Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 15, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 2: jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans young and old celebrate england's dramatic world cup win. lam i am definitely flying. probably has sunkin i am definitely flying. probably has sunk ina i am definitely flying. probably has sunk in a little bit more this morning about a really great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. and i am live at the oval with more reaction from what has been an extraordinary tournament. a serial thief who targeted victims through dating apps is found guilty of murdering a businessman using the drug ghb. com pletely u na cce pta ble theresa may's verdict on president trump's latest twitter outburst, branded racist by critics. coming up on afternoon live all the sport.
2:01 pm
we will have more on the oval celebrations plus the latest on england at the netball world cup. they take on jamaica later england at the netball world cup. they take onjamaica later on. england at the netball world cup. they take on jamaica later on. nick is looking at the weather. high pressure to start, low pressure later. i have the forecast plus i will be getting on your goat, simon, with news of something old but increasingly popular in the way of dealing with spreading wildfires. more celebrated in death than in life: alan turing the mathematician who helped invent modern computing and break the german enigma code will be the face of the new £50 note. 1966, 2003, and now 2019 — the years
2:02 pm
we heard the words ‘england have won the world cup‘ first in football, then rugby, and now of course cricket. and those words are still echoing in our ears after that remarkable cricket game yesterday described by many as the best final ever. and one of the most remarkable games ever. the players head to downing street tonight for a reception earlier, fans, many of them children, joined the team at the oval to celebrate. many will be hoping that the world cup win will have a positive long term effect on the grass roots of the game. let's go to the oval now. the euphoria is still there. yes and it was etched all over the faces of those england players. only now is the enormity of what they have achieved starting to sink in because yesterday evening, everyone was consumed, not just with yesterday evening, everyone was consumed, notjust with the result but the nature of the result, the way that england won that match. what after seven weeks over cricket,
2:03 pm
48 matches, nothing can split those two finalists, england and new zealand, after their respective 50 overs, the scores were tied and as we know, we went to that super over and still the two teams couldn't be split. and so it was the boundaries that england had school, those fours and sixes that saw them over the line. they beat new zealand. it there have been some fantastic celebrations here. eoin morgan the captain was with them carrying that trophy and a huge celebration, lots of local schoolchildren, more fans and supporters welcomed them in. they were given a huge round of applause as they came down the pavilion here at the oval. it was at that point that i think now they are realising just what they have achieved. you were talking about how rare it is for england to win a world cup, of course england's men's teams have emulated the women's side but it has been so difficult for england to get over that line in
2:04 pm
this major tournament. we have seen them lose finals previously, three, their most recent 27 years ago. we know white ball cricket has been prioritise and eoin morgan has been at the forefront of that. could they deliver on home soil? could they deliver on home soil? could they deliver when the pressure was on? they have been number one in the world rankings but could they show it at this major tournament here in england? it at this major tournament here in england 7 they it at this major tournament here in england? they did so but not in the manner that i think they ever envisaged. i don't think any of us did. the question for the ecb is how do you have harnessed this enthusiasm and how do you reinvigorate the grassroots of the game? a lot of criticism that the move away from terrestrial television but the money that came in from sky has got us to where we are, it helped them establish this team. yes, it has done. there is no doubt about that and financially,
2:05 pm
much better off but it is about finding that balance and that is something the ecb will feel they have managed to achieve throughout this tournament. a huge boost that sky made yesterday available for free to air television but let's not forget, there have been clips you have been able to watch by the bbc sports website, you have been able to follow the coverage on test match special, it is about bringing all those outlets together which is something the ecb field has been achieved. you only had to notice the record number of hits that came through the bbc sports website yesterday, combined that with the numbers who would have been watching live on television as families up and down the country gather together to watch such a special moment in the history of british sport. you could tell as well here today that the number of players that stopped to sign autographs for those schoolchildren, they want to harness that goodwill, good feeling and build upon that going forward and there can be no doubt hopefully they
2:06 pm
will feel this could be a real launch pad going forward with the success launch pad going forward with the success of this world cup on home soil and the ashes now to come, this could be a wonderful summer for english cricket and the ecb will hope this will help to reinvigorate the mood towards cricket in this country and will galvanise more interest. we will see more girls and boys are choosing to play cricket perhaps over other sports. thank you. let's get more reaction to yesterday's victory. i can talk to gary white who played with ben stokes. when you first saw him play, did he stand out back then? he stood out with raw potential. you could see he had all the components and raw ingredients there that would have given him a good opportunity to play first—class cricket and that is what everybody thought. if this lie can play first—class cricket he will
2:07 pm
have done really well. he looked really powerful as a batsman and then his bowling started to come together and that is when everyone thought this lad has a real chance of being a top first—class cricketer. i don't think at that stage anybody would have envisaged him going on to do what he did in the game, especially yesterday but you could see he had all the components there that needed honed to make him into the quality cricketer he is today. you are captain of the cockermouth cricket club. what were seems like yesterday, those last few minutes we re yesterday, those last few minutes were a lot of us were behind so. yesterday, those last few minutes were a lot of us were behind sqm was brilliant down here. the atmosphere was incredible and the nice part of it was there were former team—mates of ben's, his first coach, the first captain who picked him for the first team, there we re picked him for the first team, there were old school friends and the next generation of cricketers who look up to ben, look up to that england team, boys and girls who just want to go out there and play the game in
2:08 pm
the same way ben does. his parents are from new zealand, he was born in new zealand, he came over here as a young lad. at 15 was he allowed to forget that and move on? yeah, i think he will spend so much time down here, his life was down at the cricket club. he lived 200 yards away from here, he spent all his time in the nets behind me or over in the pavilion. he used to have a horrible habit of dipping his mars bar in his coke to refuel, all he did was live for the game of cricket and although he was a good rugby player as well, cricket was really where he stood out. you are describing someone who clearly obsessed with the game. he was a voracious trainer and that is something that has stood him in good stead more recently. yes, he was. it was just his appetite for the game asa was just his appetite for the game as a young lad. he had a huge appetite for it, you could never get
2:09 pm
him out of the nets, you could never get the bat out of his hand and the bowling quality, he had another string to his bow. he was always a brilliant fielder as well and you can see that in his game, he is never out of the game, he is always in the heat of the action and the script couldn't have been written letter by stephen spielberg than for a man like ben to come to the fore. it didn't happen with the ball, in the field but when you can strike a ball like he can and relax and play a final like ball like he can and relax and play afinallikea ball like he can and relax and play a final like a game out here, we really couldn't have written a script better than for ben yesterday. there will be films made about this. i am wondering, someone who knows him as you do, it was clear as he was doing that mammoth evenings that it was destroying him. you could see him just wilting and yet the determination to go through and then he came back to do the super over. i think you would have
2:10 pm
had to have a real man's job to stop him coming back to that over. we all said, ben is going to come back out. the adrenaline will get him through. they picked the two right players to do it. not only did they bat well together but ben clearly hit the ball well and when those two came out, just had a really good feeling that super over was going to go our way. he seems difficult times in recent yea rs. way. he seems difficult times in recent years. what will this due to the man, ben stokes? how will this change him or maybe it won't?” don't think it will in that regard. like you say, there have been ups and downs for ben and i think yesterday was lovely for him, especially after the t20 final where he bowled the last over and he took that burden and he felt the pain of what happened during that game. yesterday was a redemption for ben
2:11 pm
and that will exorcise a few demons for him and he can put that behind him. he came out batting, like he was under no pressure. that sums him up was under no pressure. that sums him up as was under no pressure. that sums him upasa was under no pressure. that sums him up as a character. that speaks volumes without anybody saying what he is like. what you see out there is genuinely what you get is a person and cricketer. england have won the world cup. it has a ring to it. it's fantastic. the atmosphere down here that would have been replicated up and down the country. the number of text we have had, phone calls from casual cricket watchers, people who don't normally watchers, people who don't normally watch the game were glued to their television sets yesterday. it's been incredible. not only from feedback from what ben did but what dignity asa from what ben did but what dignity as a whole did and how that can impact positively on the boys and girls who come down here of which we have a really good thriving junior section. that hopefully will be
2:12 pm
replicated up and down the country and clubs will see the real wards of what the english team did yesterday. great to talk to you. thank you for joining us. i suspect we will all be celebrating for a few more days yet. you are watching afternoon live. a drug dealer has been convicted of murdering a man with the sex drug, ghb. gerald matovu, who's 26, gave eric michels a fatal dose at his home in south west london after the pair met through a dating app. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. murdered for his bank cards, his computer, his mobile phone and a few bottles of wine. business executive and part—time actor eric michaels. he had contacted his killer gerry matovu through the gay dating app grindr. picking him up from a homeless hostel and stopping off at sainsburys on the way back to his south—west london home. but that night, gerry matovu drugged him with the sedative ghb in order to rob him.
2:13 pm
he gave him a fatal dose. today, eric michaels' sons describe the family's grief. i'll never meet anyone like him ever again in my life, and losing him has been like losing a limb. the devastation it causes is unbelievable. especially when he had so much to live for. i mean, he was only 54. leaving eric michels dead in his bed, gerry matovu left in a minicab with a suitcase of loot. in the following days, he and an accomplice brandon dunbar went on a spending spree using eric michels' bank cards. he's a liar, he's a hustler, he's a thief. he had no regard for a person's welfare. no regard at all for their life, because he's using a really dangerous drug to facilitate his crimes. matovu had been using ghb to rob people he met on grindrfor years. between them, he and dunbar had robbed at least a dozen people.
2:14 pm
here they are seen leaving the flat of one of their targets. five victims went to the police, but the investigations were limited. the most extraordinary incident happened at this east london hotel last may after a dutch businessman who was a guest met matovu on grindr. here, matovu drugged him and stole all his possessions, including his clothes, his laptop, his mobile phones and his bank cards. he even took the flat screen television and the toilet brush from the hotel bedroom. but police failed to identify the man who had drugged his victim into unconsciousness, even though it would have been easy to do so from his grindr account. i don't understand why it wasn't followed up at that time, because we might not be where we are today if it was. it's just a shame my dad had to die for them to go and find him, basically. the police were well aware of gerry matovu. he had been convicted of selling drugs to stephen port,
2:15 pm
the notorious ghb serial killer. today we can reveal that matovu had even drugged and robbed port himself, just before stephen port was arrested for killing four men, prompting this exchange on whatsapp. i hope you don't do that again to anyone, as it's not only dangerous, but to then take their stuff is criminal. port wrote. to which matovu replied. i'm so sorry, and it won't happen ever again. this case has highlighted once more how police don't always take the misuse of this incredibly dangerous drug seriously enough. any allegation of anything involving ghb in the future should be taken very, very seriously and investigated every time. eric michels' sons want the drug laws to be changed to recognise just how lethal ghb can be. daniel sandford, bbc news.
2:16 pm
lee milner is at the old bailey. lee milner is at the old baileym has been extremely emotional and tense as you can imagine in courtroom six today. the whole family of eric michaels has attended every single day of this trial, waiting for that all—importa nt verdict and they got it today and as thejury read verdict and they got it today and as the jury read out that murder verdict and said the words guilty, they jumped up verdict and said the words guilty, theyjumped up in the air. a lot of emotion as thejury left, theyjumped up in the air. a lot of emotion as the jury left, they thank them as well. eric michaels was a much loved father he was a businessman, a pa rt—time much loved father he was a businessman, a part—time actor and he was simply robbed for his possessions. he met his killer gerald matovu on a gay dating app on grindrand on the gerald matovu on a gay dating app on grindr and on the night he met him, he was drugged with this sedative
2:17 pm
ghb. this drug is really strong, it is used by some clubbers. only a few drops of this substance can have catastrophic circumstances. when gerald matovu realised he had given mr michael is gerald matovu realised he had given mrmichael is an gerald matovu realised he had given mr michael is an overdose, he took his time to look round the room, photographs of his credit cards and took what he could and went on a spending spree with his co—defendant. earlier on, we spoke to one of mr michael's's sons, sam, who gave an emotional statement outside court today. today we have finally receive justice for our dad on this long and traumatic road. the man who made us who we are today, the man who never stop telling us how much we could achieve. dad was a hard—working man how much we could achieve. dad was a ha rd—working man whose how much we could achieve. dad was a hard—working man whose mission was to give his children a life ofjoy and that he did for so many years. he taught us what it was meant to be
2:18 pm
loved. he was truly respected by his family, co—workers and friends. he loved all the simple things in life and had time for anyone. we could not have asked better father. we would like to thank all the officers from the homicide team who have helped us over the last 11 months. your hard work has made this journey easier for all of us. we would also like to thank our prosecution team and all the other witnesses that came forward to help us in our case. we are now for the press to please respect our privacy. we will never forget our wonderful father and he will forever be in our hearts. set gerald matovu has done this a number of times, robbing a dozen people with ghb. the most extraordinary incident happened in a hotel in east london with a dutch businessman where they robbed everything include the tv and toilet brush. as you can imagine, mr michael's's sons are
2:19 pm
calling for a change in the law as to how people use this drug. earlier on, we also heard not only was he convicted of murder but gerald matovu even robbed stephen port, the notorious ghb serial killer before port was arrested for killing four people there. aside from the murder conviction, gerald matovu was found guilty of six counts of administering a noxious substance and won possession of ghb with intent to supply. they will both appear for sentencing in the next few months. teresa three of the congresswomen were born in the united states. another came to the country as a young child.
2:20 pm
let's see what the us president said. he began, it is so interesting to see congresswomen come from countries whose own governments... our correspondent gary o'donoghue is in washington. what is the reaction there? from democrats, it is what you would
2:21 pm
expect and it is a reaction that is difficult to disagree with. they are calling this racist language, they are calling these tweets races. there is no doubt that on a pretty objective level these are invoking racist tropes that go back a long way. we can remember back in the 70s and 80s in britain the national front was their key message, people should go home, go back to where they came from and that is exactly what the president has been saying here. the fact is all these four congresswomen are american citizens, they wouldn't be in congress if they weren't, three were born in this country. those are the facts but thatis country. those are the facts but that is not really what it is about from the president's point of view. it is about pressing some buttons, buttons he has pressed before as he has talked about mexicans as rapists and drug dealers and when he has talked about good people on both
2:22 pm
sides of the argument when white supremacist marched in charlottesville. supremacist marched in cha rlottesville. there supremacist marched in charlottesville. there is a whole range of examples and on the republican side, there has been a deafening silence as there always is in these cases. when the president goes overboard, senior republicans goes overboard, senior republicans go to ground, they try and avoid the question. however there was one very unlucky member of the administration who got cornered by a bunch of reporters on the way to the white house this more —— morning. his explanation ran along these lines. the tweets are not racist, his logic for that was, the president has an asian american woman in his cabinet. what? yes. so, some of my best friends are.... that was his argument for the tweets not being racist. we had theresa may saying this was completely unacceptable.
