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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 19, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 2pm. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. some try this is the minimum that one might have expected after eight yea rs of really one might have expected after eight years of really severe pain restrictions. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. seventeen people have been injured, some seriously, in a "car cruise" crash in hertfordshire. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with hugh. day two of the open golf. that is right, good afternoon. yesterday was pretty much all about those players do badly.
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thanks hugh and sarah has all the weather — more rain to come. also coming up — a new streaming service to rival netftlix, the bbc and itv plan to launch britbox by the end of the year to show new commissions and classic programmes. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live.
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hundreds of thousands of public sector workers are set to get a pay rise above the rate of inflation. the treasury is expected to confirm the details on monday, but reports suggest that among those in line for rises are the armed forces, police in england and wales and teachers in england. the pay award represents one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. but labour have dismissed it as insulting. our political correspondent iain watson reports. on one level, it's quite straightforward actually, public sector... now an apparent victory for some of those in the government payroll. the treasury was going to announce an inflation busting increase next week, the figure to be leaked to the times newspaper today. teachers and school staff will get a 2.75% increase. armed forces will get a 2.5% increase across the board. other
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soldiers are expected to get more. to .5% for police, dentists and nhs co nsulta nts. to .5% for police, dentists and nhs consultants. but inflation running at around 2%, this represents a real terms increase. but these pay increases come with a political sting in the tail. they have to be funded for existing departmental budgets. so, is the chancellor trying to rain on the parade of theresa may's successor? giving him this challenge. is he prepared to cut elsewhere in the public services to fund the pay increases or will he simply expand departmental budgets and with government borrowing? today the home secretary maintains that the home secretary maintains that the cash to hire please pay would not come at the expense of other priorities. release forces can fund it on their budgets, because when we set budgets we do try in my case ta ke set budgets we do try in my case take into account what might happen further down the line. later on that financial year. but the further down the line. later on that financialyear. but the union said the increases should be fully funded by central government if cuts are to
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be made elsewhere. and the pay settle m e nt be made elsewhere. and the pay settlement is not equally generous to everyone. no they know above inflation increase for senior civil servant and some public sector budget is still waiting for an item on their pay. when george osborne froze public—sector pay, he was creating a ticking time bomb.” froze public—sector pay, he was creating a ticking time bomb. i can report to the british people that their hard work is paying of and the area of a austerities finally coming to an end. george osborne's successof to an end. george osborne's successor take a different approach. but some experts say not an overly generally one. spending is beginning to rise, that said it is not a child a generous offer. it is the minimum that one might of expected after eight years of really severe pay rejections in the public sector. is this really the end of austerity because? chancellor? philip hammond as its better to leave number 11 downing st for the next last time next week. he also believing some
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big challenges for whoever succeeds him. the chancellor philip hammond has refused to rule out supporting a motion of no confidence in a possible borisjohnson government to try to block a no deal brexit. speaking to two european newspapers just days before a new conservative leader is announced, mr hammond promised to do everything in his power to block no—deal. our political correspondentjessica parker is in westminster. tell us more about what mr hammond has been saying. as you say, the outgoing chancellor and a man who has become i would say increasingly outspoken in recent weeks, perhaps you could describe him as more happy. whoever wins a conservative leadership is not expected to keep mr hammond at number 11, so he has been speaking to a banshees paper and a german newspaper. i understand this interview to place earlier this week when he was in paris for a g7 summit. the most interesting thing to pick out is when he was asked in
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the context of preventing a nokia brexit, mr hammond is very much an opponent of a no del brexit, whether he would rule out supporting a motion of no confidence in a future government, to which he said i do not exclude anything for the moment. so, that is pretty remarkable if you think about it. he had a chancellor who is leaving post, but not ruling out potentially having to bring down a government. a future government that will be made up of his own conservative party. what with the mechanism because maxon try, so a vote of no confidence is usually brought by the opposition. so, it would be led by labour if it was in the context, this is heavily speculatively, but in order to prevent a nokia brexit they do not find another parliamentary mechanism of doing it. perhaps the likes of the snp retiring as well, the green and the lib dems. it would all be about the parliamentary arithmetic,
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pitting as they would see it country before party if they are adamantly opposed to a nokia brexit. vote occurs and then, as i understand it, if the government loses, around a two—week period for somebody else to try and form some form of workable government and go to the queen. if that does not happen then you are in general election territory. so, look, heavily speculatively at this stage as to whether we will definitely have a motion of no confidence, other that does seem fairly likely looking down the road. labour might try and do that again. and indeed, whether it succeeds. how many conservative mps, despite what they might say now, not ruling it out would really be prepared to go that far. i think there is a question as to whether they would be prepared to go that far whether this isa prepared to go that far whether this is a bit of tough talk. we will see. thank you very much. seventeen people have been injured, two seriously, after a crash at a meeting of car enthusiasts in hertfordshire. two of the cars collided and ploughed into spectators on the roadside. our correspondent kathryn
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stanczyszyn is in stevenage now... well, there have been no updates from police as of yet on whether a not any arrests had been made. just behind me is the scene of that accident last night. it was a collision as a car came out of this junction and seemingly failed to see a car that was coming at speeds up the carriageway. they clipped each other and both cars then ended up speeding into pedestrians and eyewitnesses have described this horror of seeing people actually being thrown up in the air from the force of that accident. we know that 17 people are injured, the ambulance service said 16 were taking to hospital at the time. we do not have any updates on the condition at the moment. this is my report. a split
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second and then disaster. as this car pulls out of a junction sending another headlong into bystanders on another headlong into bystanders on a central reservation. out of control, the original car also careered into people on the side of the road. 17 were injured, two of them seriously, many of them described to be young. just shorts, panic. everybody was obviously trying to help. i am not first aid trained, ido trying to help. i am not first aid trained, i do not want to touch anyone or get involved busy, you can see quite a lot of kids on the road. it was pretty shocking. if you get there. it is like were what is going on. hundreds gather to show off their vehicles. organisers say the event was supposed to be restricted toa event was supposed to be restricted to a nearby car park, but they clearly says vehicles travelling at speed along the carriageway. many
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had taken to social media to say they have raised concerns about similar gatherings that happens regularly in this area. hertfordshire police said they were not aware of any specific happening landside, although they know they do ta ke landside, although they know they do take place. we were not aware of this large—scale gathering body would say is not to attend these type of events. i think what happened last night shows what could happened last night shows what could happen when you have got such large numbers on the roads and cars perhaps committing offences. police are now appealing for anyone with any footage of what happened to contact them urgently. organisers say they are devastated and this charity event will not take place again. well, police are continuing their investigations and, actually, marked out on the casual behind me is that yellow paint which shows the path of the two cars. police say
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that investigation will continue, but we do know and we have been speaking to locals who say they are second this. but actually, these kind of meats have been happening very regular in this area. something many as often as every week. they do bring with them right the striving and they are consigned updates are not taking it seriously enough. the organisers of this particular event, which was actually going on in the car parkjust of, z was not intended to be anything other than this meet up. a static meet up, waxy people drive their cars, they get out of them as they walk around and look at other people's card. they said by this and do believe they may have been a brutality here last night. thank you very much. the home secretary sajid javid says more must be done to prevent open racism entering mainstream politics. in a thinly disguised attack on donald trump — he called on public leaders to moderate their language in order "to halt the spread
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of poisonous ideologies." loose language, it's used at all levels. i'm from an immigrant family and i know what it's like to be told to go back where you came from. and i don't think they mean rochdale. laughter some worry that new arrivals will take over their communities and that our national identity will be diluted. i firmly reject that. i've seen how immigration can enrich our country and i welcome it. joining us from birmingham to discuss this further is jahan mahmood a former home office advisor. we had a quick example from the home secretary, what kind of languages he referring to? just, i the discourse then pull the right for quite a few
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yea rs. then pull the right for quite a few years. the other, the foreigner, the migrant is being seen as not british. i certainly believe that the recent england when demonstrates the recent england when demonstrates the great strength of diversity of this nation. the fact that, for instance, the queen is of germanic descent. the page and site of england as a foreigner. we are a diverse nation and we need to embrace that brilliance. that has culminated in a magnificent win for the england cricket team. i think diversity really is the strength of this nation. they need to be more language and bringing people together, rather than focusing on the differences. how then, do you tackle extremism, while championing difference? that is a very good question. i think one of the things is, the first year has to be cohesion. however, as soon as people start literally infringing upon those lines of being divisive, then we have to call it out. i mean, one
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of the main problem is that we had seen certainly in some media, is this incident kind ofjumping on the other. like, for instance, i work in counterterrorism, i often feel that muslins are siphoned out as being the only community of suffering with this terrorist scourge. however, we have seen in the last few years that there has been a rise in the far right extremist ideologues. that is something that is not challenged properly if the media continues to emphasise and focus on one community. what is the evidence, though? that muslims are more targeted than others? it is research that has highlighted that. let me give you an example, over the years damon smith has not been highlighted. i think there was a guy who was a far right extremist ideologues and they were caught with nazi ideology and in one case looking to set up an explosive device in an underground tube
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station. neither one of them got the label of terrace. we are very quick tojump at the label of terrace. we are very quick to jump at the muslim community and call out the terrorism. macca we should not forget that the home secretary comes from a community that has provided a long number of servicemen in the first and second world war. he probably comes from a family that saw active service for britain on the battlefields of the sun, among other places, if not the second world war. a lot of us are actually descendants of the men and women who fought for this nation. my father comes amid family that fought in the burma campaign for britain against the imperial japanese in the burma campaign for britain against the imperialjapanese army. so, we are notjust some kind of faith: group of communities who have just landed here by default or by mistake. we are descendants of the
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men who have defended this nation. we are british subjects before we became citizens. i think that is something that is missing from the school syllabus and for many documentaries and history programmes that could actually help to challenge that one—sided view that these people are just foreigners and bloated community that is the nothing for britain. thank you very much for talking to us. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit seventeen people have been injured —— some seriously —— in a ‘car cruise' crash in hertfordshire. in sports, tommy fleetwood cards 67 to be one shot of the lead at the open. ellyse perry hit a century
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before the rain stops play. tom daley has the chance to defend his 10 metre platform world title tomorrow. he's through to the semifinal along with fellow briton noah williams at the world championships. i'll be back with more on those stories later. the dutch supreme court has ruled that the netherlands is partly to blame for 350 deaths in bosnia's srebrenica massacre. the men were murdered after dutch troops at a united nations—declared safe zone handed them over to general ratko mladic‘s forces. bosnian serb forces killed 8,000 muslim men in the town in 1995. from the hague, anne holligan has this update thejudges began by acknowledging those dutch soldiers
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were in an impossible position. lightly armed in the face of the bosnian serb onslaught. thousands of refugees had fled here to what was supposed to be, as you say, a designated safe zone. it was in the process of the evacuation it was found that the dutch soldiers knew there was a high chance that the muslim men would be executed. but instead of stopping the evacuation, they actually facilitated it by helping to split the refugees into groups and then funnelling them out of this un compound into bosnian serb hands. now, the dutch soldiers had argued, or the dutch state, had argued that this had helped to prevent further bloodshed by saving the women and children. but this case specifically relates to 350 muslim men or bosniacks acts as they are called, who were hiding inside the compound and the dutch children's did not give them the chance to say whether they wanted
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to stay or risk leaving. — grow —— grow dutch soldiers. and in that case, this court, the highest court in the netherlands, found that the dutch state has 10% liability, because the chances of those men surviving had they been given the chance, the option to stay hidden inside was only 10% anyway. because the bosnian serb forces so intent on creating this ethnically pure territory would probably have swept through the camp anyway. so, dutch liability reduced to 10%, but maintained that dutch soldiers acted wrongly in allowing these refugees to be deported and then, of course, that ended in the execution of these 350 men, along with the thousands of other muslim men and boys, the remains are still being dug up today. such was the extent of this mass execution, which of course has been found to be a genocide. the worst killing on european soil
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since the second world war. this is the highest court in the netherlands, there is no appeal here. three of the mothers were inside watching on the front row, three of the mothers of srebrenica and they have carried the hopes and expectations of thousands of survivors on their shoulders throughout these years. in 2002, the dutch government did resign and acknowledge response but at the dutch soldiers were facing a mission impossible and they chose the worst, the best of two evils, they said. for the mothers, though, here today, they are relatives, so in a case of one she was being the real figurehead of this campaign for justice. her son and her husband were not within that group of 350, so as far as she and her friends here today are concerned, they have not had justice. because the dutch state was not found liable for their deaths. but, as the court pointed out today, the real culprits whether leaders,
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the bosnian serb leaders who ran the full campaign of slaughter and mass executions against the muslims. a man has beenjailed for 10 years for killing and sexually assaulting the british teenager scarlett keeling in goa in 2008. samson d'souza was found guilty of "culpable homicide not amounting to murder" by an indian court on wednesday. another man, placido carvalho was cleared of all charges. scarlett‘s mother fiona mackeown said she he was happy d'souza had been sentenced to a"rigorous imprisonment". a man who raped and murdered a 13—year—old girl to stop her from exposing him as a sex abuser has been jailed for life. stephen nicholson, aged 25, stabbed lucy mchugh in woodland in southampton last july. he was found guilty of murder and three charges of raping lucy following a trial at winchester crown court, and was ordered to spend at least 33 years in jail. a strong earthquake has shaken
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the greek capital, athens, knocking out phone networks and power in parts of the city. athenians ran out into the streets and evacuated tall buildings as the tremor shook the capital for some 15 seconds. the earthquake was registered at a 5.1 magnitude with an epicentre about 14 miles north—west of athens. there are no reports of serious injuries, but several aftershocks have been felt. schools and colleges in england desperately need a multi—billion pound injection of cash — according to a cross party group of mps. the education select committee says that in recent years, funding for schools has not kept up with an increase in costs and pupil numbers. the government says it accepts schools are facing challenges. here's our education correspondent frankie mccamley. earlier this month, protests in westminster over school funding. in may, families take to the streets in cities across the country, demanding action on what they call
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a national crisis in special needs funding. two months before that, thousands of head teachers in england wrote to parents saying schools are facing a funding crisis following, their unprecedented march through westminster where hundreds gathered. today, another call for action following an inquiry by a group of mps. we are calling for a ten—year plan. our argument is very simple. if the nhs can have a ten—year plan and £20 billion extra long—term funding settlement, why should education be the poor relation in terms of public funding? the inquiry recommends that all schools and colleges get the multi—billion cash injection they desperately need, specifically calling for more funding for special needs pupils, increasing money for post—i6 education, and extra funding for disadvantaged students up to the age of 19. but some head teachers say
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they are already at breaking point. the dfe and the government forgets to say that there is nearly 750,000 more children in our school since 2010. schools have got to provide all sorts of complex services. we want to deliver on those but we need to be funded properly. the government says, while it is accurate to say funding is at its highest level, it does recognise schools are facing budgeting challenges. frankie mccamley, bbc news. all week we've been marking the 50th anniversary of the mission that culminated in neil armstrong becoming the first man to walk on the moon. that historic moment was watched live on tv by a global audience of 600 million people. the pictures were broadcast thanks to a radio telescope in rural australia, immortalized in the film ‘the dish.‘ hywel griffith has been to meet one of the people who helped bring those unforgettable first images to the world. they've got the flag up now and you can see the stars & stripes.
