fantastic. there were some silent tory mps. on the backbench. they are looking at
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the backbench. they are looking at the detail that is interesting. i spoke to one of the cabinet minister sacked yesterday who said, i‘m willing to... somebody hasjust shouted, there is only one simon mccoy! they are looking at the detail. they want to see how serious borisjohnson is detail. they want to see how serious boris johnson is about detail. they want to see how serious borisjohnson is about getting a deal. when he says he wants a deal but is preparing for a new deal, they are watching carefully. he talked about that backstop being abolished. the question to downing street worth, is that the prerequisite for any talks with brussels‘s? everyone is on site giving him the benefit of the doubt andi giving him the benefit of the doubt and i think those who want to oppose and i think those who want to oppose a no—deal on the tory side, they are convinced boris johnson a no—deal on the tory side, they are convinced borisjohnson is working towards trying to get a deal through parliament and behind—the—scenes will be working hard for that. one
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of the things he‘s going to be doing todayis of the things he‘s going to be doing today is speaking tojean—claude juncker. he is leaving the post but there will be conversations. where they have meetings, where there be any kind of negotiations over august or not? on what terms will they be? there has been talk, the eu saying they are not reopening the withdrawal agreement. to me, hss no—deal cabinets, we are preparing for that at all costs because that is what people thought three years ago. you have to be willing to walk away otherwise he won‘t get a good deal out of the eu. we are not looking at a cabinet reshuffle, this isa looking at a cabinet reshuffle, this is a whole new game. what the most changes in transition within the same party. it is different and sending a clear message, you could hear the eurosceptics and they‘re
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absolutely delighted because they think for the first time he‘s taking it seriously and he has reiterated we are going to leave at the end of october. ijust interviewed a tory mp, very concerned about the rights of eu citizens living here. there has been a bit of upset about that because lots of mps were expecting an announcement. boris johnson talked about eu citizens, there is an unequivocal commitment to protect them. but there is an argument with got their settlement scheme, a million people have applied for it but that means 2.3 million haven‘t. u nless but that means 2.3 million haven‘t. unless it is law where it is assumed you have the right to stay, that is not going to be enough, that is not an unequivocal commitment first up isa an unequivocal commitment first up is a legislation coming under when will it come? teaser may, enjoying the first day of her holiday. she went to lourdes. it is a tweet showing a photograph of her. not
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just her. there is david gorka, gleick clark. —— greg clarke. the cricket has been more successful than yesterday. i want to talk about labour because it was interesting, jeremy corbyn today, looking at some of the labour mps at the end of that long session today, they didn‘t look entirely happy with how it had gone. they haven‘t looked entirely happy for a very long time. they are concerned. some of them now and saying they are worried about no—deal, they hate the cabinets that have been put together. that is where the uk is heading. you go back to theresa may yesterday and her a nswer to to theresa may yesterday and her answer to yvette cooper, yvette coopehs
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answer to yvette cooper, yvette cooper‘s response, sorry, theresa may‘s response was, where he could have voted for the deal. you always knew the alternative could be no—deal. there are several mps who would be willing to vote for a deal but when it‘s come back to the house of commons? if it is work to do that with some changes, you just never know how many labour mps might get behind it, it might get through. that seems a long way off at the moment but if done —— borisjohnson could have some change, it is possible. he has put in place a brexit team who are all passionate about brexit, who are willing to go down a new deal route specific managed to do it he can turn around to those in his party and say, i tried everything. i did it, parliament has blocked no—deal. there is only one vicky young. you should be out there shouting that on a megaphone! thank you very much. i
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wa nt to a megaphone! thank you very much. i want to share with the skies over westminster, it is clouding over. i‘ve got my thermometer here with records temperatures in the shade. it was showing 40 celsius but it has dropped, it is turning chilly. it is showing 34. this is unscientific. the skies over westminster are cloudy, it is cooling down a bit. we are waiting to see whether this has been the hottestjuly day on record. ben rich will be along later on. but let‘s return to politics. joining me now is the times columnist and former conservative mp, matthew parris. what was your take on the mood in the house of commons today? they are troubled in lots of ways. they appear to be dominating the impression. then i worried people on the conservative benches in the labour party are in a terrible
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state. they don‘t really have a leader who they think of as a leader. they are not sure what they can do what they should do to stop this. they see now, as they‘ve not seen clearly for a long time, it is coming down the track toward them. what is coming down the track toward them is their sense of optimism that borisjohnson... i‘m them is their sense of optimism that boris johnson. .. i‘m sorry. jeremy corbyn has said that is no time for optimism. some summary of the somebody standing up saying that is a different story here. whether you buy into it or not, that is going to appeal to a lot of people out in the country. for a little while, yes. saying everything is lovely in the garden and isn‘t as great, aren‘t you glad to be alive, you can get away with us for a while. but as it sta rts away with us for a while. but as it starts to cloud over them even a spot of rain, people i wondering if you are a rainmaker or not. the
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problem with the sort of positive thinking optimism is that as a law of diminishing returns, every time boris retreats into saying be positive, it looks less impressive. he has a honeymoon, there is no question there is a bit of a honeymoon on around it. i‘d call an election straightaway if i was him. do you think he would win it? he'd do better now than he‘d be able to when i no—deal brexit is absolutely imminent. you can see the policy here is to say, it‘s a newer‘s cans, we wa nt here is to say, it‘s a newer‘s cans, we want to negotiate, we want to do this with a deal, it is up to the eu. is that an argument that will hold any water? it will convince brexiteers who have always thought it was europe‘s filed, they are being horrible to us, they are not giving us nice things, blame the firm. i don‘t think anybody on the
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rimene side of the argument or anybody wavering will be in any doubt the europeans have held to the same position all along, they have a lwa ys same position all along, they have always said this can‘t be reopened, they‘ve only said the backstop stays, they are not doing anything new. they are simply sticking to the position they‘ve always said was their permanent position. everybody is talking about brexit, another major issue is the future of the uk. we had ian black of the snp saying borisjohnson will be the last prime minister of the united kingdom. he‘s got some work to do, notjust in brussels. he has work to do but i don‘t know how he‘s going to go about it. boris is not a name to conjure with north of the board as he is in london in the south—east. he horrifies ruth davidson and a lot of her scottish tory mps. there is talk of a possible breakaway. there
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are more of them than the dup and they have been taken for granted. ruth davidson has never been a fan of borisjohnson ruth davidson has never been a fan of boris johnson but ruth davidson has never been a fan of borisjohnson but she was persuaded to work with him. now she is getting worried indeed. she is upset about the sacking of david mundell as scottish secretary. he needs to hit the road in the next few days, doesn‘t t. why does he need to go? word is that boris magic, his supporters say, that‘s boris approach? waders he need put that are most effective use of? he does best by a rallying that part of the country in those places of the country that are already with him and giving an impression of an unstoppable momentum. i wouldn‘t go to places where i‘m going to be booed away audiences might be thin, i‘d go to the midlands, i‘d go to north east derbyshire, he had an
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astonishingly good result at the last election. i‘d go to mansfield, i‘d go to the west midlands. i‘d go to places where it looks like boris is speaking for the people. to places where it looks like boris is speaking for the peoplem to places where it looks like boris is speaking for the people. it is a lwa ys is speaking for the people. it is always good to see you. thank you. let‘s go to paris, where temperatures have hit 43 degrees. people are doing whatever they can to try and cool down. that is by the eiffel tower. it is great if you can do that but there are health warnings in place across europe. a heatwave warning in places in many parts of europe. particular calls to keep an aye on the elderly and on the young who find it difficult to copein the young who find it difficult to cope in temperatures of this nature.
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we have been talking in the uk about a possible record breaking day, it hit the record forjuly, that is the scene of westminster. it is clouding over a bed and my unscientific thermometer here, this is the one we have been monitoring the shade, it is reading below a hundred, it is turning chilly, which is 36 degrees. this is unscientific because people gets cross with me. ben rich is here. by four o‘clock we would be talking about a record—breaking temperature. are we there? not quite. there were two records. we‘ve broken the record forjuly, we have been up to 37.7 degrees at heathrow.
