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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  July 18, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. mp's have approved a measure that would prevent the next british prime minister from suspending parliament, to force through a no—deal brexit. the number of conservatives that defied the government whip will alarm borisjohnson. those who abstained, included four cabinet ministers. a no—deal brexit will shrink the uk economy by 2%, says the office for budget responsibility, that would plunge the uk into recession throughout 2020. at a fiery rally in north carolina, donald trump's supporters shout a new, divisive chant "send her back." now he is trying to distance himself from it. i disagree with it.
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also on the programme: president trump was directly involved in talks that led to the illegal payments to stormy daniels — according to unsealed court documents. and burger that. the patty without any meat at all. could you tell the difference? hello, i am katty kay in washington, christian fraser is in london. we are leaving the eu on october 31st "do or die" says the man many expect to be the prime minister this time next week. borisjohnson is not wholly in favour of suspending parliament to force through a no—deal brexit but neither has he ruled it out. and so today parliament moved to stop him, before he even takes office. the mps voted on an amendment to the northern ireland bill. the change they forced through, requires parliament to sit and debate progress on restoring devolved government to northern ireland.
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in theory it prevents parliament from being suspended through october. i7 tory rebels backed the amendment. a further 30 — six of them cabinet ministers — including philip hammond, david gauke, and greg clark abstained. the ayes to the right, 315. the noes to the left, 274. so the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock. the government was defeated by 41 votes. that result came on the back of a warning today from the independent office for budget responsibility that in the event of a no—deal brexit — and without any considerable disruption at the british ports — the uk economy will shrink by 2%, and slip into recession next year. here's the chancellor phillip hammond. i greatly fear the impact on our economy and our public finances of the kind of no—deal brexit that is realistically being discussed now.
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the two men fighting to succeed theresa may — borisjohnson and jeremy hunt — accept it will be bumpy in the event of a no—deal brexit. but both candidates believe the uk will recover quickly. mr hunt warned that if the eu were not willing to compromise on britain's exit, and were seen to be forcing the uk into no deal, the relationship could be damaged for a generation. no deal for us would also be political, we would have european neighbours that had deliberately chosen to make the uk poorer. and that would change and harden british attitudes to europe for a generation. to discuss today's amendment let's speak now to hannah white, a constitutional expert from the institute for government, who joins us from westminster. can we do at the technical stuff first. does this definitive. boris johnson from suspending parliament? it does not. i think that there were a couple of things that could happen
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that could mean, if he chose to, he could still prorogue parliament, despite these amendments. these amendments have been attached to a bill about northern ireland, should the power—sharing executive beauty established in the meantime there would be no need for the government toissue would be no need for the government to issue these updates —— should the power—sharing initiative be re—established. if he were to try to prorogue parliament less than two weeks before the end of october the fortnightly reports, the first one would not happen before the end of october. there are various holes in it but what's more important is the political signal it sends, parliament saying to the prospective new prime minister do not think you can take parliament out of the picture at this crucial time. there have been several votes that have been very easily split and hard to tell what parliamentarians want
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and do not want but it seems on the issue of having their democratically elected body suspended in order to get a no—deal brexit through, parliament is pretty clear about what it wants and does not want. i think that is right and that significant, and you think about what sirjohn major has said, if the prime minister tried to ask the queen to prorogue parliament, he would ask the courts if that was legitimate advice and the courts would take into account all the indications from parliament about what they thought would be happening at the end of october and i think this vote would be taken into account as an indication that parliament would like to be sitting at the end of october. there were questions in the house today as to whether the new prime minister could get in there quickly and stop this bill before it gets royal assent, would that be possible? that would be very difficult now, i think. the house of lords has to finish off the process of ping—pong
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because there was one final amendment to amendments, and they have to sign that off. at that point, the process of royal assent is pretty automatic. again, the political signal that it would send for a new prime minister, just in office, to try to intervene and say lam planning office, to try to intervene and say i am planning to suspend representative democracy as my first act, i think that would be very difficult for him to contemplate doing. hannah, thank you very much. there is no sign the eu is prepared to bend on the deal agreed, some of the key figures on the european side had been speaking to the bbc, michel barnier said the existing agreement was the only way to leave the eu in an orderly manner. this document is the only way to leave the eu in an orderly manner. if we just tore up the membership
