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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 24, 2019 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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to take an interest in when i'm on the backbenches, this is one and, along with the wider issue of mental health i will continue to look at. i've committed to taking the autism training that has been made available for members of parliament. it's always a historic moment when a prime minister leaves office, especially when the country faces such difficult times as we do ahead. but her departure marks another milestone. now we are onto our 77th brightness that now, she is always only the second woman ever to hold that office. she put tackling them in trafficking out of the horrors of domestic violence as a priority at the heart of her government. in that respect, her legacy is secured
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because everyone in this house backs that and we will all be committed to taking that forward. even her harshest critics must recognise her integrity, commitment to public service, dedication to this country. those are qualities that none of us should ever take for granted. can i just for her a word of the sisterly advice? sometimes, you just have to bea advice? sometimes, you just have to be a bit more careful when a man wa nts to be a bit more careful when a man wants to hold your hand. laughter. i thank her for laughter. i thank herfor her laughter. i thank her for her service as our prime minister and i sincerely wish her all the best for her future. prime minister and i sincerely wish her all the best for herfuture. can i think the right honourable lady for her question. she joined i think the right honourable lady for her question. shejoined this housein for her question. shejoined this house in 1982 when there was a female prime minister but very few women in this house and she has played a very important role that
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she should be proud of and ensuring more members came into this house as members of parliament. she started something which started to change the face of this house, something very important. i came here as one of only 13 conservative women, indeed, one labour member approach me to sign new private members bill because he assumed i must‘ve been a labourmp sincei because he assumed i must‘ve been a labour mp since i was a women. i am also proud in getting more women mps in this house, i'm sure amongst some of the women in this house that is a future prime minister, may be more than one. i will return to the backbenches, it will be my first time ina backbenches, it will be my first time in a 21 years,. i'm told i have a nswered time in a 21 years,. i'm told i have answered over a500 questions over 1a0 hours in this house, more than i
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might have expected mr speaker. laughter. . in future, infuture, i in future, i look forward to asking the questions. but we are, as the right honourable lady said, living through extraordinary times. this house of commons is likely at the centre of those events, that is because of the vital link between every single member of this house and the communities, that is the bedrock of our parliamentary democracy and our liberty. and each of us can take pride in that. that duty to serve my constituents will remain my greatest motivation. applause.
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reporter: that was prime minister my‘s final p and q is taking place
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in parliament there. a packed room, it was her 95th and final time. she is now leaving. that is quite a busy schedule on for this afternoon. she is going to be heading to buckingham palace to meet the queen. 0nce is going to be heading to buckingham palace to meet the queen. once that has taken place just before three o'clock, boris johnson has taken place just before three o'clock, borisjohnson at has taken place just before three o'clock, boris johnson at around half past three will meet the queen to formally become prime minister. borisjohnson is then set to enter downing street just after four o'clock. we will be covering all of this on bbc news, we will be shortly crossing over to sophie to pick up the news at one. just to remind you of what prime minister mae and her final p in queues. she told them
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that she will continue as a constituency mp, and she was happy to hand over to a successor committed to delivering brexit and creating a bright future for this country. her successor, of creating a bright future for this country. hersuccessor, of course, borisjohnson, who yesterday became the leader of the conservative party, beating jeremy hunt. prime minister mae is going back to downing street, she is going to deliver her farewell speech there. i think one of the main thing is we are all waiting for here is to see what boris johnson are all waiting for here is to see what borisjohnson was my cabinet is going to look like. he says he wants it to reflect modern britain, so more diversity, more women in there. there has already been some speculation about who is going to be in at that cabinet, but we expect
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those details to start coming out later this afternoon and into this evening. interestingly, prime minister mae was also asked what advice she would give her successor — she paid tribute to her husband. we cross now to the bbc one news. unusually long to prime ministers questions for herfinal unusually long to prime ministers questions for her final appearance at pm cues, 95th time, standing ovation as she sat down for the last time. your reflection on herfinal words, norman? —— pmqs. time. your reflection on herfinal words, norman? -- pmqs. it was a more reflective prime ministers questions, plenty of tributes to theresa may, including from some of those tory mps who have made her life a misery, prompting chanting from opposition mps of, "hypocrites, hypocrites", although she was