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at kew gardens i should say. and also in essex. we are not far off. let‘s remind ourselves of what the record is. we are looking for a temperature of 38.5 degrees and that was set back in 2003 as havisham in kent. 37.7, that is where we are now, that isn‘t too far. we haven‘t quite made it that far yet, there is some time to go of course to get to that record. a few different things going on, some hot air wafting our way. it isn't wafting, it is hitters like a steam rain! wafting is one of my typical weather words! it has come in like a steam rain from the south sea can feel the effects, it is humid as well. as you can see, the clouds have started to roll in
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to some extent, we are not alone, there have been a few showers in southern areas and that might be putting a lid on things. it is very close to call whether we‘re going to break that record are not. there is still another hour in which we could. i will keep an on my thermometer. you will be back, we will talk to you later. karsten haustein is a climate scientist at the university of oxford, hejoins me now from jena in germany. it is fairto it is fair to say you have been looking at figures for this for many, looking at figures for this for any looking at figures for this for many, many years. he will turn around and say, told you so. you couldn‘t have said it any clearer! that is how i feel today. we have been saying, the next big heatwave is going to crush numbers. today is the day. the uk isn‘t a record—breaking, 38.5 needs to be
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broken but we might get there. paris, germany, belgium, netherlands, it is stunning. this is climate change, that is what it is. if it is like that today, what is it going to be in five, ten, 15 years? iam speaking going to be in five, ten, 15 years? i am speaking as a scientist, it is something which is need specific preconditions. there are two ingredients. it has to be at the height of summer, we had at the right time, and it has to be the perfect weather setup. that has come together right now, it hasn‘t come together right now, it hasn‘t come together for the last 15 years, 2003 was the last time. you might as well have to wait another 15 years before you get the next record. that‘s what we will get to see more offers was
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heatwave. last year was one, there are more of those to come. you talk about 2003, we are in 2019, we‘ve seen nothing like this is 2003, what you say to those who say, this is just weather, this isn‘t something that suggests a trend. that is understandable that people think that but that is why we are looking into that with scientific rigour and detail. what you find is, if you use the observational record we have got, 170 years of data, we see a trend towards higher temperatures in general, but also towards these more extreme temperatures. if you look at the difference places, notjust one country, one specific spot, then it is really, clearly by now, these
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signal climate change. this frequency for heatwave to occur is what we should expect. if a heatwave occurs and if conditions are right, we do see records, instances of rape today the all wreckers can be smashed is give you a chance to say i told you so again. what is your prediction for the next 20, 40 yea rs ? prediction for the next 20, 40 years? for the uk it is always going to stay close to the oceans. it is a good thing because it is a moderator and a day to day shows it. there is and a day to day shows it. there is a bit of elevated clouds. we‘ve got 43 in places like paris, 42 with the netherlands, in ten or 20 years, that could go up 1 degrees higher.
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then it is getting to dangerous territories. imagine we have a situation like 2003 where it continues for a couple of days and then the macro this is a short lived event so we are lucky. seven people next week will say, it is too cold in the uk. —— some people. next week will say, it is too cold in the uk. -- some people. always good to talk to you. thank you very much for your time. thank you for having me. i‘m joined by our health and science correspondent, james gallagher. let‘s talk about the effects this has on people. why do people suffer when the temperature gets to this level? your body wants to maintain its core body temperature at 37.5 degrees. in winter, that is why you shiver. in the middle of summer,
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your body has to cool down and the hotter it gets outside the high abilities for your body to keep cool abilities for your body to keep cool. we are both stupidly wearing ties the macro you are looking very cool in a suit and tie. i‘m a huge amount of make—up! our hearts are beating far more harder than they did. blood vessels opening to allow blood to get close to the surface. we are sweating as well to increase the heat loss from our bodies. both of those are normal physiological reactions to his but over time and in excess they can‘t become dangerous. it is lowering our blood pressure, that sweating is leading to fluid loss and salt loss of the electrolyte balance inside our bodies are changing. there me, the electrolyte. salt comes out of your body when you sweat and that is a
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precise balance inside our bodies between the amount of water and salt to minerals. our nervous system and our muscles. you will notice things like swelling because water is leaking out of your blood vessels. then you have prickly heat rash but it gets more severe when you get dizzy and faint, you might feel sick. you are sweating profusely. but it gets worse if you go to heatstro ke but it gets worse if you go to heatstroke itself. that is the point you are dialling 999. we can grab a glass of water, there are elderly people and young children who can‘t find for themselves and it is critical to keep an aye on them. there is a couple of big distinct groups to keep an aye on. there are people with long—term health
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conditions, if you have heart disease, your body is in a state where it is less easily to deal with weather, but if you are in hot weather, but if you are in hot weather, you need to recognise it is hot in the first place, you need to change your behaviour because of it. children can‘t do that, the old can‘t do that. people with some mental disorders, like parkinson‘s disease are the of the weather and thatis disease are the of the weather and that is the people we need to look after. what about those people with bosses who say, you still have to work. all those who say you have to go to work with a suit on! that is the moments where you lose control of your environment. that is a difficult time, what do you do then? you can be sensible as you can and way more appropriate clothing on the
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rain, don‘t commute to work as i am, they can surgically attached to your water bottle. that is how much i have drunk in the past ten minutes, a bit too much. too much information, actually. you've got to keep fluid our new because what‘ll happen if you rain get stuck? you can control the environments you can, particularly your home environment, keeping it as cool as possible. it is baking hot, i can‘t get my highs cold enough, and are better off going to the part where there is a breeze? how can i keep myself cool, how can i keep my home cool and keep hydrated. always good to see you. i‘ve seen many creepy things in my time but pulling that out of your pocket up there! i'm afraid to comment. you are watching
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afternoon light. we were talking about the issue of heat and what it is doing to commuters. trains are running slower. network rail is reporting damage to the overhead wires and that is between them and junction. we‘ll be live with our correspondent andy moore in euston in about half an hour‘s time north korea has fired two short—range missiles into the sea, according to officals in south korea. they say they believe that north korea was testing a new type of weapon. it‘s the first time north korea has fired missiles since its leader
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kimjong—un met donald trump late last month. boeing has warned it may have to hope production of its 737 max plane. it was taken out of service in march after two crashes which killed nearly 350 people. ben rich is still with me, and he‘s got your weather forecast. asi as i mentioned this earlier on we have had the temperature up to 37 point 7 degrees. in essex and also in kew gardens to the west of london. over the next few days though things are going to cool off dramatically. there will be rain around as well but as we go into this evening those temperatures will still hold up around 36 degrees in london at six o‘clock for example.
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but that heat has already started to cause some scattered showers. the odd thunderstorm through the night, hit and miss but if you catch one you will know about it. a lot of rain ina you will know about it. a lot of rain in a short period of time. gusty winds and it will be one of those warm and muggy nights with temperatures in some spots no lower than 20 degrees. tomorrow we could still have some of those showers around. we also see a band of cloud pushing in from the west, that will produce the odd patch of cloud to limit rain as well. it is introducing colder air so temperatures for western areas lower than they have been. northern scotla nd than they have been. northern scotland could again get 27 degrees. parts of eastern england could get to 29 or 30 again. so another fairly hot day. the forecast for saturday, outbreaks of pretty heavy rain, especially across eastern england, a to scotland. a slow—moving weather
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front, some uncertainty about its position but some of us having a 5°99y position but some of us having a soggy day on saturday. dry weather to the north—east of scotland. temperatures far more comfortable between 20 and 23 degrees. as we get into sunday that frontal system still sitting around, it may be a little further south and include parts of south—west scotland for example. there are other areas dry and we keep those significantly warmer temperatures. values in the mid to low 20s. then we stick with that cooler field, it may well turn drier as we head towards the middle of the week.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit. today is the first day of a new approach which will end with our exit from the eu on the 31st of october. the uk sees the second hottest day on record and the hottestjuly day as councils step up visits to the elderly — and doctors warn of the risk of heatstroke. meanwhile, on this the hottest day of the year so far, rail services are disrupted and passengers are told to stay at home, with the risk of rail tracks buckling.
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sport now on afternoon live with adam wild — and an unlikely figure riding to england‘s rescue after an embarrassing first day of the test against ireland. yeah, good evening once again. we might have finally found a successful opener for england. the night watchman jack leach has successful opener for england. the night watchmanjack leach has made his highest ever first class score as england‘s cricketers have studied things a little as they try to claw back their embarrassing deficit in the first test against ireland. there were all out for 85 yesterday we re there were all out for 85 yesterday were not the sort of form they wa nted were not the sort of form they wanted to showjust a week before the start of the ashes. somerset‘s jack leach has fallen in the last few minutes but not before scoring an impressive 92. not bad for a number11, is an impressive 92. not bad for a number 11, is it? an impressive 92. not bad for a number11, is it? he has an impressive 92. not bad for a number 11, is it? he has been working hard on his batting but this performance has ta ken working hard on his batting but this performance has taken many by surprise. 72 for one day specialist jason roy on his test debut as well.
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england are now 187—3. that is a lead of 65, simon. it is afternoon, surely? it is afternoon, surely? let‘s talk swimming and britain‘s adam peaty has come out with some pretty forceful comments about the big doping controversy at the world championships this week. yeah, it has cast a long shadow over the world aquatics championships taking place in south korea. that row over china‘s sun yang. he served a three month drugs ban back in 2014. he called britain‘s duncan scott a loser as the pair left the pulled following the medal ceremony yesterday. scott won bronze in the 200 metre freestyle but refused to share the podium with the controversial gold medallist. he is not the anyone to do so this week and now britain‘s record—breaking swimmer adam peaty has had his say as well. he has told the bbc he
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supports the actions of some of his competitors. scott was warned after refusing to share the podium. there was a refusing to share the podium. there wasa similar refusing to share the podium. there was a similar show by an australian swimmer. absolutely. ithink was a similar show by an australian swimmer. absolutely. i think being british that is one of our best qualities, we will stand for what we think is bright and the rest of the world is with us. when matt horton protested as well, he came back in the dining room and all the competitors were clapping him. we know doping doesn't have any place in sport, it never has and never will but it is getting that message out and standing our ground. massive applause to duncan. i have seen it on twitter and everyone is behind him. i repeat ten times a date of the media, doping has no place in sport, any sport, and the people who win. if you cheat and win, you know you haven't won and that stays with them for the rest of their life.