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card? the uk will have to face the consequences. let's speak to michael birnbaum, brussels bureau chief for the washington post, and anne mcelvoy — senior editor at the economist — whojoins me now. let me start with you, and, i know you've just interviewed the former german finance minister and you've been talking about what might happen in the summer, what are his thoughts? that's an interview for an upcoming documentary so i'm public not going to delve into that, you will have to listen to the radio four documentary. the background to this is germany and france are i think getting serious about the fact no deal might happen. you could say they've been saying all along, if that's going to happen it's up to you, that is your fault, great britain, for not getting more serious about this earlier. i think it's beginning to dawn, particularly in berlin, was my impression, you
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either are therefore have to say we will also take the damage or you would be looking at the very small changes that you might be able to offer. michel barnier telling panorama that withdrawal agreement is the way forward but clearly something would have to move, otherwise everyone will have to accept the consequences of no deal and how that plays out for the irish economy in particular is important so economy in particular is important soi economy in particular is important so i imagine we will hear more on that. michael, the new european commission president who takes over in november, after the event slightly, she said she was open to extension. there will be discussions through the summer and if they do not make progress there is a fear may be attitudes might have hardened by the sist attitudes might have hardened by the 31st of october. that's right, among some european leaders attitudes are already hardening and a couple of the last summits with brexit, emmanuel macron
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really holding out a very hard line about extending. i spoke to the flat here, more and more, they look at the situation in london and they say we want to get this over with, we don't see much movement on the british side, we would be happy, we would be much happier to have some sort of deal but there is a lot of worry you will wind up with red lines and demands from london that the europeans simply cannot give. michael, it's interesting to get an american‘s perspective on what's happening in britain and the european relationship. i was in the uk last week and heard several times for people who voted for remain, the trouble is that europeans have given isa trouble is that europeans have given is a tough deal, they got everything they want in the withdrawal agreement, that's not what you are hearing from eu officials? that's not at all how europeans would put it, that's not terribly surprising. the way many people in
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brussels... specifically what do they feel they gave? they feel they gave a lot on the idea that britain could remain ina the idea that britain could remain in a type of customs union, which is precisely what. .. this in a type of customs union, which is precisely what... this is the backstop, the thing that as it off conservative politicians in london. the europeans themselves are a little uncomfortable with the idea of half in, half out of britain. they say they made that concession to allow northern ireland to stay in the same custom zone as britain but to allow, enable their own trading rules to remain in place. they also say fundamentally, if you take the red lines from both sides, the europeans and the british, and you do arithmetic, the outcome is the withdrawal deal. there's not a lot
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of wiggle room, given the demands on both sides. essentially, there is not much room for real negotiation, just some symbolic gestures, which they seem ready to give nowt but it is symbolism. at the moment we are involved in an exercise. i wanted to play the jeremy hunt clip, we still —— he is saying we are not going to come crawling on our knees. it seems to me the other side of no deal, we could go into a deep freeze in this relationship, the dark ages between the eu and the uk. i think that's absolutely right. that's the risk and it was interesting hearing that narrative very well explained, from brussels, the problem with that as it does not solve the problem. it's what the
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germans call guilt and blame, you can do that game but at some point you would be left with the consequences. you would be left with the consequences. the eu said they were going to protect the interests of ireland but no deal absolutely does not do that. if i could see a glimmerofa way not do that. if i could see a glimmer of a way forward, you would say you cannot take away from the withdrawal deal, at that point was well made by the previous speaker. it's like those messy recipes, you could always add to it, perhaps add to it, and that i think is where jeremy hunt is alluding to. boris johnson does not speak in those terms because he is about do or die at the moment. as the deadline gets closer, i think you will either want to pass the blame back to the eu which is diminishing returns for all involved, or to show there are small
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amounts of flexibility which come with imagination, could be used. that's the question, what will be mood be between france, germany and britain as we go into the early autumn? right now we are simply stuck but it does not benefit anyone. we live in interesting times. i am grateful to you both for your contributions. it turns out, boris johnson has been kippered twice today, once by parliament and once by the european commission. he said this yesterday abbott fishermen in the isle of man. after decades of sending keepers like this through the post, he has had his costs massively increased by brussels' bureaucrats who have insisted that each kipper must be accompanied by a this, a plastic ice pillow. pointless, pointless, expensive, environmentally damaging, health and safety. it turns out in fact there is no eu
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requirement to supply smoked kippers with ice pillows. the only requirement, let me get this right, is to supply food to consumers in a way that ensures it is fit to eat, which i would guess we are all in favour of. it turns out british fishermen introduced the ice pillows because with these you can get listeria with smoked products so it arrives healthier with the ice pillow. very good rule, particularly if you enjoy smoked kippers, which i do. they are good for you. not so good, it turns out, for boris johnson. why does borisjohnson suffer at all from getting basic facts wrong? there is a cross over here because someone there is a cross over here because someone else closer to it you who does not really care about that. the problem is this has been a trend right through the past a0 years, british politicians have talked about straight bananas, condoms that