2:23 pm
with american voters generally, how do you think this will play? the president thinks this sort of feeling of this rhetoric does play well. it plays and galvanises certain elements of his support. on issues of and nationalism. we know that he thinks that is one of the strongest cards he has got. he thinks it is an even stronger card than the economy. the economy at the moment any american president would be delighted in charting from the rooftops, the stock market, employment rates growth, and even some aspects of the trade disputes that have been going on, it has brought the chinese to the table perhaps in a way they haven't been
2:24 pm
brought to the table before. the president once said he didn't want to go on about the economy because it is boring. that is him saying he thinks his base, his support want something else, they want some more red meat and this is what he regards as red meat i think. the curious thing is the timing. we are just coming up to the summer, once you do this, in order to have an impact, you need to go to a bigger and greater level next time, so it doesn't bode well i don't think for what kind of election campaign we are going to have next year in this country. if it's going to be fought on these terms and in this kind of language. i would get that holiday booked if i were you. thank you very much. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has said there's still a chance that the iran nuclear deal could be saved.
2:25 pm
he's holding talks in brussels with european foreign ministers, about breaches by tehran of the agreement, after the us withdrew from it last year. it isn't dead yet and we are totally committed to keeping the middle east de—nuclearised. if iran acquires nuclear weapons, then other countries in the region will acquire nuclear weapons and it becomes a very toxic and dangerous situation. so, we are looking to find a way to preserve the nuclear deal, which we think is the best way of keeping the middle east as a whole nuclear weapon free. iran is still a good year away from developing a nuclear weapon. we think there is still some closing but small window to keep the deal alive and that's what i'm here to talk about. let's cross to our correspondent there adam fleming. when he says it is not dead yet, i am reminded of a certain parrot sketch. this is one of those stories where people tend not to use humour
2:26 pm
because it is getting incredibly tense around this iran deal. a quick reminder. donald trump pulled out a bit last year, last month the iranians said they were going to reach the limits for enriching uranium which means they are technically in breach of the agreement and so now it is a question of what the eu does about it. it is not really the eu that are the prime movers here, it is the uk, france and germany. do they launch the dispute settlement procedure which triggers a whole series of meetings, there is a commission than a miss —— at ministerial cascade of meetings. it could end up with the un passing a resolution which could see old sanctions are restored. no one has pressed that button to start that dispute resolution process yet, so that dispute resolution process yet, so will that happen today or will we just get effectively more words from the eu as they carry on doing what they have done throughout this which is calling on both the iranians and
2:27 pm
us to behave in a responsible way to not make the situation any worse and keep the deal alive. is there behind—the—scenes, when you are talking to people off the record, is their anger? it was started when the americans pulled out of the deal. their anger? it was started when the americans pulled out of the dealm is not even off the record, it was on the record. we saw the french minister and he summed it up this way. he said, this is a bad response by the iranians to a bad decision by the united states in the first place and one of the diplomats who authored the iran deal, she was speaking at an event a couple of days ago and she was talking about this dispute resolution mechanism they have got and they said it was designed to deal with issues that iran might have broken the deal. it was never conceived of to handle a situation with the united states, one of the authors of the deal, decided to pull out, so it is quite a tricky situation and the eu has focused less on the deal and less on
2:28 pm
the power politics and more on protecting european companies from the side effects of the us reimposing its sanctions on tehran whereas now they're going to have to get into the power politics about what happens to the deal. computer pioneer and code—breaker alan turing is to be the face of new £50 note. he is celebrated for his work in helping to crack the german enigma code during the second world war. he also played a pivotal role in the development of early computers. the new note will be in circulation by the end of 2021. this is how the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, made his announcement earlier this morning. it's my great pleasure to announce that the scientist that will feature on the £50 note is... alan turing. applause. so why turing?
2:29 pm
alan turing was an outstanding mathematician, whose works had an enormous impact on how we live today. as the father of computer science and artificial intelligence, alan turing's contributions were far ranging and path—breaking. he was insatiably curious about the world around him. he had in mind that ranged freely and widely and he approached a variety of problems, seemingly intractable problems, and found answers that had passed others by. his genius lay in a unique ability to link the philosophical and the abstract with the practical and the concrete. and all around us, his legacy continues to build. turing is a giant on whose shoulders so many now stand. time for a look at the weather.
2:30 pm
a way to tackle wildfires, it's an old idea. yes, let me set up the idea of wildfires first. across the western side of the usa, heat, dry land, sometimes arson, sometimes weather related but here is the view in alaska, wildfires with record heats, temperatures exceeding 30 celsius. california suffers every single year with this and this is a picture from last month. ijust want to show you the forefront of this picture, this dry grass here which is something the fire can spread through very quickly. you want to come up with a method that can deal with this, trim this down and enable bra kes to with this, trim this down and enable brakes to be created in the way of these wildfires so there is nothing for them to burn through. what comes to mind as a way of dealing with that? you tell me. the goat. the humble goat. you're kidding. i'm not
2:31 pm
kidding. ifell humble goat. you're kidding. i'm not kidding. i fell right into that one! that will not happen later! in case you have forgotten what a goat looks like, let me introduce you to one of the oldest uk species of goat. endangered as well, it is the baggot goat. if you're not familiar with the north american goat, let me introduce you to this. isn't he a beauty! this is the mountain goat. i'm not sure whether it is involved in eating through the dry grass but it isa in eating through the dry grass but it is a beautiful goat. they are being deployed... was that too much about the goat? i know. being deployed... was that too much about the goat? i knowlj being deployed... was that too much about the goat? i know. i was looking at his feet. they munch through the dry grass. it is used in california. there is a story in this. it is expanding, becoming more
2:32 pm
popular. it is cheap and very effective at creating these breaks. goats going cheep, that's a new one. laughter shall wejust laughter shall we just let that sit there? wade i think we've got two for a minute. what on earth is that? go to y°93r minute. what on earth is that? go to yoga, simon! ijust thought we wa nted yoga, simon! ijust thought we wanted to share it with you. —— goat yoga. i don't think so. it's actually quite popular. shall we have a look at the weather? yes, just pretend that didn't happen. here's a picture of what is going on across the uk at the moment. stop it, simon! i'm professional. it's a nice day out there, high pressure is how we are starting this week, low
2:33 pm
pressure is waiting in the wings and that will take over, so if you are enjoying the weather at the moment, you think it is all good, all are fine, there are changes on the horizon. a look at the satellite picture, quite a bit of cloud running into south east anglia and south—east england, cloud has been building elsewhere but most places are dry and present in the sunshine. just a quick run through of this afternoon, a slight chance of a stray shower some where but the rest staying dry. hints of rain coming up later on. a little bit cool under that cloud in east anglia, along some north sea coasts, temperatures in the mid—high teens, but the further west you are in the low 20s. so that's how we are today. into tonight come a bit more cloud starting to run up to northern ireland, parts of scotland. a weather front approaching from the atlantic, so one or two showers breaking out here. the odd patch of mist and fog elsewhere possible and temperatures may just mist and fog elsewhere possible and temperatures mayjust dip down into single figures and a few rural spots. this is how your tuesday is
2:34 pm
shaping up, remember we had that weather front approaching scotland and northern ireland, for cloud, showery rain moving through, the odd showery rain moving through, the odd shower breaking up ahead of that in england and wales but very far and few between. it is warm across eastern england compared to today, the wind is changing a bit as well. a more active weather system coming our way as we go to wednesday. the story this week is about low pressure taking over in our weather, so pressure taking over in our weather, so that will turn things wet are still in northern ireland, northern and western and scotland, sundry bursts coming in, barring the odd shower in england and wales it is mainly dry, some cloud, some sunshine, a bit of once again particularly across the eastern side of england. heading towards the upper 20s. as we go to the end of the week, a quick look at the outlook. the rain sinking southwards on thursday, another weather system, wit and breezy coming in on friday. thank you very much! it's sweat!
2:35 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. jubilant scenes at the oval — as cricket fans — young and old — celebrate england's dramatic world cup win. i was definitely flying yesterday. it has probably sunken in a little bit more this morning, but it was just a really, really great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. a serial thief who targeted victims through dating apps is found guilty of murdering a businessman using the drug ghb. completely unacceptable — theresa may's verdict on president trump's latest twitter outburst,
2:36 pm
branded racist by critics. the second world war code—breaker, alan turing, is to become the face of the bank of england's new fifty pound note. it's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. and coming up — in the week of the 50th anniversary of the first man on the moon, we'll be finding out what was it like, for the families left back on earth? sport with gavin, in the bbc sport centre. only one story in town. absolutely, it has really been a day of celebrations for england's cricketers, as we havejust of celebrations for england's cricketers, as we have just been hearing. they won the men's world cup for the first time and it was one of the most incredible matches i have ever seen. most incredible matches i have ever seen. the climax, you really could not have predicted, england beat new zealand by virtue of the super over. scores were level after 50 overs on 241 scores were level after 50 overs on 24! runs, and england and new
2:37 pm
zealand were level on 241 runs, and england and new zealand were level on 15 runs on the super over but won the world cup by scoring more boundaries overall in the match. this is the oval where the match. this is the oval where the squad has been meeting fans and the squad has been meeting fans and the media today. they will head to downing street with a drinks reception with theresa may, the prime minister, who was at lord's to see them beat new zealand yesterday. ben stokes was man of the match but several people played their part in a journey including joe root. to be involved in the previous world cup, going through all that, to see the transformation of it, be part of that journey, it the transformation of it, be part of thatjourney, it has been extremely enjoyable, exciting, we've had some great fun on the field playing in the manner we have, great fun on the field playing in the mannerwe have, and great fun on the field playing in the manner we have, and now to be able to enjoy being world champions is brilliant. i'm so proud of everyone that is involved in it, so pleased for eoin morgan, all the work he has put in, building and growing this team. after all that, the squad have to get their heads together. they have a test match against ireland. then, in around two weeks, it's the start of the ashes,
2:38 pm
where they renew their confrontation with australia — and hope to win back the ashes. they will be starting on a high, for sure. as one world cup ends all eyes is on another in full swing and some home nations in action, we are talking about netball. england take on jamaica in the second round of the netball world cup, but the other home nations are in action too in liverpool. england won all three matches in the first phase. kate gray is there for us, how tough willjamaica be for england, kate? this is a huge match for england. they are up against the number two seeds, jamaica. we are expecting to seeds, jamaica. we are expecting to see them out on court for a warm up any moment now. this is a bit of an unexpected match earlier on, many said it might be an england— jamaican final here in liverpool but the reason it is not is because yesterday jamaica the reason it is not is because yesterdayjamaica suffered the reason it is not is because yesterday jamaica suffered their first defeat against south africa. jamaica struggling to find their rhythm in that match. south africa definitely the team on form here at this tournament. as a result, they
2:39 pm
are coming into this match against england as a must win. if they don't win, it means they may not progress on to the semifinals. england as you said won all three of their group stage matches so they are feeling confident, they beat samoa yesterday so confident, they beat samoa yesterday so it has been fairly easy. they are short of a player, tracey neville's roses lost a player to injury, leila gus gough, with a ruptured achilles. it will be interesting to see how this match goes. a real test of who is going to progress further and if england win it does take the pressure off their match against south africa on thursday. it certainly is a match you do not want to miss. live on bbc two from 2:45pm. england are being announced as we speak, listen to that roar. the cloud — — as we speak, listen to that roar. the cloud —— the crowd are going to love it in liverpool. it already feels like we are in the final stages of this tournament and you will not want to miss this match.
2:40 pm
and, just before we go, tom daley and matty lee have won bronze, in the 10m synchronised diving, at the world aqautics championships in south korea. china won gold, with russia claiming silver. the result, which is theirfirst major honour as a pair, has secured gb a place in the event for tokyo 2020. that's all the sport for now. gavin, thank you very much. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said "it's dangerous rubbish" to say there's no link between crime and poverty. in a speech in south london, mr khan cited new research suggesting that the majority of murder and manslaughter suspects had themselves previously been the victims of knife crime. here's our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani. full of fighting spirit for all the right reasons. volunteers at south london's dwaynamics boxing club coach 320 children, teaching them discipline, self—confidence, and how to avoid crime in one of the poorest parts of london.