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hopefully duncan next week will pick him up and smash him out of the water! racing at southern was abandoned early today because of the current heatwave. they are meeting had controversially gone ahead despite temperatures topping 30 degrees. it had started at 1125 this morning, 2.5 hours earlier than scheduled in a bid to cope with the heat. but the british horseracing authority decided to call an early halt. manchester united have beaten totte n ha m halt. manchester united have beaten tottenham to— one in a pre—season friendly in china. —— 2—1. united regained their lead just ten minutes before the end. this goal securing the victory. now, after shane lowry‘s open jumping
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securing the victory. now, after shane lowry‘s openjumping ship victory at the weekend there is more good news for irish golf because adare manor is set to be named as the host for the 2026 ryder cup. the last time it was staged in ireland was in 2006. and england‘s mel reid is in contention for golf‘s fourth major of the year. the championship is being played on the edge of the french alps. the englishwoman is tied for fifth on five under par, two shots behind the leader. and that is all the sport for now. i will be back with more in the next hour. on his first day in the job, borisjohnson has promised to "work flat out" to get a new withdrawal deal with the european union — insisting that theresa may‘s
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agreement is dead. the new prime minister also said the uk was better prepared for a ‘no deal‘ than many believe. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. how do we know if that is true? well, we don‘t yet know is the honest answer. we know plenty of preparation was done back in march stopped there was some feeling i think politically certainly from mr johnson and his allies that there was never the political backing that made people really believe it. so let‘s have a listen to what he said in the comments today about what he wa nts to in the comments today about what he wants to do with no deal preparations. no, we will listen that a bit later but in the meantime let‘s talk about the 39 billion because boris johnson let‘s talk about the 39 billion because borisjohnson again used as the number that we will hang onto if there is an ideal. jeremy corbyn said it was 33. who is right? too hot to play clips obviously! jeremy corbyn is right. i think a lot of us, including the bbc, have been using this figure of 39 billion
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because it was the estimate of the cost of the financial settlement, the divorce bill for leaving the eu. of course that was up until the 29th of march. from who? from the office for budget responsibility, so the official independent government body that we think the money will cost. but that was on the assumption that we left on the 29th of march. obviously we are still in the eu and so paying budget contributions, so if we were to leave on the 31st of october it would be about £33 billion. let's hear now from boris johnson. here it is. in the 98 days that remain to us we must turbo—charge our preparations to make sure that there is as little disruption as possible to our national life. and i believe that thatis national life. and i believe that that is possible with the kind of national effort that the british people have made before and will make again. and in the circumstances we would of course have available to
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£39 billion in the withdrawal agreement to help deal with any consequences. i have today instructed the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster to make these preparations is top priority. i have asked the cabinet secretary to mobilise the civil service to deliver this outcome, should it become necessary. and the chancellor has confirmed that all necessary funding will be made available. every serious —looking duchy of lancaster michael grove there. whose job it will be to see it through if it is no deal. turbo-charging preparations, borisjohnson said. yes, so in the preparations before march 29 there was something called operation yellowhammer. it was to look at the potential dangers consequences of on the food
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industry, and other industries. it involved thousands of civil servants, many of them been taken from other departments to make that preparation. people who were on the inside at the time said we think we did all we could but there are a lwa ys did all we could but there are always unknown unknowns. the thing is if you then move those people back onto no deal planning from the department for education of the department for education of the department of health or whatever, they can‘t start planning for all they can‘t start planning for all the other domestic policies that mr johnson says he wants to push through. i think the other no deal planning back in march was what is the business community doing. i think there are two aspects there, first big business, which did prepare relatively well for no deal but of course a lot of businesses spent money in march for no reason. are you now going to be able to persuade them to spend that money again, potentially for no reason ain? again, potentially for no reason again? are you believing the government that it would push for no deal again. and then there are small businesses, most of which didn‘t actually make any preparations for the simple reason is they can‘t afford to, they don‘t have enough
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money sloshing around to make those preparations. a lot of businesses didn‘t make those preparations. i think what we can see is a big communications campaigns then you have got to be ready, this time we really m ea n have got to be ready, this time we really mean it. let‘s see what happens at the end of october. one group, farmers, are going to be looking very closely. michael gove knows how they feel about it because it is critical. it is and as you say he is now in charge of pushing this to the civil service. he will have the words of some farmers ringing in his ears from his time just finished as secretary of state at defra because if you are a sheep farmer for example and they were to be no deal, most sheep farmers in the uk export their land to the rest of the eu and you would be suddenly having a 40% tariff put on your lamb exports. it would mean that if that lasted for any length of time, though sheep farmers would very quickly go out of business. so you would need money, you would need money to help them out and that is pa rt money to help them out and that is part of the preparation you‘re going to have to make. people are making about fiscal headroom. if there were
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to bea about fiscal headroom. if there were to be a very abrupt no deal a lot of that money would probably have to be spent to help those parts of industry and agriculture that would suffer as a result. chris, thank you very much. two teenagers have beenjailed for offences relating to the fatal stabbing of grammar school pupil yousef makki. yousef was stabbed in the heart with a flick knife in the village of hale barns in greater manchester in march. both boys are 17 and cannot be named for legal reasons. our correspondent judith moritz sent us this update from outside manchester crown court. the boys being sentenced were being sentenced for offences relating to the stabbing, the fatal stabbing, of 17—year—old yousef makki who was a scholarship boy at manchester grammar school. he was fatally stabbed on the 2nd of march in a village in south manchester which is in an area popular with footballers and celebrities. the court heard as part of sentencing this was evidence
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of knife crime affecting all aspects of our society. this had happened after yousef makki was involved in a row with two boys, also both 17. a row over a failed drugs deal. we can‘t name the two defendents, they are young. they were sentenced today, boy a was acquitted of both murder and manslaughter but he had been carrying the knife that had fatally stabbed yousef makki. he was acquitted of both of those charges. he did admit possessing the knife and perverting the course of justice, lying to the police after the crime and for that he was sentenced today to 16 months. boy b having possessed the flick knife as well. he was acquitted of perverting the course of justice. he was acquitted of perverting the course of justice.
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he was sentenced to four months in total and sentencing, the justice said knife crime is a cancer on our society. he said both boys, the backdrop to your offending is depressingly all—too—familiar. he said they were part of a warped culture in which the possession of knives was seen to be cool and pleasing he told them both that by sending them to prison he hoped that other young people in this situation would be put off from carrying knives. a french inventor has failed in his attempt to cross the english channel on a jet—powered flyboard. franky zapata, a formerjet—ski champion, had been hoping to cross the channel in just 20 minutes. but the 40—year—old fell into the water halfway across as he tried to land on a boat to refuel. crowds gathered at sangatte beach, near calais, to watch the inventor as he took off at 9 o‘clock this morning — heading for st margaret‘s bay in dover. the attempt took place exactly 110 years since louis bleriot made the first powered flight
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across the channel. our correspondent duncan kennedy was waiting at saint margaret‘s bay near dover where franky zapata was supposed to land. it was going so well he made it 12 miles over the channel and he was supposed to hover over the refuelling boat. in the end, for a variety of reasons, they decided to put down on the boat to refuel and it was during that exercise, some sort of miss coordination between the swell of the boat going up and down that he fell into the water. we are not quite sure what happened. franky zapata himself is ok but the team are incredibly disappointed. as his colleague told me. when he was coming to the boat, he did hisjob perfectly. and when you want to land the boat was moving a little bit. that is always the problem to land on the boat.
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he did that many times but the most important time. he did it in florida and he did it perfectly in two metre waves. but this time perhaps he wanted to go too fast and the he lost the balance and fell into the water. and they told us that he feels really, really bad now. i can understand because we feel the same. special this day when hundred and tenth anniversary flight took place, landed on the cliffs over here. what turn to will do now is back to his workshop in marseille, get all the salt water out and try again for his crossing of the channel. he says it is not his only aim in the list. his aim is also to impress the french defence services who are partly funding this. he wants to show to them that this really is a viable machine.
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tributes have been paid to the actor, rutger hauer, whose death at the age of 75 was announced yesterday. the director guillermo del toro described the blade runner staras an ‘intense, deep, genuine and magnetic actor who brought beauty to his films‘. andy beatt reports. the role that catapulted rutger hauer into hollywood history. upstaging harrison ford as menacing android anti hero roy batty. his speech substantially rewritten by rutger hauer himself the night before filming. i have seen things you people wouldn‘t believe were true. attack ships on fire. i watched see beams glitter in the
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darkness. his charisma and striking looks helped him win roles in more than 100 movies, often as the villain trust. . villain trust. wrigley than 100 movies, often as the villain trust. wrigley seen on the red carpet, in 1988 winning a golden globe for best supporting actor. and more recently in sin city, batman begins trueblood. director guillermo del toro said rutger hauer had brought truth, power and beauty to his films. all those moments will be lost in time. fans too will miss a man who, away
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from the camera, led a quiet life in the netherlands, using his money and fame to promote awareness of hiv aids and back the environmental group greenpeace. bbc news. rutger hauer, whose death was announced yesterday. now on afternoon live — it‘s time for the business. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. nissan cuts 12,500 jobs worldwide. as yet, the location of those cuts is unknown. the carmaker suffers a 95% fall in profits in the first three months of the year. boeing may stop making its best—selling jet, the 737 max. it‘s been grounded since march after two fatal crashes. the company is reporting its largest ever quarterly loss. if regulators keep the model grounded, boeing said it would consider reducing or shutting production down of the plane.