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are too long, smoked fish, and they are too long, smoked fish, and they are not always based on fact. we live in the post truth age and the reality is to borisjohnson's supporters, they remember him holding up the fish last night, it isa holding up the fish last night, it is a good laugh, another dig at the eu, but it's not actually based on fa ct. eu, but it's not actually based on fact. and does it matter? no, it probably doesn't, not to supporters. but of course it does actually matter in terms of policy and knowing your details. you mention someone closer to the side of the pond. greenville north carolina is a sea of blue in a red state. it voted convincingly for hillary clinton in the 2016 election. yet last night, greenville, became the fiery symbol of donald trump's nativist politics. 8000 trump supporters joined the president in attacking four democratic congresswomen of colour. one by one he named them — ilhan omar, rashida tlaib,
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alexandria ocasio cortez and ayanna presley. criticising them as anti—american. he was the ringleader but it was the crowd that responded, en masse, with the raucous chant of "send her back." omar has a history of launching vicious anti—semitic screeds. crowd chant "send her back." a short time ago president trump tried to distance himself from that chant. i was not happy with it. i disagree with it. again, i did not say that, they did. i disagree with it. earlier in the day the president we did something quite different in tone. here's what he said. joining me now is the
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washington bureau chief for usa today, susan page. does the president perhaps feel he has gone too far? i don't know how he feels but i think he was told that. vice president mike pence met with republican congressional leaders who largely stayed silent over supportive of the president but they told him they were uncomfortable, it puts the republican party in the difficult situation and it's widely seen as a difficult situation and it's widely seen as a racist chant, long history in the united states of saying, go back to where you came from. you saw him insist to reporters he tried to speak quickly to cut off the chant but unfortunately for the present, the video shows he waited may be 12 or 13 seconds before speaking. and he did nothing to quell the crowd and he seemed to be nodding along. the theory for the republican leadership was this cannot be the lock her up of 2020.
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right, because there is a clear racial overtone. we had polling on monday and tuesday in which 68% of americans say this was offensive, his tweets saying she should go back —— could go back where she came from, all four could go back where they came from. 59% said it was un—american. those results may have some impact on republicans who worry where the party, how the party is going to be painted if this becomes a feature of every donald trump rally. what he said was deliberate because he was looking at the teleprompter. it was written down. there has been a deliberate choice to focus on these four women, stoke racial tensions over and above talking about the economy. he's taken some delight in it over the past few days. on sunday when his initial tweets come out, sometimes he tweets and backs off but he repeated this with some
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energy on monday in talking to reporters, in describing it as something that's helpful politically. he is uniting the democratic party behind these four congresswomen and he is making them the face of the democratic party and they are the most outspoken, most liberal voices in the party. they've been extremely critical of him and at some point is critical even of their own leadership, for not doing enough to stand up to him. it is dangerous because we saw last night, whatever he says, they are enthralled, the crowd, and they are used to this because there has a lwa ys used to this because there has always been chanting at this rally is, in 2016 and beyond, they seem to almost revel in the freedom to be able to express his opinions. that's what i find most disturbing. he is always talk about, from the beginning, his unwillingness to be politically correct. in our polling we found republicans by more than 221, said he agreed with his tweets
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and that's one reason we've seen congressional republicans where they do not want to split with the president and annoy their base. on the other hand, they believe this is a dangerous place for the republican party to be. i guess one question will be how does donald trump at future rallies now handle these four democratic congresswomen who he will like to be the face of the party. those crowns get raucous, we've been to those rallies, they get wild, and they will want to chant. is he going to be able to invoke ilhan omar without them shouting, send her back? that will be interesting balance he has to do or does he have to drop altogether those four names because that will precipitate that chant which the republicans have told them they cannot have the symbol of their election campaign. going back to the polling susan was talking about, 68% think his tweets
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we re talking about, 68% think his tweets were offensive, 59% think it was un—american. there's been lots written in the past week about the way the electorate is changing in america. it might work for this election but into the future the electorate is changing, the racial make—up of the electorate is changing and it is stacked against the republicans if they attach themselves to this. 20aa is the year census builders think america becomes a minority white country. all of the groups that are growing, latino groups, african—american groups, asian american groups, non—white groups, they are the growing groups, the republican party at the moment is largely getting support from white people, that is the group proportionally shrinking, that does not bode well for the party's future. more on donald trump.