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it was the tv moment of the 20th century. beautiful, just beautiful. the giant leap for mankind sent 384,000 kilometres through space and onto screens around the world. it was only possible thanks to this dish, the parkes observatory was one of three receiving the signal on earth. it produced the clearest pictures and so was the main source of the tv images. david cook was the senior receiver engineer. the enormity of the occasion didn't strike him until later. if we started to think about what a great thing we were doing we would likely have broken down and not done it properly. only afterwards did i go down outside the telescope and look up and see the moon and realise that three people up there and two of them on the surface and we helped to put them there. that's armstrong on the moon.
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much of the story was captured in the dish, a film which told the observatory‘s history with a little dramatic licence. for example, there wasn't really a power cut as the moment approached. 0h, rats, everything's dead. but there was plenty of real drama here on the day. just as the astronauts were landing on the moon, a storm arrived here in parke,s bringing wind gusts of over 100kph causing the tower to shake and sounding the safety alarms. normally, they would have shut down the dish but they didn't want to miss their moment in history. it's one which has put parkes on the map and keeps bringing visitors out to this country town. i find it very cool, because it'sjust amazing how that big thing can, like, see or hear people out in space. i don't think they realise how much of an impact it had on history when it comes from such a small town and it is out in the middle of nowhere.
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and nowadays we have this equipment. the dish is still in use and is now 10,000 times more powerful than when it came into operation. one of their projects is to look for alien life. we scan the heavens, visible from here, looking for evidence of radio emissions from alien civilisations. we haven't found anything yet. butjust imagine if the signal is found from another civilisation elsewhere. i mean, that willjust... there is still so much we still don't know about the universe around us. but 50 years on this dish is helping humans to see and think beyond our own planet. hywel griffith, bbc news, parkes. time for a look at the weather. we are taking a specialty in india. yes, look at this tiger. this tiger,
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she is a female adult tiger, was actually found in somebody‘s bed in actually found in somebody‘s bed in a residential house in india. imagine coming home, going down for a nap and this tiger is in your bed. it escaped into the house and then they waited for it to get dark and made a safe escape. it is not the only creature, lots of them have been disturbed by scenes like this. these are the monsoon floods that we have seen there. what are buffalo trying to escape those floods, also we have had reports of rhinos and elephants, too. they are all trying to move up to higher ground to escape the floodwaters there. it is not just escape the floodwaters there. it is notjust beanie escape the floodwaters there. it is not just beanie north—east escape the floodwaters there. it is notjust beanie north—east of india that has been affected, but also parts of bangladesh, as well. this isa parts of bangladesh, as well. this is a picture coming in recently from bangladesh by the streets are flooded. the months and runs from june to september, so we are likely to see my scenes like this to come. what is the forecast like for that
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pa rt what is the forecast like for that part of the world? we are set to see more heavy monsoon rain, but it is going to be shifting in possession. mainly in the north—east of india, our attention turns to the west coast. anywhere from them by right to the west coast. man bike, in fa ct, to the west coast. man bike, in fact, henne showers relentlessly over the next five days or so. —— mumbai heavy rain. it has been a bit wet here. yes of rainfall for many of us here. we have had quite a bit of us here. we have had quite a bit of rain across southern areas. it is in very dry zafar injuly. this is the scene earlier on today in warwickshire. we have got grey skies and outbreaks of rain around. through the course of the weekend things will be improving. still some shabby rain on saturday and for most of us it looks like a drier weekend. as that the moment there's still some heavy downpours through this
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afternoon into this evening. across parts of northern ireland and southern scotland. and of course wales, table top temperatures a little bit cooler than days, generally around 17 to 20 degrees. as we head through the course of this evening and overnight beekeepers rain. it is gradually putting its weight was these, but i could be the odd number of thunder mixed into. still quite mild and humid with those damages generally setting in the teens first thing tomorrow morning. the weekend the start of on a fairly unsettled note. we have got that area of low pressure, just gradually pushing its way towards the east. a wedge of higher pressure building on from the west, just quieten things down by the time again to sunday the open continues at royal portrush, we're expecting a mercy dry storage through the day and saturday. more ofa through the day and saturday. more of a chance of showers later on sunday. so, heading three saturday evening and overnight we start to see the showers easing away. through the day and saturday, some showers for instance scotland and that these
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because of england, too. meanwhile, for the rest, but my sons and coming in and temperatures a little bit warmer than they are today about 20 to 25 degrees. salmon is heavy showers just lingering in the spray time, but they should clear away through the course of saturday night. sunday morning likely to start out on a drier note. still quite mild, not quite as humid as it has been. through the day on sunday, many of us waking up to please guys, with a small veg of high pressure in charge. the next area of low pressure moving its way into voicing advice, it will cloud over across parts of northern ireland and the west of scotland through the course of the day. the winds will pick up, quite busy for the open, especially for the afternoon, with a view showers around. england and wales should stage right through the day, it'll be a little bit warm. temperatures between 20 to 25 degrees through the course of sunday. and then things are set to one up further as we let into the new working week. monday into tuesday we could well see those temperatures up in the low, possibly
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even the mid 30s. still a few showers around across northern and west parts of the uk. it was a pretty one as we had three next week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. public sector workers — including police officers, the armed forces and teachers — are in line for an above inflation pay rise — in one of the last announcements of the may government. hertfordshire police say 17 people have been injured, some seriously, following a collision between two cars at a gathering in stevenage last night.
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the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. the home secretary, sajid javid, says public leaders must do more to stop open racism entering mainstream politics. i'm from an immigrant family and i know what it's like to be told to go back where you came from. england's schools desperately need a multi—billion pound cash injection — according to a group of mps. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. everyone's talking about the open golf in northern ireland — it's been a good day for england's tommy fleetwood? that is right, if you remember to this point yesterday, we were talking about one british player dominating the headlines at royal point right, because frankly, he was very bad. but today, some of the
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other hand i are proving we can move on from rory michael roy's meltdown, by attracting our attention with some golf. they include tommy fleetwood, you couldn't miss him, evenin fleetwood, you couldn't miss him, even in the early gloom, because of that top he wore. he dropped a shot in his first how this money, he immediately got it back and was steady after. he has had steady finishes in the us open and he would bea finishes in the us open and he would be a popular winner on home soil. as with another englishman, from fleetwood to westwood. lee westwood has been second at the open before, he is one shot off the lead and has just finished his second round. jb holmes continues to set the place —— set the pace. he started early this morning, adding a 68 to his 66 yesterday. he is eight under power —— eight under par, as is lowry, he andjb —— eight under par, as is lowry, he and jb holmes are one —— eight under par, as is lowry, he andjb holmes are one head of —— eight under par, as is lowry, he and jb holmes are one head of the pack, including tommy fleetwood. let's hear from pack, including tommy fleetwood. let's hearfrom him. it's great to build a score and get
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things going and get the crowd behind you. even on day one or day two, it is a great feeling. the weekend coming up, tomorrow, warming up, whatever position i am in, and in contention. that is what we practice and play for. —— i am in contention. it will be great whatever comes, you just have to enjoy it and embrace it, that is the open at the end of the day, the biggest event in the world, and it is our home event, it's very exciting. here's how things stand. jb holmes and shane lowry, two very different parts of their day, both on eight under power. fleetwood and westwood on seven, withjustin rose playing the last just westwood on seven, withjustin rose playing the lastjust two shots behind. rory michael roy is eight over, he doesn't start for another hour or so. i over, he doesn't start for another hourorso. ican over, he doesn't start for another hour or so. i can tell you that the weather has taken a turn for the worst. it is pouring at royal, just
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in time for poor rory mcilroy to pull out the round of his life to get back into contention. and that is why they designed golfing umbrellas! and a women's ashes is under in taunton, it sounds like it is an uphill struggle for england. yes, and the weather could play a significant part there as well. australia are flying in the women's ashes — with england struggling to bowl them out. this has been reflected injust the first day. it's day two of the only test match in the multi—format series at taunton. a century for elysse perry has helped take australia to 307 for 3. a draw or a win for them would mean they retain the urn. england are 6 points to one down in the series after losing all three odis. they are trying to clear this up, a win ordraw they are trying to clear this up, a win or draw for australia women that they retain the ashes, england are six points to zero down in the series. the man whose appointment as newcastle head coach was described as unambitious
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and met with protests. he has faced those claims for rthe first time today. steve bruce, who was a boyhood newcastle fan, has taken over from the altogether more popular rafa benitez... iam not i am not everyone's cup of tea, and i'm not rafa benitez. whoever was going to sit in the seat was going to find it difficult. however, i am confident enough that with my experience and the people i have brought with me, that we will continue to take the club forward. yes, i have to put up with some nonsense, but i am determined to grasp the opportunity and have a crack at it and have a go. tom daley has the chance to defend his 10 metre platform world title tomorrow. he's through to the semifinal along with fellow briton noah williams at the world championships. that also means they secure two spots in the event at the tokyo olympics. i would love to be able to defend the world title.
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it is going to be tough, those chinese guys are pretty special. i have the mixed event as well beforehand so it will be a busy day. but for me, all things said and done like this, this isjob done. qualification for the olympics for gb in the men's platform, the individual and the synchro. tomorrow, it's about having fun and i can enjoy the final. you can follow the gulf on the bbc sport website and it is live on bbc radio five live. —— follow the gulf. the bbc and itv have revealed more details about their plans for a joint video streaming service. britbox will cost customers £5.99 a month and be launched towards the end of the year. it's being seen as a uk rival to established services such as netflix, which this week saw its share price fall after a slowdown in subscriber growth. here's our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba.
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gavin and stacey, helping the bbc and itv begin their new online life together. congratulations. tidy. you just got married. that is disgusting. the intention is for britbox to be seen as the streaming home for quality british programming. leave it out! past shows like the office are expected to help convince viewers to subscribe to what is a significant and not entirely risk—free venture for britain's two biggest broadcasters. we are in potentially traumatic times, but they are exciting times, with the merger. things move fast. have you got a fire extinguisher? there is, of course, a huge appetite for british programming, but even with his shows like happy volley on—board comedy feature isn't guaranteed to be 100% for britbox. nice glasses. you look nice.
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dol? it is going to be a challenge to compete with streaming giant netflix, which already has 11.5 million uk subscribers. it is popular with programmes that viewers because of its programming and it's easy—to—use interface. netflix has spent 5.5 billion on its user experience and that is why it is the best in the market and has the best compression algorithms and things download faster and it is why their suggestions work so well. whereas britbox will be on the itv hub stack, which works pretty well for a free service, but if you are paying £5.99 per month and you are going to be comparing it with netflix and the experience will not be seamless. on top of that, the likes of disney will soon be launching their own service, with spin offs from their popular star wars and marvel universes, and the likes of stephen spielberg and oprah winfrey are involved in apple's new service. so since several platforms will be looking for subscribers, with few able to afford them all.
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the service launches at the end of the year, aiming to showcase the very best of british, from broad church to love island. i'm sorry, i really am. but like so many other landscapes, the media world too is ever—changing and highly competitive. so while the bbc and itv are coupled up for now, who knows whether they will be together forever? to discuss this further, entertainment journalist emma bullimorejoins us from chelmsford. how excited should we be, given that we will have to shell out for this? i'm not quite sure exciting is the word right now. this is a very good long—term move, the bbc have to be seen to be keeping up with the pack, and itv, too. this is a way things are going, people like to watch tv
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ina are going, people like to watch tv in a nonlinear way, they like to be able to stream things, but a short time, it is a tough sell to get people to pay £5.99 a month, for content they are accustomed to getting for free. it is a tricky one, i'm interested to see hammy people take it up. where does this leave the licence fee, then? that is a separate story. who knows? the bbc has always had a commercial, always had bbc worldwide, this is a separate thing. britbox exists in the usa and canada, and you can see there is a huge appetite for british content and programming. but over here, i don't think we see things as a british or an american show, we just see it as good tv. i think that way of distinction tv doesn't work, so why people will sign up for this, at the moment, it feels unclear. so why people will sign up for this, at the moment, it feels uncleanm you're already having to pay the licence fee, you might think, why should i pay more for more bbc co nte nt ? should i pay more for more bbc
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content? you will have to make choices, surely? otherwise, you will have multiple different subscriptions. it is getting more and more, so there is amazon, netflix, nowtv, apple tv, and youtube are doing more original content, disney are having a streaming service, and most people cannot afford to subscribe to all of those. if they think they are getting bbc and itv content for free with the licence fee, why would they carry on? the idea is that they will eventually commission their own special content. it only takes a couple of special programmes to make people sign up. look at netflix, how different it was when house of cards and orange is the new black came along. and then, when the crown came along, the mainstream tv viewers started to sign up. if they can get some exciting prospects and programmes on britbox, that could be a game changer. like i say, it is a very much long—term strategy, and eventually, it will be something that becomes popular. i am unsure to
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begin with, though. a lot of people have said this is a golden age of tv, because of the big series that you have mentioned. why does that leave this idea of the appointment to view series, then? where everyone sits down at 9pm on a sunday, because you want to be there when it airs. it is a strange one. we still see that with things like line of duty, we definitely see it with entertainment, like strictly, people wa nt to entertainment, like strictly, people want to be on entertainment, like strictly, people want to be- on a entertainment, like strictly, people want to be - on a saturday want to be there on a saturday night. sporting events as well, there is room for that, people enjoy tweeting along and being part of the conversation. it is true, they way we watch tv has changed and you have to avoid spoilers amongst certain friends, and it feels like less of an event. however, it feels more special, in the decade i have been doing thisjob, the special, in the decade i have been doing this job, the way people view tv has changed dramatically, it has gone from being the poor relation to film to amazing entertainment. it is still good news for tv fans, we
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shouldn't be stressed out about all these streaming services, it will increase the competition, increase the quality, it is just money wise where the problem is. there are sometimes complaints about the number of repeats on tv, but there is also this amazing back catalogue of classics, how much pressure will there be on the broadcasters to make those available? that is what will be interesting. if you look at it and think, all of my favourite programmes are there, they are at my fingertips, if the technology is right as you said in the report, all of those things, there could be an enticing prospect. however, if it is just a few of them, they once released at the moment, then it is difficult. a lot of it will be word—of—mouth, some people sign up and if they say, i had a great night re—watching the office, there may be other people will sign up. there are unknown quantities at the moment, but it is interesting. they say they will launch before christmas, so we will launch before christmas, so we will soon see. emma, thank you. what
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you can't beat is live news, though, can you? whether it's almond, soy or coconut, it seems more people are ditching cow's milk for plant—based products. a quarter of british people are now drinking non—dairy milk, according to a survey of 2,000 people by the market research firm mintel. 16 to 2a year olds are the biggest users of non—dairy milk — that's 33%. but despite this, plant—based milks still only make up just 4% of the milk market, with the majority of milk sales last year being for cow's milk. well, earlier, our reporter rick kelsey said that while health concerns are one factor for this trend, environmental concerns also play a part. we could debate that all day, about when you take cows milk out of your system and choose to have a plant —based alternative, is that a good thing? we could talk about that all day, but what is more clear is when we talk about the environment and we can see on this chart, that when it comes to cows milk, there is an
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enormous difference in the impact on the environment, and this comes in three main reasons. the emissions of cows, the land use, and a water use. if you look at all these different milks we are seeing growing, i rice milk, soy milk, but to a lesser extent, almond milk, because it ta kes extent, almond milk, because it takes an enormous amount of water to produce. that is second reason, clearly what people are saying is, why they are making the shift is because they have concerns that dairyfarming is because they have concerns that dairy farming is not good for the environment. in a moment, we'll have the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. 17 people have been injured — some seriously — in a "car cruise" crash in hertfordshire.