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facebook shares jump after reporting a 28% rise in revenues. on wednesday facebook announced that will pay a record $5 billion dollar fine to settle privacy concerns. i don‘t know about you but i could do with a glass of something chilled, probably water. i‘mjust wondering what it would do for drinks options though because other people have other options that they? it will. this will come as a boost to companies like diageo already having a strong showing. it is the world‘s largest spirits company. it makes many spirits and its operating profits raised more than 9% of the end ofjune. a bright spot for the firm was the launch of white walker, a limited edition scotch inspired by game of thrones. others are
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available! you would expect it to go up available! you would expect it to go up but d‘angelo‘s share price is actually lower. last time i checked it was down around two and a half percent. that‘s because the amount it plans to return to shareholders in the next few years is less than some analysts had expected. however, the usher faces potential pressures. one of those is donald trump‘s use of trade tariffs as a weapon. the company also faces headwinds in scotland. talks over pay between the company and two of its biggest unions fell apart this week, put threatening production of some of the region‘s biggest whiskeys. a representative spoke to us recently and said he is delighted by the profitjump and said he is delighted by the profit jump in these and said he is delighted by the profitjump in these latest set of figures and he thinks d‘angelo can handle the pressures ahead. we can handle the pressures ahead. we can handle brexit and take in our stride
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but would strongly encourage the new administration and mps to get a deal. that would be our focus. for a company like ours, we have a largely indigenous supply chain, we make scotch whisky with water, barley, women, men and time. we can export to the eu tariff free and the government has got good trading arrangements where the other eu fta is exist. so for a company like diageo we can handle it. clearly it has more impact on smaller businesses in other sectors. so we strongly urge the government to get toa strongly urge the government to get to a deal. we are planning for all scenarios and as i said, for a company like diageo, we are one of the uk's biggest contributors to the balance of trade and goods, scotch whisky we export to 180 countries,
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gin is growing very rapidly. 0ur supply chains are simpler because most of what we make comes from within the uk. and as i said, we can trade in the eu tariff free so the impact for us is not material, it adds complication, but we can handle it because we are fortunate to be in a sector where both the supply chain and the tariff situation doesn't get significantly impacted by the various scenarios of brexit. diageo spokesperson speaking to azalea. the ftse100 inching higher spokesperson speaking to azalea. the ftse 100 inching higher as astrazeneca standing out. look at that. it has jumped astrazeneca standing out. look at that. it hasjumped even astrazeneca standing out. look at that. it has jumped even further, more than 7.5%, an all—time high after raising its annual sales forecast. hopes in progress in trade negotiations between the us and china also supporting broader
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sentiment. hsbc you can see there just a fraction. unilever took a dip asa just a fraction. unilever took a dip as a previous period hit ice cream sales in the us. i will be back with more business later but we can cross back to westminster now and get the weather from ben. you probably don‘t need me to tell you how warm it is. it is certainly warm in westminster. 37 point 7 degrees in kew gardens and also in essex. very close to that record of 38.5, that all—time record so we will keep you posted on that. but over the next few days things are going to cool off, a bit of rain around at times but that heat does last into this evening. temperatures in the centre of london 36 degrees still at six o‘clock if you‘re heading out and about. that heat as
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demand has spawned some showers. they will continue into the evening. scattered but if you get caught by one you will know about it. strong and gusty winds and more and more of those very warm and sticky nights, minimum temperatures 15 to 20 degrees if you are lucky. as we go into tomorrow we will start off with some showers and perhaps thunderstorms across the channel islands, extending across eastern parts of england at times. further west, cloud pushing across ireland bringing the odd spot of rain moving across wales as well. that band of cloud is a cold front, introducing colder air so temperatures in western areas... eastern england could see 2930. this is saturday‘s chart, you can see that same weather front reinvigorate some outbreaks of rain running across eastern parts of england up into scotland. very slow moving, it could be a wet start to
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the weekend in some places. dry down to the south—west but those temperatures return to values more typical really of this type of year —— this time of year. 21. this weather front is still sitting in place, it does not want to move. some places could see may be 80 millimetres of rain is their weekend wears on. again some dry weather to the north—east, dry weather to the south west and keeping those cooler temperatures. mid to low 20 is at best. that is all for now.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy live at westminster. today at 4:00pm... the uk sees the second hottest day on record as councils step up visits to the elderly, and doctors warn of the risk of heatstroke. meanwhile, on the hottest day of the year so far, train passengers are told to stay at home as extreme temperatures plunge the rail network into chaos. good morning everybody and it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here in respect of the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party. after addressing his first cabinet meeting he tells the house of commons he wants to leave the eu with a deal, but there must be preparations for a no—deal brexit. today is the first day of a new approach which will end with our
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exit from the eu on the 31st of october. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. hello again, simon. nightwatchmanjack leach has been the unlikely star as england‘s cricketers have almost got themselves back on track in their one—off test against ireland at lords. he felljust short of his century. but england, back in a bit of bother again, more on that, later in the hour. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. i‘m in westminster. the uk has seen the second hottest day on record, with the mercury reaching 37.7 celsius at kew in london and writtle in essex. it is also the hottest
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day of the year so far. while for families enjoying the school holidays the heatwave is a chance to bask in tropical temperatures, for others the extreme weather could mean disruption or danger to health. public health england has issued a heat—health warning. the hot weather‘s led to a reduced or altered service on much of the uk‘s train network today, with some rail firms advising passengers not to travel. severe speed restrictions have been imposed because of measures to prevent rails buckling in the heat. let‘s talk to dr peter stott from the met office who joins us from exeter. are we going to hit that expected record? that's what we are looking at very closely right now actually. we are going to see the maximum temperatures today in the next few minutes probably. it is touch and 90, minutes probably. it is touch and go, but we don‘t know if we will break the all—time record. what we do know is we have broken thejuly record and this is definitely the
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second warmest day on record, underlining the role of climate change, which has undoubtedly had a pa rt change, which has undoubtedly had a part to play in this. you have said that before quite some time ago, and today i suspect you are feeling, i told you so. we did, and we published a paper on the 2003 heatwave in 2004, the first paper to make an explicit link between an individual extreme weather event, the heatwave of 2003, and then we made a prediction, saying we would see more frequent heat waves of this sort, and that is what we have seen throughout europe. peter, how unusual is the fact we are talking about such a large part of europe affected by this? it is unusual. this is what is part of making the link to climate change. we are bringing up this very warm air from northern africa, which has seen a warming of over two celsius over the last 100 years, twice the global average, and we have seen records
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broken throughout europe, germany, the netherlands, belgium, the highest ever temperatures in paris of over 40 celsius today. last year in 2018 we saw extreme heatwaves in japan, northern scandinavia and north america. it‘s a global pattern of heatwaves and it‘s a signal of climate change. like many people across the country we are looking at the thermometer. mine says 102 fahrenheit, just under 40 celsius. how do you get your figures and what makes them the right ones? they are very well calibrated. they are very well monitored. it means we have a consistent record going back in time. it‘s great that people are monitoring this and looking at it from their own weather stations, and that‘s really good. what we have our calibrated stations with the met office that can go back over 150 yea rs office that can go back over 150 years so office that can go back over 150 yea rs so we office that can go back over 150 years so we can make these state m e nts years so we can make these statements about whether or not it
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is the warmest day on record or not. it's is the warmest day on record or not. it‘s the really high precision and calibration of the instruments that makes them the special measurements, if you like. history suggests that 2020, next year you will write another paper about the heat of 2019. i wonder what the predictions will be for the next 20 or 30 years. if we look forward 20 or 30 years into the future, what we are saying is, if we think back to last summer in the uk, 2018 was the warmest summer on record, then we are looking at potentially every other summer being as warm as that. the other thing to remember is that you go forward 20 or 30 years, certainly towards the latter part of this century, that very much depends on emissions of greenhouse gases, and it depends very much on whether the world collectively is able to stick to the paris agreement that was made to the paris agreement that was made to keep temperatures below two celsius relative to preindustrial. it is all to play for this century.