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tempted byjeremy hypocrites", although she was tempted by jeremy corbyn hypocrites", although she was tempted byjeremy corbyn and other labour mps to say something just obliging, difficult, loyaltowards —— disloyal towards her successor, borisjohnson, she —— disloyal towards her successor, boris johnson, she did —— disloyal towards her successor, borisjohnson, she did not. she showed him a degree of loyalty which frankly he and his supporters have never shown her. i thought there was a visual warning sign for boris johnson, sitting behind theresa may we re johnson, sitting behind theresa may were the likes of philip hammond, david gauke, david livingstone, former remainers, most of them will return to the backbenches. they have made clear, if borisjohnson seeks to pursue no deal, then the gloves will come off, and who knows, theresa may may even take off the gloves herself. —— david lidington. 99 days until october 31, an awful lot of work to do very fast including obviously appointing one of the most senior figures in government yellow crucial in getting us government yellow crucial in getting usa government yellow crucial in getting us a sense government yellow crucial in getting us a sense of what a borisjohnson government is actually going to look like, the initial picture is that it
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is one where a hardline brexiteers are going to be in the driving seat, so, for example, we know that priti patel, arden brexiteer, set for a topjob, possibly home patel, arden brexiteer, set for a top job, possibly home secretary, patel, arden brexiteer, set for a topjob, possibly home secretary, a lot of speculation about dominic raab getting a top job and lot of speculation about dominic raab getting a topjob and dominic cummings, he was the mastermind behind the vote leave campaign, the evil genius in the eyes of his critics, someone prepared to do things unconventionally and ruffle feathers, if borisjohnson wants to strike a rather different approach with the eu, then dominic cummings is the man to tread on toes, smash a through plates and throw the crockery around. —— ardent brexiteer. longer than usual prime ministers questions, we can show you the final moments, theresa may as she made her final comments to the commons. that
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duty to serve my constituents will remain my greatest motivation. applause standing ovation for theresa may, three years, 11 days, she will be heading back to downing street shortly, where she will say her final goodbyes and address the nation, before making her way here to buckingham palace, we expect that to buckingham palace, we expect that to happen at 2:30pm, to a0 5pm, the timing will be loose, that is when she will arrive to tender her resignation to the queen. nicholas witchell is with me now. the queen, the union flag flying low, she is not even here, yet. she is expecting quite soon, she has been at windsor, ordinarily she would have gone to balmoral last week but she stayed in london precisely because of this. no one but no one has a similar level
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of knowledge and experience of recent british prime ministers than the queen, boris johnson recent british prime ministers than the queen, borisjohnson will be the 1ath, winston churchill was the first, he fought in the boer war. they know each other, the queen has made borisjohnson as foreign secretary and mayor of london and he isa secretary and mayor of london and he is a member of the privy council, they will have met on a number of occasions, i don't think they know each other well and when he comes here this afternoon for an audience to be invited by the queen to form an administration on the basis he is the man who can command the confidence of the house of commons, that, remember, is the only criteria by which a british prime minister is chosen, she will have some fairly pointed question for him. she will wa nt to pointed question for him. she will want to be reassured that he has the application, that he has a grip on detail that is required. she has had prime ministers like wilson, thatcher, brown, theresa may, who have had a formidable grip on detail. it is her one opportunity 110w detail. it is her one opportunity now before going to balmoral to tease out what are his plans, and she will be keenly interested,
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particularly in the protection of the union, the union of the united kingdom. well, borisjohnson has just 99 days to sort out brexit one way or the other. he has vowed to take the uk out of the european union by 31st 0ctober, come what may. but with mps about to leave for their summer break, the timetable is very tight. chris morris is at westminster with some of the key dates ahead. s, sophie, it really is tight, just over three months for borisjohnson to achieve what has proved unachievable so far in just over three years, and that is to sort out this brexit conundrum. as you say, the first date really in the timeline is that this week, tomorrow, parliament goes into its long summer tomorrow, parliament goes into its long summer recess, tomorrow, parliament goes into its long summer recess, most mps will not be back here in westminster until september. that doesn't mean there will be a rest for the government, he has two big brexit related issues to deal with, making diplomatic contacts with all those other european leaders, to try to negotiate what they have said is
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non—negotiable. but also to start planning again at full speed for a potential no—deal brexit, both within government and within the business community. when mps do come backin business community. when mps do come back in september, they won't be here for all that long, they are due to have another recess towards the end of september, during the party conference season. end of september, during the party conference season. horacejohnson will be addressing the conservative party conference, which begins at the end of september, and his speech there will be closely watched. as for the mood in which he will go into the final month of october, but the first meeting with all the other eu leaders, the people he needs to convince if he is to get a deal to leave the eu by october 31, something which many people feel is pretty unlikely, given the time constraints, that meeting, the eu summit, does not take place until 0ctober summit, does not take place until october 17, summit, does not take place until 0ctober17, 18, that is a couple of weeks before the "brexit" deadline comes up. “— weeks before the "brexit" deadline comes up. —— brexit. what we do not know are the dates where things may
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change dramatically, such as a potential vote of no confidence from the opposition. after most people go on holiday in august, september and 0ctober are going to be a bit of a roller—coaster ride. the european union's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has said he's looking forward to "working constructively" with mrjohnson — to ratify the withdrawal agreement. 0ur correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels no plans to go to brussels any time soon? none that are known of here, that is why the eu is waiting to see what position borisjohnson why the eu is waiting to see what position boris johnson takes. why the eu is waiting to see what position borisjohnson takes. michel barnier, the bbc caught up with him a short time ago, he said that this was a very important moment for brexit because, he said, the uk had a fundamental choice to make, this is what he said. we look forward to hearing what the new prime minister, borisjohnson, wants,