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sick mr coburn, serving a three—year prison term for campaign finance violations is alleged of making... karen mcdougall also alleged she had affair with donald trump. maybe you can tell us why they have been unsealed and why it significant. as i understand that, donald trump was never mentioned in court, there was always someone called, i don't know, suspects a. now we have documents that seem to point directly at the president. it's a very good question. the first question about why the judge ordered these to be released to the public,
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some of which were still redacted as he felt it was a subject of national importance that the issue of campaign finance law violations was something the public should be made aware of and the second part of the question is something people are upset about because the southern district of new york that was prosecuting this case against michael cohen openly stated the investigation is over but now we see evidence corroborating what we already really knew what was that individual one, donald trump, who michael cohen alluded to in his guilty plea, he made this illegal campaign contribution at the behest and direction of donald trump. what we're seeing today is evidenced that corroborates that and evidence that implicates hope hicks. people are wondering why there was no move forward on the criminal prosecution forward on the criminal prosecution for these other individuals.
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i guess part of the answer to that is, as we know from the issue of the robert mueller report, is the department ofjustice's robert mueller report, is the department of justice's and robert mueller report, is the department ofjustice's and standard isa department ofjustice's and standard is a sitting president cannot be indicted, that is their belief. in a sense what does this matter to donald trump, he's not going to be indicted for this. michael cohen is the one in prison, he is in the white house, so does it matter to him? that's exactly right in the white house came out with a statement saying they are very pleased with the outcome of this investigation, essentially sort of pulling a robert mueller report, just because there was no charges, they are manipulating that into saying it's an exoneration. it is not exoneration, it's evidence of a conspiracy to commit a crime. as you rightly noted, there is a department ofjustice guideline... where he to stopping president in
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2020, the might change. that is exactly right. you will have to look into the statute of limitations on the type of crimes but there is a scenario, if the statute of limitations has not run out and he does not win in 2020, he could be indicted. it sounds like the southern district is dropping this case altogether. thank you very much indeed. jeffrey epstein will go to prison to await his trial, he will not be at home under house arrest. that was another case that was decided today. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. iran's revolutionary guard claims to have seized a foreign tanker it says has been smuggling oil in the strait of hormuz. it was carrying a crew of 12 people on board. two the 50th anniversary of the first apollo landing we visit the radio in rural australia that picked
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up radio in rural australia that picked up and transmitted those images of neil armstrong taking his first steps on the moon. that's still to come. good evening. thursday brought sunny spells and scattered heavy showers. temperatures in the south reaching the mid 20s but with the heavy showers are scenes like this in aberdeenshire earlier on. big shower clouds, blue sky in between. through this evening and tonight we keep some clear spells and showers. showers in the north tend to dry away overnight. our attention turned to the south—west as the next batch of heavy rainfall which is south—west of england on friday morning. elsewhere cooler and fresher than recent nights. here is the area of low pressure for our weather on friday. moving into the south—west of the uk and pushing northwards and eastwards. heavy
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bursts, particularly for south wales through the morning and southern parts of england. rainfall pushing across the midlands and into southern scotland. some of the showers could be quite heavy and thundery, particularly on the southern side of the main rain band. further heavy showers pushing in across the channel islands, south—west of england and wales, nowhere immune to showers. still some heavy rain lingering for northern ireland and the southern half of scotland where there could bea half of scotland where there could be a rumble of thunder during friday afternoon. northern scotland with the best of the dry weather. we will keep the fairly showery and at times thundery theme into friday evening. showery rain over the next few days is likely to affect the golf at royal portrush. persistent rain at times on friday but things are looking drierfor times on friday but things are looking drier for saturday. times on friday but things are looking drierfor saturday. here is the low pressure gradually pushing eastwards through friday and into
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saturday. weather fronts not far away to start the weekend. blame for east anglia and the south—east first thing that should clear. we are all in the theme of danny police—mac —— sunny spells and scattered showers. most of the showers across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland looking slightly drier as a ridge of high pressure moves in from the west. temperatures a touch warmer than friday. sunday looks slightly drier day of the weekend for most. showers for the north west. temperatures on the rise, in the south in particular, on into next week. goodbye.
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this is beyond 100 days, with me katty kay in washington. christian fraser is in london. our top stories: british mps back a bid to stop a new prime minister suspending parliament to force through a no—deal brexit. president trump sparks condemnation after supporters at a rally chant "send her back!" referring to a somali—born us lawmaker. coming up in the next half hour: iran's revolutionary guard say they've seized a foreign tanker accused of smuggling oil, with a crew of 12 on board. plus — how a telescope in rural australia, helped to bring those famous images of man's first steps on the moon to the world.