2:41 pm
one, two. joshua simpson's jab is the measure of their success. once on the verge of a criminal life, the club has turned him into a 16—year—old champion. he is escaping gangs and looking to the future. there's people that are there that's trying to get out, and there's people that are there but, like, they like to be there. now i can see, like, loads of different routes and i can pick which route i feel is best. like, everything is open now. the dwaynamics boxing club costs £80,000 a year to run. and if everybody who volunteers here were properly paid, it would probably cost double that. the organisers say this part of south london needs 20 such clubs to reach all of the vulnerable children. they say that would be a small price to pay for the lives that could be saved. we are dealing with young children who are frightened, they are stressed, they are going through trauma, because this youth violence has now got so out of control. today london's mayor, sadiq khan, has revealed research which he says proves a link between serious youth
2:42 pm
violence and poverty, exacerbated by cuts in public services. we know that the time of day when there's most likely to be serious street violence is between 3pm and 6pm. so it beggars belief that because of government cuts we have closed down after—school clubs, closed down youth centres. which is why you see this increase in serious street violence at this time. the government says it's put an extra £100 million in to combatting serious violence, and there are plans to legally compel schools and other bodies to collaborate on solutions, but youth leaders say that's not enough for london, let alone the rest of the country and they're in downing street today to appeal for a lot more cash. dominic casciani, bbc news. becka hudson is a criminal justice researcher at university college london — she's here with me is it right to call it dangerous
2:43 pm
rubbish? absolutely and the figures we see today is what the proof of many front line and community organisations have known for a long time, that when we see young people going to school hungry, when we see millions of people going to food banks, and we see kids turning up to school without the necessary things they need, this is going to have a knock—on effect, in terms of their mental well—being and we are going to see a rise in youth violence. what do you say to those who say for every youngster that turns to crime there are many others that don't? there must be other things at play here? of course any young person, any person, given a set of circumstances will make different decisions, based on their individual character and the things they are exposed to, but the point is that on a greater and greater scale, more and more of our young people are not having opportunities given to them, they are not having jobs available, and they are struggling with the kind of basic necessities they need to survive and that will always open
2:44 pm
up to survive and that will always open up more of them to mental health difficulties and to struggling in other ways, and we know that these are the kind of gateways towards what we end up seeing in violent crime figures. it is always a complex figure when we try to analyse the background to any crime we've been talking about for years but particularly recently with the increase in knife crime in london and other major cities of the uk. lots of people, you listen to a radio phone in, it's about the lack ofa radio phone in, it's about the lack of a fatherfigure, radio phone in, it's about the lack of a father figure, lack of proper not just down to of a father figure, lack of proper notjust down to not having an amount of money to make things as most people would want them to be at that stage. i disagree it is only within the family. i think a lot of the time we will hear other figures about the rates of poverty in this country, like millions of families going to food banks, and actually the social and economic conditions that produce serious youth violence are those same social and economic conditions we hear about when we talk about food banks and problems
2:45 pm
in school. these are the conditions we are giving to our young people andi we are giving to our young people and i don't think we can. because we see it is a societywide problem these figures are going up on all figures in england, notjust london, so we can see figures in england, notjust london, so we can see actually this is affecting young people in a collective way and therefore it is not just collective way and therefore it is notjust individual choice of collective way and therefore it is not just individual choice of family influence, which is the way as a society and as government it needs to be addressed. so you can't police away poverty, what can you do? provide proper investment in youth services was that there are also... at what level are they actually in contact when you say youth services? community centres? where is the front line here? youth workers, a huge number of whom have been cut in the past ten years, community centres and youth centres, yes. there are also existing community organisations that work on the ground with young people, on the street, or providing portable youth services in buses and things that go to different communities. those things need to be properly funded and supported because there are
2:46 pm
figures which show that when there are large cuts to youth services in an area, that area will experience a higher rise of youth violence. so that's one element but i also think we need to look at poverty across society as a whole, which is what we are seeing with these figures today, this is also about our communities asa this is also about our communities as a whole and when you have communities where wages have stagnated, cost of living is soaring and public services are being ripped from under them, you are leaving huge numbers of people in vulnerable situations and that's where we see these problems starting and then we end up with a horrible figures about more young people dying on our streets. very good to see you. thank you for coming in. the head of the commission for countering extremism says the government has been ‘too slow‘ to respond to protests outside primary schools in birmingham, against the teaching to mostly muslim pupils about lgbt relationships. speaking to the bbc‘s panorama, sara khan also said the protests had been ‘whipping up fear and hysteria'. sima kotecha reports. chanting.
2:47 pm
protesters outside schools in birmingham have been campaigning against the use of storybooks featuring same—sex couples. part of programmes teaching about equality. most pupils at the schools are muslim. being gay and legal is ok. that doesn't mean we have to morally accept it. are you homophobic? i'm not homophobic at all. we have nothing against the lgbt community. you believe what you want, but i shouldn't have to agree with the way they are living. now the lead commissioner for countering extremisms, sara khan, has described what she has seen in birmingham as extremism. i would describe them as a mob. it is a mob who are chanting and shouting and engaging in intimidatory and threatening behaviour. the dfe could have done so much more. i think they were too slow to respond but also clarifying what is actually being taught to pupils in school. in 2020, the government wants all schools to teach lgbt content as part of new compulsory relationship and sex education.
2:48 pm
the guidance was changed, because the world has changed. we want children to grow up understanding that some people are different, some relationships different some relationships are different from what they may have experienced but all are valuable. teachers‘ leaders are now concerned that the protests will escalate further. with schools elsewhere in the country already seeing pushback from parents. we are seeing cases being referred almost on a weekly basis now. over 70 schools where these issues have been raised directly. panorama has spoken to other religious groups around the country who are now looking to build campaigns of their own. in glasgow, pauline gallagher has set up catholic family voice. the muslim community in birmingham are total stars as far as we're concerned and they are trailblazers. we are encouraged by what we see. judith nemeth runs the values foundation set up last year to promote what she calls traditionalfamily values in education. there is no way that people of faith will teach that it's ok to be gay.
2:49 pm
they won't, because the bible tells us it isn't 0k to be gay, but that doesn't mean that we are intolerant of people who do follow that lifestyle. schools across the country are getting ready for the summer break and protests at the gates are likely to stop. but with the new guidance coming into force next year, it‘s unclear what the autumn term will bring. sima kotecha, bbc news. and you can see the full panorama — ‘sex education: the lgbt debate in schools‘ on bbc one tonight at 8.30. and it‘ll be available afterwards on the iplayer. egon is here — in a moment he will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans of all ages celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. completely unacceptable — theresa may‘s verdict on president trump‘s latest twitter outburst, branded racist by critics. a man from south london is found
2:50 pm
guilty of the murder of a businessman using the sex drug ghb. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. shares in sport direct have been falling after it delayed releasing its latest results. it blamed the delay on uncertainty over trading at house of fraser, which it bought last year. more on this in a moment. two million low—paid workers could get statutory sick pay for the first time. right now, only people on minium wage for more than 14 hours a week get statutory sick pay. but that time limit could be cut under plans being considered by the government. china‘s economy grew at its slowest pace since the early 90s over the last three months, according to official figures. the world‘s second biggest economy grew 6.2% from the same period last year. it‘s been hit by the trade war with america.
2:51 pm
it‘s amazon prime day today, but not all blockbuster deals and price cuts. it started in 2015, where members are able to access all sorts of bargains, but it‘s not all plain saling for the company. it‘s under pressure over working conditions for workers, and some warehouse workers are walking out over this. there something in the water! let's go to there something in the water! let's gotoa there something in the water! let's go to a professional! michelle is with us at the new york stock exchange. how much will workers‘ discontent
2:52 pm
cast a shadow over prime day? look, i think you're talking about a few facilities in america, where we are expecting some disruption. i we nt are expecting some disruption. i went to visit shakopee's amazon warehouse performance centre in minnesota, located a short distance from the twin cities of minneapolis and st paul, trying to service mainly customers in that area. and they are planning a strike in a few hours' time, about six hours, to cover the end of the day shift at the start of the night shift. given the start of the night shift. given the numbers! the start of the night shift. given the numbers i was told will be involved, it's probably more symbolic than anything, but i think what they're trying to achieve is shine a spotlight on the working conditions at amazon warehouses. i was speaking to william stoltz, who isa was speaking to william stoltz, who is a picker there, was speaking to william stoltz, who is a pickerthere, hisjob was speaking to william stoltz, who is a picker there, hisjob is to was speaking to william stoltz, who is a picker there, his job is to try to collect all those items to get them shipped out for customers, and he says because of, thanks to robots, he processes about 300 items an hour. so their complaint is about
2:53 pm
the demands that are being placed on them, the stress, the fact there are a lot of part—time workers, and they we re a lot of part—time workers, and they were just like their voices to be heard on this issue. what you are seeing essentially is a conflict between the efficiency that amazon prizes, as do its analysts and customers, who like to receive their orders quickly and efficiently, and then on the other side of the workers, who are being treated in an increasingly sort of robotlike style andl increasingly sort of robotlike style and i think that's what you are seeing them come out and protest against. what is the company doing about this? well, amazon has put out about this? well, amazon has put out a statement. they have said they have responded to many of the protesters's demands already. last year they raised salaries at many of the amazon workhouse workers to above the minimum wage. let me read you this, they say we provide great employment in point —— opportunities with excellent pay, we go on to
2:54 pm
encourage anyone to compare our pay, benefits and workplace to other retailers and major employees in the shakopee community and across the country. that being said, while amazon thinks they are meeting what their workers want, there is going on strike today would disagree. let‘s leave it there, thank you for joining us. now a look at the markets. what has caught your eye? the ftse 100 markets. what has caught your eye? the ftse100 doing well off the back of that news of a slowdown in china. the hope is that will spur the governor in beijing to stimulate the economy, good news for a mining company was to i will see you later. this week marks 50 years since the historic moment when the first man — neil armstrong — set foot on the moon. the apollo 11 mission represented — in armstrong‘s own words —
2:55 pm
a ‘giant leap for mankind,‘ with the world — back on planet earth — watching and marvelling. among them of course were the astronauts‘ families. just months after apollo 11, alan bean became the fourth man on the moon as part of apollo 12. his wife and daughter have been speaking to the bbc about their memories of that moment in 1969. men were leaving the earth to land on the ocean of storms. my father is alan bean and he was the lunar module pilot on apollo 12, fourth man to walk on the moon. our neighbourhood was very close to nasa. everyone was either an engineer, flight controller or physician. our neighbourhood had a very focussed goal. we didn‘t really think about it that much. we didn't really think about it that much. ijust knew he was training to go into space. launch date was very exciting. it was a rainy day. we huddled all together, my mother, my grandmother, my brother and i. he trained seven—and—a—half years. we were just excited that it was finally going to happen. we had been waiting for so long. 3, 2, 1 — zero. all engines running, commence lift off. then when it goes, the birds fly
2:56 pm
and it‘s so much noise and the ground shakes. roger, roger, bye—bye. see you on the other side. have fun. we just went on to school, because that‘s what you were supposed to do. mom tried to keep our normal routine as kids. and of course we were enjoying the moment and being there, but, we still have to keep doing what we‘re supposed to do, and that was important to my dad. you always have in the back of your mind that something could go wrong, and he told me, "remember i'm doing what i always loved, so don't worry." and i did have great confidence in his skill. we would rather him do what he loved, even if it had a big risk. i can't believe it. amazing! go for landing. the day he landed on the moon it was about 12.30 houston time, and we were alljust sitting around, watching the tv, and hoping for the best. no—one else can tell you "i love you to the moon
2:57 pm
and back" and really mean it, and i know that that was true. so often he would say how his thoughts would drift back to his family. when he was on the moon, he looked up and saw that earth and thought, "gosh, you know, everybody i love is over there." when alan first got home, he had lost a lot of weight. he was a finicky eater and eating that space food was not his thing. you know, he didn't talk about it a lot when he came home, not because he wasn't proud or anything, but he kinda just wanted to be with his family, you know. not because he wasn't proud or anything, but he kinda when you see somebody that‘s been working so hard and has such a dream, we just knew how hard he‘d wored — and we had too, mostly my parents, you know, they had made a lot of sacrifices. he really did love to us the moon and back, and, well, i think he‘s still up there, thinking about us. remembering the moon missions. you
2:58 pm
are watching afternoon live, let‘s catch up with the weather closer to home. all quiet out there to start the week, high pressure but there are weather changes on the way. for some of us it gets wet and a little windier as we go through the rest of the week. variable cloud, sunny spells, rather cloudy across parts of east anglia at the moment and down towards essex, and temperatures here just into the teens were some of us. you‘ve got some sunshine, at least the low 20s this afternoon. tonight, most a dry, a weatherfront getting close to northern ireland and western scotland, some outbreaks of rain starting to move in. under clear skies elsewhere there may be the odd patch of mist and fog and a few spots dipping down into single figures as tuesday begins. a weak weather front working through northern ireland and scotland on through tuesday, so expect an area of the cloud, either patchy rain or one or two showers out of that but brightening up again in the afternoon, and sunny spells for england and wales, an isolated shower, that‘s all it‘s going to be but a greater chance to see more in
2:59 pm
the way of widespread rain and strong winds and cooler weather as we go through the rest of the week.
