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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 18, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 3... hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at two... the ayes to the right, 315, the noes to the left, 274. a blow for the government — and the next prime minister — the eyes—mac to you right, 315. the mp5 back an amendment that would make it much more difficult to suspend parliament hose“ mac the eyes—mac to you right, 315. the to force through no deal. nose— mac to the eyes—mac to you right, 315. the nose—mac to the left, 274. —— the at least five cabinet ministers — including philip hammond — abstain from voting and a government minister — margot james — resigns. theresa may says she won't ayes to the right, 315, the noes to sack the abstainers. the public finance watchdog says the left, 274. a no—deal brexit could add an extra a blow for the government — 30 billion pounds a year and the next prime minister — to the deficit — and put the uk into recession. mps back an amendment that would make the suspension of parliament much harder. the eu commission's most senior vice—president says uk ministers were totally unprepared when they first arrived at least five cabinet ministers, to negotiate brexit. including philip hammond, abstain from voting when they first arrived and a government minister — time when they first arrived is running out, you do not h margot james — resigns. the public finance watchdog says a time is running out, you do not have a plan, it's like lance corporal a no—deal brexit could add an extra 30 billion pounds a year jones. don't panic, don't panic, to the deficit — and put running around like idiots.
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the uk into recession. the eu commission's former vice—president says uk ministers hashem abedi, brother of the manchester arena were totally unprepared bomber, appears in court — when they first arrived and pleads not guilty to negotiate brexit. to 22 counts of murder time is running out, you don't have a plan, it's like a lance corporal coming up on afternoon jones, don't panic, don't panic, live, all the sport. running around like idiots. coming up on afternoon good afternoon again. great day for live all the sport... northern ireland golf but not so rory mcilroy is trying to battle much for a couple of northern back from what was an awful start on ireland golfers. michael roy and home soil, the opening day of mcdowell have had their opening northern irelandmy first open rounds at royal portrush ruined by a championship for 68 years and so far couple of bad holes but an irishman being a chasing one for one northern irishman. you'll bring you the still leads, more on that later. —— leader board and all the details mcgrory michael roy. and some rain in the forecast for us soon. and some rain in the forecast for as well. getting drier by the time the golf and for most of us over the we get to sunday and much warmer next few days. things turning warmer through the early part of next week. next few days. things turning warmer next week. you'll talk about that and heat elsewhere around the globe i will tell you about that later as later on any programme. well. also coming up — how three million tonnes of sand could help to save norfolk‘s disappearing coastline. also coming up — new safety regulations could mean the river thames' historic little ships might have to be rebuilt.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. hello, everyone — i'm simon mccoy. this is afternoon live. mp5 have voted in favour i'm simon mccoy. of a measure that could block efforts by the next prime minister mps have voted in favour of a measure that could block to force through a no—deal brexit efforts by the next prime minister by suspending parliament. the commons voted by a majority to force through a no—deal brexit by suspending parliament. of 41 to approve an amendment put in the last hour, the commons forward by labour's hilary benn voted by a majority of 41 to approve an amendment put and former minister alistair burt. forward by labour's hilary benn and former minister alistair burt. four cabinet ministers within minutes of the vote abstained from voting — a resignation, minister the chancellor phillip hammond, margot james quit having voted thejustice secretary david gauke, against the government. the business secretary greg clark it's being seen as a victory and the international development for parliament — and a problem secretary, rory stewart. for borisjohnson orjeremy hunt. whoever is next prime minister. seventeen conservatives voted as it means the threat of a no—deal against the government — including the minister margot james brexit can't be used in any further who has since resigned. it's being seen as a victory negotiations with the eu. for parliament — and a problem for the whoever is the next prime minister — some feel that a general election boris johnson orjeremy hunt. soon now looks more likely. for abstain from voting. this is the moment in the commons that the government was defeated , four abstained from voting. the ayes to the right, 315, this is the moment
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the government was defeated. the noes to the left, 274. the ayes to the right, 315, the noes to the left, 274. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it. unlock. the ayes to the right, 315, the noes to the left, 274. if you have a feeling of deja vu so the ayes have it, the ayes have about all this, you're not alone. it. unlock. we can talk to our political correspondentjessica parker we can talk to our political in the houses of parliament now. correspondentjessica parker in the houses of parliament now. whoever is next prime minister faces the real problem here. this this is significant. yes, we are used to big brexit votes but this amendment was all about ensuring parliament does it in that crucial period running up to october the one is important, why? because many expect boris johnson 31st in order to store a future one is important, why? because many expect borisjohnson to be taking overin expect borisjohnson to be taking over in number ten next week, he has prime ministerfrom 31st in order to store a future prime minister from ramming not ruled out a node your brexit, he 31st in order to store a future prime ministerfrom ramming through ano prime ministerfrom ramming through a no del brexit, it's very much said it is do or die to get out by aimed at boris johnson. the 31st of october and he has not a no del brexit, it's very much aimed at borisjohnson. obviously widely seen as the frontrunner in ruled out suspending parliament in order to make that happen. these the conservative leadership contest, we will get the result on tuesday moves today and ending the northern the mac tuesday next week as to ireland bill are all about trying to whether boris johnson stop borisjohnson, the mac tuesday next week as to whether borisjohnson of the mac tuesday next week as to whether boris johnson ofjeremy ireland bill are all about trying to stop boris johnson, if ireland bill are all about trying to the mac tuesday next week as to whether borisjohnson ofjeremy hunt has won that contest but because
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stop borisjohnson, if indeed he does become prime minister, from borisjohnson has so far failed to suspending parliament and forcing through a node your brexit. one of rule out suspending parliament and has also said that he wants the uk those who led this amendment, to come out of the eu on the 31st of putting it through comes today, is october do or die, those mp5 who alistair burt. alistair burtjoins really don't want to see a no—deal me now. firstly, will this make prorogation or suspending parliament brexit, and those mp5 are very much object to the idea that parliament should be locked out of this kind of actually impossible for a future prime minister over that period decision have used in northern where you could see a node your brexit at the end of october? we ireland bill, amended the northern think it does, we think the ireland bill, amended the northern ireland bill, amended the northern ireland bill in order to try and make sure that does not happen, so technical mechanism would require parliament to be recalled to deal it is rather over to borisjohnson. with the issue that we passed today and in terms of those abstaining, in relation to northern ireland. as important as that is, it also —— is those not backing the government, one has gone, resigned, but the also the symbolism of parliament other is probably not. you had some saying, please don't bypass us, we need to be there to make whatever decisions need to be made in relation to a deal or no deal and pretty high profile abstentions, the likes of greg clark, philip hammond, parliament must be sitting in the the chancellor of the exchequer, and run—up to october 31. i think that as you mentioned, a resignation from was clear from the significant as you mentioned, a resignation from a business minister margot james numberof as you mentioned, a resignation from a business minister margotjames who voted in favour of the amendment, was clear from the significant number of those who supported the amendment. you talk about the therefore against the government significant number of those whip, so in terms of those ministers supporting the amendment, i think around 17 tory rebels, margot james who have abstained or not voted with
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the government, because we really are in the dying days of the theresa the minister as well, voting with you. this is quite a significant may premiership, there will be a new moment in terms of a rebellion almost against a future prime minister next wednesday, it administration rather than just this appears it's very unlikely we will see any sackings but what i would one. i think it is putting down a marker. we are in difficult times say is that perhaps next week you could see more resignations because there might be ministers serving in where people profess that they want to secure a deal and i do not want there might be ministers serving in the current government who think they will either lose theirjob the rhetoric of either of the two contenders to make a deal more should borisjohnson they will either lose theirjob should boris johnson take difficult. there are some who they will either lose theirjob should borisjohnson take over or old so object to the direction of persist in believing that no deal is which he is taking the party, and a viable option. if that is the case then that will have to be tested out important to say on this issue of and parliament and parliament cannot prorogation, suspending parliament, borisjohnson said he is not ruling be bypassed just to avoid such a it out, but he is not strongly test. i think the message attracted to the idea as well. the be bypassed just to avoid such a test. ithink the message is, leave, go for a deal, make sure the deal is argument from some of the brexiteers right for britain and the eu and i and boris johnson backers argument from some of the brexiteers and borisjohnson backers is that you have to keep everything on the think the backing would be there in parliament for that. but if people table, whether that is suspending parliament, going for a no deal on think parliament can be avoided, i the 31st of what may, because it's think parliament can be avoided, i think this vote and the feel in only that way that you might get a parliament from very significant better deal out of the european colleagues makes that much more difficult. what do you say to those union, but as ever, in parliament, not everyone agrees. this time next who would criticise you from within
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your own party, saying you're week, there will be someone else in weakening the hand of a future prime minister who wants to be able to go number ten. whoever it is they may to brussels and say, look, we are well feel their hands are already serious about a no deal therefore tied behind their backs with this. give us a better agreement?” serious about a no deal therefore yeah, look, i have spoken to one give us a better agreement? i do not think there was any weakening at borisjohnson back all. it's still possible for the yeah, look, i have spoken to one boris johnson back at this afternoon who isn't entirely convinced that prime minister to come to parliament this can stop a future prime and give any suggestion whatsoever, eithera and give any suggestion whatsoever, either a deal or a no deal as to minister from this can stop a future prime ministerfrom probing this can stop a future prime minister from probing parliament. this can stop a future prime ministerfrom probing parliament. i think the lawyers will be poring what the hell should do, and that is the proper thing for the prime over this amendment, as this bill minister. what we need is the right now makes its way back through the negotiator to be there doing that lords and probably comes into law job with the european union and that very shortly. you're right, it will i'm supporting jeremy hunt, because i think he has a better chance of certainly be something to consider but another point worth remembering getting that deal but whoever is the as well, regardless as to whether prime minister, the clio centre parliament is or is not sitting on parliament is, trying to get the 31st of october, it is now still something done without parliament being there, with that night with the 31st of october, it is now still the illegal default that the uk will parliament prorogued, that will not leave the european union on that work. this is crossing the teas and date, so i would say this is the dotting the eyes to make sure that does not happen. we have had the beginning of another battle, one very much aimed at a borisjohnson premiership. you will see continuous chancellor philip hammond and staining, not turning up as i effo rts premiership. you will see continuous efforts to try and stop him by a understand it, to avoid putting is number of mp5 going towards a no—deal brexit. i think this is in a
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way, just the beginning of a battle idea across your. when it comes to people like philip hammond, will concerning mp5 versus borisjohnson they now be sitting on the and he hasn't even taken over yet, if indeed he does, the results on backbenches trying to make life difficult? as they did for theresa may. you are jumping two or three tuesday, jeremy hunt still very much steps here. i know nothing of philip insistent that he is in it to wind it and he could cause a political hammond's situation today or upset. thank you very much. anything else. philip hammond has been very clear as chancellor in warning the country about the dangers of no deal but it's not a meanwhile the government's financial resistance to boris johnson. watchdog has warned that a no—deal dangers of no deal but it's not a brexit could mean a surge in public resistance to borisjohnson. i'm not borrowing of 30 billion supporting boris in the leadership contest, that is clear, but if he pounds a year — more than doubling the deficit. it's the first time a price has been becomes prime minister, i want, like put on the impact leaving everyone else, to be able to rally the eu without a deal. around a conservative prime minister who will do their best for the united kingdom. i believe that involves getting a deal to leave the chancellor philip hammond says eu andl the report, from the office involves getting a deal to leave the eu and i want to give him every cent for budget responsibility, that we will have every support for shows there would be a ‘very significant hit' that we will have every support for that but if there are siren voices to the british economy. here's our economics correspondent andy verity. on his shoulders suggesting that the it was in may 2010 that former chancellor george osborne created a better course of action is no deal budget of responsibility. which can somehow be got through the the idea was there would be someone in house, that is not the right way to place independent to make sure go about it. whether you are, new the government was not prime minister, go for a deal but do outspending its income
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not take parliament for granted. and maintaining national debt. today it warned that public finances would take a hit even if a no—deal brexit did not feelings running high on this issue. cause much disruption. it adds about £30 further battles to come and it's billion per year to important to say this is still a government borrowing, piece of legislation going through which is not an insignificant sum of money, that is parliament, not yet a signed, sealed largely because you have less growth in the economy which means less and delivered act with those attached amendment but, as i say, as income tax receipts, long as boris johnson attached amendment but, as i say, as things like weaker house prices, long as borisjohnson refuses to rule out probing parliament, refuses less property transactions, so less capital taxes to rule out a no deal as well, you as well. will see efforts continue only to try and stop that from happening. —— some gains. you would be spending a little bit is known as borisjohnson refuses to less on debt interest and have some tariff revenues but overall it is a hit to the rule out pro roguing parliament. public finances of with me now is mo hussein — £30 billion per year. he used to be a special adviser to the home secretary amber rudd. what we're seeing is parliament finding its voice, weeks of under the scenario the obr looked distractions from contests, and we at, a no—deal brexit has limited would be thinking of everything is impact and the gdp could shrink by fine, it is not. we hear that loud 2%. in that event, it would boost and clear. mps have voted to send a the budget deficit by £30 billion and the national debt would be 12% higher, about £200 billion more.