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donald trump appears to be trying to turn down the attacks against four democratic congresswoman. in north carolina, his supporters chanted to send her back, referring to the somali born lawmaker ian hanh omar who is an american citizen. he accused her along with herfellow congresswomen of hating america. some say the chance echoed the lock herup some say the chance echoed the lock her up chance referring to hilary hinton. perhaps, but last nights chance... let's bring in former advisor to george w bush, ron christie.
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i deeply disagree with the extreme left and are disgusted with their tone... what say you? good evening. i agree with him 100%. i don't agree with hardly anything ilhan omar has to say, but is she not the embodiment of the american dream? someone who made it to the united states, became a citizen and she was elected to the united states congress. the disrespect that is being shown to this particular member of congress is galling. you can politely disagree with someone's politics but saying those sort of thing is particularly at a rally where the president should have said, stop, enough, we are better than that, the fa ct enough, we are better than that, the fact he didn't is quite revealing. what do you make of his comments when it comes out and says, i didn't
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like it, i didn'tjoin in the chance, indeed i try to talk quickly to shut them up. susan page she said there were 12 and 13 seconds where she stands and listens. is he being told he has to try and quench this, nip this in the bud? 100%. i would say this to you, i have no doubt whatsoever that either the vice president or someone at a high level went to the president and said, you've got to knock this stuff. there are reports here that the vice president had breakfast with members of congress and they told him, enough is enough, you had to tell him this is not acceptable behaviour, so my sense is the president at the time didn't think there was anything wrong and the cooler heads and the wiser heads had gone to him and said, this racist type of endorsement of that behaviour is not conducive to your office. interesting you use the word racist because have a listen to lindsey graham, who said this.
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no, i don't think it's racist to say, was it racist to say, love it or leave it? i don't think a somali refugee embracing trump would not have been asked to go back. if you're a racist, you want everybody from somalia to go back because they're black or they're muslim. that's not what this is about to me. but you are calling it, you are saying that is racist. i know what a dog whistle looks like and i know what a dog whistle sounds like. you can't tell me that saying, send her back, means anything other than take this black woman and send her back to somalia and we know how president trump has referred to somalia. the notion that this isn't racist, just an innocent child, we all know that isn't true. let's see whether they can manage to control those crowds and to clarify, the government put ‘s own office of employment does classify the term sent her back as
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something that is not lawful under american employment law. it is seen as something that is biased and racist and prejudiced, so that is not just ron christie, racist and prejudiced, so that is notjust ron christie, that is critics of the president saying that. iran's revolutionary guard say they have seized a foreign tanker accused of smuggling oil, with a crew of 12 on board. the iranians it was transferring one million litres of fuel from iranian smugglers to foreign customers. the iranians have not yet identified the ship or its owners, but iranian television have broadcast footage that suggests the ship was a panamanian—flagged vessel that went missing on 1ajuly. we're joined now by barbara leaf. she was the former american ambassadorfor the she was the former american ambassador for the uae. did she was the former american ambassadorfor the uae. did the americans rescued the ship or did they seize it? the iranians. well,
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it seems a transparent attempt to do some equalisation with the iranians tanker that was seized and bordered by the uk marines last week off gibraltar. there was an effort to portray this originally the iranians said on tuesday that they had helped a tanker in distress, identifying this and a few days later it is termed a smuggling vessel. this is a little bit of parallelism. you were ambassador to the uae, what does it do to relations between the uae and iran? what kind of retribution might there be? how does the uae respond? ido there be? how does the uae respond? i do not think it is an issue of the uae responding, it has to be an international response. you see the administration and tempting to organise this and we will hear more later tomorrow i understand. that is
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to get more countries engaged with military assets to safeguard, to go through the strait of hormuz and provide some sort of security. the iranian foreign minister has been in new york this week at the united nations, his travel is severely restricted under these new sanctions but he has been talking today about the tanker that of course was seized by uk authorities off the coast of gibraltar and he is saying, it is the best ath ofjuly present the brits could have given to the americans and it was requested by the americans. do you have any other details about that ship or indeed what the administration was playing out here? well, alli know is what the administration was playing out here? well, all i know is what is out in the public domain which is that it was suspected of smuggling oil to iranian oil to syria.