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here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the amount the government borrowed injune was the highest it's been in that month since 2015. these are official government figures and they showed public sector borrowing at £7.2 billion, that's up from £3.3 billion injune 2018 and higher than all the forecasts in a poll of economists by reuters. london's crossrail project will probably go even further over budget, according to a report by mps. commuters have been "let down" by a programme that is well behind schedule, the public accounts committee said. the mps said they were "sceptical" about the department for transport‘s "ability to oversee major rail projects". the world's biggest plane—maker boeing is setting aside almost
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£4 billion to compensate airlines for the grounding of the 737 max. the aircraft was withdrawn from service worldwide in march after two crashes, in indonesia and ethiopia, in the space of five months. 346 people were killed. youtube hads been defebnding its algorithms? what do these algorithms do? there is quite a feeling that the algorithms that send you down a rabbit hole. the belief is the algorithms direct to you. once you start watching one thing, they direct you down increasingly, we could call them extremist directions. more and more niche? yes, for instance, flat earth society and believers, they are quite interesting, you can start on one video of flat earth beliefs, which will be told to you, and there will be more prompts which will throw you into more extreme... does
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it matter if a lot of people believe the earth is flat? several hundred yea rs of the earth is flat? several hundred years of science would suggest it did. some try but does it matter? it may or may not, but there are certain beliefs and things that could get worrying if people are pushed in what direction is by conspiracy theories. ben mcowen wilson, said youtube "does the opposite of taking you down the rabbit hole". he has been defending his algorithms and he says you're heading towards censorship. i think it is important that platforms do not take a view of banning speakers, unless the individuals are part of prescribed groups, where we ban them today, or where the individuals themselves are prescribed. i think that does begin to look much more like censorship. what in a regulatory sense is the worst case scenario that the uk government could come up with?”
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think for the british public, what we ought to be worried about, for viewers and listeners at home, what they should be worried about is decisions being taken in a dark room by unnamed individuals around who gets a right to speak and make their thoughts and views available to the public. i think that is what we should all be afraid of. we might end up in those places, and at that point, we may have to take a decision on whether it would be appropriate for youtube to continue to operate, we are not available in china, sudan, in many markets where we have been a bit unable to work with governments to agree a set of rules who don't... and boeing is putting aside more money for the problems with the 737 max? this really is a case that hasn't been closed at all. we have a long way to go on this and it is very worrying for boeing, about how expensive it will be. it is about $5 billion that have been put aside,
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but we don't know really how long it will be before the 737 max comes back. the cost of this is not just... they are not selling any 737 max, but it is the fact that the whole production line has slowed down. once you do this, things get a lot more expensive. you're not producing as efficiently as he is to be able to. we talked to michelle, a business corresponded in the usa. michelle, tell us the latest. you have $5 billion put aside, it will not be the end, well it? no, the company has said this isjust what the end, well it? no, the company has said this is just what they think it will cut them to compensate their customers, in other words, think it will cut them to compensate their customers, in otherwords, the airlines, for the fact that the 737 max planes have been grounded since these two fatal crashes, or whether it is that some companies are waiting for deliveries can now expect delays. this isjust an estimate for what they think it will cost in the second quarter, in other words, in the last three months.
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there are obviously ongoing costs for the rest of this year, and it is an estimate, so it could go up. the other factor in all of this, the airline has come out and said that the cost of making these planes has gone up because they are making fewer of them, pushing up costs in its factories, and of course, there are the funds it has set aside to try and compensate the families. this isjust a rough number at this point, as the planes remain grounded, but the airline is hopeful that it will be back up and flying again towards the end of this year. how much damage has been done to boeing by all of this? normally, a $5 billion hit, that would wipe out most companies. but boeing is massive, it can forward this kind of write—off, but how damaging is it to its reputation, to its sales, generally? if you look at the sales, you have already seen a cancellation
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ofan order you have already seen a cancellation of an order from a saudi arabian airline, there are still more orders that are pending, we will have to wait and see what other airlines come out and say they want to revise in their plans, you will see a financial hit. the cost of making these planes has now changed as a result of the five they have had to reduce the rate at which they are making it, that means it pushes up costs, reduces its profit margin. then you have the cost of the litigation associated with all of this, the compensation costs we have touched on, so there is a financial hit, and as you point out, the reputational hit. will customers, once this plane is deemed safe enough to fly again, will customers actually be willing to bore these planes? will they trust boeing, the world's largest aircraft maker? there are lots of questions which boeing has to try and address. thank you, michelle. that is it. thank you, michelle. that is it. thank you, jamie.
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major cities in the usa are bracing themselves for a heatwave. more than 130 million americans are at risk of heat —related illnesses and experts are calling on people to check on those who are most vulnerable. from new york, here is our reporter, laura. it is all hands on deck in chicago as the city prepares to take care of its youngest and eldest residents, the most vulnerable to heat stroke. we have a coordinated, collaborative and competitive response. chicago's temperatures have been hovering in the upper 90s all week and could climb to near triple digits on saturday. the best thing in a heatwave is to stay out of the sun when possible, stay hydrated, stay in core areas. he is talking about the majority of the us population, more than 200 million people are under heat alerts from the central us to the north east. the new york city triathlon scheduled for this sunday was cancelled for the very first
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time in the event's history. organisers say it was due to the forecasted oppressive heat and humidity. some athletes say they are relieved. part of me was hoping it would be cancelled but i wasn't sure if they would actually do it. it is notjust people seeking relief. animals, from these cows in wisconsin to this panting red panda in virginia, are hoping this heatwave breaks, and soon. by the weekend, cities in at least 14 states are expected to break their high—temperature records. laura podesta, cbs news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. things will be warming up here over the next few days, but before that when weather we see next week, we have some rain. it is welcome rain, particularly in the south, where it has been dryjuly. this is the picture in warwickshire, quite a bit of rain there, and more to come
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during the weekend. some showery rain on saturday, but an improving picture by the time you get to sunday, most of us are seeing a drier and warmer day, too. through the rest of this afternoon and into this evening, some heavy bursts of rain pushing across northern ireland, may well affect the open. scotland, england and wales seeing showery rain, temperatures about 17-20 showery rain, temperatures about 17—20 for most of us at the moment. moving through this evening and overnight, we will see some of the rain continuing, quite heavy for a time, some rumbles of thunder mixed infour time, some rumbles of thunder mixed in four parts of northern ireland, also, particularly south—east of england, some heavy bursts overnight. still mild and humid, with temperatures sitting in the mid teens overnight. just out of your beacon, we have a low pressure in charge, that will bring some showery rain urban —— on saturday. it will push out to the east, as a ridge of high pressure comes in to quite things down. we may see some showers at the open. saturday will be the
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drier day, temperatures around 17—18 over the next couple of days. there is likely to see rain on saturday, initially across east anglia and south—eastern can, that should clear away, and then we are in a sunshine and showers mixture, especially for the east. that is where we will see the east. that is where we will see the bulk of. heavier showers. the bulk of the heavier showers. further west, high—pressure, so dry weather for northern ireland, further west, high—pressure, so dry weatherfor northern ireland, in further west, high—pressure, so dry weather for northern ireland, in the south—west of england, too. a bit warmer than it is today. into saturday night, most of the showers fade away, so a dry evening, clear skies, temperatures holding up, generally between about 10—15 overnight and into sunday. sunday looks like a better day of the weekend, because we have the ridge of high pressure pushing in from the south. it will not last too long for all of us, because we have low pressure moving in towards the north—west later in the day, but for the bulk of the day, sunday is fine and dry, some long spans of sunshine, light wind, feeling pretty one, too. later in the day, cloud and rain, and an increasing wind for northern ireland and into the west of scotland. in the south and east,
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temperatures 22—25, should feel like a pleasant day on sunday. things are set to really warm up on monday into tuesday, temperatures reaching the low 30s through the middle part of the week.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 3pm. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. this is the minimum that one might have expected after eight years of really severe pay restraint in the pay black sector. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. seventeen people have been injured, some seriously, in a "car cruise" crash in hertfordshire. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. the focus on the open in northern ireland. yes, the open leaderboard is very congested this afternoon.
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three english players very much in contention. tommy fleetwood, lee westwood a re contention. tommy fleetwood, lee westwood are both two shots off the lead. we will bring it as leaderboard later. thanks, hugh. sarah has all the weather, more rain to come? a better frame to come and stay open and many places will see rain over the next 24—hour is. welcome rain in the next 24—hour is. welcome rain in the south where it has been very jaipur much ofjuly so far. other details and have an hour. other details and have an hour. thanks, sarah. also coming up — why the claws are out for the latest version of cats. lord lloyd webber‘s beloved musical is getting the hollywood treatment and fans have reacted with bafflement to the new trailer. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. hundreds of thousands of public sector workers are set to get a pay rise
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above the rate of inflation. the treasury is expected to confirm on monday that workers — including teachers and police officers — will receive increases of up to 2.9%. it's thought the rise will come from existing budgets. our political correspondent iain watson reports. public sector unions have campaigned against pay caps and for higher wages during the years of austerity. now an apparent victory for some of those on the government payroll. the treasury was going to announce an inflation busting increase next week. the figures were leaked to the times newspaper today. teachers and school staff will get a 2.75% increase, armed forces will get a 2.5% rise across the board, although soldiers are expected to get a bit more and there is a 2.5% rise for the police, dentists and nhs co nsulta nts. with inflation running at around 2%, this presents a real terms increase. but these pay increases
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come with a political sting in the tail. they have to be funded from existing departmental budgets, so is the chancellor phillip hammond trying to rein in the parade of theresa may's successor, giving him this challenge. is he prepared to cut elsewhere in the public services to fund the pay increases, or will he simply expand departmental budgets and with it government borrowing? today, the home secretary maintained that the cash for higher police pay wouldn't come at the expense of other priorities. i know police forces, they can fund it from their budgets, because when we set budgets we do try, certainly in my case, try to take into account what might happen further down the line later in that financial year. but the unions say the increases should be fully funded by central government if cuts are not to be made elsewhere and the pay settlement is an equally generous to everyone. they will be no above inflation increase foot senior civil servants and some public sector workers are still waiting for announcements on their pay.