3:00 pm
michael‘s hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3: jubilant scenes at the oval, as cricket fans young and old celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. emotional, definitely playing yesterday. it has probably sunk in a little bit more this morning, butjust a really, really great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. a serial thief who targeted victims through dating apps is found guilty of murdering a businessman using the drug ghb. completely unacceptable — theresa may‘s verdict on president trump‘s latest twitter outburst, branded racist by critics. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. england are hoping to maintain their perfect record at the netball world cup — they‘re up against jamaica right now, in liverpool. the latest from that,
3:01 pm
a bit later on. it isa it is a quiet start to the week, high pressure, it is settled, but there are changes under way and the old but increasingly popular way of dealing with the spread of wildfires. getting up close and personal — we‘ll talking to the biologist who went diving with this giant jellyfish off the cornwall coast. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i‘m simon mccoy. 1966, 2003, and now 2019 — the years we heard the words "england have won the world cup". first in football, then rugby, and now of course for the first time in men‘s cricket. and those words are still echoing in our ears after that remarkable game yesterday — described by many as the best final ever and one of the most
3:02 pm
remarkable games ever. the players head to downing street tonight for a reception. earlier, fans, many of them children, joined the team at the oval to celebrate. many will be hoping that the world cup win will have a positive long—term effect on the grass—roots of the game. lords perhaps was exhausted. in any other case there‘s another famous cricket venue in london for england‘s most famous cricketers. that feels like their status today, anyway. at the oval, for the first time, welcome world cup winning men. we were flying yesterday and probably it has sunk in a bit more this morning. it was just a great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. we just went back to the hotel, seeing family and friends. it went on pretty long. i guess a few of the boys are tired this morning, but i guess it was worth it. it only takes a second to lift a trophy, but it takes years to plan
3:03 pm
a world cup campaign. there should now be time and space to enjoy it. social media, from her majesty the queen, from the prime minister and from countless others. a digital celebration. to match the scenes yesterday near the fountains in trafalgar square, and cricket can do this... for nearly 15 years there has been a charity called chance to shine. established because many in cricket feared that the sport was disappearing from state schools in britain. this morning they put on an assembly in south—west london, as they do every week, but never before after such a cricket frenzy. cricket has been hidden away for 20 years and people who are not traditional sports fans were gripped, i saw social media, i had text messages. people have been trying to convince forever that cricket‘s a great sport. they saw it yesterday and they saw the drama of a game and how it could unite people. every story has two sides. new zealand must be the unluckiest
3:04 pm
runners up in cricket history. mind you, not everyone there was distraught. new zealand is where ben stokes was born, and where he still has family. they were gripped by the action on the other side of the world. when we were watching it it was an incredible feeling, to have your son out there, doing what he does and getting right down to the last ball. so we probably got the best of both worlds as i see it. new zealand played so well. they deserved so much out of the game and they did get a lot out of the game too. the complications of crucial moments are still being discussed. standby — when the throw ht ben stokes‘ bat and flew to the boundary, it is now suggested it should have been five instead of six runs, because he had only completed one run at the time of the throw. well... ruthless, brave, fortunate — all these qualities england typified at this world cup, all qualities that they lacked in previous editions. this team have an incredible opportunity to not only
3:05 pm
inspire from yesterday, that‘s going to inspire, but they are young, they are a team that will stay together a few years. you‘re looking at a couple of them that may not be there in four years‘ time at the world cup, but the majority of this team are just at the start of what could be a very long journey in the england team. maybe this was the most gripping cricket match ever, but it is only the start of this summer. the twists and turns of yesterday‘s spectacular game will no doubt have inspired a new generation of cricket fans. we can talk to malcolm broad — who has been organising youth cricket festivals since 1983 — and 13—year—old rory nicholson who is playing at this years festival. malcolm, first of all, when you are watching yesterday‘s game, what was going through your mind? what other young players might be going through theirs? it was a wonderful moment yesterday. i have run 30 years of festivals, i have watched hundreds of games of cricket but i‘ve never
3:06 pm
watched a game finish in such an amazing, spectacular way. we had some 200 boys here or representing counties, teams from over the world and they were all enthralled by the finish. no sport could have a better finish. no sport could have a better finish. to see their enthusiasm, to see them jumping around and to see how much they enjoyed that great game, i will probably never see anything like that again in my life. as an inspiration to young people, it had everything. it had everything. there were moments where you could hear a pin drop, moments where children were jumping around, people embracing each other, cheers to the rafters, just the perfect start to my festival, wonderful for the 12 teams who are here and wonderfulfor the young the 12 teams who are here and wonderful for the young cricketers. iam sure wonderful for the young cricketers. i am sure they will be inspired to go out and they will be very lucky to play such an exciting game in
3:07 pm
their lifetimes. rory, you are 13, you love the game already but there are plenty who think cricket is boring. what do you say to them now? i think this shows them that cricket is very exciting and that players are very determined and that should inspire them to become cricketers. everybody looks at ben stokes, is he the man yesterday who you thought stood out or where there others?” believe he was the main man who helped pull england together and bring them close to the victory. malcolm, just looking ahead, we have the 100 game, the way the game is played is changing, does that help? is that what also inspires young people? we are not in four days and days of what seems like an endless game. cricket can be boring and the shorterform of game. cricket can be boring and the shorter form of the game undoubtedly is more appealing to young people. i have seen that change in my years,
3:08 pm
my many years of cricket administration. youngsters now do like a administration. youngsters now do likea game administration. youngsters now do like a game that starts and finishes in two, three hours rather than a whole day of cricket. but we are seeing here they are playing 100 overs, two teams playing two overs each. you can get a longer game but to sell the game to everyone, a shorter version i‘m sure we‘ll be really popular and successful. worry, do you agree? yeah, i agree totally that the shorter game is very appealing for youngsters and it's great. i am wondering, a lot of talk about whether games like this should be available free to air so eve ryo ne should be available free to air so everyone in the country can see them. is that an issue with some of your friends? i think everybody around the world should be able to
3:09 pm
see that amazing victory from england. it's very inspiring and determined. malcolm, is there something you have come across? have youngsters all grown up with cricket not being free to air?” youngsters all grown up with cricket not being free to air? i think the ashes series in 2005 is the last series televised by the bbc and without doubt the game has lost a huge audience, many, many participants because it has only been available on commercial channels, on sky. i desperately hope more cricket will return to free to view television, it will inspire far, far more people. it will be the lifeblood of the game. i understand why the money from sky is so important to grassroots cricket, but you‘ve got to have an input of huge numbers of players and that will only come if everybody can view the
3:10 pm
sort of game we saw yesterday. not just a one—off but every summer in england and every winter around the world. rory, you are 13 years old, do you think you will ever see a game like that again? no, i thought it was a very exciting victory for england and it was very inspiring. i don't think it is possible to see a better game than that. might we be talking to you in a few years‘ time when you are walking out in a england shirt? hopefully. malcolm, what are the chances? we are here at king‘s college in taunton, somerset. into the southerton three —— in 2003, jos buttler was the same age as rory. yesterday he was instrumental in helping england to that victory. of the 11 players on the field yesterday, i have seen nine of them at the festivals we
3:11 pm
have run, so perhaps rory will be yet another one in a few years‘ time. you would be able to judge better than most. you havejos buttler playing there. did you know immediately, when someone likejos buttler comes onto the field, do you know straightaway that is something special because ——? know straightaway that is something special because --? he had that air, that something about him that made you look twice but equally, i have beenin you look twice but equally, i have been in the game long enough to know, you think of a player has certain future prospects for england and he disappears from the game when he is 19 or 20 or maybe even younger. i have seen many of them come through. alistair cooke played here years ago. i remember taking him to hospital once when he was hit on the head as a 14—year—old. he had something about him. i have yet to
3:12 pm
see enough of rory to know whether he willjoin that illustrious group but we live in hope. we will and me way well be playing this interview backin way well be playing this interview back ina way well be playing this interview back in a few years. great to see you both. thank you very much for joining us. you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. a drug dealer has been convicted of murdering a man with the sex drug ghb. gerald matovu, who‘s 26, gave eric michels a fatal dose at his home in south west london after the pair met through a dating app. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. murdered for his bank cards, his computer, his mobile phone and a few bottles of wine. business executive and part—time actor eric michaels. he had contacted his killer gerry matovu through the gay dating app grindr. picking him up from a homeless hostel and stopping off at sainsburys on the way back to his south—west london home. but that night, gerry matovu drugged him with the sedative ghb in order to rob him.
3:13 pm
he gave him a fatal dose. today, eric michaels‘ sons describe the family‘s grief. i‘ll never meet anyone like him ever again in my life, and losing him has been like losing a limb. the devastation it causes is unbelievable. especially when he had so much to live for. i mean, he was only 54. leaving eric michels dead in his bed, gerry matovu left in a minicab with a suitcase of loot. in the following days, he and an accomplice brandon dunbar went on a spending spree using eric michels‘ bank cards. he‘s a liar, he‘s a hustler, he‘s a thief. he had no regard for a person‘s welfare. no regard at all for their life, because he‘s using a really dangerous drug to facilitate his crimes. matovu had been using ghb to rob people he met on grindrfor years. between them, he and dunbar had robbed at least a dozen people.
3:14 pm
here they are seen leaving the flat of one of their targets. five victims went to the police, but the investigations were limited. the most extraordinary incident happened at this east london hotel last may after a dutch businessman who was a guest met matovu on grindr. here, matovu drugged him and stole all his possessions, including his clothes, his laptop, his mobile phones and his bank cards. he even took the flat screen television and the toilet brush from the hotel bedroom. but police failed to identify the man who had drugged his victim into unconsciousness, even though it would have been easy to do so from his grindr account. i don‘t understand why it wasn‘t followed up at that time, because we might not be where we are today if it was. it‘s just a shame my dad had to die for them to go and find him, basically. the police were well aware of gerry matovu. he had been convicted of selling drugs to stephen port,
3:15 pm
the notorious ghb serial killer. today we can reveal that matovu had even drugged and robbed port himself, just before stephen port was arrested for killing four men, prompting this exchange on whatsapp. "i hope you don‘t do that again to anyone, as it‘s not only dangerous, but to then take their stuff is criminal." port wrote. to which matovu replied. "i‘m so sorry, and it won‘t happen ever again. this case has highlighted once more how police don‘t always take the misuse of this incredibly dangerous drug seriously enough. any allegation of anything involving ghb in the future should be taken very, very seriously and investigated every time. eric michels‘ sons want the drug laws to be changed to recognise just how lethal ghb can be. daniel sandford, bbc news.
3:16 pm
theresa may has described remarks by president trump that four democratic congresswomen should go back to the countries they came from as "completely unacceptable". in a series of tweets, the president said they should fix the "catastrophic" governments in their countries of origin instead of criticising the us. three of the congresswomen were born in the united states, while another came to the country as a young child. let‘s see what the us president said. he began... "so interesting to see ‘progressive‘ democrat congresswomen — who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world, if they even have a functioning government at all — now loudly and viciously telling the people of the united states, the greatest and most powerful nation on earth, how our government is to be run. why don‘t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came? then come back and show us how it is done. these places need your help badly, you can‘t leave fast enough. i‘m sure that nancy pelosi, the democrat house speaker, would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements!"
3:17 pm
our washington correspondent gary o‘donoghue explained how politicians in president trump‘s republican party were reacting to the outburst. on the republican side there has been a deafening silence as there a lwa ys been a deafening silence as there always is in these cases when the president go overboard like this. they go over ground, they try to avoid the question, however there was one unlucky member of the administration who got cornered by a bunch of reporters on the way into the white house. mark short, he is the white house. mark short, he is the chief of staff to the vice presidents. he said the tweets aren‘t racist and his logic for that was, the president has an asian american women in his cabinet. what? yes, so some of my best friends are... that was the basis of his argument that the tweets went racist. we have had theresa may
3:18 pm
saying this is a completely unacceptable comment. but the trouble is, with american voters generally, how do you think this will play? the president thinks this sort of feeling of this sort of rhetoric does play well. it plays, he thinks, it galvanises certain elements of his support on issues of immigration and border security. and nationalism. we know that he thinks thatis nationalism. we know that he thinks that is one of the strongest cards he has got. he thinks it is an even stronger card than the economy. the economy at the moment, any american president would be delighted to be shouting from the rooftops day after day after day, the stock market, unemployment rates, growth, you name it, and even in some ways, some aspects of the trade disputes that have been going on. it has brought
3:19 pm
the chinese to the table perhaps in a way they haven‘t been brought to the table before. the president once said recently, he didn‘t want to go on about the economy because it was boring. that is him saying he thinks his base, his support want something else, they want some more red meat and this is what he regards as red meat. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans of all ages celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. completely unacceptable — theresa may‘s verdict on president trump‘s latest twitter outburst, branded racist by critics. a man from south london is found guilty of the murder of a businessman using the sex drug ghb. and we will talk to the biologist who went diving with this giant jellyfish of the norfolk coast.
3:20 pm
england cricketers have been the toast of the oval. we will hear more from the players as they get a hero 's welcome after winning the world cup. and the home nations are in action at the netball world cup. england are playing jamaica but northern ireland suffered a setback after losing to malawi. and tom daley and matty lee have won bronze in the ten metres synchronised diving in south korea. it is the first major honour for the pair and secures a place for gb in the event for tokyo 2020. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has said there‘s still a chance that the iran nuclear deal could be saved. he‘s holding talks in brussels with european foreign ministers, about breaches by tehran of the agreement, after the us withdrew from it last year. it isn‘t dead yet and we are totally committed to keeping the middle east de—nuclearised. if iran acquires nuclear weapons, then other countries in the region
3:21 pm
will acquire nuclear weapons and it becomes a very toxic and dangerous situation. so, we are looking to find a way to preserve the nuclear deal, which we think is the best way of keeping the middle east as a whole nuclear weapon free. iran is still a good year away from developing a nuclear weapon. we think there is still some closing but small window to keep the deal alive and that‘s what i‘m here to talk about. earlier, our brussels correspondent adam fleming explained how we got to this point. donald trump pulled out of it last year, last month the iranians said they were going to reach the limits for enriching uranium which means they are technically in breach of they are technically in breach of the agreement. now it is a question of what does the eu do about it and it is not really the eu that are the prime movers, it is the uk, france, germany. they will have to make a decision, do they glance the dispute settle m e nt decision, do they glance the dispute settlement procedure in the deal
3:22 pm
which triggers a whole series of meetings, there is a commission, a ministerial set of meetings, a cascading set of deadlines as well and it could end up with the un security council passing a resolution which could see the old sanctions restored. no one has pressed that button to stop that dispute resolution process yet, so will that happen today or will we just get effectively more words from the eu as they carry on doing what they have done throughout this which is calling on both the iranians and the us to behave in a responsible way to not make the situation any worse and keep the deal alive. way to not make the situation any worse and keep the deal alivem there behind—the—scenes, when you are talking to people of the record, is there anger that this was started when the americans pulled out of the deal? it is not even off the record, it was on the record today. we saw the french foreign minister who doesn‘t often stop on the red carpet on the way to these meetings and he summed it up this way, he said this isa summed it up this way, he said this is a bad response by the iranians to
3:23 pm
a bad decision by the united states in the first place. one of the diplomats who authored the iran deal, she was speaking at an event a couple of days ago and was talking about this dispute resolution mechanism they have got and they said it was designed to deal with issues that iran might have broken the deal, it was never conceived of to handle a situation where the united states, one of the other authors of the deal, decided to pull out. it is quite a tricky situation and the eu has focused less on the deal and less on the power politics and more on protecting european companies from the side effects of the us reimposing its sanctions on tehran whereas now they will have to get into the power politics about what happens to the deal. you may find this hard to believe but a jellyfish the same size as an adult human has been spotted off cornwall coast. lizzie daly, a biologist with wild ocean week, said the huge barreljellyfish was as big as her body. it is the largest species of jellyfish found in british waters. well, lizziejoins me from cardiff.