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hearing what the new prime minister, boris johnson, wants, what hearing what the new prime minister, borisjohnson, wants, what are the choices of the uk, is it an orderly brexit? is it the preference of the eu? we have worked for brexit, orderly brexit, the last two years. is it orderly brexit, the last two years. isita orderly brexit, the last two years. is it a no—deal brexit? a no—deal brexit will never be the choice of the eu, but we are prepared for it. foran the eu, but we are prepared for it. for an orderly brexit, we will work for the next few weeks and months with the new uk government. and we have been hearing from the european parliament's brexit have been hearing from the european pa rliament‘s brexit group have been hearing from the european parliament's brexit group and they made very clear, no deal would be extremely damaging for both sides, but, sticking to the eu's logic and position, they said there would be no mini deal, no side deal, no extra agreement to mitigate the impact, if thatis agreement to mitigate the impact, if that is the choice mrjohnson makes.
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businesses up and down the country have been holding their breath, dealing with uncertainty as they wait to find out what kind of brexit we will have. so what's the reaction now that borisjohnson is about to move in to number ten and the prospect of a no—deal brexit is now firmly back on the table? our business correspondent danni hewson is in salford. 0ne one of the first key announcements that we are expecting from boris johnson's government is to turbo boost regional business but for regional business, apart from brexit, transport is one of the biggest issues. there are big questions about the future of high speed two, under a borisjohnson government, and also high speed three, also known as northern powerhouse rail, will that ever happen? i have a couple of businesses with me now, you manufacturer new technologies. mo, transport is a
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huge issue — are you concerned about what boris johnson might huge issue — are you concerned about what borisjohnson might do for the regions? very concerned. i think it is really important to see through the commitments that the government has made, and boris has made in his election campaign. we need hsz to happen, we need hs3 to happen. the infrastructure is critical, we are in mediacity now, and we run a digital manufacturing accelerator from here, we have got connectivity, we are going to have full fibre network by 2027, the digital economy is already contributing a billion to the economy, we need a proper infrastructure for the north to really show leadership for the country and for the world, and if we are going to be in a post—brexit world, we need the northern regions to actually be able to have that investment to succeed. and what about brexit, sam, are you ready for about brexit, sam, are you ready for a no—deal brexit? about brexit, sam, are you ready for a no-deal brexit? i think everybody has to be at this point. i don't see any signs that we are going to get
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ideal. both parties seem to be completely entrenched in their position, so whilst i would really love it if we could get a good deal over the line, love it if we could get a good deal overthe line, i love it if we could get a good deal over the line, i think the reality is that we have got to prepare for no—deal at this point. is that we have got to prepare for no-deal at this point. 0k, thank you very much indeed. as with everything, businesses here arejust waiting for the detail. danni hewson there and solve it. and we will have more on all of that later in the programme. the time right now is 18 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime: theresa may receives a standing ovation in the house of commons as she bows out after three difficult years as prime minister she difficult years as prime minister heads to buckingh afternoon she heads to buckingham palace this afternoon where she will tender her resignation to the queen. moments later, bouchier will be summoned to the palace for his audience with her majesty, where she will invite him to become her 1ath prime minister. in sport on bbc news, england loses early wickets in their only warm—up test match ahead of the ashes. world cup winnerjason roy the first man to go, on his test debut
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against ireland at lord's. forecasters say temperatures in some parts of the uk could reach 36 celsius today. the heat follows thunderstorms which swept across much of the country last night. the rnli has warned people against the dangers of of people ecooling off in rivers and lakes. andrew plant is in weston—super—mare. andrew. yeah, it is a mere 25 degrees here in weston, much cooler than yesterday, people are telling me it is pretty much a perfect temperature, but not so tomorrow. temperatures are set to soar, and that involves taking precautions, not least for hospitals. the local general tells us they have brought in air conditioning units for each of their wards to try to keep staff and patients go. and police are putting on extra patrols,
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particularly on the main road in and out of cornwall to try to make sure people don't ever get stuck in hot ca rs. storms across much of the uk, as mother nature let off steam. the owners of this house in cardiff surveying the damage of a lightning strike this morning, brought on by the fierce heat. network rail is warning passengers of speed restrictions, tracks at risk of buckling as the temperatures go up. and warnings too around the water. divers in the thames finding the body of a swimmer this morning. another man died in a lake in the cotswolds yesterday afternoon. elsewhere, hospitals having to work hard to keep patients and staff cope. all of our patients are at risk, but the elderly are most vulnerable, so we are making sure we are increasing theirfluid intake by doing more regular tea rounds, with squashes and milkshakes. we have ice lollies and ice creams on offer as well. for seasonal businesses, an early start this morning — deliveries of extra ice cream. these few days, they hope, shaping up to be the busiest of the year.