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that it was suspected of smuggling oilto iranian oilto syria. so he is saying that wasn't the case, it wasn't going to syria. does it matter if it has iranian oil on board? you have seen the administration's maximum campaign, pressure campaign and this is driving at reducing iran's ability to export its oil to zero. i see as pa rt to export its oil to zero. i see as part of that. thank you for coming into join part of that. thank you for coming intojoin us. the part of that. thank you for coming into join us. the americans part of that. thank you for coming intojoin us. the americans have basketball, the british have netball. also oddly, most famous basketball players have been men, most netball players seem to be women and there is a lot more money in basketball. did you play it? i did. it was always very cold and wet and we walked ridiculously short skirts. i haven't played it but i know there is a world cup of netball because i have been watching it with my daughter, so i can tell you that australia has made it to the semi
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final by beating new zealand and they will face either england or south africa this evening. which makes this almost a commonwealth end the tournament. kate gray is in liverpool for us and what i have been struck by, before we talk about the match tonight, just watching it, is the stadiums and how full they have been and it's really in keeping with what has happened through the summer. here you have a minority women's sport and women sports in general that have really come to the fore this summer. yes, it has been a brilliant summer of sport and this england netball team will be hoping to continue that. we have seen them welcomed out on to court, they are up welcomed out on to court, they are up against south africa. but this arena just erupted and every england match at this tournament so far has been sold out but there has been a brilliant atmosphere around all of the matches here in liverpool. people are really getting on board with netball and they are seeing it asa
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with netball and they are seeing it as a sport that has grown over the past few years, particularly after england won the commonwealth games for the first time ever last year and now they're hoping to go all the way at this world cup. they will be the first ever english netball team to wina the first ever english netball team to win a netball world cup, so this match isn't necessarily about whether they will make it to the finals or semifinals, it is about proving a point because they are up against a very strong team, south africa. is it a very commonwealth game? is it just africa. is it a very commonwealth game? is itjust chance that it is england, australia, new zealand and south africa that are in the final four? netball has been a very strong support within the common north country is obviously because it is a traditionally english sport, so those nations have been much more superior at it. for a long time, new zealand and australia used to dominate and it was a bit uncompetitive for a while, but in the last few years the likes of england, south africa, jamaica as well have really started putting pressure on australia and new zealand which is why we are seeing such competitive matches are much
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earlier on in the tournament rather than just earlier on in the tournament rather thanjust ina earlier on in the tournament rather than just in a final earlier on in the tournament rather thanjust in a final and it earlier on in the tournament rather than just in a final and it was earlier on in the tournament rather thanjust in a final and it was a bullet match between australia and new zealand. it came down to the final few seconds, new zealand mist a penalty shot which meant australia did indeed win but both those teams will progress onto the semifinals, as will england and south africa here, but it is now all about working out who plays who to ensure they make it through to the semifinals and then the finals. we are rooting for them. enjoy the game. thank you. do you know what the symmetry is here? who coaches the symmetry is here? who coaches the england team? tracey neville and who is her brother? philip neville who is her brother? philip neville who took the england team to the semifinal of the women's football. and gary who was also a footballer. how about that? is the humble burger
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getting a identity crisis? we put the taste challenge of meat free burgers to our panellists. the man had been spotted carrying a gun hidden behind a dustbin. his friend was also chased down. have you got a weapon on you? a large knife found on him. they were jailed this week but with knife and gun crime rising it is getting harder to stop. john lewis knows the pain of
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knife crime. her husband was repeatedly stabbed and killed two yea rs repeatedly stabbed and killed two years ago. this person not only took my husband's life, he took mine with it. i will never get over the death, his death ever. in the year up until march, more than a3,000 crimes involved a knife or a sharp object, thatis involved a knife or a sharp object, that is up more than 3000. robbery was also up 11% and the proportion of crimes the police are solving is down, now just of crimes the police are solving is down, nowjust 7.8% of offences end up down, nowjust 7.8% of offences end up with someone being charged or summoned. on an estate in sutton coldfield, cctv shows a hooded youth are trying to break in. the residents have hard private security feeling they can't rely on the police. police resources are stretched, patrolling the states is a low priority. we need to put more money into the policing. there is frustration hit that so few crimes
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are being sold. we are investing more in the police this year than la st more in the police this year than last year as a country, £1 billion more going into our police system and we have made specific money available for serious violence. white politicians are now promising there will be more police. that crashed into the lunar surface while neil armstrong and buzz aldrin we re while neil armstrong and buzz aldrin were there. but the bank could only track the descent. by the time the men had landed, damien had gone above the horizon so the job of transmitting those pictures fell to a team near the side of the world to the radio telescope in rural australia. it was later immortalised
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film the dish and we have been to meet one of the people who helped bring us those famous images. they've got the flag up now, you can see the stars & stripes... it was the tv moment of the 20th century. beautiful, just beautiful. the giant leap for mankind sent 38a,000 kilometres through space and onto screens around the world. it was only possible thanks to this dish. the park's observatory was one of three receiving the signal on earth. it produced the clearest pictures and so was the main source of the tv images. david cook was the senior receiver engineer. the enormity of the occasion didn't strike him until later. if we started to think about the great thing we were doing, we were likely to break down and not do it properly, so only afterwards did i go down, outside the telescope, look up and see the moon and realise there were three people up there,
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two on the surface and we had helped put them there. that is armstrong. on the moon. much of the story was captured in the dish. the film which told the observatory‘s history with a little dramatic licence. for example, there wasn't really a power cut as the moment approached. but there was plenty of real—life drama here on the day. just as the astronauts were landing on the moon, a storm arrived to park's bringing wind gusts of over 100 kilometres an hour, causing the tower to shake, sounding the safety alarms. normally they would have shut down the dish, but they didn't want to miss their moment in history. it is one which has put parks on the map and keeps bringing visitors out to this country town. i find it very cool because it is just amazing how that big thing can like to see people out in space.