3:24 pm
just explain first of all, were you expecting when you went into the sea, to see one? welcome at this time of year, it is the right season for it so these jellyfish, these barrel jellyfish are seasonal visitors, they visit in the summer in the warmer waters. i wasn‘t expecting to see one that psi is i wasn‘t surprised to see the odd jellyfish float by. it was absolutely enormous, still looking at the picture you think, how is that a jellyfish? if i saw that i would assume the other way very fast. is it dangerous? absolutely not. these barreljellies despite their size, they are no threat to humans. they have a milestone, some people don‘t even feel the sting, so they are no threat. they are just a very large, gentle giant. when you
3:25 pm
we re very large, gentle giant. when you were swimming along, does your heart miss a beat? for me, not really. i ama miss a beat? for me, not really. i am a biologist so i am more interested in how it moves, the environment it is in, thinking about its ecology. but i can understand four others may be. others like me. is this a good sign? when you see things like this off the coast of britain, is it a sign the sea is doing all right? yes, absolutely. the whole wild ocean week was all about celebrating what wildlife we have on our coast. a lot of people think they have to fly off to see something extraordinary. our british coasts are diverse, they are mixed. this season it is particularly alive and that is what it is all about and being able to show that has been brilliant to showcase how diverse these uk coasts really are. how many of these giant jellyfish these uk coasts really are. how many of these giantjellyfish do you think there are off the coast of britain? there are thousands. there
3:26 pm
are thousands of them but don‘t fear, they are no threat. we do get thousands of them in the summer months and i‘m sure for anyone that has been swimming, have a little look, in various places in cornwall, scotla nd look, in various places in cornwall, scotland and wales, there have been lots of sighting so you will be lucky to see one this time of year but you properly code if you went for a snorkel. if i saw one of the coast, i would not think i was lucky. i would be out of that water. what else is going on in the sea that perhaps would catch us by surprise? i was surprised to see something like that of the coast of this country. are there other things? absolutely. things like our orkut that we get moving from shetland to scotland. a great time for dolphins, whales. a few days before our encounter with the jellyfish, we were in scotland
3:27 pm
looking at minky wales. we saw them preaching. you may see seasonal visitors, blue sharks off of wales. our coasts are full of life at this time of yearand our coasts are full of life at this time of year and there‘s lots to discover. there is so much going on. that issue in the wet suit because the pictures were taken by diane abbott? yes, dan did take those pictures and that is me behind that jellyfish. it was enormous. thank you very much. let‘s have a look at the weather and joining us now is nick miller. and they have found an interesting way of dealing with wildfires. we haven't finished with the natural world. let me take you to california. this is a wildfire from last month. and we are approaching wildfire season and this is something that can be caused by arson but lightning strikes as well.
3:28 pm
it is called dry lightning so you get storms, high based cloud, so not a huge amount of rain falling from them which is what you want to jump on the ground. there is a big problem with the shrubland, the grassland out there and it is all very dry, ready to go, to burn and it isa very dry, ready to go, to burn and it is a big problem with how to deal with that. we want to create channels where that grassland doesn‘t exist to any great depth and we wa nt doesn‘t exist to any great depth and we want the fire to stop and not be able tojump we want the fire to stop and not be able to jump that. a fire break. yes. i went on a bit too much about the science. let me show you the weapon against the wildfires. that isa weapon against the wildfires. that is a different picture from last time. it is. this is a pygmy goat. this is an african species but they can be found in the uk. but back by
3:29 pm
popular demand is our picture of the mountain goat in the usa. this was taken in the state of north dakota not far from taken in the state of north dakota not farfrom a taken in the state of north dakota not far from a town called oral. this is a beautiful picture and this is the sort of thing that might be eating away at that grassland. this is an old method. it has been done before, californians know all about this, you get the goats in, much away at the grass but it is expanding across the western side of the usa. more states are employing this very cheap method of dealing with the dry grass. they need more goats. you can rent a goat. if you are so goats. you can rent a goat. if you are so inclined you could rent a goat and you know what the name for a lazy goat is? no, what is the name for a lazy goat? billy idol. finally, let me show you a picture... if there was anything
3:30 pm
worth me coming in today, it was that. finally, this is what goats are sometime used for. this is goat y°93 are sometime used for. this is goat yoga and this is where you, a position called a downward dog. do you want to demonstrate? no. they stand on your back and it is supposedly a fun and calming method of doing yoga and that is expanding as well. along with goats eating grass. what about the weather? yes, please. i feel much grass. what about the weather? yes, please. ifeel much happier in grass. what about the weather? yes, please. i feel much happier in front of pictures like this. this is the uk. this is what is going on at the moment. it is all quite out there. this is high pressure which is right across us, this is high pressure which is right across us, slap bang across the british isles. when you see that, things are settled but queueing up in the atlantic, we have weather
3:31 pm
fronts, areas of low pressure coming our way so fronts, areas of low pressure coming our way so there are changes. this area of cloud, not sunny spells everywhere, part of the east midlands, east anglia rather cloudy. that area of cloud slowly getting smaller during the rest of what is left of this afternoon. elsewhere, broken cloud and sunny spells. slight chance of a stray shower. the winds are light and temperatures into the teens, but where you have the sunshine, you are into the low and mid 20s. things were warm up for some of us as the week goes on. tonight, we will see broken cloud, long, clear spells and temperatures will drop away. may be into single figures in a few spots, mist and fog patches around as well. a week where system patches around as well. a week where syste m m oves patches around as well. a week where system moves to northern ireland and western scotland which will bring some patchy rain. tomorrow that spreads further east and will break up
3:32 pm
spreads further east and will break up intoa spreads further east and will break up into a few showers, brightening up up into a few showers, brightening up again here in the afternoon. england and wales, the odd in northern england, whereas eastern england, more in the way of sunshine and temperatures on the up compared with today. approaching the upper 20s in some places. big picture as we go into wednesday and this is a more vigorous area of low pressure starting to move in. more rain associated with that. into northern ireland, west of scotland. ahead of that, eastern scotland into england and wales, if you sunny spells but the chance of catching a shower but most the chance of catching a shower but m ost pla ces the chance of catching a shower but most places will stay dry. the range of temperatures, 25, 20 6 degrees. the weather system works out estimates on thursday. you may see patchy rain reaching down towards the south—east another weather system coming on friday which will bring more rain in places and some of that could be heavy and thundery. a breeze picking up, high pressure
3:33 pm
to start the week, weather changes coming, no pressure about take over. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. jubilant scenes at the oval — as cricket fans — young and old — celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. i was definitely flying yesterday. it has probably sunken in a little bit more this morning, but it was just a really, really great day yesterday,
3:34 pm
especially sharing it with the lads. a serial thief who targeted victims through dating apps is found guilty of murdering a businessman using the drug ghb. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism after he tweeted four congresswomen should go back to where they came from. the second world war code—breaker, alan turing, is to become the face of the bank of england‘s new fifty pound note. sport with gavin, still only one place to start, your heartbeat is beginning to come down after that performance yesterday. an amazing day for england‘s cricketers. they‘ve been enjoying the adulation, from fans who‘ve come to see them — at the oval. they were there to celebrate a first ever cricket world cup england beating new zealand in the most dramatic of circumstances.a quick reminder. scores were level after 50 overs. so a super—over needed. level on 15 runs after that too.
3:35 pm
so england won the world cup by virtue of scoring more boundaries overall in the match. these the scenes at the oval earlier — where the squad mingled with schoolchildren and people wanting to hear from their new heroes. they‘ll head to downing street later for a drinks reception with the prime minister, theresa may — who was at lord‘s to see them beat new zealand in yesterday‘s final. ben stokes man of the match in the final. but several people played their part — including joe root. to be involved in the previous world cup, going through all that, to see the transformation of it, be part of that journey, it has been extremely enjoyable, exciting, we've had some great fun on the field playing in the mannerwe have, and now to be able to enjoy being world champions is brilliant. i'm so proud of everyone that is involved in it, so pleased for eoin morgan, all the work he has put in, building and growing this team. after all that — the squad have to get their heads together...
3:36 pm
they have a test match against ireland. then, in around two weeks, it‘s the start of the ashes, where they renew their confrontation with australia — and hope to win back the ashes. but they could record sports personality of the now, couldn‘t they? i don‘t want to pre—empt. let‘s move on and talk about another world cup in full swing, the netball world cup in full swing, the netball world cup. home nations are in action. northern ireland lost to malawi at the netball world cup earlier. and scotland play south africa later. but right now — england are playing jamaica. hoping to continue their perfect record so far. they‘ve won all three matches in the first phase. kate gray is there for us ...how are they getting on kate? and how tough are they expecting this to be? well, it is half—time here in liverpool, we are taking a few deep breaths because it is incredibly tense out there. england made a very confident start against jamaica. they are the number two seeds, we always knew it would be a tough match against jamaica, didn't expect to be competing against them so early in the tournament but you make a loss to south africa yesterday so
3:37 pm
they now face england today, desperate for a win. england made a very strong start in the first quarter, they were ahead by five and look like they might be running away with the game but you can never underestimate the sunshine girls from jamaica. they've got an incredibly strong shooter in janelle fowler, who pops in the goals for fun and she managed to find her flow and actually managed to make up that goal difference by the quarter time. england were still leading 14—12. but then they came back on in the second half and looked a little bit nervous. their usual reliable partnership ofjoe hart and and helen housby were missing shots, very unusual behaviour —— jo houghton. jamaica were level with england and this arena lifted their cheers, trying to carry the roses and find their rhythm again. we have just come to the end of that first half, and england have managed to ta ke half, and england have managed to take the lead once again. the score now stands at 28—26. incredibly
3:38 pm
tight here, which we knew it would be. most people thought this match would be the final match of this tournament, but there's been some strange results here, which has meant england now have to face the tough opponent that is jamaica meant england now have to face the tough opponent that isjamaica here on day four. ifjamaica lose today it may mean they do not progress to the semifinals, if england when it means their chances of making it through to the semifinals is a little bit easier, because they will face south africa on thursday, set to be another really tough match. the girls will be back out on court injusta the girls will be back out on court injust a few the girls will be back out on court in just a few moments time. the girls will be back out on court injust a few moments time. i'm sure tracey neville will be giving them all the calming influence she can to ensure that they can hold it together and really see this match out in the second half. you can follow all the action on bbc two. there will be lots of netball action across the course of the day. scotland will be playing south africa at 25 past five this afternoon and you can see that across other bbc outlets. but for now england lead jamaica 28—26 and you do not want to miss out. thank
3:39 pm
you do not want to miss out. thank you very much. and — just before we go, tom daley and matty lee — have won bronze, in the ten metre synchronised diving, at the world aqautics championships — in south korea. china won gold — with russia claiming silver. the result — which is their first major honour as a pair — has secured gb a place in the event for the tokyo 2020 olympics. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. sadly no goat yoga to endon. just as well, gavin. let‘s return to the news that there‘s been further condemnation of remarks by president trump that four democratic congresswomen should go back to the countries they came from. the british prime minister, theresa may, described the tweets as "completely unacceptable". donald trump said the women should fix the ‘catastrophic‘ governments in their countries of origin instead of criticising the us. three of the congresswomen were born in the united states, while another came to the country as a young child.