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signal to the media, the next prime that most benign version minister as well, about how they is not the version will not be ignored, not be that is being talked about sidelined. in terms of the action of by prominent brexiteers, they are talking about a much harder version which would cause much more proroguing or stopping parliament from sitting, to get through a no disruption to our economy, the obr deal potentially. it is not a done is clear that, in that less benign deal potentially. it is not a done deal yet but i think we are very version of no deal, the hit would be much greater, the would impact be much harder, the recession would be bigger. close to mp5 getting their way on this and certainly the symbols in but brexit supporters are taking terms of what they are saying to who the obr's analysis with a will occupy number ten do really pinch of salt. we will see, as everything else, forecast, forecast, matter. what they have done is make many have been completely wrong, i think almost every forecast by life harderfor if matter. what they have done is make life harder for if it is boris anybody from... johnson or whoever it is, if they literally from the international monetary fund right wa nt to the way through to the obr and johnson or whoever it is, if they want to suspend parliament to do so but it is still not impossible. that everything else, these have often been quite wrong and in some cases is true but equally mps are the ones budget forecast in the last six months over the budget. who passed legislation, they vote on things, they are quite important, parliamentary, that we have... for a getting the public prime minister who wants to do finances in order is no longer the top priority it was. the obr said philip anything, for legislation, they need hammond himself has mps having a working majority of all but abandoned the goal of getting rid of the budget deficit by three, that is with the alliance the mid—20205. and it points out the spending with the dup, mps are probably more promises about the candidates for the tory
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important than they have been, and leadership, jeremy hunt and boris johnson, would parliament itself is more important add tens of billions of pounds that it has been for a very long to the deficit and the debt. time so it is notjust this one budget responsibility? it ain't what it used to be. issue, it's about the working relationship between the executive and mp5 going forward on a whole range of issues. why, hence the feeling of deja vu, we've been here prosecutors have alleged the younger before but the difference here was, brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi made detonator the announcement next week, we will tubes for the device that killed 22 people. have a new prime minister, but there hashem abedi, who's been extradited from libya, appeared in court today and pleaded will be a sense of your we go again not guilty to 22 counts of murder. because already they are going to it's also alleged he bought have their hands tied in a way that chemicals used to make explosives, and a car in which bomb making perhaps they would not have wished materials were stored. with this. that is true. that is the daniel sandford was in court. lesson that will be learned, things, certainly people on both leadership teams, more releva ntly certainly people on both leadership after spending his first night in teams, more relevantly boris's team, he is the front runner and will be britain since the manchester arena looking in terms of which way certain people voted, the cabinet bombing at suffolk police station, hashem abedi was brought to his first court appearance in an ministers unsurprisingly who abstained today, what this leads to armoured police van. in the door, he confirmed his name and his british is, under theresa may's premiership, citizenship, and then at that the you had a br g, european research names of all 22 people is accused of
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group who had been a thorn in her murdering were read out. he's also side, having numbers on the backbenches. now what you will see accused of attempting to murder is an almost parallel e arg being others at the ariana grande concert built up with cabinet ministers now and of conspiracy to cause an being on the back bench, potentially, any wea k‘s explosion. it was his older brother being on the back bench, potentially, any weak‘s time and their supporters who will again be a salman abedi you detonated the bomb, thorn in the side of the next pm but the allegation is that hashem abedi helped him to buy the car by the probably for different reasons and going in different directions. it bomb parts were stored and to all goes back to the fact there is chemicals used to make the no unity in parliament and explosive. it is also suggested he ultimately it is numbers, numbers, made the detonator tubes. the lawyer numbers. that's what matters in parliament, getting things through. —— like his lawyer said he denied any involvement and was happy to it's the arithmetic. the prime come back to clear his name. he said minister may change but the numbers have not. and that will be something he had been held in solitary confinement for two years and had ofa been tortured. bringing him back have not. and that will be something of a surprise perhaps to the next by minister because the sense of optimism certainly boris johnson from war torn libya has not been minister because the sense of optimism certainly borisjohnson has easy. it's been a long and difficult been displaying and referred also from jeremy hunt saying he would not negotiation, and there was even a wa nt to from jeremy hunt saying he would not want to rule anything out, they hit yesterday when the private jet that was to fly him here developed a would maybe feel a bit hamstrung here. there is definitely an element fault when travelling from malta to tripoli. this morning was my hearing of hands being tied when they have lasted just 11 minutes and then he not taken office yet but it really was driven away again. hashem abedi does matter because if you are looking at it from the eu's side, it has now been taken away to prison
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where we will remain until a court doesn't really matter the prime appearance at orchard crown court on minister is, who is in that chair, what matters is what can get through monday when we will appear by video link for a bail hearing. parliament. this is the issue we had with the dealer theresa may agreed and then went to parliament, and it was rejected three times. i think —— when he will appear by video the eu won the process of that to link for a bail hearing. happen and the uk collectively to go back to them with, look, this is home office statistics out this morning show the proportion of crimes that have been solved what you can get through parliament. in england and wales has dropped to the lowest level recorded. if the eu already knows it is separate data from the office unlikely a no—deal brexit will get of national statistics shows that through parliament here, that means whilst overall levels of crime have not changed, individual borisjohnson, jeremy through parliament here, that means crimes including theft, boris johnson, jeremy hunt, however the next prime ministers, cannot go robbery and knife crime have increased. to the eu and say, look, it is a no deal unless we find likeability on the deal. this really does change the latest home office the deal. this really does change figures show that the negotiating position, doesn't in the 12 months to the end of march it? potentially it does, yes, it 2019, just 7.8% of offences resulted would have a big impact. that has in someone being charged a lwa ys would have a big impact. that has always been the case with the eu and or summonsed to appear at court — a fall from 9.1% the year before. the opposition or no deal, is it separate data provided from the office really on the table? will mps back of national statistics shows that instances of knife crime are up it? ina really on the table? will mps back it? in a way, it does weaken the by 8% since last year. position that they have been setting and the same data reveals recorded offences of robbery increased by 11% out but equally the teams well, i'm over the same period.
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sure, be thinking about how and what earlier our home affairs mechanisms exist to potentially even correspondent danny shaw gave us more analysis on the newly go round this and ultimately it is released crime figures. the executive that deals with it is the lowest level since these brussels and deal with these issues, figures were first compiled in 2015. not parliament, and there could be in 2015, the number of cases where something in that. there is the someone was charged or brought to thing that most mps fear which is, court was 15%. it has been falling does this all lead to an early steadily since then, and now, as you election? because if parliament say, 7.8%. of course it varies from cannot agree, with the indicative faith case to case, separate offences will be much lower than that. there will be some cases, few months ago, we have seven or petition limit possession of weapons eight different options. if for instance, where detection rates parliament can't agree, then we get are higher. the home office in its toa parliament can't agree, then we get to a case where you change the statistics is given to make numbers in parliament by which that donations for this plummeting level goes to an election. i do not see of detection. it says it may be due anyone rushing towards that but that may well be... there will be some to the more complex caseload that who will think that is what is going to happen for the other mac police have, so harder to circumstances may well take us investigate cases, also they have there. they have said —— more digital evidence to go through. circumstances may well take us there. they have said -- there was certainly a feeling in boris oscar they also say police recording practices may be partly to blame for this as well. and also the team, that there is quite an opportune time and moment to go for increasing reluctance of victims to it however the biggest risk with
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cooperate with police. that is certainly one of the reasons why that, which is widely acknowledged, fewer cases are coming to court but as you cannot go back to the people i have to say the home of a says before brexit is dealt with. whichever way you want to define, is nothing in its document about the fa ct nothing in its document about the fact that there are fewer police officers to investigate crime. dealt with, that question cannot be back on the ballot paper. it is a you're watching afternoon live, ticking clock. really good to see these are our headlines... you and thank you for your time. a blow for the government — we can talk to our political correspondentjessica parker and the next prime minister — in the houses of parliament now. mp5 back an amendment that would make suspending parliament much harder. yes, i'm joined by a government minister — yes, i'mjoined by the yes, i'm joined by the other person margotjames — resigns and at least who is leading today's amendment, 5 cabinet ministers, including philip hammond, the effort to stop a future prime abstain from voting. the public finance watchdog says minister from suspending parliament a no—deal brexit could add an extra 30 billion pounds a year in order to force through no—deal brexit, of course one thing we know to the deficit — and put the uk into recession. that parliament, the house of commons definitely does not want on past the vote is to see a no—deal brexit. i'm joined by hilary benn. and in sport, rory michael roy's opening round on home soil, a hilary benn, you worked alongside alistair burt to make this amendment quadruple and double bogey blighted return to northern ireland as he happen, it has passed today, just falls way behind the leaders on day one of the open at royal portrush. explain the significance as you understand it for the mac. will definitely work? will it stop parliament from being suspended? what the amendment does is to say, —— rory mcilroy. england have taken if parliament were not sitting for a big wicket. an otherwise tough
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any reason, for example if it had they won for the big wicket. an otherwise tough they wanted ebola so far though. and former liverpool been prorogued, it would have to be striker daniel sturridge is called back to receive the report suspended and fined for breaching betting rules but he is able to play and debate the emotions that are required under the northern ireland again from july 31. more on those bill so it basically sends a message to any future prime minister there was no point in proroguing because stories just after 3:30pm. we would then have to come back a nyway we would then have to come back anyway as the bill has been amended, and as you heard many people say, the idea that parliament would not be sitting at this absolutely crucial moment in september and october for the future of the country when we see what the future prime minister brings back in terms a bbc investigation has found that primary school pupils ofa prime minister brings back in terms of a deal or not ideal, or is trying are being repeatedly rejected for mental health support. freedom of information requests to pursue no deal, parliament from 46 health trusts across the uk intends to be here doing it a job showed the number of mental health and anyone who thinks they can referrals by primary schools have risen by nearly 50 per cent over prevent us from doing that by the last three years, locking the doors and saying, off tojust over thirty one you go, it will not work. the size and a half thousand children. while the government says it's of the majority today, 41 votes. committed to improving mental health support, the royal college of psychiatrists say the figures as... just before we write for the are ‘deeply worrying‘. our special correspondent ed thomas has more. summer recess, as... just before we write for the as a team of staff we‘ll quite often summer recess, that sends a very clear message to the next prime cry together over what we‘re parliament minister, is absolutely hearing children say.
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resolute on this question.|j i think it's going to take the death a child before people start parliament minister, is absolutely resolute on this question. i was speaking a short while ago to boris taking it more seriously. i think the government needs johnson supporter, a conservative to decide whether they want us to be mp, they pointed out that, fine, social workers and mental health yes, the house of commons may not workers, or educators. the bbc has been hearing wa nt to yes, the house of commons may not want to see a no—deal brexit and from schools across the country they can try and bring back element about the mental health of their pupils. and make sure it is not as bended in when you have a child in year four who is talking about self—harm order to do so, but there are two or talking about suicide, sides to this debate and this does that‘s shocked a number of staff. talking about suicide, not actually rule out the idea of a wondering what it would feel like, and having those no—deal brexit because if both sides conversations quite regularly. just simply cannot come to an it's incredibly distressing when you hear a child as young as six, seven, agreement, default departure date is express that level of unhappiness with their life. still october 31. that is the position in the law, but he house of commons has already made it clear on a numberof commons has already made it clear on a number of occasions so far this freedom of information responses year that it opposes leaving the from 46 health trusts across the uk indicate the number of referrals european union without a deal. the made to child mental health services house of commons is against a by primary schools for those aged 11 no—deal brexit and as long as the and under increased by nearly 50% house of commons is sitting at then over the last three years. it is for parliament to decide what it is for parliament to decide what it wants to do about any proposition that we might leave without a deal i find it really abhorrent. is the purpose of today was to send there‘s nothing that we can realistically do that is going to give the child the help that a clear message, parliament will be sitting and if you suspended it, it that child needs. will have to come back, and if the
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for serious cases schools can refer to child mental health services. house of commons comes back, as well some head teachers say securing as considering the northern ireland business, if it wanted to do other support can be a challenge. things, it can. different people have different views about what that should be taken, it depends what the external resources are reducing rapidly prime minister brings forward. in because of financial constraints. front of the house of commons at that moment. but this is a very camhs was the agency needed. significant amendment because it two years it‘s taken sends a very sick look at message to and we are still waiting for an assessment for a child the prime minister. if you think you who has experienced extreme can lock the doors on that chamber mental health distress. and tell us to go away until the 3ist primary schools can't and tell us to go away until the 31st of october, parliament will not solve everything. we need help. allow that to happen. important to say there's is now a piece of legislation that will get back to the government told us the house of lords but, as far as it was determined to improve mental health services, you understand it, this is now very and by 2024, 345,000 more children and young people will have likely to be passed and become law. access to specialist care. ido likely to be passed and become law. i do indeed think that because it ed thomas, bbc news. goes with the grain of the amendments that the house of lords past and the government attempted to nearly two million cubic metres defeat my amendment, the one with of sand is being shifted alistair burt, and also due to to a stretch of eroding norfolk coastline in a radical plan to save it from the sea. defeat the lords mamendment, saying the 5km—long dune will protect that emotion being debated as a bacton gas terminal, which supplies one third of the uk‘s technical point but basically good gas, but is teetering just
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government lost by 41 votes. when metres from a cliff edge. the £20 million project should also act as a defence this bill comes into law, it will be for two nearby villages — bacton and walcott. with the things we have added which it is the first sandscaping scheme on this scale to be ensures that parliament can sit. we wa nt ensures that parliament can sit. we want to do ourjob, you're not carried out in the uk. having the doors closed on us. hilary benn, thank you very much. as joining me now is our global science hilary benn, thank you very much. as hilary benn, thank you very much. as hilary benn was outlining there, the correspondent rebecca morelle. intention very much to try and stop a future prime minister from suspending parliament in order to i cannot picture that amount of sand force through a no—deal brexit. of but it‘s clearly a lot. course what borisjohnson has been saying is, take nothing off the i cannot picture that amount of sand but it's clearly a lot. that is right. it‘s about half of wembley table because, by doing that, you might geta table because, by doing that, you might get a better agreement out of the eu but it seems a number of mps stadium, its 4 million tonnes. it‘s here come a sufficient number of mps a sand dune on an enormous scale. we here, don't want him to play that went down to see the project right kind of hand. thank you very much. at the beginning but eventually it will stretch for nearly four miles meanwhile the government's financial along the length of the coast. its watchdog has warned that a no—deal brexit could mean a surge in public borrowing of 30 billion highest point will be around seven metres high and at will stretch 250 pounds a year. it's the first time a price has been metres high and at will stretch 250 put on the impact leaving metres out to sea, so it is notjust the eu without a deal. a bit of sand being scattered on the chancellor philip hammond says the report, from the office for budget responsibility, shows there would be beach, it will really transform at a ‘very significant hit' to the british economy. the shoreline looks like. it looks here's our economics incredibly dramatic. this isjust