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when george osborne froze public sector pay he was creating a ticking time bomb for people whose pay was not keeping pace with inflation. i can report to the british people that their hard work is paying off and the era of austerity is finally coming to an end. george osborne's successor took a different approach. but some experts said not an overly generous one. i think we are seeing the end of austerity, spending beginning to rise. that said, this is not a terribly generous offer, this is the minimum one may have expected after 80 years of really severe pay restraint in the public sector. —— eight years of pay restraint. is this really the end of austerity, chancellor? philip hammond is expected to leave number 11 downing st for the last time next week. but he will also be leaving some big challenges for whoever succeeds him. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. seventeen people have been injured, two seriously, after a crash at a meeting of car enthusiasts in hertfordshire. two of the cars collided
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and ploughed into spectators on the roadside. our correspondent kathryn stanczyszyn has been in stevenage. there has been no updates then please as yet as to whether a not arrests had been made. this is the scene of that accident last night. a collision is a car came out of this junction and seemingly failed to see a car that was coming at speed up the carriageway. they clipped each other and both cars then ended up speeding into pedestrians and eyewitnesses have described the horror of seeing people being thrown up horror of seeing people being thrown up in the airfrom the horror of seeing people being thrown up in the air from the force of the accident. we know that 17 people are injured, the ambulance service said 16 were taken to hospital at the time. we do not have any updates on their condition at the moment. a split second, and then, disaster as this car pulls out of a junction, sending another head
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long into bystanders on a central reservation. out of control, the original car also careers into people on the side of the road. 17 were injured, two of them described to be young. just shock, panic. everyone was obviously standing around trying to help. i am not first aid trained, i didn't want to get involved. you could see a lot of kids on the road distressed in agony, they had been run over and injured. it was shocking. you get there, you see it, whoa, what is going on. it was pretty horrific. hundreds were there for something called a cruise meet where drivers gather to show off their vehicles. organisers say the event was supposed to be restricted to a nearby car park. but footage clearly shows vehicles travelling at speed along the carriageway. many have taken to social media
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to say they have raised concerns to police about similar gatherings that happen regularly in this area. hertfordshire police say they were not aware in advance of anything specific happening last night although they know they do take place. we were not aware of this large—scale gathering. what i would say is not to attend this type of event. what happened last night shows what could happen when you have such large numbers in the road, and cars perhaps committing offences. police are now appealing for anyone with any footage of what happened to contact them urgently. organisers say they are devastated and this charity event will not take place again. police are continuing their investigations and marked out on the carriageway behind me is an yellow paint showing the path of the two
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ca rs. paint showing the path of the two cars. please say that investigation will continue. but we do know, and we have been speaking to locals, who say they are second this. but actually these kind of meats been very regular in this area. some say may be as be as often as every week and they do bring with them reckless driving. they say they are concerned that police are not taking seriously enough. the organisers of this particular event, which is actually going on in the car park over there, say it was not intended to be anything other than this meet up, a static meet up where people drive their cars, they get out of them and walk around and look at other people plasma cars. they said the identities to buy this and do believe have been a element here last night, which may have added to this accident. some breaking news to bring you now. involving the mp outside the houses of parliament. james garda has pleaded guilty to
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causing alarm and distress using threatening or distressing language. he also admitted to a racially aggravated offence towards a police officer. to please all guilty from james goddard aged 29 outside the houses of parliament. the chancellor philip hammond has refused to rule out supporting a motion of no confidence in a possible borisjohnson government to try to block a no deal brexit. speaking to two european newspapers just days before a new conservative leader is announced, mr hammond promised to do everything in his power to block no—deal. our political correspondent jessica parker says that hammond seems to be demob happy. perhaps you could describe him as a little bit demob happy. whoever wins the leadership contest is not expected to keep mr hammond at number11. so, he has expected to keep mr hammond at number 11. so, he has been speaking toa number 11. so, he has been speaking to a banshees paper and a german
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newspaper. i understand this interview took place earlier this week when he was in paris for a g7 summit. the most interesting thing to pick out is when he was asked in the context of preventing a nodal brexit, mr hammond is very much an opponent of a newjob accident, whether he would rule out supporting a motion of no confidence any future government. to which he said, i do not exclude anything for the moment. so, that is pretty remarkable if you think about it. you have a chancellor who is, yes, leaving post, not ruling out potentially helping to bring down a government, a future government that will be made up of his conservative party. what with the mechanism be?l made up of his conservative party. what with the mechanism be? a vote of no confidence is usually brought by the opposition party. so, it would be led by labour if it was, say in the context, this is heavily speculative, but in order to prevent a newjob accident they do not find some other parliamentary mechanism of doing that, perhaps the lack the likes of the snp would pile in as well, the greens, the lib dems. it
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would all be about the parliamentary arithmetic as to whether they would support that no vote of no confidence. a vote occurs and then, asi confidence. a vote occurs and then, as i understand it, if the government loses, a two—week period for somebody else, whether it is from that party or another party to try and form some form of workable government and go to the queen. if that does not happen, then you are in general election territories stops though, that, heavily speculative at this stage as to whether we will definitely have a motion of no confidence, although that does seem fairly likely looking down the road. labour might try do that again. and indeed, whether a not it will succeed. how many conservative mps, despite what they might say now, not ruling it out, was really be prepared to go that by? i think there is a question as to whether they would be prepared to go that far i whether this is a bit of tough talk. the home secretary sajid javid says more must be done to prevent open racism entering mainstream politics.
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in a thinly disguised attack on donald trump — he called on public leaders to moderate their language in order "to halt the spread of poisonous ideologies." loose language, it's used at all levels. i'm from an immigrant family and i know what it's like to be told to go back where you came from. and i don't think they mean rochdale. laughter some worry that new arrivals will take over their communities and that our national identity will be diluted. i firmly reject that. i've seen how immigration can enrich our country and i welcome it. a man who raped and murdered a 13—year—old girl to stop herfrom exposing him as a sex abuser has been jailed for life. stephen nicholson, aged 25, stabbed lucy mchugh in woodland in southampton last july.
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he was found guilty of murder and three charges of raping lucy following a trial at winchester crown court, and was ordered to spend at least 33 years in jail. thejudge said this the judge said this was an execution carried out after a year of sexual exploitation. lucy mchugh was just 13 years old when she was killed. her killer had raped her, taking advantage of a crash, and in bachelor and this girl had on him. cynically exploiting her, said the judge was not when she threatened to reveal details of their sexual exploitation, thejudge reveal details of their sexual exploitation, the judge said reveal details of their sexual exploitation, thejudge said he simply had to get rid of her. so, he lured her to a sports ground, a woodland close to a sports ground in southampton and he stabbed her
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repeatedly in the neck. leaving her to die amongst the trees. a strong earthquake has shaken the greek capital, athens, knocking out phone networks and power in parts of the city. athenians ran out into the streets and evacuated tall buildings as the tremor shook the capital for some 15 seconds. the earthquake was registered at a 5.3 magnitude with an epicentre about 14 miles north—west of athens.there are no reports there are no reports of serious injuries but several aftershocks have been felt. the dutch supreme court has upheld a ruling that the netherlands was partly to blame for the deaths of 350 of the 8,000 muslim men, killed in the massacre at srebrenica in the bosnian war. dutch troops at a united nations safe zone handed the unarmed men and boys over to bosnian serb forces, who then murdered them. our correspondent anna holligan is at the hague. in this finaljudgment day, the
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mothers who travelled in search of justice felt only humiliation. translation: today we were humiliated before the judge even said anything, because we did not have a translator.|j judge even said anything, because we did not have a translator. i only got back 3% of my younger son's body. is of muslim refugees had fled to the un compound seeking protection in what was a designated safe zone. when the bosnian serb army leader then arrived and demanded they be surrendered, the lightly armed dutch soldiers feared the consequences of failing to operate. despite realising there was a risk they would be murdered, they took charge of organising the evacuation. putting the refugees into groups and funnelling them through tunnels where bosnian serb soldiers separated the men from women and children. what happened next? genocide. 8000 muslims
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executed. their bodies buried in mass graves. the worst atrocity committed on european soil since the holocaust. the dutch state argued for them it was mission impossible. the soldiers were overwhelmed and under supported. i spoke to one soldier he was serving on that day. ifi soldier he was serving on that day. if i had 150 marines fighting against 3000 serbs for like, four or five days, then go rescue 30,000 refugees and only 7000 were killed. that is the most brutal rescue mission ever. this case relates specifically to 350 muslim men who we re specifically to 350 muslim men who were hiding in safety inside the un
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compound. instead of giving them the option to stay, the dutch soldiers forced them to leave. the judges said that if those men had at least been given a choice they would have had a - chance of survival. and had a 10% chance of survival. and so, found the dutch state liable for 10% in those evacuations that ended in the mass executions. this judgment means the dutch were partially responsible. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. seventeen people have been injured —— some seriously —— in a ‘car cruise' crash in hertfordshire. and in sport... tommy fleetwood is part of a strong british contingent
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contending at the open. his second round 67 at royal portrush puts him two off the lead. lee westwood is alongside him on seven under par. eoin morgan says he's not in a good state to make a decision about his internatinoal future after england's cricket world cup win. ellyse perry hits a century before rain stops play on day two of the women's ashes in taunton. the covers are still on with australia 341 for 5 — they will retain the ashes if they avoid defeat. i'll be back with more on those stories later. hundreds of former members of a religious sect known as thejesus army are seeking damages for alleged abuse. the bbc has heard accounts of how people growing up in the church's communal houses suffered sexual, physical and emotional abuse on a "prolific scale". the claims date back to the 19705, 80s and 905. you may finds some parts of
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jon ironmonger‘s report disturbing. from a tiny baptist sect to one of europe's largest religious communities, thejesus army grew in wealth, membership and zeal. but behind its colourful brand of militant evangelism, we have heard claims that children were being harmed on a prolific scale communal houses throughout england by apparently dozens of individuals. rose's familyjoined the church when she was a baby. as a child, she said she was groomed and molested by an elder. then aged 15, she said she was targeted by another prominent figure. he said, "come around here," to a deserted place at the back of the building, and i had no idea what his intent was, but he proceeded to sexually assault me. afterwards, he said i was to blame for leading him astray. the bbc has spoken exclusively to more than 20 people who grew up in the church
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community houses. each of them claims to have experienced abuse including the brutal sexualised beating of boys by groups of men and the intense psychological control of young women. i've heard some people questioning, you know, really was there something more sinister going on in terms of a group of paedophiles going, "wahey, here's the sweet shop." god, here are my many, many sins... at the top of the church, one man pulled the strings. the late founder and firebrand preacher noel stanton. now we give our genitals to jesus. we can reveal he is among 43 people who have been linked to reports of historic sexual and physical abuse. at least ten have been convicted, including these two men, now in their 50s, for indecent assaults on boys.
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anotherformer member who was born into the church told us he was sexually assaulted by an adult in the grounds of a house when he was six years old while one of his brothers was raped repeatedly as a teenager. at least five of us had been abused in one way or another. i have anger for the church. i have anger because of what they have done to my family. in may, under new leadership, the church announced plans to dissolve, facing a renewed police enquiry, while an association of former members are preparing a group action against its trusts and charities. a spokesman for the church said... thejesus army has accrued assets of around £50 million, but it may yet struggle to atone for its abusive past.
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and if you've been affected by issues in that report there are a number of organisations and websites that can offer you advice and support. you can find them listed on the bbc‘s actionline website at bbc.co.uk/actionline all week we've been marking the 50th anniversary of the mission that culminated in neil armstrong becoming the first man to walk on the moon. that historic moment was watched live on tv by a global audience of 600 million people. the pictures were broadcast thanks to a radio telescope in rural australia, immortalized in the film ‘the dish.‘ hywel griffith has been to meet one of the people who helped bring those unforgettable first images to the world. they've got the flag up now and you can see the stars & stripes. it was the tv moment of the 20th century. beautiful, just beautiful. the giant leap for
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mankind sent 384,000 kilometres through space and onto screens around the world. it was only possible thanks to this dish, the parkes observatory was one of three receiving the signal on earth. it produced the clearest pictures and so was the main source of the tv images. david cook was the senior receiver engineer. the enormity of the occasion didn't strike him until later. if we started to think about what a great thing we were doing we would likely have broken down and not done it properly. only afterwards did i go down outside the telescope and look up and see the moon and realise that three people up there and two of them on the surface and we helped to put them there. that's armstrong on the moon. much of the story was captured in the dish, a film which told the observatory‘s history
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with a little dramatic licence. for example, there wasn't really a power cut as the moment approached. 0h, rats, everything's dead. but there was plenty of real drama here on the day. just as the astronauts were landing on the moon, a storm arrived here in parke,s bringing wind gusts of over 100kph causing the tower to shake and sounding the safety alarms. normally, they would have shut down the dish, but they didn't want to miss their moment in history. it's one which has put parkes on the map and keeps bringing visitors out to this country town. i find it very cool, because it'sjust amazing how that big thing can, like, see or hear people out in space. i don't think they realise how much of an impact it had on history when it comes from such a small town and it is out in the middle of nowhere. and nowadays we have this equipment. the dish is still in use and is now 10,000 times more powerful than when
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it came into operation. one of their projects is to look for alien life. we scan the heavens, visible from here, looking for evidence of radio emissions from alien civilisations. we haven't found anything yet. butjust imagine if the signal is found from another civilisation elsewhere. i mean, that willjust... there is still so much we still don't know about the universe around us. but 50 years on this dish is helping humans to see and think beyond our own planet. hywel griffith, bbc news, parkes. the new zealander of the year award usually goes to someone who has made a great contribution to their community or nation — and england cricketer ben stokes has undeniably had an impact on the country. but after breaking the heart of new zealand in a thrilling final on sunday, he has now has been nominated as kiwi of the year. the all—rounder was born in new zealand before moving to england when he was 12 — and it seems some kiwis
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still see him as their own. time for a look at the weather. we have been talking about the weather conditions in the united states. what is happening right in europe? a knock-on effect. what it is doing is affecting the jet streams, making a bid to be kinked in thejet streams, making a bid to be kinked in the jet stream for for europe, certainly, that'll have quite an impact on our weather through the course of next week. temperatures around 40 degrees in parts of spain and france. we could have wreckage back interpreters in paris, for instance. all that hot getting sucked up. through the week bit of a su btle sucked up. through the week bit of a subtle change. gets you moving closer toward europe, so it will not be too much of a long—lived heatwave. cooler air will start to move on from the atlantic by the second half of next week. certainly through the course of tuesday and wednesday some very high temperature. if we look at the next
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five days or so, that at paris. 40 degrees by wednesday, that is very, very hot. luckily, it is not lasting to long. the cooler air moving in by the end of the week. was about as? may need the rainfall. but we will get a taste of that heatwave as well. temperatures in the uk are going to be on the right. but before we get there, we do have a bit of rain around. this was the scene in conway about a bit of rain around. this was the scene in conway bit earlier on. through the weekend, is improving picture for most of us. still some showery rain on the car to saturday, but sunday should be drier and the warmer day of the weekend. for the rest of us all the play on the map, was to have quite a lot of blustery showers around at there. perhaps even - odd rumble there. perhaps even the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures somewhere between 15 and 20 degrees. a little bit cooler, certainly than it was earlier in the week. heading to the cause of the evening and overnight,
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we keep some showery rain. could be some banishment across northern ireland and scotland, that is also the south—east of england. you may well make up to quite a lot of line surface water first thing saturday morning. still quite mild and humid with those temperatures in meeting. a soggy search of the began to many of us. low pressure in charge. but it will not last too long. the main weather front pushing a choice the east and then we have a wedge of higher pressure building in from the bass. of course, the open continues at royal portrush. we are expecting at royal portrush. we are expecting a better day tomorrow, mostly dry but some sunshine. by the tamagotchi sunday a chance of more showers for portrush, particularly later on any taste. most of the showers will be down eastern scotland, they all had heavy one for west across the uk. it available to women than it is today. 20 25 degrees, sunshine in between. moving through into the evening and the showers in the east fade away
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was largely dry story is a meat free saturday night and on into the early hours of sunday morning. it will be a little bit fresher first thing sunday morning. sunday starts off with a bit of high pressure, keeping things dry and settled at first. later in the day, this low pressure moving on from the north—west will bea moving on from the north—west will be a little bit more of a player. for england and wales, we are expecting things to be dry all day on sunday. plenty of sunshine and just a light breeze around. it will cloud over four northern just a light breeze around. it will cloud overfour northern ireland just a light breeze around. it will cloud over four northern ireland and west of scotland with the arrival of the brain. temperatures properly eligible to saturday. looking at around 20 to 24 degrees. that is when things are going to be warming up when things are going to be warming up into the new working week. monday to tuesday, particular by the side, could well see the chapters in london around 31 degrees.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. public sector workers — including police officers, the armed forces & teachers — are in line for an above inflation pay rise — in one of the last announcements of the may government.