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when you see this hot weather on the way, what do you start doing? rubbing my hands together, booking holiday, you know, those sorts of things. no, no, it's a long winter, so you've got to take it while it's there, you know. many, though, were stuck inside — business as usual, except for the sweltering temperatures. these workers in a sheet—metal factory feeling the heat. everyone out enjoying themselves, it's just too hot to be working. but the job's got to get done, i suppose. we were inside for a lot of the day, to keep out of the sunshine. the beach was really, really busy. but we sort of tried to shade ourselves. we're more bothered about the children, so we keep them covered up. we've had some suncream, and obviously we'll put some cream on as well. europe is boiling — in the heat pushed up from africa, germany 33 degrees today, france even warmer.
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is bringing surfers out in force. this week could see record temperatures brought to britain's shores. at times like these, even the tropical birds need a helping hand keeping cool. andrew plant there in weston—super—mare, and a full forecast coming up later in the programme. in the next hour, the man who led the investigation into alleged russian interference in the 2016 us presidential election is due to testify in washington. robert mueller, the former special counsel, will appear before the house intelligence and judiciary committees. the hearings will be shown live on television. laura trevelyan is on capitol hill. are we going to learn anything new from this, laura, do you think? very good question, jane! this is robert mueller‘s pot, all aa8 pages of it, he has said this report is my testimony, he doesn't intend to go
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beyond what is in here, however democrats are hoping that because most americans have not read it, he will educate the american public about what he actually said, namely that there was a systematic and sweeping attempt by the russians to interfere in the 2016 election, that the trump campaign thought it would electorally benefit from information stolen by the russians, that although there wasn't a criminal conspiracy between the trump campaign and russia, the president himself was not cleared of the crime of obstruction ofjustice. republicans are hoping that they can discredit the origins of the inquiry, the president himself has been tweeting it is all a witch hunt. laura, thank you, laura trevelya n hunt. laura, thank you, laura trevelyan in washington. hot on the heels of their cricket world cup triumph, england's only warm—up match before the ashes is under way. they‘ re playing ireland in a four—day test at lord's. ireland have made a spectacular start as joe wilson reports. the world cup? forget it, it's test matches now. shirts change colour, as does the ball. red for embarrassment?