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getting under way now. why is it correspondent andy verity. necessary? what has happened? the problem is the coastline allowed it was in may 2010 that the norfolk is eroding, natural erosion, chancellor george osborne created a budget of responsibility. the idea but during storms, you can lose several metres of land every year with b that would be someone in and one of the big problems as they place independently to make sure the have a big gas terminal which supplies around one third of the government was not outspending its uk'5 supplies around one third of the income irregularly and maintaining uk‘s gas, which, when it was built, national debt. today it warmed that was 100 metres back from cliff edge, now some parts of it are ten metres public finances would take a hit evenif public finances would take a hit even if a no—deal brexit does not —— away so it is kind of teetering on the brink. needed a solution for did not cause much disruption. even if a no—deal brexit does not —— that, they needed a solution rapidly did not cause much disruptionm adds about £30 billion per year to and normally you would use a borrowing, which is not an concrete sea wall to sort of hold insignificant sum of money, that is largely because you have less growth back the sea but the problem with in the economy which means less doing that is that then affect other income tax receipts, things like we parts of the coast, makes erosion can house prices, less property worse and there are two villages a couple of miles along the coast, if transactions, so less capital taxes as well. you would be spending a you had concrete in front of the station, they would have vanished little bit less on debt interest and within a few years. sand will be a have some tariff revenues at first good solution because it protects but overall it is a hit to the the terminal and the villages, too. public finances of £30 billion per i‘m obviously being stupid here but
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doesn‘t stand around rather quickly? year. under the scenario the obr it will wash away, won‘t it? doesn‘t stand around rather quickly? it will wash away, won't it? it will change over time. the key is to use looked at, the gdp could shrink by lots and lots and lots of sand, so 296. in looked at, the gdp could shrink by 2%. in that event, it would boost what you‘re doing is returning the beach to what it was like maybe 30 the budget deficit by £30 billion and the national debt would be 12% yea rs beach to what it was like maybe 30 years ago, turning back the clock it higher, about £200 billion more. was a bit. if you have lots of it, it will move with the currents and that most benign version is not the tides, and eventually go, over 20 version that is being taught about yea rs, tides, and eventually go, over 20 years, with them having to make a decision at the end of that whether by prominent brexiteers, they are to put more sand back or whether to talking about a much harder version close down the gas terminal or move which would cause much more the villagers, but it chewed over 20 disruption to our economy, the obr is clear that, in that less benign yea rs of the villagers, but it chewed over 20 years of protection. there is precedent for this. in the netherlands, they had a scheme where version of no deal, the hit would be they put down an enormous amount of sand and it has protected the coast, much greater, the would impact be they think it is going to protect much greater, the would impact be they think it is going to protect the coast they are for 40 years, so much harder, the recession would be even longer. it is effectively bigger. but brexit supporters are taking the obr's analysis with a pinch of salt. we will see, as buying time. presumably other areas will look at the success of this everything else, forecast, forecast, because there are a large part of many have been completely wrong, i our coast suffering. there are lots think almost every forecast by of bits of the coast now facing anybody from... literally from the problems with climate change, too, international monetary fund right
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the way through to the obr and with sea levels rising and bigger, everything else, these have often more dramatic storms. flooding and been quite wrong and in some cases erosion is going to be a really big budget forecast in the last six problem but the question is, when months over the budget. getting the the scheme —— backed the scheme is public finances in order is no costing £20 million, it is being longer the top priority it was. the paid for by the gas terminal, it is obr said philip hammond himself has expensive. but all are part of the all but abandoned the goal of uk be able to afford schemes like getting rid of the budget deficit by this? there will probably be decisions at some point about which the mid—20 20s. and it points out point of the coast to protect and the mid—20 20s. and it points out the spending promises about the which points you let go because you candidates for the tory leadership, cannot protect all of it. it would jeremy hunt and borisjohnson, would add tens of billions of pounds to be too expensive. fascinating. thank the deficit and the debt. budget you very much. responsibility? it ain't what it tens of thousands of passengers every year enjoy used to be. a trip down the river thames on board historic "little ships". the oldest boat in service dates back to 1892, while another the iranian revolutionary guard took part in the dunkirk have seized a foreign evacuations in 1940. vessel, according to state media. but the department for transport says new safety regulations iranian tv says could mean they have to be rebuilt. the vessel with a crew of 12 owners claim the costs involved was seized by the revolutionary would force them to scrap the boats. guard navalforce by larak island — robert hall is on board one in the persian gulf. iranian authorities accuse the crew of "smuggling" one million litres of fuel. of them for us today.... welcome aboard the passenger vessel our security correspondent connaught, built a century ago and frank gardner is here. like her sister ships (00v) still plying her trade do you know what is going on? no, we don't, on the 24 mile route from
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central london to hampton court. to be honest. it's a very murky story. they will continue to be these murky stories because why would iran sees a tanker if it was they are a unique design. operating on its own waters and it they were built for the thames. the tide is out at low water, they can get under was something possibly under iranian the bridges, which are quite low in control? it is not clear whether this is the same tanker that this part of london, and they allow passengers still do have disappeared. all ships going access to these historic roots which actually are, as anyone who has been on them, are quite magnificent. through... any ship navigating river steamers launched for a tourism boom during the reign of queen victoria also saw military service. the connaught was called international waters needs and up as a hospital ship during world war ii. automatic information system, a we see a statue by a gentleman. transponder. the ship was my captain can turn it off if they want, but the old river boats were designed to carry their passengers in comfort and some style. the transponder shows where they are by the 19605 the river at any one time. it allows them to was buzzing with traffic, but now modern safety standards be tracked. if you're up to no good, are about to catch up with the last you turn off as a matter of course, survivors from the original fleet. so the transponder got turned off for whatever reason on the rear end for vessels like this hasn't been heard of since sunday. the new regulations could mean a virtual rebuild. it's not clear if this is the same tanker but let's look at the bigger context here. iran says they have seized this vessel because it was the connaught, for example, would lose one of her most
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smuggling fuel oil. that is a little distinctive features. it‘s this saloon at bit like accusing somebody of gambling ina the rear of the vessel. it would be cut off, bit like accusing somebody of gambling in a casino because smuggling is as old as... i was the deck would be re—plated with bulkheads but underneath and the family owned her going to say all is that my old as and two other vessels they would cost £500,000 per boat, the hills but there are no hills in they simply can‘t afford it. the hills but there are no hills in the water of the gulf coast, so that isa dan adams is connaught‘s the water of the gulf coast, so that is a poor metaphor. it is very skipper and tour guide. common, lots of people do it. during he says the safety review the years of sanctions on iraq that threatens his livelihood. we re the years of sanctions on iraq that were imposed after it invaded kuwait after saddam invaded kuwait in 1990, it‘s not practical to do it and it would send the company out of business, which then right up into the 905 and beyond, in turn if they go out of business, i‘ll go out of business because i‘ll fuel and oil smuggling happen the no longer have a job. whole time and what was happening was that barges containing fuel outside there was sympathy amongst his passengers. would come out of the shuttle add a if these boats are good enough for dunkirk they are certainly good waterway and turn left, ie east as enough for us. it would be a terrible shame. they headed south, hugging the if it's managed all these years iranian coastline, paying off and it's perfectly safe, why keep changing things? certain people and then waiting up, and at night making the short —— to the arab side of the gulf, to the emirates. that was very commonplace. the report‘s authors say there‘s room for manoeuvre. is that still going on? well, the
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sanctions are not there as they were but they have to stay on course. then but i'm told smuggling still there‘s room for discussion ta kes then but i'm told smuggling still say different parts of takes place. the overview of this is the thames, further upstream, where there is less hazard in the tidal stretch if you like, speaking about a specific case. that survivability is really important there is a lot of pressure, tension, bringing those older boats up to the same standards that new boats everybody is watching this like are constructed to. hawks and the next week, next few the recommendations go before parliament later this year. days will be crucial. they are. the future of these river veterans everyday something does not happen, the tension notches down little bit. hangs in the balance. it could easily go back up again. just to recap on what we have had, we have had the americans tightening time for a look at the weather. sanctions on iran. particularly strengthening its oil exports, threatening to retaliate, then having this mysterious attack, to lots of attacks on the tankers. the what is that photograph of? we have last ones involving flames and all been trying to guess. you know there is a theme running leaking, billowing smoke and fire, and then the shooting down by the through the programme this week about trying to come up with iranians ofa inventive ways to solve problems, and then the shooting down by the iranians of a new us drone. the us i‘m going back to the goats earlier said it was international territory, in the week, inventive ways... iran said it straight over its territory. if you remember,
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president trump sent a retaliatory do not mention goats. air strikes, called it off at the switzerland... is that now? it is glaziers, because last minute. the whole region is very much on a hair trigger and the glaziers have been melting, strong sunshine, high temperatures, diplomats certainly on the side of so they‘ve been covering... your the atlantic are trying very hard to ego, wide of you and you can see bring down the tension. a war would what is happening. it‘s like a giant not be good for anybody, there would duvet, it is filled with heavy duty be no winners of it, it would hurt a fleece, as that helps to insert lot of people. particularly people in the region of both sides of the weight the eyes and then you write, gulf, so everybody is trying to reflect the sunlight away and it reduces the melting of the iglesia de—escalate it, but that if there is another provocation from either by 50—70%. this is a glazier in side, then the other side will want to retaliate and off we go. switzerland where they‘ve been doing it at another one since 2010, it‘s not an unusual thing. tens of thousands of passengers every year enjoy it's not an unusual thing. it‘s a duvet day? a trip down the river thames it‘s a duvet day? on board historic "little ships". it is. beautiful blue sky and everything else is clear. the oldest boat in service dates back to 1892, while another no, but it does help protect it, we took part in the dunkirk evacuations in 1940. have really high—temperatu re no, but it does help protect it, we have really high—temperature is but the department for transport again across parts of europe. not as says new safety regulations high as what we saw the start of could mean they have to be rebuilt. june, getting close to 40 celsius in owners claim the costs involved parts of spain, also going somewhere would force them to scrap the boats. robert hall is on board one else now, let‘s go to the usa, you of them for us today. there he is. robert. you might remember barry... eric n barry.
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guess, indeed, just climbed off the tropical storm barry. that has been boat, we are on the river bank at richmond. if you live in richmond, moving away eastwards. what is happening behind it as it is pulling in fact, anywhere along the times, up happening behind it as it is pulling up lots and lots of heat and warmth for central and eastern parts of the these boats that run the ob river cruises, they are a popular site. —— usa, it was really hot and humid in new york last week, 32 celsius, not up cruises, they are a popular site. —— up the thames. let me just show you too sure whether our colleague are this room where i am standard but sweltering from the heat. he hasjust been dumped, hasn‘t he? decades ago showing a packed river. going back to the... let say the quite inventive ways to... but what late 18005, we have ridden on one that was 1911, but they've basically we are going to be seeing over the been plying this route, specially next couple of days is washington, designed to go up shallow waters for dc, boston getting close to 40 over a century and now they are celsius, not going to break anyjuly under threat because the maritime record. what is that in old money? in old and coastguard agency as you are about to hear said new safety money, close to 100 fahrenheit. standards really need to be applied 100 fahrenheit, really hot. and some across the board. let's hear a bit more about it. i went on one of talk of is warming up here as well. those boats, the connaught, for the not as hot as that what things will trip from westminster out west. get warmer as we head to next week. welcome aboard the passenger vessel for them, some rain in the forecast connaught, built a century ago and like her sister ships, for that as we go through this still plying her trade on the 24 afternoon, we have got some spells mile route from central of sunshine, sparkling sunshine on
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london to hampton court. they are a unique design. they were built for the thames. the north yorkshire coast through the tide is out at low water, the north yorkshire coast through the afternoon. elsewhere, we‘ve had they can get under the bridges, outbreaks of rain, this is hastings which are quite low in this part of london, and they allow passengers in east sussex but that rain is now still do have access to these clear and raised as an behind it we historic roots which actually are, as anyone who has been on them, got themselves sunshine, still fairly sharp showers across northern are quite magnificent. river steamers launched ireland, scotland, feeding into parts of northern england and north wales but elsewhere a mainly dry and for a tourism boom during the reign to the day, some spells of sunshine, someone in the sunshine, too, and of queen victoria also saw military service. you‘ll see clear spells around the connaught was called up as a hospital ship through the evening. also showers during world war ii. rumbling around across parts of scotland, northern england, northern ireland, becoming more confined to the western isles of scotland. later any night, some heavy rain arriving we see a statue by a gentleman. the old river boats were designed in western england and south—west wales. temperatures not much lower to carry their passengers in comfort and some style. than 12 celsius. tomorrow, an area by the 19605 the river was buzzing with traffic, of low pressure, frontal system but now modern safety standards pushing its way across the uk which are about to catch up with the last will bring heavy rain initially into survivors from the original fleet. south—west england and south wales. qt 20-30 south—west england and south wales. qt 20—30 millimetres across parts of south wales. using north—east with heavy bursts but getting more showery throughout the day. i do, spells of sunshine for a time before for vessels like this
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the new regulations could another band of heavy rain moves mean a virtual rebuild. into south—west england later in the the connaught, for example, would lose one of her most distinctive features. afternoon, then working its way it's this saloon at across southern counties. offers us, across southern counties. offers us, a mainly dry end to the day, wales the rear of the vessel. could see thundery showers, part of it would be cut off, the deck northern ireland, northern england would be re—plated with bulkheads and southern scotland. north of but underneath and the family scotland, not as many showers as owned her and two other vessels we‘ve seen today but when to catch they would cost £500,000 per boat, them, they will be on the heavy they simply can't afford it. dan adams is connaught‘s side. looking fairly unsettled for skipper and tour guide. the golf tomorrow and are likely to he says the safety review see some heavy rain, could well be threatens his livelihood. thundery for a time but saturday looks to be much drier with some it's not practical to do spells of sunshine, feeling a bit it and it would send the company out of business, warmer as well. as we go into which then in turn if they go out saturday, we still got the frontal of business, i'll go out of business system is working their way because i'll no longer have a job. eastwards, fairly unsettled day on saturday, heavy rain initially outside there was sympathy across parts of east anglia and amongst his passengers. if these boats are good enough south east england, something out of for dunkirk they are certainly the way and then it is really a day good enough for us. of sunny spells and showers. not too it would be a terrible shame. many showers across parts of if it's managed all these years scotla nd many showers across parts of scotland and northern ireland but and it's perfectly safe, some of them will again be quite why keep changing things? heavy, delivering a lot of rain in a short amount of time across northern england and parts of wales. a bit the report's there is room cooler, 23 celsius. going into sunday, for many, a dry day, warm
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for manoeuvre but they with spells of sunshine for that later in the day, we see this next have to on course. system arriving into northern there's room for discussion say ireland and western scotland, different parts of the thames, bringing heavy rain here by the end further upstream, where there of the day but much of the day, is less hazard in the tidal stretch if you like, that survivability is really mainly dry, some sunshine and important in bringing those older temperatures up to 22—24dc, warmest boats up to the same standards that new boats are constructed to. the recommendations go before across south—east england and east parliament later this year. anglia, and those tempers are the future of these river veterans starting to climb as we head into the weekend, getting close to 32 hangs in the balance. celsius by tuesday. we all like to hang on to historic things, i'm looking at yourjacket, but what about other boat owners? what are they saying about this?|j what are they saying about this?” was just counting down to that, i knew there was something coming. i think they are realistic, they appreciate that their vessels are older but these are very worrying time. the owners of the connaught are third generation, going back 40 of east anglia could see 31 or 32 by tuesday. this is bbc news — yea rs. are third generation, going back 40 our latest headlines: years. the issue really is this is a a blow for the government historic route, really only and the next prime minister — operating during the summer, at mp5 back an amendment to make it least the mainstream service does. much more difficult to suspend