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hertfordshire police say 17 people have been injured, some seriously, following a collision between two cars at a gathering in stevenage last night. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit the home secretary, sajid javid, says public leaders must do more to stop open racism entering mainstream politics. i'm from an immigrant family and i know what it's like to be told to go back where you came from. james goddard pleads guilty to causing alarm and distress and using threatening or abusive language towards the mp anna soubry outside the houses of parliament. more on that story now, our
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correspondent has been following the case. angus, tell us what has been happening in court today. remember backin happening in court today. remember back in january, arguments happening in court today. remember back injanuary, arguments within the house of commons about brexit had become extremely heated, but they became even more heated outside they became even more heated outside the palace of westminster, where demonstrators had begun to gather on a regular basis. a group of those, so called yellow vests, aping the demonstrations taking place in france, where there in early january when anna soubry mp came out of the house of commons and went to do interviews live on the bbc and on sky. they were seen by millions of people around the country and were televised. two men, james goddard and brian phillips and a group of others, were heard chanting very loudly during her interview, shouting that she was a nazi, she was a traitor. they also shouted that she was doing the work of adolf hitler. today, they both pleaded guilty to one charge of harassment,
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using threatening words against the mp, andjames using threatening words against the mp, and james goddard also admitted racially abusing a police officer. pending reports, they will both be sentenced on monday afternoon. thank you, angus. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. the open championship continues, and some big names under threat of leaving early? yes, the cut is coming soon at the end of today, and there will be some important names, big players, potentially having to pull up quite the stops to make sure that they don't miss that cut. rory mcilroy, whose second round isjust don't miss that cut. rory mcilroy, whose second round is just under way, were very much hope he was at the other end of the leaderboard to what he currently is. at the top end, there are some strong british contingent, tommy fleetwood, lee westwood, justin rose, all within touching distance of the lead. adam wilde is at royal poor at for us, and at least rory
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mcilroy started a better —— but better than yesterday? —— royal port. some cherokee couldn't have started much worse, he is through the first hole safely, a par four, but he will need a lot more than that if he is to be around for the weekend. the projected cut that comes weekend. the projected cut that co m es after weekend. the projected cut that comes after the second round is still a one over par, so he has seven shots to make up, and put that into context, the best run today or yesterday has been a six under par, so rory will have to do better than anyone has done so far in this championship, if he is to survive that cut. as you say, better news at the top of the leaderboard, there is an irishman, shane lowry, who is leading the way on ten under par. he done absolutely fantastically today. he is 600 for his round, and he is only at the 11th hole, so he has done well. —— six under. if a
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contingent following him today, lots of cheers and celebrations for the way he is playing. he hasjust gone ahead ofjb holmes, who was the overnight leader, the american, he is on eight under. the story of the last hour or two is lee westwood, he is just three shots off the lead. he went through the first 11 holes, had a paron went through the first 11 holes, had a par on them all, and then picked up a par on them all, and then picked up some on the back nine. this is his 82nd major, his 25th consecutive open championship, he has never won a major, it would be extraordinary, what a story it would be for lee westwood. one other story, just to mention briefly, tiger woods, who finished around about ten or 15 minutes ago, he had a better round than he did yesterday, but he is certain now to miss the cut, he will not be around for the weekend. do not miss a saturday or sunday, you may not see all of those names. thank you, adam at royal portrush.
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england's world cup winning cricket captain, eoin morgan, says he's not sure if he'll still be in the role by the time the next tournament comes around in four years time. he's been england's limited overs captain since 2015, and has been a key part of the team's transformation in that time. morgan says the world cup win has made him think about his future. i don't think i'm in a good state to make a decision at the moment, simply for the fact that i haven't had a chance to get away from the and craze of winning the world cup. i haven't been able to get into a logical mindset and ask myself a couple questions about it. for use asa couple questions about it. for use as a commitment to commit to a 50 over world cup, the t20 next year is a more realistic target, but even then, i have battled my way through this year's world cup, it has taken a huge amount out of me mentally and physically. when things calm down over the next couple of months, i will come to the decision that at the forefront of it, will be my family and the team. staying with cricket and rain has got in the way on the second day of the women's ashes test match. a draw or a win at taunton would
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mean australia retain the ashes, and a century from elise perry has them well on their way to doing just that. australia were 341—5 by the time the rain came. england are 6 points to nil down in the series after losing all three odis. it's a big day for geraint thomas at the tour de france. he's expected to take a good chunk of time off the leaderjulien allaphillipe in the time trial. you can follow it on the bbc sport website and app. that's all the sport for now. back now to our top story this afternoon. 17 people have been injured, two seriously, after a crash into a crowd of car enthusiasts in hertfordshire. two of the cars collided and ploughed into spectators on the roadside. john sootheran edited the now defunct boy racers' bible max power magazine and has attended
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car cruising events. we can speak to him now, thank you for joining we can speak to him now, thank you forjoining us. tell us what happens at these events. basically, young quys at these events. basically, young guys who have spent lots of money and time modifying their cars, making them faster, louder, cooler, they turn up somewhere like a mcdonald's car park or retail estate and they pack up and show them off. that is early on in the evening, and then gradually, things start to build up and people start doing things called doughnuts, which is where they spin around on the spot, it is loud, exciting, thrilling, and there's an element of danger. once ina while, there's an element of danger. once in a while, this escalates and gets outside the car park and out onto the roads, and that is generally when the problems begin. the roads, and that is generally when the problems beginm the roads, and that is generally when the problems begin. it had a bit of a heyday about 15 years ago, how popular is it these days?m bit of a heyday about 15 years ago, how popular is it these days? it was huge 15 years ago, it was based largely around a magazine called max three, which is the one i edited. it grew and grew, the magazine sold
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about 250,000 copies, 2 million men reading it every month. —— a magazine called max power. in 2006, became so mainstream that it lost its cool and young guys stop it. my friends and i have noticed in the last few years it has started to build steam again and young guys are getting back into their cars. what safety precautions are taken to make sure accidents do not happen? back in the day, virtually none. the thrill came from the element of danger, i think, thrill came from the element of danger, ithink, where thrill came from the element of danger, i think, where people would be standing feet away from cars that are spinning their wheels at a high speed, are spinning through crowds of people at high speeds. there was virtually no safety, the adrenaline and testosterone was what parried it and testosterone was what parried it and made it exciting. the organisers of this event in stevenage is where things went wrong, and they will not be able to do it again, even though it was done for charity. what with the appeal be something like this if
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it was static and the vehicles couldn't move? i guess for a 20—year—old, a lot of the excitement, the peril and thrill of the danger will be lost. that is what excites young men. i don't think it will be anywhere near as popular, but perhaps they could do it any more organised way, with some aspects of safety involved. you say there is a rising interest again, how different is this version compared with what you saw in 2004-2005? what i saw on the bbc website was exactly what happened at a cruise in northampton about 15 yea rs a cruise in northampton about 15 years ago, which escalated, got outside the car park and some young quy 9°t outside the car park and some young guy got hit in the central reservation. it is rare, but it does happen, and it needs to be sorted out. do you think there might be a market for the kind of magazine that to edit? i don't think magazines...
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i don't think... there are lots of websites run by a young men in their bedroom to modify their cars, there is media potential, but i doubt it would be a printed product.|j is media potential, but i doubt it would be a printed product. i think it would be the e version, for sure. thank you for talking to us. the bbc and itv have revealed more details about their plans for a joint video streaming service. britbox will cost customers £5.99 a month and be launched towards the end of the year. it's being seen as a uk rival to established services such as netflix, which this week saw its share price fall after a slowdown in subscriber growth. here's our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. gavin and stacey, helping the bbc and itv begin their new online life together. congratulations. tidy. come here. you just got married. that is disgusting. the intention is for britbox to be seen as the streaming home for quality british programming. leave it out!
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past shows like the office are expected to help convince viewers to subscribe to what is a significant and not entirely risk—free venture for britain's two biggest broadcasters. we are in potentially traumatic times, but they are exciting times, with the merger. things move fast. have you got a fire extinguisher? there is, of course, a huge appetite for british programming, but even with hit shows like happy valley on—board, the future isn't guaranteed to be 100% for britbox. nice glasses. you look nice. dol? it is going to be a challenge to compete with streaming giant netflix, which already has 11.5 million uk subscribers. it is popular with viewers because of its programming and it's easy—to—use interface. netflix has spent 5.5 billion on its user experience and that is why it is the best in the market and has the best
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compression algorithms and things download faster and it is why their suggestions work so well. whereas britbox will be on the itv hub stack, which works pretty well for a free service, but if you are paying £5.99 per month, you are going to be comparing it with netflix and the experience will not be as seamless. on top of that, the likes of disney will soon be launching their own service, with spin offs from their popular star wars and marvel universes, and the likes of stephen spielberg and oprah winfrey are involved in apple's new service. so since several platforms will be looking for subscribers, with few able to afford them all. so, soon, several platforms will be looking for subscribers, with few able to afford them all. the service launches at the end of the year, aiming to showcase the very best of british, from broad church to love island. i'm sorry, i really am. but like so many other landscapes, the media world too is ever—changing
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and highly competitive. so while the bbc and itv are coupled up for now, who knows whether they will be together forever? whether it's almond, soy or coconut, it seems more people are ditching cow's milk for plant—based products. a quarter of british people are now drinking non—dairy milk, according to a survey of 2,000 people by the market research firm mintel. 16—24 year olds are the biggest users of non—dairy milk — that's 33%. but despite this, plant—based milks still only make up just 4% of the milk market, with the majority of milk sales last year being for cow's milk. well, earlier our reporter rick kelsey said that while health concerns are one factor for this trend, people are also worried about the environment. we could debate that all day, about when you take cows milk out of your system and choose to have a plant—based alternative, is that a good thing? we could talk about that all day, but what is more clear is when we talk
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about the environment and we can see on this chart, that when it comes to cow's milk, there is an enormous difference in the impact on the environment, and this comes in three main reasons. the emissions of cows, the land use, and water use. if you look at all these different milks we are seeing growing, rice milk, soy milk, but to a lesser extent, almond milk, because it takes an enormous amount of water to produce. that is the second reason, clearly what people are saying is, why they are making the shift because they have concerns that dairy farming is not good for the environment. jamie is here — in a moment, he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big
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decisions as prime minister. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. seventeen people have been injured , some seriously, in a ‘car cruise' crash in hertfordshire. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the amount the government borrowed injune was the highest it's been in that month since 2015. these are official government figures and they showed public sector borrowing at £7.2 billion, that's up from £3.3 billion injune 2018 and higher than all the forecasts in a poll of economists by reuters. britain's largest supermarket, tesco, has increased the price of more than 1,000 products in the past two weeks. the firm raised prices on products including cheese, chocolate and bananas by an average of 11%. tesco says it held off raising prices for as long as it could, and insists it is still competitive when compared to asda, sainsbury‘s and morrisons.