3:40 pm
let‘s speak now to frances steed seller, national reporter with the washington post, she joins us from washington. i‘m just wondering how many people agree with the house speaker, nancy pelosi, who has denounced president trump for wanting to make america white again? i think this is key to this very outspoken set of tweets he put out yesterday. trump knows that his future, his re—election in 2020, defends upon firing up this base of largely white voters who rallied behind him in 2016. if you go back four years, he spoke in a way that people thought would make him unelectable, he talked about mexicans as rapists and criminals, and republicans at that point thought he would not be able to move forward on a platform like that. in fa ct, forward on a platform like that. in fact, it proved to be his winning ticket, to rally these largely white southern people who have felt left out by diversity politics, identity politics, and this is certainly an
3:41 pm
approach that steve bannon pushed very ha rd approach that steve bannon pushed very hard from him from early on. now you see this coming up again. there has been outrage this morning understandably on media and other places but trump has doubled down, again very much his approach, making an outrageous statement, demanding an outrageous statement, demanding an apology from other people, double down yourself and move on. we saw it right before the election in 2016 when the access hollywood tapes came out when he talked about grabbing women by the crotch, again there was questions of whether he could survive that but in fact he did, double down and move on, this is very much trump playing to his own strengths. this tactic when someone accuses him of being racist, he then has a go at them for using disgusting language. attack back and move on. each outrage seems to lead just to the next one. a lot of people found it in some sense unsurprising but it is interesting
3:42 pm
politically. one of the most notable conservative voices is to may speaking out against him. very little from republicans. within the democrats, this highlights potential rifts within the far more diverse group of democrats who came in particularly into the house in 2018, trump did not name the women that he was speaking about in his tweet, but there is a group of four known as there is a group of four known as the squad who are far more progressive, far more liberal than pelosi, and there have been rifts among them. we also saw a very prominent rift on stage when senator kemal harris took on vice president biden about his talking about dealing with segregation in the past. these issues are potentially tricky for democrats as they try to rally a united front, and their chief goal of course is to defeat trump in 2020. but they have other issues, deep divisions on trade, health care and the president knows it. right, so the president by
3:43 pm
making tweets like this is highlighting floors at first, and i think deborah dingell spoke this morning, he seemed to unite people, and of course pelosi and many others including elizabeth warren rallied behind these women, but it also does highlight potential rifts in the democratic party far more broadly because he has a very loud voice, particularly on twitter. do you believe that the president in any way might have felt that there was something wrong with what he was tweeting? i can't get inside the president‘s head and i am a reporter, not an opinion journalist, so reporter, not an opinion journalist, so that is for others to speculate on. we can just look at his track record and know that his strategies are to make these very sweeping statements, and then from their double down and move on.” statements, and then from their double down and move on. i would not expect anyone from the washington post to say anything differently, but i‘m wondering about other media outlets, because some are less vociferous in criticism of the president. some media outlets to the right? i did not look this morning at some of that coverage but i
3:44 pm
believe they gave him a pass on it, and that was the secondary reporting i saw. that is is open to you as it is to me. i'mjust i saw. that is is open to you as it is to me. i'm just wondering whether theresa may as you mentioned condemning these comments, will that make any difference, given the situation is between the uk and the us at the moment? right, with the departing ambassador here, and her of him but of course borisjohnson saying he could not defend that ambassador. so i think we will see a very different relationship going on between the potential new ambassador, and i imagine one that johnson will advocate for, and president trump. the worry about this, from where i am sitting, these tweets seem to be getting more and more outrageous. you sort of wonder where we‘re headed with this. more outrageous. you sort of wonder where we're headed with this.” think that is a big question, we move from one outspoken tweet to another outspoken tweet, and each time doubling down on them and i think that‘s the question on everybody else‘s minds. what is on
3:45 pm
trump‘s mind is a real election in 2020 and he probably doesn‘t look any further than that. really good to talk to you, thank you very much. egon is here with the business news injusta egon is here with the business news injust a moment but egon is here with the business news in just a moment but first the headlines. jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans of all ages celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. completely unacceptable — theresa may‘s verdict on president trump‘s latest twitter outburst, branded racist by critics. a man from south london is found guilty of the murder of a businessman using the sex drug ghb. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. shares in sport direct have been falling after it delayed releasing its latest results. it blamed the delay on uncertainty over trading at house of fraser — which it bought last year. more on this in a moment. two million low—paid workers could get statutory sick pay for the first time. right now, only people on minium
3:46 pm
wage for more than 14 hours a week get statutory sick pay. but that time limit could be cut under plans being considered by the government. china‘s economy grew at its slowest pace since the early 90s over the last three months, according to official figures. the world‘s second biggest economy grew 6.2% from the same period last year. it‘s been hit by the trade war with america. sports direct under pressure? not a place you expect to find them. what has happened is its share price... this is mike ashley, of course. he features very strongly in the story, the boss of sport direct of course. the company were due to put out the latest results on thursday, but it is now delaying it as far back as putting it back, the release back as far perhaps as august 23. the reason
3:47 pm
it is doing this it says it doesn‘t really know how well house of fraser is doing. it bought house of fraser last year at a time when, let‘s face it, we know the high street is not doing particularly well. the boss of sport direct, mr mike ashley, says that trading conditions are unbelievably bad. so greg mcdonald from retail week wonders if mr ashley has bitten off more than he can chew. quite a lot of uncertainty about house of fraser. we have not had an update about it since the end of la st had an update about it since the end of last year, at that time it had lost more than £30 million injust 11 weeks. several months now, high street conditions are very difficult, but you just have to wonder how sensible that acquisition was, how far he has made progress with his strategy with it. and whether or not he hasjust been
3:48 pm
juggfing whether or not he hasjust been juggling too many balls and getting involved in the rails with the likes of debenhams, where he managed to oust some members of the board, where he spent quite a bit of time demanding lie detector tests when he was demanding lie detector tests when he was trying to get control of it. so you just wonder has he spent enough time on the core sports direct business? the new £50 note is coming our way — neither of us is likely to ever see one! and it features alan turing — the mathematician and and computer scientist. that‘s right, and the man behind the turing test, to do with testing how effective a eye is. the £50 note the bank put out a call to see who should be on the new £50 note, and people as diverse as margaret thatcher and stephen hawking were nominated —— ai is. sarahjohn is
3:49 pm
the anchoring and‘s chief cashier, and shejoins the anchoring and‘s chief cashier, and she joins us the anchoring and‘s chief cashier, and shejoins us now. sarah, why mr turing? alan turing was an absolutely outstanding mathematician, and widely regarded as the father of computing. he is probably best known by the public for his work during world work to —— world war ii at bletchley park, code breaking being really pivotal in the encryption of german messages but his legacy goes way beyond that. he came up with the initial concept of a machine that could be used to solve any comparable problem, what we now know as a computer, and those computers are just now all around us today from how we work, at home, and most of us carry a very small version in our pockets, and it is that legacy really we are celebrating on this note. and a vast array of people considered, not me and simon unfortunately, but what
3:50 pm
are the criteria for selecting who goes on to a new banknote? we announced in november last year that we we re announced in november last year that we were looking for a scientist to feature on this 50 per note. that scientist needed to be deceased, and they needed to have made a substantive contribution to british science. and we were absolutely amazed by the response we got from the general public, the public nominations process. we got over 227,000 nominations, which resulted ina list 227,000 nominations, which resulted in a list of 989 eligible scientists. 989 people who met the criteria to appear on the note and alan turing is the outcome of whittling down that 989 to the face of alan turing to appear on the 50. when is the note heading our way? we expect it to be released by the end of 2021, it is still in design process at the moment, we have released the key artwork today but there are still a lot of work to do
3:51 pm
to get it out on the streets. sara, is your signature a bit more shaky on the £50 note? why would it be? i don‘t know, my hands would be shaking! you haven‘t changed it in any way. i have not, so my signature is first going to come out on the £20 note you will see early next year. there are around 2 billion of those, so that was the one actually i was probably a little bit more nervous about. there are still quite a lot of £50 notes out there, over 300,000,050 per note but it will actually be the same signature that appears on those as appears on the 20. your hand must be aching! sorry, egon, i overtook that. not at all. we had better have a look at nothing at all, we haven‘t got time. we had better have a look at nothing at all, we haven't got time. see you next hour. sorry, egon. iwill be in trouble for that, sorry.
3:52 pm
the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said "it‘s dangerous rubbish" to say there‘s no link between crime and poverty. in a speech in south london, mr khan cited new research suggesting that the majority of murder and manslaughter suspects had themselves previously been the victims of knife crime. here‘s our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani. full of fighting spirit for all the right reasons. some of the 320 children coached by south london‘s dwaynamics boxing club. 15 trainers give their time forfree, teaching children discipline, self—confidence, and how to stay away from crime in one of the poorest parts of london. joshua simpson‘s jab is the measure of success. on the verge of a criminal life, police took him to the club for mentoring, and he‘s now a 16—year—old champion. there's people that are there and they're trying to get out, and there are people that are there and they like to be there. now i can see, like, loads of different routes and i can pick which route i feel is best. like, everything is open now. the club is a tribute tojoshua‘s cousin, dwayne simpson, stabbed to death five years ago while protecting a friend. if everybody who volunteers here
3:53 pm
we re if everybody who volunteers here were properly paid it would probably cost double that. the organisers say this part of south london needs 20 such clubs to reach all of the vulnerable children. they say that would be a small price to play for the most that can be saved. we are dealing with young children that are frightened. they are stressed, they are going through trauma, because this youth violence has now got so out of control. london's mayor sadiq khan has revealed search which she says proves a link between serious youth violence and poverty exacerbated by cuts in public services. we know that the greatest time of day where there is most likely to be serious street violence is between three pmn 6pm, so it beggars belief that because of government cuts we closed down of school clubs, youth centres, which is why you see increasing violence at this time. the government says it is putting an extra £100 million into combating serious violence and there are plans to legally compel
3:54 pm
schools and other bodies to collaborate on solutions, but youth leaders say that‘s not enough for london, you‘ll yet alone the rest of the country, and they are in downing street today to appeal for a lot more cash. this week marks 50 years since the historic moment when the first man — neil armstrong — set foot on the moon. the apollo 11 mission represented — in armstrong‘s own words — a ‘giant leap for mankind,‘ with the world — back on planet earth — watching and marvelling. among them of course were the astronauts‘ families. just months after apollo 11, alan bean became the fourth man on the moon as part of apollo 12. his wife and daughter have been speaking to the bbc about their memories of that moment in 1969. men were leaving the earth to land on the ocean of storms. my father is alan bean and he was the lunar module pilot on apollo 12, fourth man to walk on the moon. our neighbourhood was very close to nasa. everyone was either an engineer, flight controller or physician.
3:55 pm
our neighbourhood had a very focussed goal. we didn't really think about it that much. ijust knew he was training to go into space. launch date was very exciting. it was a rainy day. we huddled all together, my mother, my grandmother, my brother and i. he trained seven—and—a—half years. we were just excited that it was finally going to happen. we had been waiting for so long. 3, 2, 1 — zero. all engines running, commence lift off. then when it goes, the birds fly and it‘s so much noise and the ground shakes. roger, roger, bye—bye. see you on the other side. have fun. we just went on to school, because that‘s what you were supposed to do. mom tried to keep our normal routine as kids. and of course we were enjoying the moment and being there, but, we still have to keep doing what we‘re supposed to do, and that was important to my dad. you always have in the back of your mind that something could go wrong, and he told me, "remember i'm doing what i always loved, so don't worry." and i did have great confidence in his skill.
3:56 pm
we would rather him do what he loved, even if it had a big risk. i can't believe it. amazing! go for landing. the day he landed on the moon it was about 12.30 houston time, and we were alljust sitting around, watching the tv, and hoping for the best. no—one else can tell you "i love you to the moon and back" and really mean it, and i know that that was true. so often he would say how his thoughts would drift back to his family. when he was on the moon, he looked up and saw that earth and thought, "gosh, you know, everybody i love is over there." when alan first got home, he had lost a lot of weight. he was a finicky eater and eating that space food was not his thing. you know, he didn‘t talk about it a lot when he came home, not because he wasn‘t proud
3:57 pm
or anything, but he kinda just wanted to be with his family, you know. when you see somebody that‘s been working so hard and has such a dream, we just knew how hard he‘d wored — and we had too, mostly my parents, you know, they had made a lot of sacrifices. he really did love to us the moon and back, and, well, i think he‘s still up there, thinking about us. afternoon live, now the weather with nick miller. a fine start to the weak, high—pressure, so most places are dry, a mix of cloud and sunshine, warm though it is rather cloudy crosses and parts of england, for some brightening up, others will hold on to the cloud for the remaining of the afternoon and have temperatures in the high teens, elsewhere mostly in the low 20s. cloud increasing across parts of northern ireland in western scotland, a weather front getting closer here, so either a few outbreaks of rain or a few showers
3:58 pm
starting to break out, whereas elsewhere, some clear spells, one or two patches of mist and fog, dipping down into single figures. tuesday brings a very weak weather system across northern ireland and scotland, a zone of thick cloud, some rain for a time, brightening up into the afternoon. england and wales, the odd stray shower breaking up wales, the odd stray shower breaking up at most places will stay dry and it will be a warmer feeling day across the eastern side of england, but a greater chance of seeing some wetter, breezy weather as we get into the week.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4: jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans — young and old — celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. emotional, definitely playing yesterday. it has probably sunk in a little bit more this morning, butjust a really, really great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. a serial thief who targeted victims through dating apps is found guilty of murdering a businessman using the drug ghb. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four congresswomen should go back to where they came from. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with gavin ramjaun. more world cup action for england today — but this time in the netball. they‘re playing jamaica right now in liverpool, as they look to maintain
4:01 pm
their 100% record. and looking at the weather for us is nick miller. the weather is in high pressure mode to start the week, it is all quite out there but there are changes on the way. huerta and brazierfor some of us. changes on the way. huerta and brazier for some of us. stay with me for the forecast later on. we‘ll be in hull, where some local residents are taking road safety into their own hands. that‘s in news nationwide, just after 4:30. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. 1966, 2003, and now 2019 — the years we heard the words "england have won the world cup". first in football, then rugby, and now of course for the first time in men‘s cricket. and those words are still echoing in our ears after that remarkable game yesterday — described by many as
4:02 pm
the best final ever and one of the most remarkable games ever. the players head to downing street tonight for a reception. earlier, crowds of people, many of them children, joined the team at the oval to celebrate. many will be hoping that the world cup win will inspire a new generation of cricket fans. joe wilson reports. lords perhaps was exhausted. in any case there‘s another famous cricket venue in london for england‘s most famous cricketers. that feels like their status today, anyway. at the oval, for the first time, welcome world cup winning men. we were flying yesterday and probably it has sunk in a bit more this morning. it was just a great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. we just went back to the hotel, seeing family and friends. it went on pretty long. i guess a few of the boys are tired this morning, but i guess it was worth it.
4:03 pm
it only takes a second to lift a trophy, but it takes years to plan a world cup campaign. there should now be time and space to enjoy it. social media, from her majesty the queen, from the prime minister and from countless others. a digital celebration. to match the scenes yesterday near the fountains in trafalgar square, and cricket can do this... for nearly 15 years there has been a charity called chance to shine. established because many in cricket feared that the sport was disappearing from state schools in britain. this morning they put on an assembly in south—west london, as they do every week, but never before after such a cricket frenzy. cricket has been hidden away for 20 years and people who are not traditional sports fans were gripped, i saw social media, i had text messages. people have been trying to convince forever that cricket‘s a great sport. they saw it yesterday and they saw the drama of a game and how it could unite people.
4:04 pm
every story has two sides. new zealand must be the unluckiest runners up in cricket history. mind you, not everyone there was distraught. new zealand is where ben stokes was born, and where he still has family. they were gripped by the action on the other side of the world. when we were watching it it was an incredible feeling, to have your son out there, doing what he does and getting right down to the last ball. so we probably got the best of both worlds as i see it. new zealand played so well. they deserved so much out of the game and they did get a lot out of the game too. the complications of crucial moments are still being discussed. standby — when the throw ht ben stokes‘ bat and flew to the boundary, it is now suggested it should have been five instead of six runs, because he had only completed one run at the time of the throw. well... ruthless, brave, fortunate — all these qualities england typified at this world cup, all qualities that they lacked in previous editions.
4:05 pm
this team have an incredible opportunity to not only inspire from yesterday, that‘s going to inspire, but they are young, they are a team that will stay together a few years. you‘re looking at a couple of them that may not be there in four years‘ time at the world cup, but the majority of this team are just at the start of what could be a very long journey in the england team. maybe this was the most gripping cricket match ever, but it is only the start of this summer. let‘s talk to simon hughes — former professional player and now the editor of the cricketer magazine. you are just saying that you know ben stokes‘s family. talk about split loyalties of their watching in new zealand. i think ben's dad wa nted new zealand. i think ben's dad wanted new zealand to win. but in the end, i think this sort of fairness prevailed because england worked so hard for this over the last four years and they have played a fantastic brand of kick it, they have been number one in the world for the last couple of years and it required then putting a few results
4:06 pm
together, holding their nerve, dealing with the pressure which ultimately they did. have you ever seen a game ultimately they did. have you ever seen a game like that? no. the 2005 test ebbed and flowed but for a one—off game in one day, never seen anything like it. the way the drama, the unpredictability of it unfolded, the unpredictability of it unfolded, the pressure of the final, it‘s a one—off game, it‘s the final, so never. there was the butler and stokes partnership and then there was archer, many people not familiar with him. there were so many different aspects. the winner of this is the game of cricket. totally. laws, a showpiece place, an event which gave the team who have won it, the crown of being champions. i think the great thing about it was it was allowed to be on free to air tv because so many of these fine players have been shielded from the public over the
4:07 pm
last ten, 12 years. someone likejoe ruud has never played a match on free to air tv. i have given my son a little video ofjoe root wishing himself happy birthday. joe root is a bolster of the game. and yet it is the money from commercial television that has allowed the ecb to get their act together to get their act together and create this too. the game was in shape in 2005 when channel 4 covered it and when the bbc covered it. it is not all about money. you create jobs. bbc covered it. it is not all about money. you createjobs. i don‘t think they need as many employees as the ecb had. what it is about is exposure, encouraging people to play the game, the more people play, the better the tenant will emerge. the game, the more people play, the better the tenant will emergem the game, the more people play, the better the tenant will emerge. it is also about what is good to watch, the white ball. we will see the 100 ball game coming up soon. is that
4:08 pm
going to reinvigorate the grass roots which is what people want to do right now? it is about stories, narrative and that is why the 2005 ashes was so successful because the story unfolded through several weeks and this story has emerged, england had a dip in the middle, then they come out unbeaten and then this final on free to air tv, people can share in it and it was a national experience. next year, the hundred, a new tournament, it will be on every day, some on the bbc and people will be able to follow the story, get to know the players a bit and then they will get captivated by it. was that the greatest game ever yesterday? without a doubt. you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. a slight technical glitch.