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the attraction is to go on one of parliament to force through no deal. these very gentle little vessels, a government minister, margotjames, resigns after voting not one of the big, fast passenger against the government, and at least five cabinet ministers, tanks, you take life gently and go including philip hammond, abstain. up tanks, you take life gently and go up the river 20 miles to hampton the public finance watchdog says court. of course an exception can be made based on historical nature of a no—deal brexit could add an extra £30 billion a year to the deficit — and put it, there is cross—party support in the uk into recession. parliament, heavyweight too. lord west is championing their cause but the eu commission‘s most senior vice president says uk ministers were totally unprepared the marina coastguard agency are when they first arrived to negotiate brexit. pretty adamant that safety is safety, there have been tragedies in the past and they do not want to see hashem abedi, brother of the manchester arena them repeated, and really, with very bomber, appears in court and pleads not guilty to 22 counts of murder. few exceptions, that new ruling has to be across the board. we wait to see but it is a knife edge here on the river. there are those of us, more now on our top story that mp5 have backed a bid to stop a new prime minister suspending you will remember, the disaster that parliament to force involved a vote delude black about through a no—deal brexit. very similar to one of these, —— involve a boat very similar to one of these. it is notjust the ships. let‘s go back to jessica let‘s go back tojessica parker. that is exactly what the owner of let's go back to jessica parker. an amendment passed to the northern
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the connaught said to me. he said we ireland bill. it is an attempt to ensure the parliament does sit on can put as many boat heads in as you those crucial days leading up to the like but if you get a severe 31st of october and it is squarely collision, something as bad as that aimed at boris johnson incident involving the boat, the 31st of october and it is squarely aimed at borisjohnson who has so far refused to rule out parading, issue will be in —— the vessel will be in deep trouble anyway. as i said suspending parliament in order to potentially see through a no deal in the report, and so extensive to big is it because if there is one do the work that it is just not worth carrying out that work and thing that is a majority for it is they really do fear that really within a year or toe the line to against a no deal. those behind the come of it all goes through, the amendment are celebrating this afternoon. they say they have taken bout will be off the river. very afternoon. they say they have taken a significant step to strongly good to see you. thank you very much discourage any attempt by a future for that. prime minister to suspend parliament, they don‘t want to be let's have a look at the weather. it locked out of this process, they say. i am joined looks fine in richmond at least. the locked out of this process, they say. iamjoined by locked out of this process, they say. i am joined by a locked out of this process, they say. iam joined by a borisjohnson backer and a man very much involved in borisjohnson‘s earlier rain hasjust looks fine in richmond at least. the earlier rain has just about cleared backer and a man very much involved in boris johnson‘s leadership campaign. is this a blow to the from eastern england and we are left with some spells of sunshine. potential future prime minister, however quite a few showers around. campaign. is this a blow to the potentialfuture prime minister, mr johnson? it is a distraction and this was sussex earlier. a lot of disappointment. i regret these amendments being attached to an cloud, heavy outbreaks of rain and
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we have heavy showers across important piece of legislation, the scotla nd we have heavy showers across scotland and northern ireland, still negotiations to restore devolution. moving their way a crust. some filtering down to parts of northern a very sensitive time and it is england and wales. elsewhere, slightly responsible to be messing sunshine and warmth, temperatures around with this piece of northern irish business with this sort of between 19 and 20 celsius. still some showers across northern thing. boris and others have said ireland, northern england and very clearly that they don't want to scotland. these will become confined provoke parliament but it would be to northern and western areas and later we will see heavier rain wrong at this stage to take any tool arriving into south—west england and in the armoury of the table as we prepared to go back to brussels to south wales. temperatures not much seeka lower than 11 or 12 celsius. prepared to go back to brussels to seek a new agreement. so they have tomorrow we have this area of low successfully weakened boris pressure, that will deliver some heavy rain initially into south—west johnson‘s hand. should you take over at number ten next week. in statute england and south wales. could see law it says we are living on the 20 to 30 millimetres, particularly 31st of october. the european over parts of south wales. another community couldn't impose an eastwards turning shower read. a extension beyond that on the united kingdom. only the british prime reasonable afternoon. a scattering ministercan kingdom. only the british prime minister can ask for kingdom. only the british prime ministercan ask foran kingdom. only the british prime minister can ask for an extension which might not even be granted and of showers but some rain arriving boris has been clear he has no into south—west england later in the intention of asking for an extension afternoon. cooler feel tomorrow, so the position remains clear in
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statute law that the uk leaves the into south—west england later in the afternoon. coolerfeel tomorrow, 20, 20 one celsius. some heavy showers across parts of northern ireland, eu on the 31st of october this year. northern england. fewer showers you say that but perhaps mp5 could across the central belt. spells of find a way as they have before to mandate a prime minister to go and sunshine in between but likely to seek an extension. borisjohnson see a sunshine in between but likely to would be a tricky position if that seeafair sunshine in between but likely to see a fair bit of rain in the open through friday. spells of sunshine happened. paris has been clear that by the time we get to saturday. it is not his intention to seek an heavy bursts of rain as we go extension, that he intends to get a through tomorrow evening. across parts of southern counties of deal before the 31st of october or england, moving eastwards and by if we can't, we leave no deal and we saturday, quite a showery regime. negotiate a comprehensive free trade still some persistent rain across agreement. we had to bring this to a conclusion, it is three years since east anglia and south—east england and then the show is pushing their way across large parts of england the british public voted decisively to leave the eu and this parliament and wales. scotland and ireland which is full of people who didn't having a reasonable day on saturday, support that decision need to back still a couple of showers across off and let us implement the southern parts of scotland. across democratic decision that the british the south, temperatures up to 22, 20 people freely took. you say some people freely took. you say some people need to back off but some are three celsius and by sunday, should saying boris johnson bea three celsius and by sunday, should be a drier day. still some showers people need to back off but some are saying borisjohnson should have ruled this out ages ago, that it is around but not as many. more outrageous that he is even keeping persistent rain arriving into northern ireland and parts of that on the table, locking mp5 out
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western scotland later in the day but temperatures of 23, 20 four of the process. if they listen to what he said, he has said very celsius on sunday in the best of the clearly he is not in favour of using sunshine and it looks like temperatures keep on rising as we go what he described as arcane into next week, potentially close to parliamentary devices. no one wants 30 celsius by the time we get to to provoke parliament in order to tuesday. deliver brexit, we want parliament to deliver on the vote in 2016 and this is bbc news — todayis to deliver on the vote in 2016 and our latest headlines: today is a distraction. it is still a blow for the government — in law we are leaving. the prime and the next prime minister — minister is not going to ask for an mp5 back an amendment to make it much more difficult to suspend extension, we will get this over the parliament to force through no deal. line and we will leave the eu on the 31st of october. what is your message to the likes of margot james at least five cabinet ministers, including philip hammond, abstain from voting and one who has resigned because she voted government minister — margot james— resigns. in favour of this amendment and to theresa may says she won't philip hammond who has abstained. what is your message to those people sack the abstainers. the public finance watchdog says who occupy very senior positions in a no—deal brexit could add an extra government? let's just 30 billion pounds a year who occupy very senior positions in government? let'sjust calm down a to the deficit — little bit, let's give the incoming more than doubling it — prime minister a little bit of and put the uk into recession. space. let them have those the eu commission's former vice president says uk ministers discussions with their european were totally unprepared when they first arrived counterparts, with the dublin to negotiate brexit. government, let them form the new administration and let's see where we are by the autumn. let's give the
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quy: we are by the autumn. let's give the guy, whoever it is, let's give the guy, whoever it is, let's give the guy a break. finally, are you we will have sport shortly about worried after what has happened first, there has been controversy in washington over tweets made by today that boris johnson‘s message that he was trying to send to the eu donald trump. last night he appeared which is take me seriously, i will go for no deal if that is what it ata donald trump. last night he appeared at a rally where he launched a thai raid against the politician which ta kes, go for no deal if that is what it takes, that that has been undermined today? i am not because the ended with the crowd shouting, sent her back. let's go to our fundamentals haven't changed. if he is prime minister, he is not asking correspondent who was in washington. foran is prime minister, he is not asking for an extension. the legal position i don't know where to start because would require an act of parliament andl would require an act of parliament just listening to it, it is pretty and i don't see where the time or the numbers come and that will be, shocking. we had this sort of thing this house of commons in this house before when hillary clinton was the of lords saying to the british object of it. but we have not had people, we are overturning the decision you freely took in 2016. we this kind of racial demagoguery from a sitting us president, not in the are entering very dangerous territory indeed. thank you. as you 215t century, not in the 20th century, you will properly have to have been hearing over this go back to the 19th century. we will afternoon, some mp5, particularly be talking about what happened in those backing that amendment passed north carolina for a long time to this afternoon, seeing it as a come. it felt like a milestone significant step in their quest to try and stop any suspension or moment in american history, a line
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parliament and stop a nodal brexit, was crossed. after the racism of the but as you are just hearing, they original tweets, that donald trump think this is a distraction and that sent out, targeting those for actually it doesn‘t change the fact that for them the uk is still congress women of colour, three of whom were born in the united states, leaving on october 31. we had this very blatant demagoguery last night before a rally of sport now on afternoon cheering supporters. the president live with hugh ferris. naming them individually and letting the goose crescendo. then attacking we‘re now well into the first day them. and then hearing that child, of the open championship. them. and then hearing that child, the lock—up chart of the 2020 campaign, send them home. the president didn't do anything to local knowledge only gets you so dampen that chart down, indeed he far. rory mcavoy has been playing let that chance rise up and from well put rush since his tenth what we saw foreshadows what we will birthday and he is one of the see next year. it felt like he was favourite to win the open test driving his script for the 2020 championship on home soil. but he campaign and putting race right at has had an awful first day which the heart of it. the congresswomen started with a terrible opening hole. adam, it is time now he has responded. you may shoot me with finished his opening around now for your words but still like air, i us to do the analysis and what went will rise. it is more about the wrong for him. well, the obvious
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emotion surrounding all this than the words. it really is and in some a nswer wrong for him. well, the obvious answer is plenty went wrong for rory today. from the very outset, his ways, donald trump's political first opening tee shot off the first strategy here is working to a going out of bounds, actually hit a certain extent. what he is trying to spectator, smashed her phone and do is make these for congresswomen from then, it went downhill. he ended up taking eight to take that of colour the face of the modern day democratic party. there are many first hole, so four over par from members of the democratic party who the very beginning. he did rein it have problems with their politics, they think they are too radical, backin the very beginning. he did rein it back ina the very beginning. he did rein it back in a little bit, he kept things they think they are too radical, steady but then the last few holes, they think they are too left—wing and what donald trump wanted to do things got bad again. he double bogeyed the 16th and triple bogeyed was to rally the democratic party around them and we have seen that the 18th. he is eight over par in this week. in response to the the 18th. he is eight over par in the clubhouse. he has a mountain to original tweets and indeed in climb come tomorrow because he will have two really pick things up if he response to last night. a rallying is going to make the cut on of democrats around these for saturday. what a shame that would be congresswomen. he has waited them for this tournament, for all the together which was what his strategy spectators, for golf, for the was all along. the electoral championship, for northern ireland asa consequences of that are really championship, for northern ireland as a whole. it would be a shame if rory mcavoy wasn‘t around but he has interesting. donald trump knows that a lot of work to do. traditionally that will appeal to his core base,
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the sort of people that go to those the championship can throw up all rallies, the sort of people who don manner of difficulties but it is not do make america, the sort of people just rory who has struggled to do. who charge, lock her up and sent her how is everyone else doing? there home. his problem is the moderate are some notable strugglers. david republicans, the more affluent republicans, the more affluent duval, he somehow conspired to take republicans, the more highly educated republicans, the republicans that tend to live in the a13 at duval, he somehow conspired to take a 13 at the seventh hole. he had a suburban constituencies which in the real stinker of a round. he is well last yea r‘s suburban constituencies which in the last year's mid—term elections voted democrat rather than republicans and thatis democrat rather than republicans and out of contention. let me take you that is why the house, the democrats through the leaderboard, some of are in the majority in the house and those who are not struggling. there there is some interest in polling. is an irishman at the top of the 60% of americans who are aware of this controversy is the said the leaderboard, shane is an irishman at the top of the leaderboa rd, shane lowry. is an irishman at the top of the leaderboard, shane lowry. he leading the way on four under par. he‘s had president's tweets were un—american, a very good day indeed. alex noren, but i think the president might be a very good day indeed. alex noren, a lot of people tipping him to do worried about 57% of republican good things this weekend. he is just supporting him isn't that high and behind on three under but there are it speaks of the split within some strong contenders coming conservatives, those who love this through. tommy fleetwood, jordan kind of heated rhetoric of donald trump, his unorthodox style and those who voted for him last time spieth and of course tiger woods, he is just spieth and of course tiger woods, he isjust coming down holding their noses primarily
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because they hated hillary clinton. spieth and of course tiger woods, he is just coming down the second having saved his par at the first. this is donald trump's attempt to huge crowds begin to build for him. try and create new hate for figures, always popular, tiger woods, on his these congresswomen of colour, but way down the third but very early for some republicans it will be off—putting. right on the issue of days. england have removed australia‘s racism, we are about to celebrate 50 captain on the first afternoon of the one off test yea rs racism, we are about to celebrate 50 years since man landed on the moon. in the women‘s ashes, at that time, the late 605, there but will need to continue to take was one george wallace and it is wickets knowing that if the aussies avoid defeat in the match, perhaps not since him and what he they‘ll retain the ashes. meg lanning was bowled by sophie eccleston after making a half century, represented had we had this sort of but it‘s still been a strong start language. george wallace was the governor of alabama who ran in 1968 for the tourists in taunton. asa governor of alabama who ran in 1968 as a third—party candidate. richard australia 198—3. nixon was the republican presidential candidate who ran a australia have a six points to nil lead very tough campaign himself. he was in the multi—format series, so england have to win the match. a moderate republican but at election time he turned up the england know who they‘ll play in the netball temperature, he turned up the world cup semifinals. rhetoric. he ran as a law and order depending on the restul in theirfinalgroup game candidate in 1968 given the campus against south africa tonight. defending champions australia narrowly beat new zealand to finish top of the other group. so if england do the same tonight unrest, a lot of racial flash they‘ll play new zealand, who had a chance to level points. he ran a hard—line campaign their match earlier. but missed their last but he was outstripped by george second penalty shot.
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scotland also play their final wallace, a southern segregationist, group match later. a white supremacist, an absolute racist who ran both in 1968 and and britain‘s jack laughaer says he feels dead inside after a mistake at the world diving 1972. igot racist who ran both in 1968 and 1972. i got a fair amount of championships saw him miss out support, especially in the south. on a gold medal. comparisons are being made because laugher had led the 3 we haven't seen this kind of heated metre springboard event in south korea from the start, but this final dive rhetoric at the presidential level meant that he came away ina campaign from the competition with just rhetoric at the presidential level a bronze medal. in a campaign setting since then. pat buchanan was another nativist laugher says he doesn‘t know what went wrong with the dive republican who ran in 92 festival, and punched a wall in frustration. again in 96. he was very strong and very controversial in what he said but donald trump was not remarks after dropping to third place. last night outstripped pat buchanan and what we have never seen, george that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for wallace was a fringe candidate you in the next hour. more on brexit — really, he did get a lot of support and the official who led negotiations for the eu, but he had never chance of getting michel barnier, has said the uk would have to "face presidency, what we haven't seen the consequences" if it opted before is this from a sitting to leave with no—deal. he also again stressed there could american president. good to talk to be no re—negotiation of the existing brexit withdrawal agreement. you. mr barnier was speaking sport now on afternoon live with hugh.