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it is all to play for this century. it depends on the greenhouse gas emissions. always good to talk to you, peter. thank you for your time. i‘m joined by our health and science correspondent, james gallagher. first of all, explain the temperatures we are seeing across europe, what does it do to you physically? your body desperately tries to keep its core body temperature at 37.5 degrees or thereabouts, because that is what our optimum running temperature is and that is how we have evolved. with high temperatures, your body has to fight to keep cool. it firstly changes the way the blood flows around your body, blood is allowed close to the surface of your skin. we can see it on our foreheads... you are wearing a suit and looking remarkably cool. that sweat helps to keep the body cool. it accelerates the heat loss through the skin through evaporation. that
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is all the normal response. the problem is, that changes our body over time, so losing that water and the salt through sweat, it changes the salt through sweat, it changes the balance of salt and minerals and water inside the body. opening the blood vessels means the heart works harder and your blood pressure drops. those changes can have devastating consequences if they continue and if you don‘t stay hydrated or manage to keep cool. it can culminate in something called sunstroke, where your body can‘t keep cool enough and it‘s a medical emergency, when we start to get people dying from too much heat. we talk about hydration and keeping water to hand, but what about salts and minerals? if you minimise the amount of sweating you do to keep cool by controlling your environment thenit cool by controlling your environment then it shouldn‘t be too much of an issue. it starts to become a major problem when you start to reach these extreme degrees of water lost through dehydration and heat stroke. i wouldn‘t worry about that as part of your everyday, don‘t worry about
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having extra salt on your dinner tonight, as long as you eat a healthy diet and keep hydrated it will look after itself. and how do we get a good night sleep, something i never thought i would ask you!” hope that‘s not an invitation! you have to keep cool. public health england and other health bodies so you need a high enough temperature at night, and it‘s a danger to our bodies if we can‘t cool off. we need rest time for our bodies to recover to cope with high temperatures the next day. to keep your house cool throughout the whole 24 hours, because you can‘t wait until 10pm to get your house cool. are you opening your windows during the day? that can let more heat in if you have your windows and curtains thrown open. it‘s worth keeping the blinds shut during the day. a good thing to do at night, it sounds obvious that i don‘t have to tell you. do you
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really need to sleep under a duvet? are you wearing pyjamas? i am fearing what you might say, but you can sleep naked if you want to, and it can help you stay cool at night. this has taken a bizarre twist. keep the air circulating and that will help you keep cool as well. james, less expected than it might have been. vicki young is laughing in the background. we will speak to her later. but it is a serious issue, particularly in paris where we have seen pictures of people keeping cool but temperatures are hitting 45, 40 6 degrees in some areas. on the rail network there are speed restrictions in place because of the high temperatures — delays and cancellations could last until the weekend. our correspondent andy moore is at euston station in central london. my my word, a lot of people behind you. a lot of people behind me. we are getting customer service
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announcements thick and fast here about developing problems on the rail network. this morning i was reporting on the possibility of the rails buckling. this afternoon we are getting a number of reports from across the country about problems with overhead wires. i think we can bring you some live pictures from a helicopter of an incident in north london. this is affecting services between luton and london st pancras. it is described as major disruption, and that disruption is expected to continue until 10pm tonight. you might possibly be able to see some fla mes might possibly be able to see some flames on the pictures. we understand the fire brigade is in attendance. we are getting reports now of problems with overhead wires. not only at this location. we are also getting reports from the midlands and just north of euston station here, a problem at camden junction where a train was blocked
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for at least an hour. another virgin train was brought along side to move passengers off the train that was stopped. it was stopped there without any power so there was no air conditioning. you can just imagine what it must have been like on the train. some people contacted the bbc and they said it was unbearable, like a sauna. one person had to get out of their seat because they felt they couldn‘t breathe. all of these things on top of possible problems with the rails buckling. 23 rail franchises in the problems with the rails buckling. 23 railfranchises in the uk. at about lunchtime today 20 of them said they would have some problems with delays and cancellations because of the heat affecting rails. six of those companies were advising people not to travel at all. that includes south—eastern, which has 600,000 people coming into and out of london every day. i think the journey home from london is going to be very difficult for a lot of passengers
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today. we are looking at the pictures, first of the fire, which was dramatic, but now of teams looking to get people off the trains. what is the advice this evening? people will still have to get home. the advice for people in london and the south—east is, if you can find london and the south—east is, if you canfind any london and the south—east is, if you can find any alternative means of transport, then take that. obviously that would be very difficult for a lot of people who rely on the trains, it will not be easy to get ona trains, it will not be easy to get on a bus ora trains, it will not be easy to get on a bus or a tube for example. it would be difficult for a lot of customers, but that is the advice for a lot of people, to try to find alternative means. and check before you travel because it looks like a very difficult situation. what happens is, the rails expanded by up to half a metre and if there is no room for that expansion then the rails can buckle. that can be a very dangerous situation and so it‘s a public safety situation which is why
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the rail companies are saying they have to reduce the speed of the trains and because of we reduce the speed, we have to reduce the number of trains and we don‘t have the capacity to take the normal numbers of people so if you can delay your journey orfind of people so if you can delay your journey or find an alternative means of getting home from london, that‘s the advice for a lot of people. andy moore at euston station, thank you. just looking at twitter, the met office tweeting that 38.1 celsius has been recorded in cambridge, only the second time the temperature has been over 100 fahrenheit, the second time recorded ever in the uk. they are also recording that heavy and thundery downpours are moving through northern england with strong gusts. things are livening up in various parts of the country as we speak and we will return to the weather throughout the afternoon. the temperature here at westminster has soared in recent days — both outside and inside the houses of parliament,
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where earlier, boris johnson addressed the commons for the first time as the uk‘s new prime minister. promising a "new approach" to domestic policies, he told the house he would prefer to leave the eu with a deal. "we will throw ourselves into negotiations," he said. but mrjohnson said a priority for the new government would be to prepare for a no—deal scenario. labour leaderjeremy corbyn told him no one trusted him. earlier, in downing street, mrjohnson addressed his new cabinet ministers for the first time — telling them they had "a momentous task ahead", as he repeated his commitment for the uk to leave the eu on 31st october. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. good morning, everybody, and it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here today, in respect of the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party. a sight to get used to, a new prime minister in number10, a new planfor government, a team trying to make rhetoric a reality.
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we are committed, all of us, to leaving the eu on october the 31st or earlier, no ifs, no buts. around the cabinet table, listening to the new boss, whether this excites you or fills you with dread, things are looking very different in downing street. that is the agenda. borisjohnson isn‘t hanging around. after chairing cabinet he was off to parliament, welcomed to the chamber by his new leader of the commons, jacob rees—mogg. triumph after triumph achieved by this government and we‘ve only had our new prime ministerfor 24 hours. it‘s amazing. prime ministerjohnson, here to tell the commons what he will do with power. order, statement, the prime minister. more important than anything, brexit. the current deal, he says, is dead. the withdrawal agreement negotiated by my predecessor has been three times rejected by this house. its terms are unacceptable
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to this parliament and to this country. no country that values its independence and its self—respect could agree to a treaty which signed away our economic independence and self—governance as this backstop does. so the insurance policy to avoid a hard border in ireland has to go. he urged the eu to renegotiate and if not... we will of course have to leave the uk without an agreement under article 50. the uk is better prepared for the situation than many believe. but we are not as ready yet as we should be. in the 98 days that remain we must turbo—charge our preparations to make sure that there is as little disruption as possible to our national life. i believe that is possible with the kind of national effort the british people have made before.