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i don't think they realise how much of an impact it had on history when it comes from such a small town and it is out in the middle of nowhere. and nowadays we have this equipment. the dish is still in use and is now 10,000 times more powerful than when it came into operation. and one of their projects is to look for alien life. we scan the heavens visible from here, looking for evidence of radio emissions from alien civilisations. we haven't found anything yet butjust imagine if a signal is found from another civilisation elsewhere. i mean, that willjust... there is still so much we don't know about the universe around us but 50 years on, this dish is helping humans see and think beyond our own planet. i love that. just imagine if we
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found e:t.. we might run that. we have been loving this anniversary this week. one of those enjoying the trip down memory lane is buzz aldrin. he posted this photo of all of them kitted out in their astronomic gear and we are joined by the chief historian for nasa. we have been speaking about this in terms of a race between the soviet union and the united states. was it really close this race? it really was. the soviets didn't really joined the race in 1961 because they didn't believe president kennedy was serious about racing to the moon but by 1964 they realised they were in danger of having their monopoly of space accomplishments being overdone by the united states so he started a crash programme to get a man on the moon and they had a lunar probe, tried to send a robot to the moon to
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bring a sample back. it was a race. we talk about it in terms of a space race but it occurred to me that this wasn't about space at all, it was about the earth and what was going on politically here on earth. that was president kennedy's major objective, the geopolitical objective. the soviet union appeared to be head of the western capitalist model of government and it was critical for the us to prove the soviet union didn't have a better system. we kind of laugh about that, but 1961, that was a serious question. i watched michael collins and he was talking about the journey to the moon. as a series of steps, all of them as fragile and potentially dangerous as the next, so potentially dangerous as the next, so where would they have been on the 18th, 50 years ago? what sort of things were going on in apollo? they we re pa rt things were going on in apollo? they were part way to the moon and they
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we re were part way to the moon and they were rotating slowly. they had the nose of the command module pointing north to the celestial plane and the command service module would have been spinning on its axis, like a chicken on a barbecue spit. and that was to keep the temperature in the spacecraft even and they were waiting for their turn to get to the lunar orbit which would happen late tomorrow. can you dispel a myth for us, but the computer on board apollo which i understand this week, it crashed just before neil armstrong took control of apollo, or who took control because it had crashed. was that computer are less powerful than one of our mobile phones? much less powerful. that computer had only had 36 kilobytes of memory which is unbelievable from our current perspective. the beauty of that computer was that the software
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written for it was so robust that the computer could detect when it was being overloaded, turned itself off and reboot itself and then dump the parts of the calculations it knew were not as important as the critical parts. those alarms they heard on the way down where the computer saying, i have been overloaded, i have crashed and i am restarting myself. i get frustrated with my computer in the office! imagine when you are hurtling towards the moon! briefly, how have you been feeling this week? towards the moon! briefly, how have you been feeling this week7m towards the moon! briefly, how have you been feeling this week? it has been busy but wonderful. i love talking about our space history and this is a chance for me to revel in all that. we have been enjoying it too. loving seeing all of those images. we have needed this. thank you very much forjoining us. let's talk burgers — because there is a revolution under way in the world of fast food. plant—based alternatives to meat are being billed as better for the environment and our health. the white castle burger chain in the us is among those now
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selling plant—based burgers alongside the beef version and our new york team went to see how they stack up. the mission of the company and the but of the technology is to appeal to meat eaters. not asjuicy as not as juicy as i would expect. bit salty for my taste. but maybe thatis bit salty for my taste. but maybe that is part and parcel with fast food. so far, meat eaters have not really resisted the idea of having innovation in food. it is really
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startling. we genetically modify it so startling. we genetically modify it so it creates the same committee say we have been eating for millennia in animals and plants. an impossible burger pound for pound has all the proteins, it has no cholesterol, it has less total fat and actually has ten to 20% less calories than eating 20 ground beef patties. i will properly get the meat one again, so, sorry, planet. sorry planet! impossible burgers, vegan