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we'll start with the open to the bbc‘s panorama programme. golf, and it's on irish soilfor the first time this document is so important and i in nearly seven decades. recognise not so easy to read, 600 not going to script. such a paces. because we have put in the significant day. document with the uk, not against the uk, with the uk, the legal huge anticipation. sold out all four days. nearly a quarter a nswe rs the uk, with the uk, the legal a nswers to the uk, with the uk, the legal answers to each and every point of uncertainty created by brexit. this is why this document is the only way of a million people. to leave the eu in an orderly manner. and if we just tore up the surrounding the tees at royal portrush. membership card? the uk will have to long been a place of famous golfers. face the consequences. did you think rory mcilroy first played royal portrush on his 10th birthday. ever, they might choose no deal? no. did theresa may as prime minister ever say directly to you or her he was only ten. it was a quadruple ministers, we may go for no deal? bogey eight on the first hole. since no, i never heard such a sentence. then a couple of birdies have never threatened it? no. are you allowed him to fight back and he has improved his card a little bit. another northern irishman, another surprised? surely
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never threatened it? no. are you surprised ? surely in never threatened it? no. are you major winner as well, graeme surprised? surely in any negotiation, people can say we might walk away. i think the uk side which mcdowell went through under but instead of an eight on the first, he finished with a seven on the last to is well informed and competent and end up on two over par. however at the top of the leaderboard, shane know the way we work on the eu side, lowry is their leading on four under par thanks to that made upshaw they knew from the very beginning during the day which started with that we have never been impressed by darren clarke, 630 in the morning, such threats. they are not useful. anotherformer open darren clarke, 630 in the morning, another former open champion for northern ireland. he actually lives at portrush i would imagine if he was in his back garden, he might see that wonderful tee shot that opened things up and he had a good day as a blow for the government — and the next prime minister — well today. walking up the 18th mp5 back an amendment that would make suspending parliament much harder. a government minister — green, everyone shouting and margotjames — resigns after voting against the government, roaring, last time we did that was and at least 5 cabinet ministers, including philip hammond, abstain. the public finance watchdog says 2011. it was fabulous. it is not a no—deal brexit could add just me, it is everyone. i think to an extra 30 billion pounds a year to the deficit — and put the uk into recession. see how much support we have, to see
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all the people come out here, they here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. have put their arms around us as water bills in england well, fabulous. here are how things and wales are set to be cut by £50 over five years. the industry regulator said firms currently look. shane lowry still would also have to invest an additional £6 million each day in improving services for customers. leading by a shot after his 67 only three out of 17 water firms in england and wales passed today. a whole gaggle on three under the last review by ofwat. par. including the likes of robert netflix stumbles as competitors prepare to swoop — shares in the streaming service drop mcintyre and alex noren. francesco as much as 12% after it lose customers for first time in 8 years. instagram is hiding molinari who barely dropped a shot the number of likes on posts in several countries, in winning the claretjug, he has top five in the first round this including australia and japan, year and he is also on three over in order to remove pressure on users. the trial begins on thursday. par. it means users will see a user name "and others" below posts, instead of the number, let's look at the women's ashes. on theirfeed. there is concern social media platforms can contribute to low this is a must win game for england. self—esteem and feelings of inadequacy in young people. england will be desperate to take
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wickets on the first afternoon of the one off test lower water bills in the women's ashes. australia have a six points to nil lead in the multi—format series in england and wales? and have started well in taunton. kirsty gordon took her this is the water regulator out its maiden test wicket. meg lanning and elise perry in. report today and it says bills will fall by an average of £50 in the next five years. the key thing is there is a huge difference in how they are doing particularly well. much they will fall by according to where live. it is also criticised if australia avoid defeat, water firms in the amount of money they'll retain the ashes. england now know who their potential investing. they need to have money semifinal opponents will be at the netball world cup. but they still have one thrown at them. let‘s talk to the more group game to play. so let's head to liverpool head of policy and research at the and speak to kate grey. kate, the last four line up consumer councilfor head of policy and research at the consumer council for water. first of all, your reaction to news that the will be settled today. average prices of bill will come down for people in england and that's right. it is the last day of wales. this is good news for most the group faces. we know which four teams will make it through to the customers. usually people are used to hearing about bills increasing so semifinal, it is now working out who plays him. we were treated to a this makes a refreshing change. it brilliant match earlier today, the is good that ofwat have finally been defending champions, australia,
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versus new zealand. it was always tough on water companies. we think going to be interesting because both they have been lenient on the have not been faced at this point. companies for the best part of a they have had a seamless progression decade, so it is good they have been through the tournament but it was listening and they are tougher on neck and neck and the second half. companies which means there will be new zealand fighting back against the australians and it came down to a good outcome for most but not all the australians and it came down to the final second when new zealand water customers in england and had the opportunity to level the wales. you say not all because there isa wales. you say not all because there is a big difference between some match but unfortunately, maria folau areas where you might see a fall of couldn't see her penalty shot which £7 and others where it is over 100, went australia were victorious and why is there a difference? each new zealand had to settle with company submits a plan to ofwat and losing by one goal. what does that they take a view on how good that mean for england? england, if they plan is. there are differences and win today against south africa, they will play new zealand and if they they can be significant between companies. when you look at that £50 lose today, they will play australia. i don't think either of those matches will be easy but at average decrease, for some companies least we know australia at the that decrease could be completely moment are the team that had just wiped out because those numbers got the edge at the moment. that don't include the impact of inflation or the impact of financial match, english versus south africa will be at 8pm tonight and we'll see bonuses that the companies can get scotla nd will be at 8pm tonight and we'll see scotland against trinidad and tobago from ofwat if their performance is at 4pm and they are hoping to win good. both those factors can that match to make it through to the actually increase bills. some ninth and tenth play—off where they customers will be receiving mixed will meet northern ireland because
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messages today because they will northern ireland beat barbados today. lots of really interesting hear bills will be falling but the matches but i think england will be the centre of attention at 8pm build they get will go up. only tonight. thank you very much indeed. three of the 17 water firms past you can follow it on the bbc sport reviews. the review deals with and app. that's all the sport for now. customers and links. that is quite damning. ofwat were quite critical 12 israelis, aged 15 to 18 have appeared in court in cyprus in connection of the plan submitted to them and with the rape of a british holiday maker. the alleged attack took place their views really matter. because in the popular resort of ayia napa. ultimately they make the decision on the foreign office has confirmed price limits but what we want to do it is supporting a british woman with these plans is test them with and is in contact with the police. tom bateman sent this update customers, because we think it is from paralimni, where today's court customers, because we think it is customers that matter. what we will appearance was held. do is take the packages and test it was in the early hours them with customers up and down the of yesterday morning that country to see what they make of a 19—year—old british woman them and if customers don't like contacted the police just down the road in ayia napa to say she had what they see, we will go back to been raped in the hotel ofwat and expect them to take she was staying in. later that day the authorities action. arrested 12 teenagers, they are all israeli an update on the sport but a huge and aged between 15 and 18. in the last hour and a half financial benefit to these things.
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they have appeared in court. as they arrived, they covered their faces with jackets, came into the court room, it is the 148 open and the first they were handcuffed in pairs as their parents shouted messages of support, time since 1951 that northern some of whom had flown from israel, ireland has hosted the prestigious and embraced their children as they were taken into the courtroom. the judge confirmed their names competition. estimates have the but then told reporters to leave due to the young age of one amount of money at around £85 of them, the 15—year—old. million for the coming year for they were remanded in custody for another eight days to give northern ireland, so it‘s a huge police more time to investigate. deal because it is bringing tens of no charges have yet been brought, thousands of tourists and also lifting northern ireland in terms of but as for the british authorities, its commercial value and the way it they say they are in contact, is viewed by everyone around the world. it is a big deal and it means they are supporting this 19—year—old a lot in terms of the economy. one woman in ayia napa and in contact person who has done a study on this is the chief economist at ulster with the local police here. university. earlier i asked him what the short and long term economic impacts on northern ireland will be after the open is over. undoubtedly the open will bring positive a blow for the government — and the next prime minister — mp5 back an amendment that would make suspending economic gain. this will happen in parliament much harder.
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at least 5 cabinet ministers— three ways. first of all there will including philip hammond— abstain from voting and a government minister— be more visitors coming to northern margot james— resigns. ireland, they will spend money and the public finance watchdog says a no—deal brexit could add that reasonable estimate is they an extra £30 billion a year will add £40 million to the economy to the deficit — and put the uk into recession this year. secondly, northern ireland as a location around the here's your business headlines on afternoon live. water bills in england world, it gets a very large amount and wales are set to be cut of free television advertising about by £50 over five years. the industry regulator said firms would also have to invest an additional £6 million each day the natural beauty of the location in improving services for customers. and so forth. it has been estimated that the value of that advertising only three out of 17 water firms would be around 50 million so there in england and wales passed the last review by ofwat. you have 40 million of extra output, 50 million of free advertising and netflix stumbles as competitors prepare to swoop. then thirdly and also very shares in the streaming service drop importantly over the longer term, it as much as 12% after it loses is reasonable to assume that there customers for first time in eight years. will be a permanent boost to tourist instagram is hiding the number of likes on posts numbers in future years to come in in several countries, 2020, 2021 and so forth and there including australia and japan, may even be some benefit in terms of in order to remove pressure on users.
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the trial begins on thursday. business executives around the world and the united states, east asia and so forth, watching the sport on television then deciding yes, this how is that going to work? you can is an investment location that we should consider. even when the open is over, northern ireland will keep still see how many likes you have on on winning. i wanted to show you what the pound is doing against the your own instagram account but this trial means other people can't see dollar. it has bounced back. it now how many likes you have. according stands at just under $1 to instagram, it lives some of the pressure on younger people who dollar. it has bounced back. it now stands atjust under $1 25. we saw basically rely on the number of the bounce back after mp5 voted in likes they have and other people favour of the measure which could seeing the likes they have stock block a nodal brexit. that is their from a business point of view, it is way of telling westminster that they still 0k from a business point of view, it is still ok because you can still see who has liked your page, it doesn't are happy with that vote. the pound have an impact in that sense, but jumping up. by about a third of a this is a big change for instagram percent after the vote. you are in some countries. will it roll out looking at me like you don‘t understand what i am saying. always elsewhere? talk me through exactly refreshingly informative. thank you what is happening here. why are they doing this and how is it going to very much, simon!
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work with siam they have rolled it out to six more countries, ireland, twelve israelis, aged 15 to 18 have appeared in court in cyprus in connection italy, japan, australia. the test with the rape of a british holiday maker. started in canada and now you are the alleged attack took place in the popular resort of ayia napa. the foreign office has confirmed seeing facebook expand this trial it is supporting a british woman and is in contact with the police. with instagram. and as you rightly tom bateman sent this update pointed out, this is all about from paralimni where today‘s court appearance was held. trying to address concerns people have with social media when it comes toissues have with social media when it comes to issues like bullying, self—esteem, all of this. how can it was the early hours of yesterday these companies get to grips with morning just down the road here that it? they are trying to address, a 19—year—old british woman especially with young kids on the contacted the police to say she had been raped in the hotel she was platform, they want to make it more staying in. later that day the about the videos and photos as the police arrested 12 teenagers, they company says unless about are all israeli nationals and aged self—esteem, people drink self—esteem, people drink between 15 and 18. it was earlier self—esteem from the number of likes they get, they want you to focus on today that they appeared in court they get, they want you to focus on the contact. the fact they have here. they were led through the expanded it would suggest they are court building here, handcuffed seeing some success and if it together in pairs, their parents, continues to go well, i wouldn't be some of whom had flown over from surprised if you saw it expand even further. it is interesting how they israel, shouted messages of support and try to embrace some of their have done this. do you know whether it will be rolled out into the uk at children. thejudge confirmed and try to embrace some of their children. the judge confirmed the
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names of those who had been arrested any point soon? at this point the in court before asking reporters to leave because of the young age of one of them, just 15 years old. she company is not saying too much. even the trial in canada, they were then reminded them in custody for another eight days to give the fairly tight—lipped about that. when they rolled it out to the six extra police more time to investigate. the lawyers point out they have yet to countries, at one point in canada enter any plea, no charges have been you could start seeing the likes again and then it disappeared again. brought. as for the british this really is still a development authorities, the uk foreign office and they are testing. one has to has said it is supporting a 19—year—old woman who was assaulted read between the lines and say if and they say they are in contact they are expanding, they are clearly with the local authorities here. optimistic that this might address some of the concerns. about netflix added fewer paid subscribers than expected in the last three months, self—esteem, how people feel and if with the streaming service blaming price rises. shares in the company sank 10%. you're running a business, if you rely on those likes to try and they did add 2.7 million new customers worldwide measure how successful you are, that between april and june, is still available to individuals, is still available to individuals, isjust that the is still available to individuals, is just that the public won't be but that was well below forecasts. able to see how well other posts ago, they will see who like but not we are joined by the film ago, they will see who like but not a number tally unless you want to go and tv critic beth webb through counting. i have counted netflix has been nothing but a about 50 people walking past you in the last few minutes alone. it's a success story netflix has been nothing but a su ccess story so netflix has been nothing but a success story so what is going on? they have been unstoppable since
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2011 so this is the first time we busy day. it's called the new york have seen a dip in subscribers. the stock exchange. let's talk about one ceo has put it down to a twofold problem, so they have up the prices more thing before you go. business in certain regions including the us, is not so good for coal chrome. can from 1099 to 1299 us dollars. they also put it down to lack content. they have what they described as you explain this. a number of sweet content that they don‘t think has really been responsive. i would tend to disagree, so we have had in companies going public today hence the traffic. it is a chip—maker and this quarter, when they see us which between 2090 and 2011, there were has received 16 nominations at the queues of selling their chips below emmys. another tv show called dead to me which hasjust market price. these were chips used emmys. another tv show called dead to me which has just received a string of emmy nominations as well. in 3d mobile dongle is at the time. they have not seen the figures to the eu alleges the company was back up the content this quarter. but if they are putting the prices deliberately targeting a strategy that would put its arrival at a up, and programmes are not up to disadvantage so now they find the scratch, that sounds self—inflicted. isn‘t it just. we company at the end of an scratch, that sounds self—inflicted. isn‘t itjust. we had the third season of things come out, they have
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investigation. the sums involved are a new series of the crown then a new not substantial, it amounts to less than 2% of the company 's revenue series of orange is the new black la st than 2% of the company 's revenue last year but it is about sending a message to the industry that this which is their strongest programme on the service. we think of these sort of behaviour will not be tolerated in europe but the company highly expensive programmes. are they perhaps spending too much?m was sold back in 2012 and it got out seems they have spent or they are believed to have spent $50 billion of the business. it doesn't help this year on content alone. we are them but obviously it is about expecting to see some of that here changing behaviours and it marked a in the uk with them coming over to pattern where the eu has taken a shepperton studios, they have over tough stance with the tech giants.l 221 projects across europe so they are spending a lot of money that true professional. working her way through that bulletin. good to see they will help to keep up with their you, almost. can you imagine people competitors. we are looking at amazon and rich box. is that worrying them? we have a way of of just walking across us the whole netflix killers. excitingly we have time. the pound has rebounded in the last hour or so. someone has disney and apple launching streaming services in the autumn, both just chucking money at content. disney tweeted, that maryam is putting you, will expect new series around marvel simon, in your place. i like her, and star wars which are two massive
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names and apple have got money to she is funny. i havejust blocked put into big projects. they have a new series which is averaging about him. 50 million an episode. is there any more than 6,500 arrests have been made evidence that frankly we have too across england and wales for attacks much choice now and we know what we on emergency workers since tougher new laws were introduced last year. like and we are perhaps retreating the figures include attacks on the police, paramendics, firefighters and prison officers. james vincent has the details. into a more familiar into the habit. i'm now recording. it's the eighth of february at 9:58. perhaps but netflix is demoting no, you're not. bleep. diverse voices and better stories good. that perhaps wouldn‘t make their way i went to have a polite chat as part of my role as a community support officer and unprovoked, to hollywood. think about roma and he attacked me. carlos archer's attacker is serving other smaller productions which seven months in prison perhaps wouldn‘t be picked up by after being convicted of two charges, including assault studios are making their way to on an emergency worker. millions. netflix is at the hiya, how are you doing, all right? forefront of something that is seen the new law is designed asa forefront of something that is seen to protect ambulance crews, as a change the way we watch firefighters, police and pcsos. television. where do you see us bbc research shows there were more heading in five, ten years‘ time on than 6000 arrests across england this? huge expansion on the and wales under the new law streaming market. unless we see some in its first six months. pretty drastic changes in theatrical my two kids asked me, daddy, releases and certainly cinema ticket who did that to your nose? prices, we will lose a lot of i had to put it into terms