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the message for those who say he can‘t deliver... these are the sceptics and doubters, they are. time and again by their powers to innovate and to adapt, the british people have showed the doubters wrong. this prime minister isn‘t short of enthusiasm. we will be able to look back on this period, this extraordinary period, as the beginning of a new golden age for our united kingdom. that enthusiasm excites many in his party. today, the eu will have listened and realised the days of supplication are over and that we are intent on a policy to leave the european union. but he leaves others deeply worried, unconvinced he can deliver. the house will have both a sense of deja vu and of trepidation at
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a prime minister setting out rigid red lines and an artificial timetable. there is something eerily familiar about a prime minister marching off to europe with demands to scrap the backstop. labour are worried about his priorities. we have a hard right cabinet staking everything on tax cuts for the few and a reckless race to the bottom brexit. the snp even think it could mean the end of the uk. i should welcome the prime minister to his place, the last prime minister of the united kingdom. there are many battles in here to come. borisjohnson now has his own team around the cabinet table, ministers fully signed up to his brexit strategy but he faces many of the fundamental problems theresa may had. a european union that says it won‘t renegotiate, a
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wafer thin majority in parliament and after sacking key ministers, potentially a number of backbenchers who could make life difficult. but in downing street and in british politics, many things are changing. this afternoon, michel barnier has emailed eu members state by saying... our chief political correspondent, vicki young, is here. we sort of knew that already, didn‘t we? didn‘t boris johnson we sort of knew that already, didn‘t we? didn‘t borisjohnson know that already as well? he has said that. there was a lot of talk about the time limit on the backstop probably being acceptable and that could have got through the house of commons but he has hardened that line and said no, it has to be abolished. the question is, is that borisjohnson saying to the eu, that‘s a
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prerequisite for any negotiation, you have to say we will abolish the backstop and sort out the problem of the border in the future relationship, where he and many others think it should always have been rather than part of the withdrawal agreement. it was unclear from downing street afterwards whether that is what he was saying. quite a lot of people predicting there could be a stand—off where borisjohnson does there could be a stand—off where boris johnson does not there could be a stand—off where borisjohnson does not go to brussels and offer anything up, and brussels and offer anything up, and brussels do not come here and offer anything so we are in a stand—off potentially until the month of august, and all the time heading to ano august, and all the time heading to a no deal at the end of october. iain duncan smith put it suck singly when he said the days of the uk being pushed around are over. there has been a change in tone and i think that‘s part of the point of this reshuffle. it has no deal written all over it because he is bringing people who are completely signed up not just bringing people who are completely signed up notjust to brexit, because most tory mps are, but they are signed up to the possibility of no deal. so the energy is going to
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preparing for no deal. but you shouldn‘t dismiss the idea of boris johnson pursuing a deal because he has said that is what he prefers and that keeps on board many of those sacked ministers who don‘t want no deal, some of whom have threatened to block it at any cost. one of them said to me earlier, i am looking very closely and as long as he is genuinely trying to get a deal then it‘s fine and they will go along with it. the problem for boris johnson comes if he tries to push a no deal scenario through this place. should we rule out a general election? looking at the faces of the labour mps today, you could forgive them, and they certainly gave the impression that they weren‘t terribly happy with how things were going. you can never rule that out. the interesting thing is, labour have a rally tonight calling for an immediate general election but they haven‘t today put forward a no—confidence vote because that would be one way of trying to get there. i don‘t think that is what boris johnson get there. i don‘t think that is what borisjohnson wants at this stage, but it might come to it if it comes to the point where he has
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tried everything, can‘t get a new deal acceptable to this place and parliament then tries to stop and manages to stop no deal, the only thing he is left with is no solution whatsoever. tory mps, looking from their response to what they saw off borisjohnson, they their response to what they saw off boris johnson, they feel he their response to what they saw off borisjohnson, they feel he is a winner and would have a chance of winning a general election. nobody knows at this point and the liberal democrats could say they would do pretty well if it is a no deal type general election. can‘t rule it out but let‘s hope not! we are too tired! be careful. let's quickly mention theresa may. she was at lord‘s cricket ground today with david gauke... some lord‘s cricket ground today with david gauke. .. some of the gaukeward squad. she was there with some of them watching the cricket, a slightly better day than yesterday. greg clark, david gauke and former chief of staff gavin barwell was there. i thinkjohn major did that, going straight to the cricket. did she find a television to watch boris
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johnson? no, but she did want to watch you, simon. there‘s got to be someone! that's vicki young, our ex chief political correspondent! you are watching afternoon light. the irish prime minister leo varadkar has said that a no deal brexit would be a decision for britain to make alone. earlier, he was asked by reporters if he though the uk would leave the eu by the time ireland hosts the ryder cup in 2026. i think it‘s going to be a matter for the united kingdom to decide whether or not it is still a member of the european union in 2026. they had the referendum and we respect the result. but the question you ask is an interesting one, you ask me about boris johnson‘s is an interesting one, you ask me about borisjohnson‘s threat of no deal, and no deal is a british threat. the only people who can cause no deal is a united kingdom government. while we are not going to speak to borisjohnson over the airways, i look forward to meeting him in early course. but the
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position of the european union and the position of ireland has not changed, the backstop is an integral pa rt changed, the backstop is an integral part of the withdrawal agreement and without the backstop there is no withdrawal agreement, there is no transition phase, no implementation phase and there would be no free trade agreement until all those matters are resolved. so i hope that the new uk prime minister hasn‘t chosen no deal, but that will be up to them. with me is the daily telegraph columnist asa bennett. leo varadkar they‘re saying they don‘t want no deal, and i hope boris johnson is thinking it through carefully. what impression did you get of the new prime minister‘s performance today? the mantra was let boris be boris. people thought he might be stuffy and wind himself in butfar he might be stuffy and wind himself in but farfrom he might be stuffy and wind himself in but far from it. he might be stuffy and wind himself in but farfrom it. he was going at it, speaking a thousand words a minute, going after labour, corbyn and the lib dems with all sorts of brio. hang on, shouldn‘t he be reaching across the aisle, he needs to be chummy with his colleagues but farfrom to be chummy with his colleagues but far from it. to be chummy with his colleagues but
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farfrom it. in my view he will go full throttle and dare parliament to stop him. if it does, he can run to the people and say give me a new parliament in an election. there we re parliament in an election. there were two audiences, we heard cheers from the group behind him, which we haven‘t heard in a long time. what about the public watching on television and on the news tonight? what will the papers say their reaction is? they will certainly pick up on the energy and dynamism he wants to provide now as leader, rather like as iain duncan smith said, the days of submission are over, and boris is saying to the eu he will negotiate wherever and whenever. the eu has come back with just as much energy, leo varadkar saying, no fantasy, we want to talk in detail. you might say it‘s the start of a negotiation and boris is saying he‘s not afraid to do no deal. at some point somebody will have to give in. speaking to some people after the day‘s performance in the house of commons and they
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said, a general election mightjust work for him. exactly. it's anyone's guess right now. looking at the polling as it stands, he would have a real uphill struggle but boris is someone who, when he was running to be london mayor, he had double digit polling leads behind ken livingstone but turned it around and went to city hall. we live in a volatile world where theresa may had massive polling leads when she called the 2017 election, but they went away with her majority, gone. if boris has the right energy and confidence he could turn this around and be mr brexit with a brexit mandate to match. what about those sitting on the backbenches who until yesterday we re the backbenches who until yesterday were not? did you get a sense of how they feel and how they might play things over the next few weeks?” was struck yesterday when amber rudd, one of the more remainer ministers was kept on board. boris with his do or die brexit pledge
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said all ministers must be reconciled to a october 31 deadline. for somebody who backed jeremy hunt and was really sceptical about no deal, what happened? but he says they now all agree, they all happy birds singing from the same hymn sheet, if i can mix metaphors, i apologise. but the brexit conceit is apologise. but the brexit conceit is a poker game. if you hold your composure, the eu will blink first. we will have to see how well they keep it up. it has been a long and hot week. parliament now breaks up, but for boris johnson, the hot week. parliament now breaks up, but for borisjohnson, the next couple of weeks are going to be crucial. absolutely. he will have to cancel his holidays, given it is a 100 day period and he has to get brexit done by the end of it. it will be a test of two things, one for the domestic audience, showing that he is notjust mr brexit, that he can do more, thinks he can do without passing new laws. because if
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you try to pass a new law through this parliament it will be strung up like a christmas tree with amendments and hobby horses galore. we will have to see what that means. at the same time he will be touring the regions, banging the drum for the regions, banging the drum for the uk and emphasising his arguments for what he wants. the eu might want more detail but he will say, this is the detail, give me a better deal or we are out with no deal. we'll theresa may out the cricket get a mention in the papers? of course. resigning and going off to the cricket with her favourite ministers, that‘s just part of life for her now. we will have more from westminster a little later. in the meantime, some of the news. two teenagers have beenjailed for offences relating to the fatal stabbing of grammar school pupil yousef makki. yousef was stabbed in the heart with a flick knife in the village of hale barns in greater manchester in march. both boys are 17 — and can not be named for legal reasons. our correspondentjudith moritz sent us this update from outside manchester crown court.