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meat, whatever you want to call it, huge deal out on silicone valley, a lot of money being poured into this because they think it is good business as well as sustainable. it is getting a lot of attention. ok, so we have discussed before on this programme the vegan movement, how it is growing, how it now extends way beyond meat free burgers to cheese, yoghurts, ice creams. which is rather handy because i havejust had one of those midlife crisis, health checks and apparently i am consuming too much dairy. so could i live with almond milk and dairy free ice cream? and can i tell the difference between the real thing and the replica? one of these is a proper ice cream and one of them is the vegan alternative. i like the fact that stephan has brought me a napkin. anyway, let me taste one of these. this is chocolate. this one, i don't know what this is, maybe it is
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chocolate also. that is really tough. that is quite tough. white better than the cheese experiment? i really wouldn't know. i mean that. he has put post—it notes underneath. ithink... at he has put post—it notes underneath. i think... at a push he has put post—it notes underneath. ithink... ata push i he has put post—it notes underneath. i think... at a push i would say that one is the real ice cream, the chocolate one. that is the dairy one. i don't like to one up you, but you have got vegan and real ice cream. i have astronaut ice cream in honour of the apollo 15. freeze—dried ice cream. this is what it looks like. something like this. this is a neapolitan freeze—dried ice cream sandwich. i hate to say this, it has never actually been up into space. they call it astronaut ice cream. they bill it as astronaut
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ice cream. they bill it as astronaut ice cream... does it taste any good? no! really not. stick to the dairy. thursday brought us a day of sunny spells and scattered heavy showers around. we saw temperatures in the south up to the mid 20s but with the heavy showers, scenes like this. this is aberdeenshire earlier in the day. big shower clouds, blue sky in between and this evening we hit keep some of those clear spells and showers too. showers in the north dying away overnight but our attention turns to the south—west as the next batch of heavy rainfall moves into the south—west of england and south wales early on friday morning. elsewhere, cooler and fresher than recent nights with loads of ten to 1a celsius. here is the area of low pressure that will be quite a player throughout the day on friday. initially moving towards the south—west of the uk and then pushing its way northwards and eastwards. heavy bursts of rain,
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particularly for south wales and southern parts of england. the rainfall pushing across the midlands into southern scotland as well. some of the showers could be quite heavy and thundery, particularly on the southern side of the main ray ban. further heavy showers pushing on across the channel isles, the south—west of england, parts of wales through friday. nowhere immune toa wales through friday. nowhere immune to a shower. 20 or 21 degrees across england and wales, still some heavy rain lingering for northern ireland into the southern half of scotland where there could be a rumble of thunder. northern scotland seem the best of the dry weather but still a few scattered showers. we will keep that showery and at times thundery theme into friday evening. the showery rain over the next few days is likely to affect the golf open, some fairly persistent rain at times during friday but things are looking drierfor during friday but things are looking drier for the during friday but things are looking drierfor the open during friday but things are looking drier for the open on saturday. here is the low pressure which is gradually pushing its way eastward through friday night and on into saturday. still weather front is not
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far away to start their weekend so rain likely across east anglia and the south—east. that should clear and then we are all in that the aim of sunny spells and scattered showers, most will be across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland looked dry as a ridge of high pressure moves in from the west. temperatures 23 degrees, warmer than friday. sunday looks like the drier day of the weekend, still some showers towards the north—west and those temperatures on the rise, especially in the south on into next week.
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this is bbc news i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at eight... eyes to the right 215, no to the left 27a. mps back a measure that would block the next prime minister suspending parliament in order to force through a no—deal brexit. send her back! tonight, the president gives this reaction.|j send her back! tonight, the president gives this reaction. i was not happy with it. i disagree with it. but, again, i didn't say that, david.

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