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customers at the cinemas. and just that they understand and "goodies" and "baddies" as such, the old —fashioned way, explain why things like the crown, and unfortunately a baddie had decided to break daddy's nose things like orange is the new black, when daddy wasn't looking. why they cost so much money to in the first six months of the law the metropolitan police said it made 1283 arrests. produce. netflix have now become west yorkshire police made their own worst enemy. they feel 504 arrests and west this enormous pressure every time midlands police made 497. they come to a new series, they need to outdo the last one and until now but the mp who helped bring they have had the fan base and in the law thinks tougher sentences should be handed out. audiences to back up justifying that amount of money. how they move the numbers of arrests still show forward from here, they will that there is a problem. properly have to reconsider. i don't want to see in court subscription prices have gone up in suspended sentences, the us, it still sounds cheaper than which i think are offensive to those what we are paying here. yes, it who've been victims of crime, where there are community still is and what they‘re hoping to resolutions that are not then honoured by the perpetrator, do is sustain prices especially in dealt with outside of court. we've got to get europe. they are anticipating 7 really tough on this. we owe that to our million subscribers over the rest of the year and they hope most of that emergency service workers. we're under attack from fireworks. will be from international at the moment the maximum audiences. thank you. sentence is 12 months. firefighter dave gilliam was involved in an attack similar to this one. for him, tougher sentences
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still won't work. first we can say many happy returns we started getting to this boy, jiao shing, pelted by fireworks. who‘s been celebrating his 9th it was obviously, the fire had been birthday at a zoo in berlin. set we believe to draw us into that and there may be more happy news corner and for a few seconds soon as his partner meng meng has i couldn't see anything. just been artificially inseminated it's a personal view but i'm not convinced this is going to change anything. and everyone hopes she‘s pregnant. i think those people know that what they are doing is wrong and that they could get into trouble as for that cake — for it, so i'm not sure no sugar, just iced sweet any extra legislation potatoes and red beetroot, is really going to stop it. a ministry ofjustice spokesperson but he seems to prefer said, attacking our hard—working emergency staff will not be bamboo anyway. tolerated and the law was brought in so those who commit such violence quite rightly face a stronger punishment, doubling the sentence and then we‘ve got shi shi who is from six to 12 months. one year old and lives in shanghai. but some are now pushing shi shi has also had a birthday, for a minimum sentence for those who attack emergency services staff. shi shi is one year old. james vincent, bbc news. and shi shi had a cake too, she celebrated with her mother, apparently by sitting on her cake. beautiful sunshine around in the afternoon. for others, quite a few i‘ve got the media critic for the
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showers, particularly across guardian sniggering here. how would northern ireland and scotland, heavy you have critiqued that? ten out of bursts of rain. the odd rumble of ten. adorable content! let's have a thunder as well. some frequent look at the weather. some unsettled showers across northern ireland and weather over the next couple of scotland. earlier rain just about days. most of us will see rain clear from east anglia and south—east england, behind that some before things turned drier. whilst sunshine and want to end the day. we have had some sunshine this this evening there will be some afternoon, also frequent and heavy clear spells for many but still some showers particularly across northern showers around parts of northern ireland and scotland. if you are england, ireland and scotland, filtering down into northern england becoming more confined to the and north wales. the earlier rain clearing away from eastern england western isles. later some more persistent rain arriving into so many of us will see clear spells south—west england and south wales, for a time overnight. showers still temperatures 11 or 12 celsius. form northern ireland and northern tomorrow this area of low pressure scotland. some heavy rain then pushing its way eastwards. heavy arriving into south—west england and south wales later in the night, rain initially to south—west england temperatures not much lower than 11 and south wales, 20 to 30 millimetres. through the morning or 12 celsius. three friday we have this area of low pressure and still some heavy outburst about frontal system to deal with. that turning more showery. not so much will bring heavy rain into rain getting up into the central south—west england and south wales.
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belt and northwards. behind it, some 20 to 30 millimetres likely in sharp showers, the odd rumble of places. pushing its way northern thunder, also some spells of eastwards, turning more showery as sunshine. could find some heavy it does so and behind it we will see some bright or sunny spells showers, flashes of lightning across developing but also showers. later northern ireland, northern england. in the afternoon another spell of fewer showers across scotland rain arriving into south—west compared to today. good spells of england which will work its way eastwards. ahead of it, once the sunshine in between. fairly wet for morning rain has clear, bright or the open tomorrow. outbreaks of rain on and off. but looking drier with sunny spells, scattering of showers, could well be heavy and thundery spells of sunshine by the time we across northern ireland, northern get to saturday. tomorrow evening, england. still some showers in more persistent rain pushing its way scotla nd england. still some showers in scotland but not as many as today. across southern counties of england. then clearing out the way on there is some heavy rain to content saturday but may linger over parts with across southern counties of england three friday evening, pushing its way eastwards and we of east anglia and south of england. still have heavy showers continuing a day of sunny spells and scattered across northern england, southern scotla nd across northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland. quite showers. some quite heavy an unsubtle day for the open on particularly across central parts of friday. but looking much drier by england. some spells of sunshine across northern ireland and saturday. saturday in more detail, scotland. 17 to 23 celsius compared frontal systems continuing to slide their way eastwards. that rain will
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to today. sunday, a of dry weather turn more showery so more frequent for many. one or two showers perhaps showers through saturday morning, but it looks like we will see more particularly across northern persistent rain arriving into parts england, east england, south—east england, east england, south—east england through the day becoming of northern ireland and western scotland. ahead of that, spells of more scattered. nonetheless still some heavier ones and with the sunshine, temperatures of 23 or 24 potential for some rumbles of celsius and those temperatures keep thunder but looking drier across on climbing through next week. parts 00:59:19,225 --> 2147483052:06:25,986 of east anglia could see 31 or 32 by 2147483052:06:25,986 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 tuesday. northern ireland, wales, western scotla nd northern ireland, wales, western scotland through the afternoon and in the sunshine, temperatures of 23, maybe even 24 celsius. temperatures keep on rising through sunday and monday, temperatures of 30 celsius by tuesday and most will be dry with spells of sunshine.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m afternoon live. simon mccoy. today at 4. afternoon live. the afternoon live. ayes to the right, the noes to the the ayes to the right, the noes to the left, 274. a blow for the government and the next prime minister. mp5 back an amendment that would make it much more difficult to suspend parliament to force through no deal. —— a no—deal brexit. at least five cabinet ministers, including philip hammond, abstain from voting and a government minister, margot james, resigns. theresa may says she won‘t sack the abstainers. the public finance watchdog says a no—deal brexit could add an extra £30 billion a year to the deficit and put the uk into recession. the eu commission‘s most senior vice—president says uk ministers were totally unprepared when they first arrived to negotiate brexit. time is running out, you don‘t have a plan. it‘s like lance corporaljones, "don‘t panic, don‘t panic," running around like idiots.
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ca re care worker stephen nicholson is found guilty of killing lucy mccue to stop herfrom found guilty of killing lucy mccue to stop her from accusing found guilty of killing lucy mccue to stop herfrom accusing him coming up on afternoon live all the sport. rory mcilroy and‘s challenge on home soil could be over already, he finished his first round at royal portrush and eight over par. details of his opening—round nightmarejust after 4:30pm. and looking at the weather, alina jenkins. hello, simon, more rain in the forecast over the next day or so before things turn mainly drive for the second half of the weekend and potentially very warm through the early pa rt potentially very warm through the early part of next week. i‘ll tell you all about it in the next half an hour.
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hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i want you to consider this kipper. the truth about kippers. reality check‘s chris morris will be getting to the bottom of borisjohnson‘s claims. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. mp5 have voted in favour of a measure that could block efforts by the next prime minister to force through a no—deal brexit by suspending parliament. the commons voted by a majority of 41 to approve an amendment put forward by labour‘s hilary benn and former minister alistair burt. four cabinet ministers abstained from voting. the chancellor phillip hammond, thejustice secretary david gauke, the business secretary greg clark and the international development secretary, rory stewart. theresa may so she will not sack the
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abstainers. 17 conservatives voted against the government, has since resigned. it‘s being seen as a victory for parliament and a problem for whoever becomes the next prime minister, boris johnson orjeremy hunt. this is the moment in the commons that the goverment was defeated. the ayes to the right, 315. the noes to the left, 274. house: 0h! the ayes to the right, 315. the noes to the left, 274. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it. unlock. we can talk to our political correspondent nick eardley in the houses of parliament now. this is significant, isn‘t it? it is for a couple of reasons. the first is it makes the idea of packing this place up and sending mp5 home to
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force through brexit a lot less likely and a lot less attractive to the new prime minister. jeremy hunt said he would not do it and boris johnson doesn‘t want to do it but has left it on the table. today's vote m ea ns has left it on the table. today's vote means the positives of doing that are very few and far between. i think it makes it considerably less likely. the second is it is a warning to mrjohnson that there are a lot of mp5 in here, many in his own party, who are prepared to rebel against the government on brexit if they have to. the 17 tories who voted against the plan, surrey, voted against the plan, surrey, voted for the plan to try and block suspending parliament and the 30 who abstained and didn‘t vote at all, some of them were not here at all today so we can‘t count all of them in that number but there were a significant few, including the chancellor phillip hammond and other cabinet ministers who abstained from the vote because, quite frankly, they can‘t get on board with the idea of packing this place up to
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make sure brexit happens. let‘s hear the rationale of one of them, greg clark. there hasn't been a discussion in cabinet on whether we should prorogue parliament, in other words shut the doors of parliament, to prevent it meeting in the context of brexit. there hasn't been a discussion of that. and clearly, given the views of the government has taken, and the views that i have expressed to you and have taken all the time that i've been in this post, i couldn't support the idea that we would allow the doors of parliament to be locked against mps at this crucially important time. i think that would be a constitutional outrage. we should not participate in it. greg clark explaining why he
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abstained. what this doesn‘t do is stop no deal. it creates a window to try and prevent it happening. it is still the legal default, it is still not completely in the uk‘s hands. let‘s have a chat with one of the mp5 who is part of this effort to try and stop no deal happening, the snp's try and stop no deal happening, the snp‘s leader down here ian blackford. how are you going to stop no deal happening? you are right in what you say that if nothing else happens we leave on a no deal basis as the default. the office for budget responsibility has made it clear no—deal brexit will really hurt, people will lose jobs. how are you going to stop it? today has been a momentous day and i'm so grateful colleagues across the house have givena very colleagues across the house have given a very clear signal to the new prime minister, because that's what this is about, but he's not going to get away, if he chooses to prorogue parliament, and we have given ourselves a mechanism that parliament can sit and we can stop the new prime minister doing that. i wa nt the new prime minister doing that. i want to say to colleagues across the table we have to go further and we
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have to bring forward over the course of the coming weeks when we are in parliament, legislation that will allow us to strike out no deal. it's up to parliament to do that. of course we have to find a way to do it and there are mechanisms we can use. people often talk about taking back control. well actually, that's exactly what has happened today, parliament has taken back control. the message we must send to boris johnson, you will not do untold damage to the economy by driving the united kingdom out of the european union on a no deal basis, all of us have responsibilities to protect the economic interests of our constituents and i believe that's what we will be doing. i'm much more confident today that no deal will not happen if parliament does its job. we have heard these political arguments against no deal before. we have had votes in here were you guys haven‘t been able to get your ducks ina row haven‘t been able to get your ducks in a row and haven‘t got to a stage where you firmly block no deal. what‘s different this time? what can you tell our viewers you will do come september, october that will stop no deal happening? what is different as more conservatives are
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prepared to stand up. those that voted today and those that abstain, many in the government, and i suspect many of them will be out of borisjohnson's suspect many of them will be out of boris johnson's government, so that alliance will grow over the course of the coming weeks. when we come back after the summer recess. and i do appeal to everyone and i would say think about the responsibility we have to our constituents. no deal will be calamitous. it is the height of irresponsibility. i don't believe that any politician should be inflicting economic harm on the people of the united kingdom. that's what we won't do. we have to use our responsibilities and amend the withdrawal act and stop no deal. that is the responsibility we have and no prime minister will be able to stop parliament doing that if we ta ke to stop parliament doing that if we take control and seize the moment. it is not completely in your hands evenif it is not completely in your hands even if you amended the withdrawal and actand even if you amended the withdrawal and act and took no deal off the table, any domestic since europe has a big say in this too. —— amended the withdrawal act. have you had any signs from europe that they would be willing to extend again even if
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nothing has changed here? i'm so grateful that europe has extended the hand of friendship by extending the hand of friendship by extending the period. i've been speaking to european diplomats, ambassadors and politicians. europe wants to help us. europe doesn't want to see us leaving no deal in europe doesn't wa nt leaving no deal in europe doesn't want to see a dislocation on not just our economy but the effect that would have on europe as well. i'm much more hopeful today that we can find a way forward out of this that will stop no deal. ian blackford, thank you very much for your time. there is elements here today of there is anotherjourney in this long political battle in westminster over what brexit looks like. today matters, as i was saying. it gives to things, it gives the space to stop no deal and shows the political pressure of the new prime minister would be under if they went down that route but there are huge political battles to come here and that we have seen over the last
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couple of years, predicting with any certainty what is going to happen in there is a full‘s game. certainty what is going to happen in there is a full's game. nick eardley with ian blackford, thank you very much. meanwhile, the government‘s financial watchdog has warned that a no—deal brexit could mean a surge in public borrowing of £30 billion a year, more than doubling the deficit. it‘s the first time a price has been put on the impact of leaving the eu without a deal. chancellor philip hammond says the report, from the office for budget responsibility, shows there would be a very significant hit to the british economy. here‘s our economics correspondent andy verity. it was in may 2010 that former chancellor george osborne created the office for budget responsibility. the idea was there would be someone independent to make sure the government was sticking to its own goals for cutting the deficit, the amount by which the government outspends its income, and containing the national debt. today it warned public finances
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would take a hit even if a no—deal brexit didn‘t cause much disruption. it adds around £30 billion a year to government borrowing, a not insignificant sum of money. and that is largely because you have less growth in the economy which means less income tax receipts, also things like weaker house prices, less property transactions so you have less capital taxes as well. there are some gains in the other direction, to begin with you‘d be spending less on debt interest and tariff revenues but overall it is a hit to the public finances of around £30 billion a year. under the scenario the obr looked at, the no—deal brexit has only a limited impact and the gdp shrinks by 2% in the next year or so. in that event, the obr says, it would boost the budget deficit by £30 billion and the national debt would be 12% higher. about £200 billion more. that most benign version is not the version that is being talked about by prominent brexiteers. they are talking about a much harder version which would cause more disruption to our economy
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and the obr is clear that in that less benign version of no deal, it would be much greater, the impact would be much harder, the recession would be bigger. but brexit supporters are taking the analysis with a pinch of salt. we will see, as everything else, many forecasts have been completely wrong over the years, in fact any forecast from the international monetary fund right the way through to the obr and everything else, these has often been quite wrong. in some cases budget forecasts didn‘t last six months after the budget. but getting the public finances in order is no longer the top priority it was. the obr says philip hammond himself has all but abandoned the goal of getting rid of the budget deficit by the mid—20205 and points out spending promises of both the candidates for the tory leadership would add tens
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of billions of pounds to the deficit and the debt. budget responsibility? it ain‘t what it used to be. andy verity, bbc news. more on brexit — and the official who led negotiations for the eu, michel barnier, has said the uk would have to "face the consequences" if it opted to leave with no deal. he also again stressed there could be no re—negotiation of the existing brexit withdrawal agreement. mr barnier was speaking to the bbc‘s panorama programme. let‘s hear more of what he had to say. of this document is so important and i recognise not so easy to read. 600 pages. because we have put into the document with the uk, not against the uk, the legal answers to each and every point of uncertainty created by brexit. that is the point. that is why this document is the only way to leave the eu in an orderly manner. and if we just left, if we just tore
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up the membership card? the uk would have to face the consequences. in another interview for the programme, the eu commission‘s first vice—president, frans timmermans, said uk ministers were, in his words, "running around like idiots" when they arrived to negotiate brexit in 2017. the first time i saw public utterances by david davis, and i saw him not coming, not negotiating, grandstanding elsewhere. i thought, "oh, my god. they haven‘t got a plan." that was really shocking, frankly. cos then the damage... if you don‘t have a plan... we see it, that time‘s running out, you don‘t have a plan, it‘s like lance corporaljones. "don‘t panic, don‘t panic!" running around like idiots. in response, the minister for exiting the eu, lord callanan, told the bbc that the comments were, as he put it, "childish insults". i think mr timmermans needs to stop with the childish insults and if he was such a big fan
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of dad‘s army he would know the riposte from captain mainwaring to such comments, "stupid boy". tomorrow evening we have a special programme on the liberal democrat leadership contest. the two candidates, jo swinson and ed davey, will go head to head here on bbc news at 7pm tomorrow night. if you have any questions for the candidates you can tweet us using #bbclibdemdebate. prosecutors have alleged the younger brother of the manchester arena bomber salman abedi made detonator tubes for the device that killed 22 people. hashem abedi, who‘s been extradited from libya, appeared in court today and pleaded not guilty to 22 counts of murder. it‘s also alleged he bought chemicals used to make explosives, and a car in which bomb making materials were stored. a bbc investigation found primary school pupils are being repeatedly rejected for mental health support. freedom of information requests from
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46 health trusts across the uk showed the number of health referrals by primary schools have risen by nearly 50% over the last three years to just over 31,500 children. while the government says it‘s committed to improving mental health support, the royal college of psychiatrists say the figures are "deeply worrying". our special correspondent ed thomas has more. as a team of staff we‘ll quite often cry together over what we‘re hearing children say. i think it's going to take the death a child before people start taking it more seriously. i think the government needs to decide whether they want us to be social workers and mental health workers, or educators. the bbc has been hearing from schools across the country about the mental health of their pupils. when you have a child in year four who is talking about self—harm or talking about suicide, that‘s shocked a number of staff. talking about suicide, wondering what it would feel like, and having those conversations quite regularly. it's incredibly distressing
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when you hear a child as young as six, seven, express that level of unhappiness with their life. freedom of information responses from 46 health trusts across the uk indicate the number of referrals made to child mental health services by primary schools for those aged 11 and under increased by nearly 50% over the last three years. i find it really abhorrent. there‘s nothing that we can realistically do that is going to give the child the help that that child needs. for serious cases schools can refer to child mental health services. some head teachers say securing support can be a challenge. external resources are reducing rapidly because of financial constraints.