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the boys being sentenced for offences relating to that stabbing, the fatal stabbing of 17—year—old yousef makki, who was a scholarship boy at the prestigious manchester grammar school. he was fatally stabbed on the 2nd of march in hale barns, a village in south manchester, in an area popular with footballers and celebrity. the court heard as part of sentencing that this was evidence of knife crime affecting all aspects of our society. the court was told this had happened after yousef makki was involved in a row with two other boys, also both 17, a row over a failed drug steel. we cannot name the 217—year—olds defendants, they are too young in law, but they were sentenced today. the first of those two boys was acquitted at trial here of both murder and manslaughter. although it was accepted that he had been carrying the knife that had fatally stabbed yousef makki, he had stabbed him but was acquitted of both those charges. but he did admit
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possessing a knife and perverting the course of justice, possessing a knife and perverting the course ofjustice, lying to the police, and he was sentenced to 16 months. the second boy admitted to having possessing a flick knife is well stop he had been acquitted of perverting the course ofjustice and we re perverting the course ofjustice and were sentenced to four months in total. in sentencing, mrjustice brian said knife crime is a cancer on our society. he said to both boys, the backdrop to your offending is depressingly all—too—familiar. he said they were part of a warped culture in which the possession of knives was seen to be cool and aesthetically pleasing. he told them both that by sending them to prison, he hopes that other young people in this situation would be put off from carrying knives. no doubt you have been checking the thermometer. we have had one in the shade and right now it is reading
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just below 100 fahrenheit, that is 35 or so degrees celsius. this is very unscientific. if you want to know what‘s really going on, i have the man right here to tell us. ben. we got to 38.1 degrees now at cambridge. that‘s the highest we‘ve seen so five. only the second time the uk has recorded a temperature above 100 fahrenheit. it is 0.4 degrees away from that all—time temperature record. it hasn't happened, because we were expecting by now to reporting... yeah as far asi by now to reporting... yeah as far as i know it hasn‘t quite happened but a lot of the observations don‘t necessarily come in immediately. there is a lot of data still to crunch so it‘s very, very close and we will keep you up—to—date. things are happening around the country, things are breaking. we've seen a few thunderstorms across east wales, east midlands, north—west england. that heralds a change over the next few days. some pretty different weather to come as we head towards the end of this week will
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stop we can sum it up like this. the headline, we will see some rain at times and crucially that significantly cooler feel developing across the uk. those temperatures have been up above 38 degrees in places and they stay pretty high into the first part of the evening, only dropping away very slowly. many areas are still in the low to mid 30s are. the showers and thunderstorms will continue through tonight, quite hit and miss. thunderstorms will continue through tonight, quite hitand miss. some places will avoid them and stay dry but if you do catch one of those you will know about it. a lot of rain in a short space of time, thunder, lightning, hail, gusty winds, and a warm and sticky night. 15 to 20 degrees if you are lucky. things start to change as we go through tomorrow. we will see showers and thunderstorms around particularly through the channel islands come across the eastern side of england at times. also in the west, extra cloud bringing patchy rain for northern ireland, western england, wales and parts of scotland. behind that band of cloud and patchy rain
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isa that band of cloud and patchy rain is a cold front. we see cooler air, temperatures dipping away in the west. still perhaps 27 in northern scotland, 29 possibly 30 degrees and eastern england but certainly cooler thanit eastern england but certainly cooler than it has been. into saturday, outbreaks of rain. a slow—moving band of rain stretching from scotla nd band of rain stretching from scotland down across northern and eastern england, some spots here through the weekend could see 50 to 80 millimetres of rain and for all of us, whether it is wet or dry, it will be cooler. 20 to 23 degrees. if anything some spots will be a touch below the average for the time of year. into sunday, the outbreaks of rain continue for some, the very slow—moving weather front wriggling around, not going anywhere fast. outbreaks are pretty heavy and persistent rain at times, dry to the north—east of scotland, dry to the south—west of the uk, as well, and we stick with the lower temperatures, slightly more co mforta ble temperatures, slightly more comfortable temperatures for many of us. we will keep you posted over the next couple of hours about the
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all—time record, but 38.1 degrees at cambridge this afternoon.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the uk sees the second hottest day on record and the hottestjuly day ever. rail services are severely affected by the heat — with trains breaking down and being delayed or cancelled. passengers are told to stay at home . forecasters are warning the heat could lead to downpours in some areas, causing more disruption — doctors are warning of the risk of heatstroke. on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit. today is the first day of a new approach which will end with our exit from the eu on the 31st of october. sport now on afternoon live with adam wild — and an unlikely figure riding to england‘s rescue after an embarrassing first day of the test against ireland. it's it‘s been a conundrum for a while in english cricket. who will open the
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batting? we are not entirely sure we found the answer but jack leach said better than many who have tried. the nightwatchman made his highest ever first class score as england looked like they were steady and things after their embarrassing performance yesterday with the bat in the one—off test against ireland at lord‘s. they were all out for 85 yesterday, not the kind of form they wa nted yesterday, not the kind of form they wanted to showjust a week before the start of the ashes series. jack leach has now fallen but not before scoring a very impressive 92. not bad at all for a number 11. he has been working very hard on his batting over the last few years but this performance has taken many by surprise. he was outjust short of his century, 72 as well forjason roy on his test debut, but since then things have not been too clever once again. england are now 209—5 just after tea. that is a lead of just after tea. that is a lead of just 87 so still a long way to go there at lord‘s.
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just 87 so still a long way to go there at lord's. switched to swimming. i‘d give anything to be in a pool! britain‘s adam peaty has come out with some pretty forceful comments about the big doping controversy at the world championships this week. it's it‘s been a row that has been one of the big talking points in the world aquatics championships taking place in south korea. one of the big talking point in sport more generally, the row over the chinese athlete has been on all week. a three—month drug ban was heard calling britten‘s duncan scott a loser as the pair left the pill following the medal ceremony yesterday in some pretty ugly scenes —— michael left the pool. one runs in three sabot refused to share the podium with the gold medallist. now adam peaty has had his say, as well. adam peaty has had his say, as well. adam peaty has told the bbc he supports the action of some of his fellow competitors who have protested. scott was warned after refusing to share the podium. it was a similar show of demonstration by
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australia‘s mack horton. and adam peaty says he would do the same if the situation arose. absolutely, absolutely. i think being british thatis absolutely. i think being british that is one of mao dillon echo our best quality. we all stand for what we think is like. went mack horton protested, came back in the dining room, all the countries were clapping him. doping has no place in sport, never have, never will, but doping has no place in sport, never have, neverwill, but it doping has no place in sport, never have, never will, but it is getting that message out and just standing ourground. that message out and just standing our ground. message applaud two dunks. i repeat ten times a day to the media, doping has no place in sport, any sport, and the people who will win. .. sport, any sport, and the people who will win... even sport, any sport, and the people who will win. .. even if sport, any sport, and the people who will win... even if you cheat and when you know you haven't won. that stays with them for the rest of their life. hopefully dunks next year will smash them out of the water. racing at southwell was abandoned with two races remaining earlier this afternoon because of the current
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heatwave. the meeting had controversially gone ahead despite temperatures topping 30 degrees centigrade. the seven—race meeting had started at 11:25 this morning, two—and—a—half hours earlier than scheduled, in a bid to cope with the heat, but the british horseracing authority decided to call an early a halt. arsenal have signed real madrid midfielder dani ceballos on a season—long loan deal. the 22—year—old has made 56 appearances for the spanish giants since joining in 2017 from real betis. arsenal are also set to sign saint—etienne teenage centre—back william saliba for a fee in the region of £27 million. manchester united have beaten tottenham 2—1 in a pre—season friendly in china. anthony martial‘s effort from a tight angle gave ole gunnar solskjaer‘s side the lead midway through the first half in shanghai. spurs levelled after the break, though — lucal moura with the equaliser. but united regained their lead just 10 minutes before the end — teenager angel gomes‘ impressive
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goal securing the victory. after shane lowry‘s open championship victory at the weekend, there‘s more good news for irish golf because adare manor has been named as the venue to host the 2026 ryder cup. the course in limerick has beaten the belfry to the honour of hosting the bienniel tournament between europe and the usa. the last time it was staged in ireland was back in 2006. just before we gojulian alaphilippe remains the man to catch at the tour de france. he remains in the yellow jersey after stage 18 in the alps, which was won by nairo quintana. defending champion, britain‘s geraint thomas dropped a place and is now third overall — 1 minute 35 seconds behind alaphillipe. you can find more on that on the bbc sport website.
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that‘s bbc.co.uk/sport. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. today i‘m not the only one that‘s out and about in the sun, south east today‘s ian palmer joins me from faversham, where the uk record temperature record was set at 38.5c in august 2003. we will be with ian in a moment. it looks lovely today. and i‘m alsojoined by south today‘s travel correspondent paul clifton who is out at the network rail training centre in basingstoke to look at how the weather is impacting rail travel. first to ian, is kent about to lose its record? well, it‘s getting very close, simon, it has to be said. everyone is on tenterhooks here. we have a
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recorded temperature of 38.1, recorded temperature of 38.1, recorded in cambridgeshire. as you mentioned earlier, a record temperature of 38.5 was recorded in this very box on august ten, 2003. this record is incredibly important to here where they grow cherries, plums and apples. because since that record was broken, people have come here just to look at this very weather station here. if ijust turn a little bit to my right here, you can see that they have built an outdoor classroom, where children from across kent and beyond can come and learn about how that record temperature was actually recorded and why it is so important and how accurate this thing is. a 38.1 is the highest temperature recorded so far today. will it get to that 38.5
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mark? well... isuppose far today. will it get to that 38.5 mark? well... i suppose at nearly 5pm, we got much longer to wait. it's 5pm, we got much longer to wait. it‘s obviously a cause of considerable pride where you are. yes, i mean, people really do want the record to stay here in kent if at all possible. they are very proud of it. i don‘t know if you can remember, going back to that wonderful... i mean, obviously people are killing off, as you can see, pictures of people curling up on the kent coast now, but if you go back to that day in 2003 —— cooling off. the record of 38.1 was recorded in gravesend, a weather centre there. that whether sent it was checked on a daily basis, but it wasn‘t until seven weeks later that they check this box and realised that that had been surpassed and the reason for that is that this box was being manned by a volunteer who only checkedit being manned by a volunteer who only checked it once a month. it‘s actually checked every day now, but
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back then we had to wait seven weeks before we actually realised that the hottest temperature ever recorded in the uk was actually right here where iam standing. the uk was actually right here where i am standing. ian, did you volunteer for this i am standing. ian, did you volunteerfor this gig i am standing. ian, did you volunteer for this gig this afternoon? you know what, simon? i do love the heat, but it is a little fierce here, i have to tell you. looking at those pictures of people swimming, gosh, i am envious. looking at those pictures of people swimming, gosh, iam envious. great to see you, thank you. lets go on to paul. there are some real problems out and about on the rails today. it's going to make a mess of this evening‘s rush hour this evening. a huge part of the country with delays and cancellations. the air temperature climbed into the 30s, and the temperature on the steel rail has been running 20 degrees above that. so here at network rail training centre in basingstoke, standing in the sun, the tracks here have been
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easily 50 celsius, so too hot to touch. in that heat, they expand. one mile of track expands by about one metre. and if it‘s not treated carefully, that can cause buckling. that‘s why drivers have been told to slow down. if the drivers slow down, that means they take up more space on the tracks, there is room for fewer trains. it leads to cancellations are. some services are running today at about half their normal number. at waterloo this evening they are handing out 20,000 bottles of water, and on the tracks heading out of waterloo through south london, the speed limit is down to 30 mph, just half the normal amount. there are speed limit on most of the region‘s mainlines. southern, thames link, south—eastern, gatwick express and others are all advising passengers not to travel home by train if at all possible, they should find a
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different route to. here on the south—western, it is not bad. services are running fairly well, as they are on great western. it‘s clearly a n they are on great western. it‘s clearly an extremely messy situation on the railways this evening. operators are dealing with it as they do, but you can hear people around the country going, hang on a minute, we are not the only country that deals with temperatures of this nature, and yet we always seem to have problems with our transport. you are right, simon. today is exceptional, obviously, but network rail knows it has to plan for a changing climate. it could stress the rails to work better at higher temperatures, but that would have a knock—on effect in winter, when things are cooler. so it would move the operating window of the railway. here in the south of england, much of the railway is built on clay embankments. they are drying out and cracking and the result is something like pot holes on the road. so trains have to slow down for those,
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as well. longer term, the railway has some really fundamental problems to deal with that are related to climate change. they may take decades to play out, but as the railway prepares for them, the cost is going to be absolutely mind boggling. what we are seeing today, yes, is an exceptional day, but it is an indication of what the railway will have to learn to deal with in the longer term. paul, always good to talk to you. ian palmer information, that was nationwide. thank you. if you would like to see more on any of those stories come at you can access them by the bbc i player. we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm. we will stay with that theme.