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the world's biggest plane—maker boeing is setting aside almost £4 billion to compensate airlines for the grounding of the 737 max. the aircraft was withdrawn from service worldwide in march after two crashes, in indonesia and ethiopia, in the space of five months. 346 people were killed. holiday time — how do i take money abroad? have been on holiday, but i' going i have been on holiday, but i'm going again, i'm very lucky. i don't think you can have too many. you must always have one up your sleeve. how should i take my money abroad?|j can't how should i take my money abroad?” can't say i'm an expert, but one thing that i do is that i put aside a little bit of money every month and exchange it, so it smooths out the exchange rate. remarkably, i am quite organised. having done a feature on this several years ago,
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since then, i decided, every month, a little bit goes aside onto my money for a holiday fund. it usually goes into euros, that is normally go ifigo goes into euros, that is normally go if i go abroad. i got caught out when we went to america one year. anyway, you cannot win them all. but we can talk about this in an expert way, because we can... of course! steve novotney from money saving expert joins us now. what is the best way to ta ke joins us now. what is the best way to take money abroad? there are many ways. for many, the best would be an overseas debit or credit card. a lot of plastic when you take it overseas is very expensive, if you take the wrong credit card, you can pay a 3% fee but if you get a specialist card, they will not have these fees, you will have the near— perfect exchange rate, you just have to use
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that. but use it only for overseas, that. but use it only for overseas, thatis that. but use it only for overseas, that is our golden rule. is not a money card you charge up with cash or as money card you charge up with cash orasa link money card you charge up with cash or as a link to your account? there are both options. we normally talk about overseas credit card, a credit or debit card, which is a current account. but you can also get prepaid cards, which is slightly different, and in that case, you load up the car beforehand and you will spend when you are overseas. what about taking cash abroad? changing it in the airport before you go? our golden rule is never change it at the airport, if you possibly can. it is a common mistake, lots of people will do that, it is understandable. the rates you get there are very poor, we have seen this week 80 cents for £1 in one case, which is a very low amount indeed. it is much better to use a comparison site beforehand, check what the best rates are, or evenif check what the best rates are, or even if you are on the way to the airport, in the car, see if you can
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order it for collection at the airport, and you may get a slightly better rate. whatever you do, try not to buy it as you enter the airport. once you get abroad, should you use your card for everything or go and get lots of cash out and use that? it depends on the card, it depends on the atm fees as well, and it depends what you're comfortable with. you want to be careful carrying around a large amount of cash. so long as you have the right ca rd cash. so long as you have the right card you are using that to withdraw, then you should be ok. it is a fine art, you want to make sure you are 0k, art, you want to make sure you are ok, if you haven't got the best rate, you can probably live without, but you want to avoid being stung by nasty fees. we have seen in some cases a £5 sandwich or glass of wine, if you get it wrong, it could cost as expanse 40p through the extra fees, that is what you want to watch for. —— £6 40 p. extra fees, that is what you want to watch for. -- £6 40 p. is that when they ask if you want to pay for it in pounds or local currency? yes, the real is to pay in local
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currency, it tends to wane in almost every case. if they did it currency exchange for you, they will do it at a much worse wholesale rate and you will lose out. if in doubt, go with the local currency. thank you. you are looking very smug.” the local currency. thank you. you are looking very smug. i am very smug, i have one of those credit cards. you've done something right! something?! you ought to be congratulated. come back later. fans of the cult 19805 movie top gun got a bit of a surprise at the comicon event in san diego on thursday — when tom cruise made an unexpected appearance to promote the film's sequel, 33 years after the original film was released, maverick is back. mrtom mr tom cruise! in a newly released trailer, we can see cruise racing on a motorcycle and flying a fighter
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jet through a narrow snow—filled canyon, as well as the odd reference or two to his age. it's not the only classic being revisited on the big screen though. another trailer that's just been released is for the musical cats, and it's fair to say the internet is reacting with bafflement. despite the all star cast which includes idris elba, judy dench and taylor swift, eyebrows are being raised at the surreal cgi human cat hybrids. i'm joined from glasgow by film writer and critic siobhan synott. let's deal with cats, first. is this going to appeal to people who did like the cats musical or didn't like it? i think it nails it right from the out. if you liked memory, you will like this particular movie, because memory is all you hear. the rumour is that andrew lloyd webber has composed some new songs, but
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this is comforting and consoling as a film, as far as the point is that it tackles. less comforting and consoling is perhaps the appearance of the cats. they are cgi skins on the actors to make them look more catlike, and the effect is like the kids from the lion king. it is a bit like a work—out video, in some ways, with all that lycra. it is less than realistic bodies, shall we say. lack of genitals was what was commented on on the internet about these creatures. it is strange that they go to the effort of having all the cat features, yet the bodies are humanlike ones. there is a lot of dancing in cats and if you have somebody built like a cat, then you will not appreciate the movement of the body. did it work for you? it is difficult to tell the trailers, particularly one that is as cautious as this one, but i am surprised or
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intrigued by how big are these cats? at one point, you see them in a dustbin, a hole cut in a dustbin, thatis dustbin, a hole cut in a dustbin, that is a big cat. at other times, a little port stuck in a mousetrap, quite a small cat. —— a little paw stuck. let's talk about top gun. i remember it from the first time around, is it likely to appeal to a cinema goer of a certain age?” think it is built for that for sure. you see in the trailer, not much story, but certainly, all the touchstones that made tom cruise's hotshot pilot the big raid. you see the ray bans, the jacket, there is a joke about whether he is headed for extinction. it is tom cruise's signature role. in some ways, it is surprising it has taken him 34 years to get back to it, isn't it? they do refer to his age, is a tongue in cheek, there where they do it? yes,
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because he knows he looks good and he can get away with it. it is strange, what other concessions are we going to have to his age, apart from the fact he is supposedly training rather than an actual fighter pilot? he is supposed to be a maverick, he now be reasonably orthodox? how indignant should i be that his former leading lady, kelly mcgillis, isn't in the film? in some ways, i think kelly mcgillis has been speared, because she had to crouch for most of the original sum, because she is three inches taller than tom cruise. the old sexist thing of a younger woman paired up with an older actors seems to be adhered to full stop this time, it isjennifer connolly, so adhered to full stop this time, it is jennifer connolly, so perhaps aged —— age difference isn't too grievous. when these films out? yes, tom cruise's. .. grievous. when these films out? yes, tom cruise's... age —wise, it is supposed to be out in 2020, and cats is aimed as a christmas treat for you in december, when we will all find out whether ian mckellen
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canvassing. i will be waiting with bated breath. good to speak to you, thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. the unsettled weather injuly is set to continue, some rain on the forecast on saturday. this is the picture today, earlier on in dorset, grey skies, outbreaks of rain as well. most of the showers will be on saturday, this weekend, by sunday, with some higher pressure, it is looking likely drier day of their weekend. the rest of this afternoon, you can see the rain on the map, temperature is about 20—21 across england and wales, a little bit cooler in scotland and northern ireland. into this evening and overnight, further heavy bursts of rain, from northern ireland, scotla nd rain, from northern ireland, scotland and southern and eastern parts of england, could be the odd rumble of thunder overnight, and the temperatures will hold up in the mid teens. still rather warm and humid, too. to start the weekend, low pressure still in charge, gradually
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will be pushing away to the east on a saturday, as a ridge of high pressure builds in from the south—west, that should tend to squeeze the showers away. as the open continues, we are expecting an improved day on saturday. dry weather for sunday, but they could be some showers arriving later on in the day. heading through the day on saturday, a day of sunshine and showers, the main band of rain clears towards the south—east, most of the showers will be for eastern scotla nd of the showers will be for eastern scotland and down the east coast of england, too, further west, from wales, northern ireland, a lot of dry weather developing and temperatures will be a little bit warmer than today, with highs between 18—25. three saturday evening, the showers in the east fade away, so most of look dry as we end the day, temperatures holding up in double figures, so quite mild, not too humid, as we move into the early hours of sunday. through the day on sunday, a ridge of high pressure will not last too long, because we have the next area of low pressure moving into the north—west of the uk, so things will turn white
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and breezy in northern ireland, particularly during sunday afternoon. mostly dry it through the morning, for the rest of the uk, lots of dry weather with long spans of sunshine, and the temperature starting to creep up with a south—westerly breeze. highs between 20-25 south—westerly breeze. highs between 20—25 on sunday, it looks like the temperatures will continue to rise into the new working week. from monday into tuesday, a return to sunny spells, we could see highs in london of 31 degrees by the time you get to tuesday. by bye for now.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 4pm. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among public sector workers in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. this is the minimum that one might have expected after eight years of really severe pay restraint in the public sector. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. a pro—brexit activist pleads guilty to causing alarm and distress using threatening or abusive language towards the mp anna soubry outside parliament. seventeen people have been injured, some seriously, in a "car cruise" crash in hertfordshire. coming up on afternoon
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live all the sport. yes, the likes of tommy fleetwood, lee westwood and justin rose look ready for a weekend challenge at royal portrush. tiger woods is getting ready to go home. rory mcilroy could well do as well. with a happy latest in his second round later. sarah has all the details about the weather. it has been a bit ofa about the weather. it has been a bit of a soggy day as there so far today. aspects of showery rain. for the weekend, still some showers around on saturday. sunday looking like the drier day for most of us and with a have a feel for class and about half an hour. also coming up — we'll be in birmingham for news nationwide looking at a scheme to increase literacy across the region.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. hundreds of thousands of public sector workers are set to get a pay rise above the rate of inflation. the treasury is expected to confirm on monday that workers — including teachers and police officers — will receive increases of up to two—point—nine per cent. it's thought the rise will come from existing budgets. our political correspondent iain watson reports. public sector unions have campaigned against pay caps and for higher wages during the years of austerity. now an apparent victory for some of those on the government payroll. the treasury was going to announce an inflation busting increase next week. the figures were leaked to the times newspaper today. teachers and school staff will get a 2.75% increase, armed forces will get a 2.5% rise across the board, although soldiers are expected to get a bit more and there is a 2.5% rise for the police, dentists and nhs consultants. with inflation running at around 2%,
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this presents a real terms increase. but these pay increases come with a political sting in the tail. they have to be funded from existing departmental budgets, so is the chancellor phillip hammond trying to rein in the parade of theresa may's successor, giving him this challenge. is he prepared to cut elsewhere in the public services to fund the pay increases, or will he simply expand departmental budgets and with it government borrowing? today, the home secretary maintained that the cash for higher police pay wouldn't come at the expense of other priorities. i know police forces, they can fund it from their budgets because when we set budgets we do try, certainly in my case, try to take into account what might happen further down the line later in that financial year. but the unions say the increases should be fully funded by central government if cuts are not to be made elsewhere and the pay settlement is an equally generous to everyone. they will be no above inflation
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increase foot senior civil servants and some public sector workers are still waiting for announcements on their pay. when george osborne froze public sector pay he was creating a ticking time bomb for people whose pay was not keeping pace with inflation. i can report to the british people that their hard work is paying off and the era of austerity is finally coming to an end. george osborne's successor took a different approach. but some experts said not an overly generous one. i think we are seeing the end of austerity, spending beginning to rise. that said, this is not a terribly generous offer, this is the minimum one may have expected after 80 years of really severe pay restraint in the public sector. eight years of severe pay restraint. philip hammond is expected to leave number 11 downing st for the last time next week. but he will also be leaving some big challenges for whoever succeeds him. iain watson, bbc news, westminster.
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seventeen people have been injured, two seriously, after a crash at a meeting of car enthusiasts in hertfordshire. two of the cars collided and ploughed into spectators on the roadside. our correspondent kathryn stanczyszyn has been in stevenage... there has been no updates from police as yet as to whether or not any arrests have been made. this is the scene of that accident last night. a collision as a car came out of this junction and seemingly failed to see a car that was coming at speed up the carriageway. they clipped each other and both cars then ended up speeding into pedestrians and eyewitnesses have described the horror of seeing people being thrown up in the air from the force of the accident. we know that 17 people are injured, the ambulance service said 16 were taken to hospital at the time. we do not have any updates on their condition at the moment. a split second, and then,
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disaster as this car pulls out of a junction, sending another head long into bystanders on a central reservation. out of control, the original car also careers into people on the side of the road. 17 were injured, two of them described to be young. just shock, panic. everyone was obviously standing around trying to help. i am not first aid trained, i didn't want to get involved. you could see a lot of kids on the road distressed in agony, they had been run over and injured. it was shocking. you get there, you see it, whoa, what is going on. it was pretty horrific. hundreds were there for something called a cruise meet where drivers gather to show off their vehicles. organisers say the event was supposed to be restricted to a nearby car park. but footage clearly shows vehicles travelling at speed along the carriageway.
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many have taken to social media to say they have raised concerns to police about similar gatherings that happen regularly in this area. hertfordshire police say they were not aware in advance of anything specific happening last night although they know they do take place. we were not aware of this large—scale gathering. what i would say is not to attend this type of event. what happened last night shows what could happen when you have such large numbers in the road, and cars perhaps committing offences. police are now appealing for anyone with any footage of what happened to contact them urgently. organisers say they are devastated and this charity event will not take place again. police are continuing their investigations and actually marked out on the carriageway behind me are
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some yellow paint that shows the path of the two cars. please say that investigation will continue. we do know, we have in speaking to locals, they say they are sick of this. that actually these kind of meet ups have been happening very regularly in this area. some saying as often as every week and they do bring with them reckless driving. they say they are concerned that police are not taking it seriously enough. the organisers of this particular event which is actually going on in the car park say it was not intended to be added then that meet up, a static meet up, where people drive their cars, they get out of them and they walk around and look at other people's card. they say they are devastated by this and do believe they may have been a rogue element here last night which may have added to this accident. a pro—brexit activist who shouted abuse at the change uk mp, anna soubry, outside parliament injanuary has pleaded guilty to public order offences. james goddard, who's 29, admitted causing alarm and distress using threatening
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or abusive language. our 0ur correspondence our correspondence has been at the court and take us back to the events at the beginning of this year. the arguments within the house of commons about brexit had become extremely heated. they would become even more heated outside the palace of westminster, where demonstrators had begun to gather on a regular basis. a group of those, so—called, yellow vets, aping the demonstrations taking place in france, where there in early january. when annecy breaking out of the house of commons, went to do interviews and on the scene by millions people around the country. two men and a group of others were heard chanting very loudly during her interview, shouting that she was
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a nazi, that she was scam and a traitor. they also shouted that she was doing the work of adolf hitler. today they both pleaded guilty to one charge of harassment and using threatening words against the mp. james goddard also cemented racially abusing a police officer. pending reports, they will both be sentenced on monday afternoon. the chancellor philip hammond has refused to rule out supporting a motion of no confidence in a possible borisjohnson government to try to block a no deal brexit. speaking to two european newspapers just days before a new conservative leader is announced, mr hammond promised to do everything in his power to block no—deal. our political correspondent jessica parker told us about phillip hammond's recent interviews.
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perhaps it could do scribe him as elizabeth demob happy as they hands towards the end of his chancellorship. the expecting eve ryo ne chancellorship. the expecting everyone is ship contest to keep mr hammond at number 11 to stop so, he has been speaking to a pensions paper and has been speaking to a pensions paperand a has been speaking to a pensions paper and a german newspaper. i understand this interview took place earlier this week, when he was impact. adjusting to pick out is when he was asked in the context of preventing a new deal brexit, mr hammond is very much an opponent of eight new deal brexit, whether he would rule out supporting government they made up of his own conservative party. what
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which the mechanism because mac of his own conservative party. what which the mechanism because matfi would be led by labour, if it was, say in the context, this is heavy speculative, but in order to prevent a new deal brexit if they do not find the other parliamentary mechanism, perhaps the likes of the snp would pile in, as well. then it would all be about at parliamentary written a check as to whether any conservatives would support that vote of no confidence, pitching as they would sate country before party, if they are opposed party, if they are adamantly opposed toa party, if they are adamantly opposed to a new deal brexit was of a boat occurs and then as i understand, i think there is then, if the government loses, a two—week period for it somebody else to try and form some form of workable government and go to the queen. if that does not happen, you are in general election territory. so, lip, headingley speculative at this stage as a mother with a motion of no confidence, although that does seem fairly likely looking down the road,
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labour may try do that again for and indeed, whether it succeeds. how many conservative mps, despite what they might say now, not ruling it out, which really be prepared to go that far. i think there is a question as to whether they would be prepared to go that far whether this isa prepared to go that far whether this is a bit of tough talk. the home secretary sajid javid says more must be done to prevent open racism entering mainstream politics. in a thinly disguised attack on donald trump — he called on public leaders to moderate their language in order "to halt the spread of poisonous ideologies." loose language, it's used at all levels. i'm from an immigrant family and i know what it's like to be told to go back where you came from. and i don't think they mean rochdale. laughter some worry that new arrivals will take over their communities and that our national identity will be diluted. i firmly reject that.