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camhs was the agency needed. two years it‘s taken and we are still waiting for an assessment for a child who has experienced extreme mental health distress. primary schools can't solve everything. we need help. the government told us it was determined to improve mental health services, and by 2024, 345,000 more children and young people will have access to specialist care. ed thomas, bbc news. a man has been found guilty of murdering and raping 13 year—old lucy mchugh injuly of last year. 25—year—old stephen nicholson killed lucy to prevent her from revealing his abuse of her, her body was discovered amongst woodland in southampton. with me now is our correspondent angus crawford. what is the background to this? lucy was 13 when she went missing from her home on july was 13 when she went missing from her home onjuly 25 last year in southampton. she was described as vulnerable, it wasn‘t doing well at school, diagnosed with adhd and later found stabbed to death in woodland nearby, she had 11 stab wounds, dna evidence led to stephen
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nicholson who had been the family lodger and today he was found guilty of what was called in court and execution style killing, carried out in his mind, to prevent herfrom revealing she was pregnant. she wasn‘t actually pregnant. she he was found guilty of three counts of rape. he was described as cold, calculating and a predatory paedophile. a police investigation involving facebook and messages left there. detectives felt in the very early moments of this investigation that his facebook account would have vital evidence in it, vital information about messages so they applied to facebook and facebook said as is routine in these cases u nless said as is routine in these cases unless there is an imminent threat to life we cannot by us law and over the information so they simply couldn‘t. nicholson wouldn‘t hand over the password so he was sent to prison for obstructing the police in their duties and facebook said you‘ve got to apply through something called the mutual legal
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assistance treaty which can take months to get the information. the information only came through on the day the trial started and was only partial information. what should have happened by now is that a treaty should have been passed by the us and the uk changing that situation, which would allow facebook and other social media companies to hand over information to the police much more quickly. that treaty has not yet been passed. as for nicholson, he will be sentenced tomorrow. angus crawford, thank you very much. new home office statistics show the proportion of crime solved in england and wales has dropped to the lowest level recorded. separate data from the office for national statistics shows while overall levels of crime have not changed, individual clients including theft, robbery and knife crime has increased. the latest home office figures show in the 12 months to the end of march 2019 just 7.8% of offences resulted in someone being charged or summoned to appear in court, a fall from 9% the year
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before. separate data provided from the office for national statistics shows that instances of knife crime are up by 8% since last year and the same data reveals recorded offences of robbery increased by 11% over the same period. earlier our home affairs correspondent danny shaw gave more analysis on the newly released crime figures. it is the lowest levels since these figures we re lowest levels since these figures were compiled in 2015. in 2015 the number of cases where someone was charged and brought to court was 15% and it has been falling steadily since then, and now, as you say, 7.8%. of course it varies from case to case, sexual offences will be much lower than that. there are some cases, possession of weapons for instance, drugs offences, where the detection rates are higher. the home office in its statistics have given some explanations for this plummeting level of detection. it says it may be due to the more complex caseload that police have. so it is harder to investigate cases, also they have more digital
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evidence to go through. they also say police recording practices may be partly to blame for this as well. and also, the increasing reluctance of victims to cooperate with police. that is certainly one of the reasons why fewer cases are coming to court. i have to say the home office says nothing in its document about the fa ct nothing in its document about the fact that there are fewer police officers to investigate crime. that was danny shaw reporting. conservative leadership favourite borisjohnson waved a smoked kipper about his head at the final tory leadership hustings on wednesday, and promised to cut britain free of brussels‘ "regulatory overkill" and red tape after brexit. mrjohnson‘s claimed that "brussels bureaucrats" insist every kipper must be accompanied by a plastic pillow, increasing manufacturing costs for british fishmongers. but there was a problem with his statement as the eu does not regulate the sale of smoked fish. here‘s what the eu commission had to say about boris johnson‘s fishy
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comments on twitter earlier today. the tweet from the eu commission in london‘s account says: "fishy story? this is uk national competence, not eu." you have done with a great favour, but actually not, because they stink. reality check correspondent chris morrisjoins me now to get to the bottom of this fishy business. because of your highly skilled production team, i‘ve only got one hand so i can‘t pick up both of them. we could probably have a competition to see who could get more bad which —related puns into the next three minutes but i have to hang my head in shame in the newsroom. again. the point is he got it wrong hook, line and sinker. he went off the scale. a rent off the scales. let‘s listen to what he went wrong on. i want you to consider this.... kipper. this kipper, which has been presented to me just now by the editor of a national newspaper who received it from a kipper smoker in the isle of man who is utterly furious because, after decades of sending kippers like this through the post, he has had his costs massively
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increased by brussels' bureaucrats who have insisted that each kipper must be accompanied by a... this, a plastic ice pillow. pointless, pointless, expensive, environmentally damaging, 'elf and safety. at least it didn‘t smell. so what was wrong? there are no eu food safety rules which say that a smoked kip at salesman needs to pop an ice pillow into the post when he sends a kipper to a consumer. in fact, those rules, if they do exist, are entirely uk rules. the uk government guidance says all food must be delivered to consumers in a way they don‘t become unsafe or unfit to eat, which seems perfectly sensible, and that means they need refrigerating, or to be kept cool while being transported. so it‘s a pretty
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sensible thing to say but it‘s nothing to do with brussels bureaucrats and the european commission was quick to highlight this thanks to some digging from some of the british journalist spaced over there. let‘s listen to what they said today. the case described by mrjohnson falls outside the scope of the eu legislation and it is purely a uk national competence. so, i hope this is clear and the rules must be checked with the national authorities. there are strict rules when it comes to fresh fish but these kind of rules don't apply to processed fishery products. i'm talking about the temperature and the exact case that he was explaining.
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so he is just so he isjust wrong. is this embarrassing? he's even more wrong because, of course, the isle of man isn‘t part of the eu, or indeed part of the uk, so it has nothing to do with eu rules at all. is it embarrassing? you know, the picture of him waving his kipper was on the front page of several... we have to do that again, we just missed that. waving his kipper... this is a family show, was on the front of several national newspapers this morning. he‘s made his point. you look at the research when things are said that i described as fake news or whatever and all the research says no one remember the fact it wasn‘t true. the tory party faithful will just wasn‘t true. the tory party faithful willjust remember the wasn‘t true. the tory party faithful will just remember the image wasn‘t true. the tory party faithful willjust remember the image of borisjohnson willjust remember the image of boris johnson waving willjust remember the image of borisjohnson waving a fish around and railing at brussels bureaucrats so he‘s kind of made his point, the fa ct so he‘s kind of made his point, the fact he got it completely wrong, sadly, doesn‘t seem to matter. fact he got it completely wrong, sadly, doesn't seem to matter. ok, chris, and your kippers, thank you.
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we will be back. we even got a gratuitous shot of the kippers to finish with. thank you. we have had the chancellor philip hammond tweet the chancellor philip hammond tweet the defence of his decision to abstain from that vote this afternoon. this is on the ability to suspend parliament for whoever becomes the next prime minister. the conservative party has always at its co re conservative party has always at its core had a fundamental belief in the importance of strong institutions and ina importance of strong institutions and in a representative democracy there can be no more vital institution than its parliament. it should not be controversial to believe parliament be allowed to sit and have a say during a key period during our country‘s history. that‘s his defence of his decision to abstain, effectively, against the government in that vote. let‘s get back to the increase in referrals to child mental health services and we can speak to sue blair who is head teacher of pennine way primary school in carlisle and she spoke to our special
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correspondent early and she joins me now from carlisle. does this shine with your experience of what has been going on and child psychiatric health being available? hello to you. we are finding that there is a growing need for children to be able to get additional support and in schools we are very frustrated because we don‘t seem to be able to access that support quickly enough. when a child is displaying behaviours and unhappy signs we know we need to tackle it quickly, and sadly, we arejust we need to tackle it quickly, and sadly, we are just not able to do so. the result of this is you are seeing self—harm, i think, in youngsters of an astonishing age. i think what we are seeing is a range of behaviours where children are not able to articulate that they are feeling unhappy but the behaviours
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are showing us that they are struggling to be able to tell us that they are feeling stressed or depressed. or any range of things. and yes, that does result in self harming. we have seen eating disorders, and a range of other behaviours. where is the line between being a teacher and someone who is that closely involved with a child‘s mental health? who is that closely involved with a child's mental health?” who is that closely involved with a child's mental health? i think that‘s a really good question because actually we are educators. but we are in a privileged position of knowing the children really well because we have them all day long five days a week. so we are able to recognise signs. we are able to listen and talk with parents on a daily basis. and so together we can recognise that sometimes the children are crying out for help. the struggle that we find is that we are asked to help with mental health issues but we are not given the resources or the training to be able
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to do it in the effective way that us as professionals would like to do it. professional or not, even on a human level it must be very difficult for teachers to hear the sorts of stories from youngsters who are in this sort of state of mind. it is hard but we have strategies in place so that we can support each other, there are supervision sessions and we make sure that we work together as clusters of schools. so in our local community there are 11 schools together who support each other and we try and make sure that we work effectively with other agencies such as public health england and other health professionals. you need help? we do need help and we need to be trusted. if we, as professionals, asking for help, then the professionals out there and the government, i need to
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say, should trust that we know what we are talking about and we need some additional resource to help. sue blair, thank you for your time this afternoon. thank you. still heavy showers to deal with through the rest of thursday, particularly in scotland and northern ireland, a few feeding into north england and wales. sunshine developing behind. current temperatures up to 24 celsius in some places. some heavy rain arriving into parts of south—west england and south wales later in the night. temperatures generally between 10-14. temperatures generally between 10—14. heavy rain in south—west england and south wales, pushing its way north eastwards during the day. behind its spells of sunshine, but
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later in the day another spell of heavy rain across southern counties. temperature is cooler tomorrow. quite unsettled on saturday with a mix of sunshine and heavy showers, but warmer and drier for mix of sunshine and heavy showers, but warmer and drierfor many mix of sunshine and heavy showers, but warmer and drier for many on sunday. a public finance watchdog says a no—deal brexit could add an extra £30 billion into the deficit and put the uk into recession. a senior eu minister says the uk‘s ministers we re minister says the uk‘s ministers were unprepared when they arrived to
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negotiate brexit. perhaps we put too much pressure on people like rory mcilroy before he sta rts people like rory mcilroy before he starts playing games like this. yes, he has not responded particularly well to the gargantuan pressure that is on him. for most of us 79 would be a good round. for you and me it is astonishing. but for rory mcilroy, it is not so good. for rory mcilroy playing the first round of the open at the course he‘s been playing
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since he was a kid. not so good — double, triple and quadruple bogey in his round of eight over at royal portrush. is his challenge over even though it is only early afternoon? he really does have a mountain to climb after a very disappointing first round here at royal portrush. so many hopes were resting on his shoulders. he admitted after he came off that he was nervous on the first tee this morning. it really did show. he hooked out of bounds on his very first shot. he did come back slightly but he came apart again in the closing holes with a double bogey and a triple bogey to finish. he finishes on eight over for the day. hugely disappointing for him. others faring rather better in what our extraordinary changeable conditions at royal portrush. shane lowry is leading the way, the irishman. alex noren and a whole
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host of other players on three under. tommy fleetwood hasjust joined them on three under as he birdied a moment or two ago. pruskow echo, the world number one, ominously poised behind him. it is all to play for. —— brooks koepka. england have removed australia‘s captain on the first afternoon of the one—off test in the women‘s ashes but will need to continue to take wickets knowing that if the aussies avoid defeat in the match, they‘ll retain the ashes. three of the batters for australia have reached a half—century beyond. australia are currently 198—3. australia have a six points to nil lead in the multi—format series so england have to win the match. england now know who their potential semi—final opponents will be at the netball world cup. but they still have one more group game to play,
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so let‘s head to liverpool and speak to kate grey. who will england want to avoid in the last four? today we witnessed a really exciting match at the netball world cup, australia versus new zealand, the two teams england could potentially face in the semifinal. it has to be a real highlight in liverpool, it was end to end stuff, particularly in the second half. australia had an eight goal lead and new zealand came back at them and the score line came down to the final few seconds where new zealand had a penalty shot which meant they could have drawn even, but u nfortu nately could have drawn even, but unfortunately they could not sink it and the defending champions won that match. if they win their group, they will be the favourites. but new zealand are a huge threat as well. if england win against south africa this evening, they will play new zealand. if they lose, they will play australia. either way it is not an easy semifinal match for them and
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it has heightened the pressure on the hosts. they will play at 8pm. we have got scotland in action at the moment and they are leading by 22-21. if moment and they are leading by 22—21. if they win that, they will be in the ninth and tenth play—offs. lots of exciting things happening. britten‘s simon yates has won a stage in the tour de france. downhill three riders were fighting it out in a sprint finish. it was eventually won by simon yates. a frenchman retains the overall leader‘s jersey. that is all your support for now.