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i want to talk to adam ward. adam has been stuck on a train that was leaving euston for over 3 hours. he is on the phone right now... is that right, you are on it for three hours with yellow yes. the replacement train that came to our aid, just getting that train now. it's aid, just getting that train now. it‘s been outside euston a mile away for over three hours. two hours of that was without power or fresh air. adam, did you have water? what did people do when they realised they we re people do when they realised they were stuck? what temperatures like? it was like a greenhouse. people did have water passed around although it was warm water, but still useful. we didn‘t really know how long we would
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be stuck there. we had to find another train. what about that operation to get you off the trains? three hours sounds a long time. yes, the staff were fantastic and doing the staff were fantastic and doing the best they could. people were taken off the train on old rickety ladders. people with a disability would have struggled. by the time we moved onto the train, which did have power, we sat for an hour and a half to get onto that train,... that you sound fairly calm but i‘m guessing there are some people in this situation who gets cross. a few
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tempers boiled over a little bit. people were good—humoured and knew there was no one to blame. people we re there was no one to blame. people were getting upset, children were crying. there was a young baby. we also had people... i think we've got... we‘ve lost you, adam, i think. i‘m going to let you get on and get home. have as good a journey as possible in getting home and no doubt you will wonder if it was ever worth leaving home in the first place. adam has been stuck on a train for three hours. in a moment ben bland will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live the hottestjuly day ever. rail services have been severely affected by the heat, trains have broken down and be delayed or cancelled. passengers have been told to stay home if they can. forecasters are warning that heat could lead to
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downpours in some areas, causing more disruption. doctors are warning of the risk of heat stroke. on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. nissan cuts 12,500 jobs worldwide. as yet, the location of those cuts is unknown. the car—maker suffers a 95% fall in profits in the first three months of the year. boeing may stop making its best—selling jet, the 737 max. it‘s been grounded since march after two fatal crashes. the company is reporting its largest ever quarterly loss. if regulators keep the model grounded, boeing said it would consider reducing or shutting production down of the plane. facebook shares jump after reporting a 28% rise in revenues. on wednesday facebook announced that will pay a record $5 billion fine to settle privacy concerns.
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it seems like these are incredibly turbulent times for boeing and it is now really feeling the financial hit from the grounding of the 737 max, so much so it is talking about reducing or even completely stopping production of that model. why? because a number of airlines have put orders on hold until a software fix has been comprehensively tested and approved by regulators. the jet has been grounded worldwide since march because of fatal accidents in ethiopia and indonesia which killed almost 350 people. boeing‘s boss says he thinks the 737 max will be back in the air by october. but that is still far from certain. the crisis has seen boeing rack up its biggest ever quarterly loss of £2.7 billion.
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let‘s speak to simon french, chief economist at panmure gordon. i want to speak about the london market. diageo shares were down despite some robust results. it's difficult to know what else diageo could have done. a 6% increase in sales, 9% in profits. it increased the dividend by 5%. but i think the reason for the share price weakness todayisit reason for the share price weakness today is it has been on a fantastic run. it has just today is it has been on a fantastic run. it hasjust run up its share price in almost a straight line as investors look to a safe haven of drink staples against the risk of slowing global growth and they are taking some profits today because the stock itself is on 28 times next year‘s earnings, which is more than double the overall valuation of the ftse100. another double the overall valuation of the ftse 100. another one that has
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caught my attention, astrazeneca. its shares busting through, smashing an all—time high. they are upping their forecast. why do you think investors are getting so excited about that? they are getting excited and the stock is up 17% this year. again, it‘s partly the fact that health care is a defensive sector and against the backdrop of slowing global growth, that is attractive. there are two parts of the story that you really want to understand and that is the cancer drugs, where sales are up more than 40% and then sales are up more than 40% and then sales in china by more than 57%. those two parts of astrazeneca‘s sales are those two parts of astrazeneca‘s sales a re really those two parts of astrazeneca‘s sales are really what drove the shareholder enthusiasm and the stock responded today. we were talking about boeing a while ago. how much patience do you think investors will have before they start to think, actually, this is really a company in crisis? it's a good
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question because they have had to be patient and the share price has moved sideways this year in the us. at the big surcharge we had, $4.9 billion, the write—down against the liability they may face for the max aircraft, the problem shareholder space will that be enough? we don‘t know what litigation you may get from the two fatal crashes, and also what is the future of this max production? those things will really test patients with investors. thanks very much indeed. simon french, thank you. let‘s have a quick look at the markets. astrazeneca smashes through an all—time high after it raised its
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annual product sales. some hopes of progress in trade negotiations between the united states and china ahead of meetings in shanghai next week also supported the broader sentiment, helping boost shares of asia—focused banks hsbc and standard chartered. you can see hsbc is now in the negative as it closes the session. the consumer goods giant unilever also took a dip as rainy weather, obviously not today, but in the previous results period, hit ice cream sales in europe and north america. i dare say they will pick up america. i dare say they will pick up today. drinks and spirits company diageo fell. that despite some pretty robust earnings reports. new york has begun its trading session in the last couple of hours. that‘s it from me this afternoon and
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simon. time now for the weather. good afternoon. temperatures have been on the rise over the past few days and i think today we are seeing the peak of this current heat wave. in fact we could potentially break the all—time temperature record. that currently stands at 38.5 celsius, recorded in faversham in kent back in 2003. now this afternoon there is a chance we could just about break that record, so highs potentially reaching around about 39 celsius. probably somewhere around the london region orjust to the north or west of london. now it is going to be very hot day, really, wherever you are across the uk today, particularly through central and eastern parts of england. elsewhere we‘ve got some showers and some thunderstorms to contend with, too, as we head through the latter part of this afternoon and initially across parts of southern england, wales and then across northern england, too. but look at these temperatures. across parts of scotland they are reaching around 29 or 30 degrees. the mid 20s for northern ireland. england and wales widely up into the 30s. 38 or 39 celsius possible. with all the heat and also the humidity, many of us will see
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some thunderstorms developing tonight, so some pretty lively weather. these showers are going to be quite hit and miss. we won‘t all see them, but they are going to rumble northwards across england, wales, pushing into scotland through the second half of the night, too, so some heavy, thundery downpours likely. it‘s going to be fairly uncomfortable for sleeping with those temperatures still around 19 or 20 degrees overnight for many of us, and add on the noise of those thunderstorms, too. but as we head through the day tomorrow, eventually things will be turning cooler and fresher. all thanks to this cold front. it‘s moving in, bringing atlantic air gradually across the country. we‘ve still got some fairly heavy downpours to come as that frontal system makes its way in from the west. eastern england in particular could well see some very heavy showers, thunderstorms with large hail and squally winds and frequent lightning through the course of tomorrow. and then a little bit of patchy rain moves in as that cold front pushes its way gradually further eastwards and many of us seeing temperatures about 10 degrees cooler tomorrow compared to those
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highs of today. this weather front stays put through friday night and then on into the weekend, particularly across eastern england and also the east of scotland, too. now that could potentially be very heavy as we head through the weekend with some flooding problems possible for the north—east of england and eastern scotland. but the main thing you‘re going to notice as you head into the weekend, things will be much cooler and fresher, more comfortable by day and also for sleeping overnight, too. bye— bye.
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today at 5: we‘re at westminster, with the uk experiencing its hottest day for a july ever, with temperatures reaching 38.1 celsius in cambridge. while some enjoy the soaring warmth, the nhs is warning of the risk of heatstroke, and councils are stepping up home visits to the elderly. train passengers are told to stay at home as the extreme temperatures cause chaos on the rail network, with problems on overhead lines. we‘re not the only ones. extreme heat has gripped much of western europe, with paris setting a new record of 42.4 celsius. in other news, on his first full day as prime minister, borisjohnson predicts a golden age for britain after brexit and welcomes in his new cabinet. well, good morning, everybody, and it is wonderful to see

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