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i've seen how immigration can enrich our country and i welcome it. with me is liam duffy a research fellow on extremism at the think tank, civitasw. watch for you was noteworthy about this speech because mac there was a lot of good. i think it was a strong, it was an antidote to populism. we have seen quite a lot of populism on these issues on both sides of a land deck. what he has given isa sides of a land deck. what he has given is a realistic perspective speech. i think what is a little bit disappointing and this is nothing to do with what he said everything he said was great. the previous home secretary made a similar call to arms, the counterterrorism commissioner and so did david cameron, itjust commissioner and so did david cameron, it just seems commissioner and so did david cameron, itjust seems we keep having this culture arms to have
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open discussions on extremism and i'm not sure that we are moving closer to having them. buys its difficult to have an? it is a very pearly understood phenomena. i'm not one to polarise social media, but one to polarise social media, but one thing it really touched on was being quite, we need to protect the integrity of the word extremist and notjust label integrity of the word extremist and not just label everything we like as extreme as that is a dangerous road to go down. that is a example of not having serious conversations. at the expense of looking at real extremism, where blaming certain people first terrorist attacks, i do not think we are having serious conversations about extremism as a society that a the ritz, how do they vary? there is one common thread, fire left, far left or 5&5, they rely on victimhood narratives. they reliance like a threat was dobson,
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with the far right that may be the immigrants, with the fire left that might be conspiracy, controlling the media, controlling the papers and the banks. with 5&5, it is this idea that muslims are in an inhospitable... it is creating a threat narrative and then they come in with the ideology and that is a very common route to extremism. how do we stop then people with influence using this kind of language if, in cases of some politicians, it actually wins in boats? that is a tough one. i think the rest of us, it is a kind of silent addresses majority unless that were not willing to use that language and play those games, i think we need to hold ground against them. they need to be more open discussion, instead ofjust rolling our eyes and getting on with it, the re st of our eyes and getting on with it, the rest of us can speak up about this and, you know, we are quite
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comfortable with calling out things like the far right and come jewel recognising the ideology and tactics, but less comfortable talking about islamist extremism for example. there was a large section in the speech talking about islamist extremism and it is much of a comment... it as such more on the judge being responsible about this. i think it sounds, as he said, it starts from communities and society societies. the rest of us can show that this is not something we want to engage in. it is easy to feel that we are mired in my extremism than ever. in your view what progress having made? he started his speech by speaking about his experience in the 1970s and 80s. i think, you know, just objectively speaking i think we have made great progress since then. i agree with him,| progress since then. i agree with him, ithink progress since then. i agree with him, i think anybody would have to look at britain and see it is one if not the most successful multiethnic and racial democracy is in the world. that should be recognised,
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but there are tiny minorities and pull the ends of the political spectrum is a religious passions which are dragging us about a little bit and are seeking to buy a lot society. there has been progress made, let us not, there is hate crime increases are things about, but i think the national front that has been talked about in the speech is really happening as much anymore. we should recognise that, but be more willing to call at extremism properly. thank you very much for coming in. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. seventeen people have been injured —— some seriously —— in a ‘car cruise' crash in hertfordshire. and in sport... a blistering front nine restores shane lowry‘s lead at the open. the irishman's on 10 under par. two ahead of the field.
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with three englishman in touching distance at royal portrush. eoin morgan says he's not in a good state to make a decision about his internatinoal future after england's cricket world cup win. ellyse perry hits a century before rain stops play on day two of the women's ashes in taunton. the covers are still on with australia 341 for 5 — they will retain the ashes if they avoid defeat. i'll be back with more on those stories later. a man who raped and murdered a 13—year—old girl to stop her from exposing him as a sex abuser has been jailed for life. stephen nicholson, aged 25, stabbed lucy mchugh in woodland in southampton last july. he was found guilty of murder and three charges of raping lucy following a trial at winchester crown court, and was ordered to spend at least 33 years in jail. our correspondent james ingham
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is outside winchester crown court. thejudge said this was an execution carried out after a year of sexual exploitation. lucy mchugh was just 13 years old when she was killed. her killer had raped her, taking advantage of a crush, an infatuation this girl had on him. cynically exploiting her, said thejudge. when she threatened to reveal details of their sexual exploitation, thejudge said he simply had to get rid of her. so, he lured her to a sports ground, a woodland close to a sports ground in southampton and he stabbed her repeatedly in the neck. leaving her to die amongst the trees. a strong earthquake has shaken the greek capital, athens, knocking out phone networks and power in parts of the city.
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athenians ran out into the streets and evacuated tall buildings as the tremor shook the capital for some 15 seconds. the earthquake was registered at a 5.1 magnitude with an epicentre about 14 miles north—west of athens. there are no reports of serious injuries, but several aftershocks have been felt. the dutch supreme court has upheld a ruling that the netherlands was partly to blame for the deaths of 350 of the 8,000 muslim men, killed in the massacre at srebrenica in the bosnian war. dutch troops at a united nations safe zone handed the unarmed men and boys over to bosnian serb forces, who then murdered them. anna holligan reports on this finaljudgment day, the mothers who travelled in search ofjustice felt only humiliation.
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translation: today we were humiliated before thejudge even said anything, because we did not have a translator. i only got back 3% of my younger son's body. thousands of muslim refugees had fled to the un compound seeking protection in what was a designated safe zone. when the bosnian serb army leader then arrived and demanded they be surrendered, the lightly armed dutch soldiers feared the consequences of failing to operate. despite realising there was a risk they would be murdered, they took charge of organising the evacuation. putting the refugees into groups and funnelling them through tunnels where bosnian serb soldiers separated the men from women and children. what happened next? genocide. 8,000 muslims executed. their bodies buried in mass graves. the worst atrocity committed on european soil
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since the holocaust. the dutch state argued for them it was mission impossible. the soldiers were overwhelmed and under supported. i spoke to one soldier who was serving on that day. if i had 150 marines fighting against 3000 serbs for like, four or five days, then go rescue 30,000 refugees and only 7,000 were killed. that is the most brutal rescue mission ever. this case relates specifically to 350 muslim men who were hiding in safety inside the un compound. instead of giving them the option to stay, the dutch soldiers forced them to leave. the judges said that if those men
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had at least been given a choice they would have had a 10% chance of survival. and so, found the dutch state liable for 10% in those evacuations that ended in the mass executions. this judgment means the dutch were partially responsible. a man has admitted killing an edinburgh shopkeeper by frightening him to death during a drunken rampage. david de montfalcon died from a heart attack after alan rooney entered his shop in edinburgh's tollcross in august last year. david cowan brings us this report. prosecutors accepted that alan mooney had not meant to kill the shopkeeper, but his conduct had been so extreme it cause his death. the 35 yield entered the shop in edinburgh and started shouting and swearing. cctv captured him smashing
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glass cabinets and damaging guitars. he looked drunk and made that's against the owner, even though he appeared not to know who he was. witnesses said the shopkeeper appeared shocked and scared during the incident. he tried to claim alan down, but the whole thing only came to an end 20 american tourists and another consummate got him out of the shop. after the police arrived, the shop. after the police arrived, the shopkeeper collapse, he was taken to hospital, but did not survive. the incident lasted just five minutes, leaving the shop the shopkeeper lodge strain with glass. the 64—year—old had a history of heart problems, but the court was told distress caused fatal attack. thejudge told him...
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he was remanded in custody and shall be sentenced in september. all week we've been marking the 50th anniversary of the mission that culminated in neil armstrong becoming the first man to walk on the moon. behind the apollo 11 project were hundreds of thousands of engineers, scientists and technicians. among them were dozens of britons, including people who trained neil armstrong and the designers of the fuel cells on the saturn 5 rocket. duncan kennedy reports. they had the world behind them and the moon in front. lift—off. .. as easy as a, b, c for armstrong, buzz and collins — well not really. it took 400,000 people to make this happen. including british engineers. it consumes hydrogen and oxygen to water and produces electrical energy. like francis tom bacon. at cambridge university, he developed the first hydrogen—oxygen fuel cell that
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provided power, heat and clean water to apollo 11. his colleagues recall a gentleman engineer. he was always terribly polite. he would ask you what your interests were and if they had any bearing on the fuel cell, he was deeply interested. but if they didn't, he switched off. britain had its own rocket programme from the 19505. missiles like blue streak and black arrow were tested here on the isle of wight. but when the blue streak and other projects were cancelled here, and the arrow programme cancelled in canada, that meant highly—skilled british engineers had to go somewhere else and where did many of them end up? well, it's thought between 20 and 30 of them went to work for nasa on the moon space programme. with the laser reflector in the background...
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one of them was keith wright from dorset. he helped create the main experiments carried out on the moon. this is buzz aldrin carrying keith's equipment. the aim — to measure vibrations on the lunar surface. what was it like to be, in effect, a part of history, apollo 11? when we actually landed, we alljumped, "we did it!" then again, as soon as we heard they'd deployed the experiments, it was great, it was our part done and it worked. other british engineers on apollo 11 did everything from helping redesign this contraption after neil armstrong had to make this ejection from it during training, to creating the mission control centre itself. the giant leap to the moon may have been made wearing american boots, but some of the small steps had a british footprint as well. duncan kennedy, bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. the weekend is almost upon us, how will the weather shape up? a case of mixed fortunes. showery rain around particular unsaturated stop most of i should be drier and a touch warmer by the time again to sunday. the address at this evening, we have advents of rain, particularly across northern ireland and scotland. could be the order rumble of number during the early hours of saturday morning. still quite warm and humid, those temperatures generally sitting in the mid—teens of a night. to start your saturday morning, some persistent rain first thing in the south—east. that should clear away and you'll be left in sunny spells and you'll be left in sunny spells and scattered showers. most of the showers for instance scotland and england, further west you are my likely to stage either stop fairly long spells of sunshine and temperature range between 18 and 25 degrees. to the dance under, drier start and long spells of sunshine
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cloud and rain and an increasing went fishing into northern ireland and western scotland later in the day. by. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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public sector workers — including police officers, the armed forces and teachers — are in line for an above inflation pay rise — in one of the last announcements of the may government. hertfordshire police say 17 people have been injured, some seriously, following a collision between two cars at a gathering in stevenage last night. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. two men plead guilty to public order offences against the mp anna soubry outside parliament earlier this year. the home secretary, sajid javid, says public leaders must do more to stop open racism entering mainstream politics. i'm from an immigrant family and i know what it's like to be told to go back where you came from. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. and it's getting close to crunch time for some big names at the open championship? it certainly is.
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i have a bit of a working theory about the golf today, you have to bear with me. if you have "wood" in your name... things are going your way at royal portrush. if you have "woods", not so much. gary wootton, chris wood and tiger woods are all heading home because they were miss the cut. but lee westwood and tommy fleetwood, well, they‘ re dreaming of the claretjug. let's head to the course now and join adam wild. adam, all these players being put into the shade by shane lowry. yes, it is certainly a theory, we will see how that pans out. shane lowry, currently the leader, the irish causing huge cheers around this course, we can hear it right across the royal portrush. he is going like a train, he started with
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three birdies early on in his round, he is currently ten under par, he is the only one of the top players on the only one of the top players on the leaderboard who is still out on the leaderboard who is still out on the course. he still has another five holes to play, but is already six underfor the five holes to play, but is already six under for the day. five holes to play, but is already six underfor the day. behind him, jb holmes is still right up there, he was the overnight leader going into the day, and he is well in contention after a three under round today. behind him, and here comes your wood players, tommy fleetwood had a spectacular round today, four or under parfor had a spectacular round today, four orunder parfor him, had a spectacular round today, four or under parfor him, so he is three shots off the lead. as is lee westwood, what a story this could be. this is his 25th consecutive open, his 82nd major championship in all. he has never won, could this year be the year? it could be an extraordinary tale. other players who it isn't going well for, tiger woods, he is almost certainly going to have the weekend off. he did better than yesterday at one under, but he will still not make the cut.
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rory mcilroy going much better than he was yesterday, he had a birdie on the hole behind me, the third, he is one under but looking very doubtful to make it to the weekend. thank you, adam. england's world cup winning cricket captain, eoin morgan, says he's not sure if he'll still be in the role by the time the next tournament comes around in four years time. he's been england's limited overs captain since 2015, and has been a key part of the team's transformation in that time. morgan says the world cup win has made him think about his future. i don't think i'm in a good state to make a decision at the moment, simply for the fact that i haven't had a chance to get away from the and craze of winning the world cup. i haven't been able to get into a logical mindset and ask myself a couple questions about it. four uses a big commitment to commit toa50 four uses a big commitment to commit to a 50 over world cup, the t20 world cup next year is probably more realistic. even then, i have battled
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my way through this year's world cup it has taken a lot out of me mentally and physically, once everything comes down over the next couple of months, i will hopefully come to a decision. at the forefront of that will be my family and the team. steve bruce has admitted he's not everyone's cup of tea in his first opportunity to respond to the reaction to his appointment as newcastle boss. bruce also revealed that he took the job despite his friend and club legend alan shearer‘s advice not to, but insists he's quietly confident he'll do well at st james park. fans greeted the club's decision to replace rafa benitez with bruce by protesting, and calling the appointment unambitious. the former sunderland boss has signed a three year deal. and tom daley has the chance to defend his 10 metre platform world title tomorrow. he's through to the semifinal along with fellow briton noah williams at the world championships. that also means they secure two spots in the event at the tokyo olympics. it's a big day for geraint thomas at the tour de france. he's expected to take
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a good chunk of time off the leaderjulien allaphillipe in the time trial. he is under way and has been for about 15 minutes or so. you can follow it on the bbc sport website and app. that's all the sport for now. the bbc and itv have revealed more details about their plans for a joint video streaming service. britbox will cost customers £5.99 a month and be launched towards the end of the year. it's being seen as a uk rival to established services such as netflix, which this week saw its share price fall after a slowdown in subscriber growth. here's our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. gavin and stacey, helping the bbc and itv begin their new online life together. congratulations. tidy. come here. you just got married. that is disgusting. the intention is for britbox to be seen as the streaming home for quality british programming. leave it out!