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now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to amy garcia from look north in leeds who is talking about attacks on emergency workers across the region and the uk. and we also have spotlight‘s janine jansen in plymouth who is going to tell us about the flagship project in cornwall‘s climate change action plan. we‘ll hear from janine in a moment. first, amy, you‘ve been speaking to emergency service workers who‘ve been assaulted haven‘t you? yes, the assaults on emergency workers offences act, or protecting the protected as it is known, is a new law that has been in place since november last year. we wanted to find out how it has been enforced. we did a freedom of information request and there has been a total of 6663 arrests in england and wales. there has always been an offence for assaulting a police officer, but this is a new law and
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it covers all emergency workers, so ambulance, fire, pc essos. it raises the maximum sentence from six to 12 months. we have been out on the streets of york with callas archer. he got punched on duty and it was ca ptu red he got punched on duty and it was captured on his body cam.” he got punched on duty and it was captured on his body cam. i am now recording, it is the 8th of february... i went to have a polite chat and he attacked me. my two kids asked me, who did that to your nose? i had to put it into terms that they understand, goodies and baddies as such. unfortunately a baddie decided to break daddy's knows when he was not looking. we know about the number of arrests, but some people wa nt to number of arrests, but some people want to see stronger punishment. yes, a halifax mp lobbied for this new law. she was out with the police a couple of years ago and she had to
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call 999 because the officers she was with were being attacked themselves. she says the number of arrests are high and that means the new law is not a deterrent. the west yorkshire police federation thinks there should be a minimum sentence. the numbers of arrests show there is a problem. i do not want to see in court suspended sentences which are offensive to those who are victims offensive to those who are victims of crime. where there are community resolutions that have not been honoured dealt with outside of court, we have to get tough on theirs. we owe that to our emergency service workers. they say they need to be clear messages to say that attacks on these people are not acceptable. we lost a bit of that. this story is now being picked up nationally. much more tonight on
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look north. much more tonight on look north. and janine, tell us about why flowers and trees have been making the news. that is in plymouth. it is fashionable growing wildflower meadows and planting along the verges. a conservancy agency wants to save wild flowers so that road verges are home to 700 species. but they say 97% of meadows have vanished since the 19305 and verges are the last remaining refuge for bees, butterflies, birds, bats and bugs. while flower planting is proving popular in cornwall, millions of pounds of public money from various different pots, like the highways budget, is being spent transforming cornel‘s areas. the good news about the road verges is it saves on grass cutting and it is also good for wildlife, for
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pollinators and is good for people‘s health and well—being. pollinators and is good for people‘s health and well-being. with all the cutbacks it is a bit of a no—brainer. it ticks the boxes for the environment and saving money. what other plans to scorn will have to improve the environment?‘ radical plan has been announced, the flagship project of the council‘s climate change action plan. there are proposals for a forest for cornwall. it could cost up to £30 million. they arejust cornwall. it could cost up to £30 million. they are just plans at the moment and they will be discussed next week. trees do not come cheap. it is worth every penny? yes, a large mature tree provides enough oxyge n large mature tree provides enough oxygen for ten people. by the end of the year £3.5 million will have been spent transforming seven cornish towns, that is the equivalent of 40 by towns, that is the equivalent of 40 rugby pitches. another 3 million is set to be spent in the same way in
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other towns. if you are not coming to cornwall this summer, come and have a look at our wild flowers. you are on, it is a date. always good to see you. more on spotlight tonight. and amy garcia. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them on the bbc iplayer. you can also see them at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. nearly two million cubic metres of sand is being shifted to a stretch of eroding norfolk coastline in a radical plan to save it from the sea. the 5km—long dune will protect bacton gas terminal, which supplies one third of the uk‘s gas, but is teetering just metres from a cliff edge. the £20m project should also act as a defence for two nearby villages — bacton and walcott. it is the first "sandscaping" scheme on this scale to be carried out in the uk.
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rebecca morelle reports. a crumbling cliff in the east of england and perched on top is bacton terminal, which supplies one third of the uk‘s gas. but the coastline here is eroding so fast, in a few yea rs here is eroding so fast, in a few years it could be lost. this could be the answer. a $25 million experiment on a vast scale, using sand to fight back the encroaching sea. this is a 24/7 operation. every our 10,000 cubic metres of sand is being pumped out. over the course of a few weeks it will create a massive sand dune, standing up to seven metres high and stretching for six kilometres. that is nearly four miles along the coast. it is the first time this has been tried in the uk. the problem is so big and so
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unsolvable that it needs something radical like this, so a massive volume of sand and using the wind and the waves to move the centre where it needs to be overtime to provide 15—20 years of protection. this structure is full of sand collected further along the coast from a licensed site. it delivers it to the shore using a long pipe, releasing a mixture of sand and water. it is carefully shifted into position, working section by section to create the sandy barrier. england‘s east coast desperately needs a solution. natural erosion is eating away at the cliffs and during big storms it is worse. entire homes can be lost. today the villages of ba cton can be lost. today the villages of bacton and walcott are facing this problem, with the sea wall close to collapse. but now this landscaping project, mainly paid for by the gas terminal operators, will also protect them. but schemes like this
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are expensive and not every coastal community will get help. when you have national infrastructure like this, it is being affected and people can afford to pay to protect this. where you cannot afford to protect the coast, do you just let it go? in some places that is already happening, mainly in areas where it is farmland anyway. using sand is a change of approach for sea defences, usually it is concrete or rock. but this is a more natural effort, the sand should ebb and flow with the tide, but it will protect a larger amount of the coast at a time. all eyes are on it to see if it works. all eyes are on it to see if it works. first, let‘s bring you our headlines. a blow for the government as mp5
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pass a motion making it more harder to suspend parliament. at least five cabinet ministers, including philip hammond abstained. a public finance watchdog says no—deal brexit could add £30 billion a year to the deficit and put britain into recession. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. water bills in england and wales are set to be cut by £50 over five years. the industry regulator said firms would also have to invest an additional £6 million each day in improving services for customers. only three out of 17 water firms in england and wales passed the last review by ofwat. waitrose has announced it‘s closing seven stores in the autumn. stores in bromley, sandhurst, wollaton, marlow, stevenage and waterside, near heathrow will shut. waitrose says staff whose jobs are at risk will now enter a period of consultation about opportunities elsewhere in the business.
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instagram is hiding the number of likes on posts in several countries, including australia and japan, in order to "remove pressure" on users. the trial begins today. it means users will see a user name "and others" below posts, instead of the number, on theirfeed. there is concern social media platforms can contribute to low self—esteem and feelings of inadequacy in young people. this is the moment where we talk about the market as mac and we have about the market as mac and we have a blank screen. your challenge is to tell us about it with a blank screen. they have been up and down today and they often are! i am joking. the big story today is the pound. ona joking. the big story today is the pound. on a serious note, we have seen the pound weakening significantly as investors worry
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about the prospect of a no—deal brexit. at one point it dropped below $1 24. today we have seen a rebound after ministers voted to make it more difficult for any future prime minister to suspend parliament and push through a no—deal brexit. that is how investors view no deal, they prefer it not to happen. in terms of stocks easyj et has it not to happen. in terms of stocks easyjet has been rising and asos is rising. retail is strong in the month ofjune and that has given investors something to think about. i bet the markets work where you are, michael? the screens do, but all i can hear is you in my ear. i have not got any screens to refer to. talk us through the pound. it has seen a bit of a rebound, hasn‘t it, after the vote in parliament?
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has seen a bit of a rebound, hasn‘t it, after the vote in parliament7m you look at the pound and the economic data it has been uniformly positive. it is being weighed down by concerns about a no—deal brexit. but no—deal brexit is no more likely now than it was a month ago or a week ago. what is holding it down is concerned about that. the conservative party leadership contest is weighing down on investor sentiment towards the pan. if you look at the economic data, the economy is looking up. certainly in terms of the data from may and june, it looks positive. there is talk about retail sales and economic data. unexpectedly strong retail sales in june. i am not unduly surprised by that. we have come off the back of two very weak months in april and may, so it was no surprise to see a rebound. that being said, department store sales are very
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weak. but what we did see is a big growth in diy, home improvements with sales of paint, glass, furniture. that has proved to be correct. there is money there, given the fact wages are growing much faster than inflation. we have had two weak months and consumers were playing catch up. we had decent weather injune, playing catch up. we had decent weather in june, we playing catch up. we had decent weather injune, we have seen sporting events in july weather injune, we have seen sporting events injuly and we could see a good july number as well when the figures come out in august.” see a good july number as well when the figures come out in august. i am getting over the fact you paid for your own windowsills.” getting over the fact you paid for your own windowsills. i did because they are stone, they are not pvc, i am old school. let's talk about asos. simon is giving me a look. nobody paints upvc windows? no, i
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don't, they were stone. simon was not listening. i am used to that. shares in asos have sunk. profits are likely to be much lower than expected. yes, this is the third profit warning in seven months and they have downgraded their expectations from £55 million to about £30 million. that is because of restructuring costs, but when you dig behind the numbers, the sales numbers are good. revenues are up 11 point 5%, £2.3 billion. as long as they can get past the restructuring costs and move forward with their european and us operations, we could see it going up. personally, we have not ta ken out see it going up. personally, we have not taken out the lows we saw with the first profit warning in december and there is a good possibility we could see a rebound. you wanted to talk about easyjet. last time i
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checked the share prices were up 3%. that is right, a two month high. this has been as a result of the fa ct this has been as a result of the fact there was an expectation they would downgrade their profit hmmfi would downgrade their profit forecast for this year. they have not done that. in fact they have seen an uplift in revenue receipt and there is a prospect they are behind the worst of it, given the wind that we have seen blow through the travel sector with air berlin, boeing 373 max, concerns about thomas cook, higher fuel prices, they push through all that and delivered a decent set of numbers. good to know that you are available to paint stone windowsills at any point. it will cost you. really? just a jen point. it will cost you. really? justajen and point. it will cost you. really? just a jen and tonic. does that feel like a threat to you? michael,
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always good to see you. thank you. thank you. you are welcome. shares in netflix sunk 10%,. the film and television critic has been telling me more about the figures. this is the first time in eight yea rs we have this is the first time in eight years we have seen a dip in subscribers. the ceo has put it down to a twofold problem. they have also put it down to what they say is a lacklustre content. they had in q two what they describe as weak content that has not been very responsive. i would disagree with that. we have had in this
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it is now it from me for some time but certainly from afternoon light. ben brown will be here for the news at five shortly but first let‘s have at five shortly but first let‘s have a look at the weather whether lena jenkins. hello. some unsettled weather over the next couple of days. most of us will see some rain before things turn drier for many through the second half of the weekend. whilst we have had some sunshine around this afternoon, also some frequent and locally heavy showers particularly across northern ireland and scotland, a few filtering down into northern england and northern wales, the earlier rain clearing away from eastern england. some warmth and sunshine behind that which means many of us will see some clear spells for a time overnight. still a few showers across northern england, northern ireland and parts of scotland becoming confined to northern and western areas as the night wears on. but some heavier rain arriving into south—west england
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and south wales later in the night, not much lower than 11 or 12 celsius. so through friday we have this area of low pressure and frontal system to deal with. that‘s going to bring some heavy rain initially into south—west england and south wales. 20—30 millimetres likely in places particularly for south wales. pushing its way north and eastwards through the day, still some heavier bursts but turning more showery as it does so, and behind it we will see some bright or sunny spells developing but also some showers. and then later in the afternoon, another spell of rain arriving into south—west england which will then work its way eastwards across southern counties. but ahead of it, once the morning rain has cleared, some bright or sunny spells, a scattering of showers, could well be heavy or thundery across northern ireland, northern england and southern scotland. still some showers further north across scotland but not as many as we have seen today, and in between some good spells of sunshine. some heavy rain to contend with across southern counties of england through friday evening pushing its way eastwards, and we still have some heavy, thundery showers continuing across northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland, so it‘s quite an unsettled day for the open on friday. likely to see some rain on and off through much of the day but looking
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much drier by saturday. so, let‘s look at saturday in a bit more detail. frontal systems continuing to slide their way eastwards across the uk but that rain will gradually turn more showery, so more frequent showers through saturday morning, particularly across northern england, east anglia, south—east england. through the day, those showers become a little more scattered, nonetheless, still some heavier ones and with the potential for some rumbles of thunder, but looking drier, particularly across northern ireland, wales, western scotland through the afternoon. and in the sunshine, temperatures 23, maybe even 24 celsius. temperatures keep on rising as we go through sunday and monday, could get close to 30 celsius by the time we get to tuesday and most will be dry with some spells of sunshine. bye— bye.
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today at five — a commons vote
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to try and stop the next prime minister suspending parliament. the ayes to the right... mp5 back an amendment that would block attempts to prorogue the commons in order to force through a no—deal brexit. four cabinet ministers, including the chancellor philip hammond, abstain and 17 tory mp5 rebel, including the junior minister margotjames, who‘s now resigned. we‘ll have the latest live from westminster. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the public finance watchdog says a no—deal brexit could add an extra £30 billion a year to the deficit.
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