4:09 pm
a drug dealer has been convicted of murdering a man with the sex drug ghb. gerald matovu, who‘s 26, gave eric michels a fatal dose at his home in south west london after the pair met through a dating app. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. we will bring you that shortly. a few technical glitches here today. we will file to talking about the cricket. but also netball and the world cup is under way there. all to common in our sports bulletin. but let‘s return to that story and the latest from the old bailey. murdered for his bank cards, his computer, his mobile phone and a few bottles of wine. business executive and part—time actor eric michels. he had contacted his killer gerry matovu through the gay dating app grindr. picking him up from a homeless hostel and stopping off
4:10 pm
at sainsbury‘s on the way back to his south—west london home. but that night, gerry matovu drugged him with the sedative ghb in order to rob him. he gave him a fatal dose. today, eric michels‘ sons describe the family‘s grief. i‘ll never meet anyone like him ever again in my life, and losing him has been like losing a limb. the devastation it causes is unbelievable. especially when he had so much to live for. i mean, he was only 54. leaving eric michels dead in his bed, gerry matovu left in a minicab with a suitcase of loot. in the following days, he and an accomplice, brandon dunbar, went on a spending spree using eric michels‘ bank cards. he‘s a liar, he‘s a hustler, he‘s a thief. he had no regard for a person‘s welfare. no regard at all for their life, because he‘s using a really dangerous drug to facilitate his
4:11 pm
crimes. matovu had been using ghb to rob people he met on grindrfor years. between them, he and dunbar had robbed at least a dozen people. here they are seen leaving the flat of one of their targets. five victims went to the police, but the investigations were limited. the most extraordinary incident happened at this east london hotel last may after a dutch businessman who was a guest met matovu on grindr. here, matovu drugged him and stole all his possessions, including his clothes, his laptop, his mobile phones and his bank cards. he even took the flat screen television and the toilet brush from the hotel bedroom. but police failed to identify the man who had drugged his victim into unconsciousness, even though it would have been easy to do so from his grindr account. i don‘t understand why it wasn‘t followed up at that time, because we might not be where we are today if it was.
4:12 pm
it‘s just a shame my dad had to die for them to go and find him, basically. the police were well aware of gerry matovu. he had been convicted of selling drugs to stephen port, the notorious ghb serial killer. today we can reveal that matovu had even drugged and robbed port himself, just before stephen port was arrested for killing four men, prompting this exchange on whatsapp. "i hope you don‘t do that again to anyone, as it‘s not only dangerous, but to then take their stuff is criminal," port wrote. to which matovu replied, "i‘m so sorry, and it won‘t happen ever again." this case has highlighted once more how police don‘t always take the misuse of this incredibly dangerous drug seriously enough. any allegation of anything involving ghb in the future should be taken very, very seriously and investigated every time. eric michels‘ sons want the drug laws to be changed to recognise just how lethal ghb can be.
4:13 pm
daniel sandford, bbc news. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has said there‘s still a chance that the iran nuclear deal could be saved. he‘s holding talks in brussels with european foreign ministers, about breaches by tehran of the agreement, after the us withdrew from it last year. it isn‘t dead yet and we are totally committed to keeping the middle east de—nuclearised. if iran acquires nuclear weapons, then other countries in the region will acquire nuclear weapons and it becomes a very toxic and dangerous situation. so, we are looking to find a way to preserve the nuclear deal, which we think is the best way of keeping the middle east as a whole nuclear weapon free. iran is still a good year away from developing a nuclear weapon. we think there is still some closing but small window to keep the deal alive and that‘s what i‘m here to talk about.
4:14 pm
you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans of all ages celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four congresswomen should go back to where they came from. a man from south london is found guilty of the murder of a businessman using the sex drug ghb. and in sport, fans get the chance to meet their new heroes as england‘s cricketers celebrate that famous world cup win. can england maintain their perfect record so far at the netball world cup when they face their toughest test yet. and tom daley and matty lee have won bronze in the ten metres synchronised diving at the world aquatics championships in south korea which secures a place for gb in the event for tokyo 2020. a new study claims that the origins of anorexia nervosa are in both the mind and the body.
4:15 pm
anorexia had previously been thought of as a psychiatric disease, but doctors at king‘s college london showed changes hard—wired into some people‘s dna altered the way they processed fats and sugars, making it easier to starve their bodies. the eating disorder charity beat has called the findings "groundbreaking". with me is laura shah, who has had treatment for anorexia, and also i‘m joined by professorjanet treasure from the institute of psychiatry, psychology & neuroscience at king‘s college london, who has contributed to this new research. professor, if i could start by talking to you. this is ground—breaking because up until now, the sense was this was a psychiatric problem rather than anything else. it has changed over time and at one time, it was considered more of a metabolic, hormonal disorder but then it swung to more social factors and now it has come back to a more nuanced view, a mixture of both. but if we
4:16 pm
are talking about it being in the dna, it is more than nuanced, isn‘t it? there is always interactions between the genes you have and the environments you get exposed to and life course and development. laura, ifi life course and development. laura, if i can ask you a bit about what happened with you because you were 13 when you had the symptoms, 15 when you accepted there was a real problem. what did you feel it was down two at the time? for me i don't feel there was a major trigger for my eating disorder, i felt i had behaviours leading up to it. i was quite shy, quite a high achiever, but for me i don't feel, for me of that was a coping mechanism for me to deal with the high achievements and being shy, otherthings to deal with the high achievements and being shy, other things along the way, so for me that was a coping
4:17 pm
organism that i developed but i could see how it could be metabolic because i don't feel there was a massive social trigger. does the fa ct massive social trigger. does the fact that it might be something physical as well as psychological, does it make it easierfor you physical as well as psychological, does it make it easier for you to understand what was going on?” don't know whether it makes it easier to understand but it makes it more self accepting, that it is not just your mind fighting against you, there is a predisposed thing that caused it to happen as well. the difficulty with anorexia and you know better than anybody is the effect that it has on everybody around you. so perhaps you are less worried about why is this happening than how do i change my life? definitely. when i was recovering, my mum was definitely. when i was recovering, my mum was my full—time carer, if i hadn't had had there to support me, i would be a lot worse off now than lam i would be a lot worse off now than iamat i would be a lot worse off now than i am at the moment. it really does destroy families and i'm lucky i re cove red destroy families and i'm lucky i recovered when i did and have been
4:18 pm
in recovery. if that had got worse andl in recovery. if that had got worse and i didn't have the support around me,| and i didn't have the support around me, i could quite easily have severed myself from my family or loved ones, it really is quite a traumatic illness for everyone involved. professor, you have heard laura‘s story and many stories like her many times before. will this sort of research, will it change the way perhaps youngsters with anorexia and older people indeed are treated in future? i think laura said it correctly that the people around the social system, it makes it slightly easier to understand that it isn‘t a total behavioural choice, that there are some factors thatjust total behavioural choice, that there are some factors that just almost blind people to the effects of the illness and what is going on. and, laura, get your mother quit herjob and has it, does it ever become something used to have? for me, i would still say i am in recovery. i
4:19 pm
am ina would still say i am in recovery. i am in a sorry place in recovery where i feel healthy and strong and can go about my life. in the future i hope to say i am fully recovered, but recovery is a choice you have to make every day is someone who has an eating disorder. in ten years' time i will probably be making decisions in my recovery to prolong it and sustain it. it doesn't mean i won't be recovered but it is an everyday effort to stay in that place of recovery. if and only time will give us an answer to this, if it is found there is more of a physical reason for why anorexia takes hold in the way it does, do you think in the future that might help, particularly in terms of treatment come in terms of getting help? i think it will help but i also think we need to be careful the way that is interpreted. anorexia already has a lot of stigma around it. do you think it still does? a lot of my experience of
4:20 pm
telling people i have had anorexia is, just eat. there needs to be a lot of care around the study in the way it is implemented and health ca re way it is implemented and health care professionals training and using it so it is used effectively and notjust, using it so it is used effectively and not just, oh, using it so it is used effectively and notjust, oh, that person is skinny, or they are predisposed to it. as well as analysing what you get into the desperate situation that anorexia brings, have you analyse how you have managed to get out of it? what is it that has got you through this? i thinkjust thinking to myself, do i still want to be in that mental torment when i'm 30, 40, 50? do i want to live my life under those restraints or do i wa nt life under those restraints or do i want to do something productive? not saying you can't whilst having anorexia but it does mentally limit you in being present in your day—to—day life. for me i don't want to be in that mindset for the rest of my life and look back and think, imight of my life and look back and think, i might have achieved a few things.
4:21 pm
i would rather be proud of what i have achieved and now i got there healthily. professor, is that a typical response from someone who has had to deal with anorexia? yes, the getting to recovery is a slow and difficult and arduous process. and that needs to be recognised. on average the illness can last ten yea rs or average the illness can last ten years or more and so very average the illness can last ten years or more and so very many aspects of development get disrupted which it‘s hard to catch up on. professor, good to talk to you. laura, very good to talk to. nice to see you. theresa may has described remarks by president trump that four democratic congresswomen should go back to the countries they came from as ‘completely unacceptable‘. three of the congresswomen were born in the united states, while another came to the country as a young child. in a series of tweets, the us president said:
4:22 pm
"so interesting to see ‘progressive‘ democrat congresswomen — who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world, if they even have a functioning government at all — now loudly and viciously telling the people of the united states, the greatest and most powerful nation on earth, how our government is to be run. why don‘t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came, then come back and show us how it is done. these places need your help badly, you can‘t leave fast enough. i‘m sure that nancy pelosi — the democrat house speaker — would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements!" we have a senior writer at the washington post and she explained the rationale behind the president‘s extensive use of twitter. trump knows his real action depends on firing up the space of largely white voters who rallied behind him in 2016. if you go back for years, it is almost four years ago exactly
4:23 pm
when he spoke in a way that people thought was unelectable. he talked about mexicans as rapists and criminals and republicans thought he would not be able to move forward on a platform like that. in fact it proved to be his winning ticket, to rally these largely white, southern people who felt left out by diversity politics, identity politics and this is an approach that steve bannon pushed hard from him, so now you see this coming up again. there has been outrage this morning understandably on media and other places but trump has doubled down. this is his approach, making an outrageous statement, demand an apology from others, double down on yourself and move on. we saw this in 2016 when the access hollywood tapes came out, when he talked about grabbing women by the crotch, again there were questions about whether he could survive that and in fact he did. this is very much trump playing
4:24 pm
to his own strengths. this tactic when someone to his own strengths. this tactic when someone accuses to his own strengths. this tactic when someone accuses him of being racist, he then has a go at them for using disgusting language. exactly. attack back and move on. each outrage seems to lead to the next one. at this point i think a lot of people found this in some senses somewhat unsurprising, but it is interesting politically. one of the most notable conservative voices is theresa may speaking out against him. very little from republicans and within the democrats, this highlights potential refs between the far more diverse groups of democrats who came into the house in 2018. including, trump didn‘t name the women, but there are a group of four, called the squad who are four more liberal. we saw refs on stage
4:25 pm
when senator kemal harris took on vice presidentjoe biden about his talking about segregation in the past. this is tricky for the democrats as they try to rally a united front and their chief goal is to defeat trump in 2020. the environmental campaign group, extinction rebellion are staging more protests across five uk cities. they‘re blocking roads and bridges, in what they‘re calling a "summer uprising" in cardiff, bristol, glasgow, leeds and london. through non—violent civil disobedience, the group of activists want to force governments to cut carbon emissions to stop a climate crisis. a 14—year—old boy has been seriously injured after a crash on his electric scooter. it comes a day after youtube star emily hartridge was killed while riding one in south west london, the first fatal e—scooter collision in the uk. well, today, ministers have been meeting with representatives from the electric scooter industry, over the future and safety of the vehicles on britain‘s streets.