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past shows like the office are expected to help convince viewers to subscribe to what is a significant and not entirely risk—free venture for britain's two biggest broadcasters. we are in potentially traumatic times, but they are exciting times, with the merger. things move fast. have you got a fire extinguisher? there is, of course, a huge appetite for british programming, but even with hit shows like happy valley on—board, the future isn't guaranteed to be 100% for britbox. nice glasses. you look nice. dol? it is going to be a challenge to compete with streaming giant netflix, which already has 11.5 million uk subscribers. it is popular with viewers because of its programming and it's easy—to—use interface. netflix has spent 5.5 billion on its user experience
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and that is why it is the best in the market and has the best compression algorithms and things download faster and it is why their suggestions work so well. whereas britbox will be on the itv hub stack, which works pretty well for a free service, but if you are paying £5.99 per month, you are going to be comparing it with netflix and the experience will not be as seamless. on top of that, the likes of disney will soon be launching their own service, with spin offs from their popular star wars and marvel universes, and the likes of stephen spielberg and oprah winfrey are involved in apple's new service. so, soon, several platforms will be looking for subscribers, with few able to afford them all. the service launches at the end of the year, aiming to showcase the very best of british, from broad church to love island. i'm sorry, i really am. but like so many other landscapes,
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the media world too is ever—changing and highly competitive. so while the bbc and itv are coupled up for now, who knows whether they will be together forever? a new campaign is being launched by the rnli to prevent drivers becoming stranded on holy island's causeway in northumberland, as rescues are on the rise. merchandise — including new posters — will be given to tourism businesses in the latest attempt to stop people risking their lives. there've already been ten rescues this year. steph cleasby reports. these people had to be rescued from the roof of their car the beautiful scenery is attracting many visitors, but catching people out. these people had to be rescued from the roof of their car when they became trapped by the tide on the causeway. one of many incidents over recent yea rs. despite numerous warnings alerting drivers to the dangers, the number of vehicles getting caught out by the tide
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has increased. there were 12 rescues last year and have already been ten this year, and before the school holidays have started. this year, we know ten people have got stuck, or ten incidents of vehicles being stranded by the water. and it has steadily increased over the years. that is due to tourist population, levels going up for the area, it is an amazing spot in northumberland. to get the message across to visitors, new posters will be shared with local businesses and holiday parks. we are looking at different approaches, empowering the communities — bars, restaurants, to deliver those messages, life—saving messages, that the tide does cross the causeway and it is in effect visiting the beautiful places around holy island. visitors to holy island today were leaving in good time. i did not know that we have to look at the tide. i checked this morning, oh!
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so we left in a bit of a hurry this morning to get here. making sure you leave in plenty of time? we are leaving now because we don't want to swim home. you would feel awfully silly if you got stuck in your car with water up to here, wouldn't you? so, why not have the campaign. a good idea. we have left an extra half—an—hour. we are rushing because we know what time it is and we thought everyone is going at the same time so we would leave a bit earlier. the rnli wants people to stop risking their lives by getting stranded on the causeway and instead pay attention to tide times. the time now is 2.18 in the afternoon. today we have until 2.45 to safely cross. so, it is time to make a move. some breaking news to bring you, the
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founder of the pro—brexit campaign group believe has won back his appeal against a £20,000 fine which was imposed by the election's regulator. darren grimes was fined by the electoral commission last year after being accused of breaching spending rules during the eu referendum in 2016. darren grimes set up the believe group as a youth focused campaign group and they did their political great at —— political work at the headquarters of the official brexit campaign vote leave. he has won his appeal against a £20,000 fine and the electoral commission have expressed their disappointment in the decision. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to cambridge where amanda goodman joins us from look east to tell us more
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about the crash in stevenage that left 17 people injured, some of them seriously. and amy cole from midlands today is in birmingham to tell us about a scheme to increase literacy across the region. so first let's hear from amanda, who has more on the collision last night in hertfordshire at a late night car rally, where young people meet to race souped up vehicles. 17 people injured, amanda? yes, incredible number, we know that two of them are seriously hurt after last night's so—called kroos meet in steve na g e. last night's so—called kroos meet in stevenage. after two of the cars collided and ploughed into a crowd of young people. it is thought one of young people. it is thought one of the vehicles was travelling at at least 60 or 70 mph when it struck another car pulling out. eyewitnesses say happened in a split second and sent a number of young people flying. some of them landed motionless on the road where they remained until paramedics could get
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to the scene. they are being treated at three separate hospitals in the area, and it is known that at least two of them have serious injuries. kieran o'connor was one of those who saw what happened. they were harmlessly looking at cars. this is the thing, i think a lot of it gets bad press, specially from what has happened now, in terms of what they are doing, and it is harmless natured, looking at different cars. it isn't my cup of tea, but they look at different cars, and meet up and chat, normally you get about 50-60 and chat, normally you get about 50—60 people there. last night, there was a lot more because they we re there was a lot more because they were doing some awareness for something. obviously, what happened was awful. they are fairly regular, they go pretty much once a week or in different locations, but where it actually happened, it is a small location, so... it wasjust unfortunate. it is obviously a terrible accident, what has happened, and the car veered off and crashed into kids on the road. on the other side, the slower cars got
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into the outside as well and injured a few people, but it was pretty horrific. everyone was standing around, trying to help. i am not first aid trained, didn't want to touch anyone or get involved. you could see a lot of kids on the road to stress, in agony, who had been run overand injured, to stress, in agony, who had been run over and injured, so to stress, in agony, who had been run overand injured, so it to stress, in agony, who had been run over and injured, so it was quite shocking. it was a shock, you get there and see it and it is like, well, what is going on? it was quite horrific. local people say these are cruise meet 5 horrific. local people say these are cruise meets are a real problem. young people meet late at night to show off their souped up cars, but it often ends up with them racing along single or dual carriageway is among crowds of onlookers. this one was meant to be a static event but ended up with speeding on nearby roads. one local man who didn't want to be identified said her daughter could have been killed when her car was struck by a speeding vehicle from one of these events just a few weeks ago. on the 30th ofjune, my
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daughter was travelling to work at 9:45pm, and one of these lads coming to one of these meetings wrote her off on her side of the road, and he hit her head on, and her face is now scarred and her wrist badly injured and they took at a hospital. these meats over stevenage and they took at a hospital. these meats over steve nage have and they took at a hospital. these meats over stevenage have been going on for several years, on and off, and if they leave here and it stops here, they will set up somewhere else, because that is what has been happening over the last few years. it has been well known that one of the main roads was used as a racetrack for quite some time, and it has really got to stop. if something had been done on the 30th ofjune, something had been done on the 30th of june, maybe this something had been done on the 30th ofjune, maybe this wouldn't have happened either. many people have taken to social media saying that the police need to do more and crack down on the such events. one woman told look east she saw a near miss
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at the very same spot only a week ago and that she did tell police. it seems that hertfordshire police had no idea last night's event was even happening. we were not aware of this large gathering last night and what we knew, and any intelligence, that will form part of our investigation. it was widely advertised on facebook, should you not have been aware of it? sometimes, what is on facebook, we are not always made aware of, and we will review what took place. the police are urging people who may have footage of the crash to get in touch and they say they are reviewing their policing of these meats. meanwhile, one of the organisers of last night told the bbc that it was meant to be stationary and some drivers just went rogue. he says they will not be organising any events again, but the local council aren't taking any chances, they were national legislation to ensure these events are licensed, so that crowd control can be monitored. until then, they
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are seeking an emergency injunction, effectively banning all further cruise meets events. thank you, amanda. let's speak to amy now, tell us about the initiative happening in stoke—on—trent to increase the amount of children who need help with literacy? this is a fascinating scheme, making such a difference in stoke—on—trent. i met a lady called emma who is known as a reading champion, she is part of the stokes beats out initiative. she is in charge of the library van, where she reads stories to young children and introduces them to books. —— stoke speaks out initiative. she goes to 42 schools across some of the city's most deprived areas. the idea is to encourage pa rents most deprived areas. the idea is to encourage parents to sign up and use their local libraries. what do these
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communication champion is doing a turn up to these places? the communication champions are slightly different, i met a lady called shirley who runs workshops, trying to help parents find that balance between developing their children's language skills and also using gadgets wisely. she showed them this short video clip of a child interacting with its mother while using a smartphone, and then the difference when they are both on a gadget each, and there is no interaction at all. we find that if we teach them at a younger age, the younger we can talk to these parents with their children, the children then get used to be a way of doing it, so if we can talk to them by the time they are two or three, and that routine is in place, children learn the balance between having fun with this or going out and doing that, or exploring with this, but then i have saturday afternoon or ten minutes a day, i get my tablet, that is the norm for them. i was keen to find out what the parents and those workshops found about that, and how
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long they spend using those gadgets with their kids. i would say about half an hour before, we turn anything off, had a chill out, read anything off, had a chill out, read a book, and then put them to bed. but when she said two hours, i was like, wow, two hours is longer than i originally thought. from now on, we will start trying to increase it a little bit more. they do it -- they have access to their own tablets, but 45 minutes after their reading and everything is done every day, and then they can have it for an houron the day, and then they can have it for an hour on the weekend. but that is all that they are limited to. amy, this scheme has been going for quite a while, but it is now getting backing from the department for education? yes, it was initially set up education? yes, it was initially set up by education? yes, it was initially set up by the city council in stoke—on—trent, but it is a sign of success at central governorate have now stepped in to continue the funding, that is because they have managed to narrow the gap of the number of children with those low literacy levels. —— central
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government have stepped in. it is a scheme that has to constantly evolve and adapt to new challenges. some of it is around building their vocabulary, and something now recognised is the wide gap, where children with less vocabulary don't go long—term with their learning, so we are trying to address that through teaching teachers how to enhance that vocabulary, making sure that skills and settings are enhancing their vocabulary, and offering parent workshops alongside dutch so that there is a home learning environment alongside that. stoke—on—trent is a city committed to language and learning, and it makes you think twice about how long you spend on your tablet. oh, i am a lwa ys you spend on your tablet. oh, i am always moaning myself. amy, thank you very much in birmingham, and amanda in cambridge, thank you both for taking us nationwide. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can find them on the bbc iplayer. a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm on afternoon
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life. —— afternoon live. jamie is here — in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for a pay rise — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit. two men plead guilty to public order offences against the mp anna soubry outside parliament earlier this year. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the amount the government borrowed injune was the highest it's been in that month since 2015. these are official government figures and they showed public sector borrowing at £7.2 billion, that's up from £3.3 billion injune 2018 and higher than all the forecasts in a poll of economists by reuters. britain's largest supermarket, tesco, has increased the price of more than 1,000 products in the past two weeks.
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the firm raised prices on products including cheese, chocolate and bananas by an average of 11%. tesco says it held off raising prices for as long as it could, and insists it is still competitive when compared to asda, sainsbury‘s and morrisons. the world's biggest plane—maker boeing is setting aside almost £4 billion to compensate airlines for the grounding of the 737 max. the aircraft was withdrawn from service worldwide in march after two crashes, in indonesia and ethiopia, in the space of five months. 346 people were killed. so jamie what have been the big stories today? the petrol prices are up, at the highest level they have been since 2014. the interesting thing, the oil prices are going on a different direction. another interesting commodity, gold is the highest it has been since 2012, no, 2013. it
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went through a lull for a long time and stayed down, and in the last six months it has moved up and moving quite sharply at the moment. boeing, you just heard the story about them writing off a £4 billion in order to compensate airlines, and the pound at the moment, good news for the pound, good news for holiday—makers, it has just pound, good news for holiday—makers, it hasjust gone pound, good news for holiday—makers, it has just gone up. bad news pound, good news for holiday—makers, it hasjust gone up. bad news is it has only gone up to the level it was at about one week ago. nothing to get too excited about the stop we can talk to simon about that, chief market strategist in new york. should we be interested in the pound? should we be interested in the pound ? it doesn't should we be interested in the pound? it doesn't seem to change that much, even though it was better thanit that much, even though it was better than it was this week. that is the point, it is moderately better, everybody liked the news yesterday about them being unable to close parliament during the brexit period. investors like that, but i think they recognise there are a lot more problems or potential problems between now and the end of october.
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they are being cautious and i think thatis they are being cautious and i think that is why the pound is stable, rather than soaring dramatically at this point. it is unlikely to change in the next few weeks, people are waiting to see what the new prime minister is going to do initially, but they are really going to be waiting to see what happens in september when parliament comes back. is bowing in serious trouble? i think it is poor timing from their perspective. —— boeing. the fact that this is coming at the end of an economic cycle, when there are a lot of global indicators, travel is turning down, that could be an issue for them going out. i think maybe, things could be a bit of a problem for them over the next few months. 0k, for them over the next few months. ok, and oiland for them over the next few months. ok, and oil and coal, oil prices coming down, that suggests to me a general feeling that the economy around the world is slowing. oil going up,... i'm getting my commodities going up, gold going up, thatis commodities going up, gold going up, that is a bit of a disaster investment, isn't it? that is what
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you invest in whenever thing is going really badly. absolutely, the oil stories are straightforward, despite the fact that we have had all the trouble and this tells you a great deal about slowing global demand. the gold price, that is a reaction to what people think central banks are going to do to deal with the slowdown in the economy. they think they will put more money into the system and there is more money in the system, hard assets like gold go up. so, slowing economy, central banks will make money easier, that is the key story there. ok, by gold! thank you very much, simon. always a sign of panic, by gold. it is the old—fashioned way, it is very primitive, it went out of fashion for so long, we have so many sophisticated ways to invest and hedging against problems. when you have gold, it is almost a last resort investment, when everything has gone, you was —— ask yourself, what will i invest in? you buy gold.
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nothing is as nice as gold. i say it like i have some! less of a look at the markets, that isjust like i have some! less of a look at the markets, that is just how the euro looks, the ftse has not moved very much, the other markets not moving a huge amount. the pound against the euro is probably the most interesting one to watch, that reflects what is going on in brexit, i'm afraid, that old story, but it is still relevant. the gift that keeps giving. jamie, thank you. up next, the bbc news at 5pm. now it's time for a look at the weather. the weekend is a must upon us, how they weather fair? on saturday, the weekend is a must upon us, how they weatherfair? on saturday, most of us should be drier and a touch more about the time you get to sunday. through the rest of this evening, we have outbreaks of rain in northern ireland and scotland. england and wales sing some rain,
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pushing eastward, could be some thunder during the early hours of the morning. temperature sitting in the morning. temperature sitting in the mid teens overnight, so to start saturday morning, persistent rain in the south—east, that should clear away and then we are left in the theme of sunny spells and scattered showers. most of the spells for eastern scotland and england, razz further west, you're more likely to stay dry. some spells of sunshine, temperatures around 18—25. through the day on sunday, a drier start, some long spans of sunshine, cloud and rain, and an increasing wind pushing into northern ireland and western scotland. towards the south—east, highs of around 25 degrees. by buy.
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today at five — a pay rise above inflation for hundreds of thousands of public sector workers. the armed forces, teachers and police officers are among those in line for higher pay — it's one of theresa may's last big decisions as prime minister. i think we are seeing at the end of austerity. spending beginning to rise. that said, this is not an extremely generous offer. the chancellor philip hammond refuses to rule out trying to bring down a borisjohnson government if it pushes for a no—deal brexit.

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