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well, cricket should not be a closed shop. look closely — ireland have earned this opportunity. bowling here to england's jason roy, big—hitting hero of the world cup — dismissed for five on his test debut. ireland's bowler tim murtagh, in his 38th year. stirling even caught it without using his fingers. ireland long to watch its cricket fulfil their careers with ireland — young men like mark adair. he gotjoe denly out lbw. these are the batsmen who will win england the ashes — theoretically. rory burns next to go. now captainjoe root, big appeal — the review proved it was true, he was out too for two. bairstow made zero. from the highest moment of triumph on this ground, england were being bamboozled, unravelled, humbled by ireland. woakes gone for none. moeen ali, yes, he touched it — another nought. tim murtagh had taken five wickets for 11 runs and in one morning had turned cricket
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expectations gloriously on the head. and a short time ago, i can confirm that england were 85 all out in their first that england were 85 all out in theirfirst innings. that that england were 85 all out in their first innings. that has to be one of their worst batting displays ever, we have to wonder whether the england players involved in the world cup have had time to adjust, to come down from that adrenaline rush. a huge credit to ireland for seizing this opportunity, and i wonder, standing here again, if there ever will be at normal days of cricket ever again. i might thanks very much, jo, joe wilson at lord's. let's look at the all—important weather. chris fawkes has joined chris fawkes hasjoined me, our focus is shifting to a dramatic eat, and what do i mean by that? we could see the highest temperature ever recorded in the uk as we go on through tomorrow afternoon. the current mark to beat us 38.5
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celsius, set in kent, but tomorrow afternoon we could see temperatures hit a incredible 39 celsius. before then, today is plenty warm enough again, on the satellite picture, the last of the rain is clearing away from shetland, it will be out of the way in the next hour or two, then most of us will have plenty of sunshine, although patchy cloud for northern ireland and western scotland, where there will be showers later in the day. it is not quite as hot as it was yesterday, but maybe that is the wrong word, we're still to see temperatures into the low 30s, peaking at 33 celsius, another one of those situations where after such a hot day, temperatures will be slow to fall. if you are thinking of heading to bed at 11 o'clock tonight, temperatures still in the low 20s quite widely in towns and cities, particularly across england and wails, quite warm for eastern scotland. —— england and wales. we are drawing up up three winds from spain, across
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france and into the south—east of england, where the highest temperatures are going to be, and it could be a record—breaking day. now, there will be plenty of sunshine across england and wales and scotla nd across england and wales and scotland too, northern ireland is bright initially but turning cloudy with a risk of showers later in the day. and there was temperatures surging higher and higher, day. and there was temperatures surging higherand higher, looking at 29 in edinburgh, much warmer here, but towards england and the south—east, the realfocus will here, but towards england and the south—east, the real focus will be around greater london and into wards parts of kent, where we could see temperatures hit something like 39 celsius, that could be the highest temperature ever recorded in the uk. now, looking at the weather picture through the evening on thursday night, we are going to start to see some big thunderstorms breaking out, particularly across eastern and northern parts of the uk. again, skies like this and rumbles of thunder to wake you from your slumber overnight, torrential downpours too, into friday on the weekend the threat of heavy, thundery rain around northern and eastern parts of the uk. through
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friday and into the weekend, the best of dry weather probably towards south—western parts of the uk, temperatures coming down from that incredible hot weather that we will have tomorrow afternoon. that is the latest weather, back to sophie. certainly baking hot here in the centre of london, very hot on a day of high drama. it is going to get very busy here later this afternoon as theresa may comes to tender her resignation to the queen, and boris johnson will be summoned a short time afterwards to be invited to form a new government. theresa may has just left the houses of parliament after her last prime minister's questions. she is being driven back to downing street, where she will leave for the last time. it appears the convoy is actually coming here around buckingham palace. well, we will come back to those pictures in a moment, but we
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are going to go to... we need to find out, obviously, what kind of government borisjohnson find out, obviously, what kind of government boris johnson is find out, obviously, what kind of government borisjohnson is going to form. the derbyshire spa town of buxton was split down the middle in the 2016 referendum, voting leave byjust half of 1%. so what will the voters in this marginal seat make of the new prime minister? judith moritz sent this report. buxton's political colours are a little like the classic cars on show. the town is a marginal seat close run between blue and red macro, labour currently holds power here, but some of these car buffs are also borisjohnson enthusiasts. tell me what you think of the new prime minister. i don't think we would get any better person. you are afan? why would get any better person. you are a fan? why is that? ijust would get any better person. you are a fan? why is that? i just think he isa a fan? why is that? i just think he is a proper man, absolutely superb fellow. at midday, the classic car
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auction got under way. no—one here watching prime minister's questions, but the prospect of a new pm has caught their attention. not i number one fan, but having said that, there is so much uncertainty surrounding brexit that hopefully that will produce a change, and within our industry we do notice a lot of people literally holding their breath. setting in the sun, janice came to buxton for a day out and is relaxed about borisjohnson, though he wouldn't have her vote.|j relaxed about borisjohnson, though he wouldn't have her vote. i know he isa he wouldn't have her vote. i know he is a highly intelligent man behind the buffoonery, he is sharp, and i think he has a good hard. but i actually do want a general election and to bring jeremy corbyn, we need somebody who is more humane, in my opinion. buxton has its own boris johnson lookalike, but his daddy is not a fan of the real one. when i asked what he thought of the new prime minister, he said he had to choose his words carefully. prime minister, he said he had to choose his words carefullylj prime minister, he said he had to choose his words carefully. i would
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probably use the

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