4:26 pm
joining me now is paul hodgins, ceo of a company called ginger, which wants to bring e—scooters and other forms of e—transport to towns and cities in the uk. good to see you. anybody who has not seen one, good to see you. anybody who has not seen one, describe how they work because basically you can pick them up because basically you can pick them up andjust because basically you can pick them up and just leave them and screw to wherever you want. at the moment it is illegal here. first of all, let me say, we having this conversation on the back of a very tragic accident last friday and my thoughts go out the family of emily who is the person involved in that. and we need to continue to work to make our streets safer. i think for reasons of road safety, environmental reasons, air quality, ithink generally our streets are a much better place if we can get more
4:27 pm
people onto smaller vehicles, efficient vehicles rather than having heavy, powerful vehicles on the road. it is about smaller vehicles. scooters are from a road perspective, at the moment they are two wheels, they are limited to 15 and a half miles an hour. they are very much the same in terms of characteristics as a bike on the road and that is how i describe them. i accept that and have seen them. i accept that and have seen them used in other cities. but people using them on pavements, they use them on the roads, they are going down one—way streets of wrong way, they‘re not wearing helmets, something needs to be done. absolutely. we have the opportunity in the uk now, there are positives and minuses to the legal situation where they are not legal here at the moment, but we can look at what has worked and what hasn‘t worked in other countries. people do like
4:28 pm
writing them as a way to get around. but there are elements to the way it is being implemented at the moment. the douglas version where they are just littering the streets is not the right way to go in the uk. that is the paris version and that is what is happening elsewhere. that is happening with the bikes we saw here. if you have a small number of them, it is somewhat acceptable but as you start to get larger ones, larger volumes of them, it is not the right way to go. we are working with councils, companies and others to try to give much more structure to try to give much more structure to how they are left on the streets and parks so they actually fit within the street scene and they work for everyone. they work for the users and they work for non—users as well. they are separate from how you park them to how you use them on the roads. you don‘t want them on the pavements and that is part of the reason why we need to start moving forward in this country of defining how we‘re going to them. so that
4:29 pm
people are aware of how to use them properly. that is fine in practice, and you are a former council leader in richmond, but as soon as you put scooters on the roads with the lorries, vans, taxis, cars and bikes, it is a recipe for disaster. there are too many things competing for too little space and the scooter will always result. i would put it together with smaller vehicles in general. whether it is scooters or bikes or electric bikes, there will bea bikes or electric bikes, there will be a lot of innovation in vehicle types. what we want to do is to get more people onto smaller vehicles and you are right. for 60% of car journeys, they are with one person in the car, 25% with two. we need to get people out of their cars come out of the advance, have a different system for deliveries and not requiring lorries to go into cities and get them onto smaller vehicles
4:30 pm
ofa and get them onto smaller vehicles of a range of types. scooters are a pa rt of a range of types. scooters are a part of that. scooters are something that are proven, that people like to ride but it is bikes, scooters, electric bikes altogether. if they are legal, compulsory headwear? definitely recommended. i think like the sa ntander definitely recommended. i think like the santander bikes in the centre of london, if you made it compulsory, you limit the number of people who would use it. but if people could depend on it, i would expect they would be taking their own helmets around and you certainly want them wearing that. we need to get it to the point where there aren‘t enough on the ground and people know they are going to be there and can depend on that as a way to get around. good to see you. thank you very much. let‘s have a look at the weather. let's have a look at the weather.m isa let's have a look at the weather.m is a fine start to the week. high pressure so most is a fine start to the week. high pressure so most places are dry, a mix of cloud and sunshine.
4:31 pm
pleasa ntly warm mix of cloud and sunshine. pleasantly warm though it is still rather cloudy across parts of eastern england. for some it is brightening up but some will hold on to the cloud. temperatures in the high teens, whereas elsewhere low 20s. the cloud increases across parts of northern ireland and western scotland. a few outbreaks of rain and showers starting to break out, while elsewhere clear spells. temperatures dipping down to single figures. tuesday does bring a weak system across northern ireland and scotland, a zone of the cloud, some rain, brightening in the afternoon. england and wales, the odd stray shower but most players will stay dry and it will be a warmer feeling day across the eastern side of england, but a greater chance of wetter, breezy weather later in the week.
4:32 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. jubilant scenes at the oval — as cricket fans — young and old — celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. i was definitely flying yesterday. it has probably sunken in a little bit more this morning but it was just a really, really great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. a serial thief who targeted victims through dating apps is found guilty of murdering a businessman using the drug ghb. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four
4:33 pm
congresswomen should "go back" to where they came from. the second world war code—breaker, alan turing, is to become the face of the bank of england‘s new fifty pound note. and coming up — we‘ll be in hull, where some local residents are taking road safety into their own hands. that‘s in news nationwide, in just a few minutes. sport now on afternoon live, and only one place to start, the follow—up to the victory. england‘s cricket stars have been out enjoying their world cup success today — they‘ve been greeted by hundreds who came to the oval. they were there to celebrate a first ever cricket world cup with the side. england beat new zealand in the final — in the most dramatic of circumstances. some are calling it the greatest match in cricket. a quick reminder. scores were level after 50 overs. so a super—over needed. level on 15 runs after that too. so england won the world cup by virtue of scoring more boundaries overall in the match... these the scenes at the oval earlier... today the squad brushed aside claims they were given
4:34 pm
an extra run by mistake, in the final over of regular play. they head to downing street later for a drinks reception with prime minister, theresa may. she was at lord‘s to see them win. joe root feels the team can get even better. to be involved in the previous world cup, going through all that, to see the transformation of it, be part of that journey, it has been extremely enjoyable, exciting, we've had some great fun on the field playing in the mannerwe have, and now to be able to enjoy being world champions is brilliant. i'm so proud of everyone that is involved in it, so pleased for eoin morgan, all the work he has put in, building and growing this team. won‘t be too much time to enjoy this win. they play ireland in a test next week. and at the start of next month, they attempt to win back the ashes, against the old enemy australia. won cup is over, another one in full
4:35 pm
swing in liverpool, in liverpool, in netball. the home teams are in action. northern ireland are in action. lost to malawi at the netball world cup earlier. . .. and scotland play south africa later. but right now — england are playing jamaica hoping to continue their perfect record so far... they‘ve won all three matches in the first phase. kate gray is there for us ...how are they getting on kate? and how tough are they expecting this to be? what does the result mean for england in the long run? we have been treated to a real spectacle of netball, we knew that england against jamaica would be an england matchup, — — against jamaica would be an england matchup, —— exciting matchup. jamaica lost to south africa yesterday, which meant they met england today obviously desperate for a win. england came out in the first quarter, a very exciting start to the game, they let jamaica back in who are very flamboyant and a fa st in who are very flamboyant and a fast paced team. they started to claw back at england, the nerve started to kick in and our reliable shooting partnership started to miss, and it was getting a little
4:36 pm
bit close for comfort. tracey neville gave her a rose is a good talking to and they came out in the third quarter absolutely meaning business. they ended up getting a lead of eight goals. there was a cheeky little fist pump by tracey neville at three quarters time, she knew the girls had put out a very strong first three quarters and they just had to finish in the final quarter and that's exactly what they did. at times they look like they would run away with it and they were 13 goals up at one point but jamaica still had a bit of fight left in them at the end and the final score was them at the end and the final score was 56—48. i can't emphasise enough how important this win was for england. they have now proved they are one of the jamaica were tipped as the team that could have gone all the way in this tournament but it looks like they won't even make it through to the semifinals, but england will look to be the favourites now. they've got a day
4:37 pm
off tomorrow which means they can recuperate, rest, and then a slightly easier game on wednesday against trinidad and tobago and then they face the very much on form team, south africa on thursday. the crowd on their feet, showing their love and celebration for the team. really lifting this competition in liverpool and showing what we can expect over the coming days. as you said, northern ireland unfortunately did lose earlier today, which means they are out of the top eight places, but we still have scotland to come. they will be on court at 520 5p against a very tough opponent, south africa, it will be difficult for them to see that game out but definitely worth watching. you can see all of the netball here at this world cup across the bbc platforms. we will keep you updated as it happens. and — just before we go, tom daley and matty lee — have won bronze, in the 10 metre synchronised diving, at the world aqautics
4:38 pm
championships — in south korea. china won gold — with russia claiming silver. the result — which is their first major honour as a pair — has secured gb a place in the event for the tokyo 2020 olympics. look how much it means to them, that is all from us for now, back to you, simon. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to hull where we‘re joined by look north‘s peter levy, who is going to be telling us about local residents taking road safety into their own hands. and in newcastle we have look north‘sjeff brown who is talking about a phenomenal day in british cricket... first to hull, this is a community that has been given speed guns, is that has been given speed guns, is that right? yes. there are many rural areas in villages in yorkshire
4:39 pm
and lincolnshire, and the crime commissioner says there is a persistent problem with drivers speeding. the idea of volunteers holding speed guns has already been used in lincolnshire, and where it has been running in lincolnshire it has been running in lincolnshire it has been running in lincolnshire it has been very successful and has made a difference. now it‘s to be started in the humberside police force area. it‘s called community speed watch. it is operated as you say by local people who just hold the speed guns, and they want to make a difference in their area. villagers in an area where they think speeding is an issue where they live can apply to have a speed gun. the volunteers then go out on the road, and they write down the number plates of the cars, which are caught speeding. the royal society for the prevention of accidents says about 400 people a year are killed in crashes, in which the person involved in the crash has exceeded the speed limit or has been driving too fast for the conditions. they
4:40 pm
welcome this game, they say it is a good way of highlighting the dangers of speed but it is an unusual one. they can write down the numbers of the offenders. the spreadsheet of all the people who have been speeding is given to the police. they will get in touch with the drivers who have regularly broken the speed limit. they don‘t get a fine, they get a warning letter. i spoke to the crime commissioner earlier, and he said if they were caught speeding twice they would be hearing from the police. in lincolnshire where it has already started, 60 communities have signed up started, 60 communities have signed up and hundreds of police letters are sent out every month. the thinking is that anything that can stop speeding or make us more aware of speeding, has got to be a good thing, and speed cameras do, i‘m sure you agree with this, they do
4:41 pm
cause a lot of resentment. imagine if bill who lives next door to you is pointing a speed gun at you and then a couple of days later you are in the queue at the supermarket with him. it could be very awkward. but an interesting idea. but you are right, that will be an issue, isn‘t it? it is so true because he could live next door to you, catch you on the speed gun and then a couple of days later you see him on the garden hedge or the supermarket, it could be really awkward. you must tell your show for next time you come to dell in october when you come up to see us to watch out for the hand—held guns. see us to watch out for the hand-held guns. yeah, when he gets out! laughter thank you for that. over to jeff. celebrations everywhere after that game yesterday and no more so than durham. let‘s focus on the man of the match, ben stokes, you have interviewed him many times.” the match, ben stokes, you have interviewed him many times. i have, always a pleasure but not quite as much fun as watching him play. i've been lucky enough to have followed ben's progressed through the durham
4:42 pm
ranks then making it with england. it's been fantastic but of course it hasn't always been easy for him, cast your mind back three years ago to the world t20 final, england on the brink of lifting the trophy against the west indies, ben stokes bowling the final over, hit for four successive sixes by carlos braithwaite. that was on the pitch, off the pitch there was the incident outside a bristol nightclub which saw him charged and then cleared of affray. something that had hung over him for quite a while. now he is a national hero. it will be interesting to see the reaction back home in new zealand because that is the country of his birth. he came over to england the country of his birth. he came overto england in the country of his birth. he came over to england in 2003 when his dad, jed stokes, a rugby league coach, got a job with workington town. west cumbria was home, cockermouth was ben's first cricket club, where he learned the game before he got picked up by durham, then of course making it to england and being the world cup match winner. as you can imagine, mixed emotions back home in christchurch,
4:43 pm
with his mum and dad watching that final. we were watching it, it was an incredible feeling. to have your son doing what he does and getting right down to the last ball, we probably have the rest of post worlds, new zealand deserve so much, they got a lot out of the game too because i don't think you would be a fan of new zealand, who wouldn't have thought they gave it their best shot and they have to be very harsh if they didn't. the way that game was if they didn't. the way that game was played, i would say it is already in the annals of folklore as the best game of one—day cricket ever played. at the end of the game, ijust cried my eyes out, basically. but i was sort of really disappointed for the black caps because they had given so much as well. wouldn't it be great if it could have been a draw and it comes to new zealand for six months, stays
4:44 pm
in england for six months? itjust seemed like that would have been a deserving way to finish for both teams. fantastic. as we heard, ben stokes was not the only one from durham in the final. a very good quiz question for you, five of the 22 players in that final had come through the durham cricket academy, the two obvious ones are two current players, ben stokes and mark wood, mark wood incidentally the third world cup winner to come from the northumberland town of ashington after bobby and jackie charlton with england in 1966 will stop liam plunkett of surrey spent the first ten years of his career, a local lead. and then the two you might struggle with, tom latham, who has been playing for durham for the last two years, and the really difficult one, opener henry nicholls, who played for the durham academy 2011.
4:45 pm
and paul collingwood. assistant coach to the england side. not surprisingly when we went down to durham today, playing a chairmanship game against worcestershire, the chief executive had a big smile on his face. having three durham players in the team and paul collingwood as a coach and the man of the match in ben, an enormous boost. all those kids in the durham area, if they are not inspired to ta ke area, if they are not inspired to take up cricket, i will be very surprised. an enormous boost. more and more kids watching, it will be interesting on friday night, i think we will get a few more. it can only bea we will get a few more. it can only be a positive benefit. looking forward to friday. that legacy issue really is the most important question, what can this world cup
4:46 pm
win do as a whole which has been suffering slightly in the last few years? especially for durham, the youngest of the first—class counties, only became a first—class team in 1992 counties, only became a first—class team in1992 and counties, only became a first—class team in 1992 and in the last few years they have had financial problems, because of that they were relegated from division one of the championship down to division two, a te st championship down to division two, a test match is taken away from them so there has been a lot of doom and gloom around durham over the last few years but they are hoping this world cup win on the part their players have played in it will inspire the next generation, let's keep our fingers crossed. jeff, peter, is there a uniform for look north? both wearing blue? i‘m not going to say who suits better. i'm not going to offer to play cricket with you after last year and wimbledon, we know what happened. how unusual can you get the last word. thank you both very much. if
4:47 pm
you would like to see more of those stories, access them via the bbc iplayer. a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 430 here on afternoon live. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said "it‘s dangerous rubbish" to say there‘s no link between crime and poverty. in a speech in south london, mr khan cited new research suggesting that the majority of murder and manslaughter suspects had themselves previously been the victims of knife crime. here‘s our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani. full of fighting spirit for all the right reasons. volunteers at south london‘s dwaynamics boxing club coach 320 children, teaching them discipline, self—confidence, and how to avoid crime in one of the poorest parts of london. one, two. joshua simpson‘s jab is the measure of their success. once on the verge of a criminal life, the club has turned him into a 16—year—old champion.
4:48 pm
he is escaping gangs and looking to the future. there‘s people that are there that‘s trying to get out, and there‘s people that are there but, like, they like to be there. now i can see, like, loads of different routes and i can pick which route i feel is best. like, everything is open now. the dwaynamics boxing club costs £80,000 a year to run. and if everybody who volunteers here were properly paid, it would probably cost double that. the organisers say this part of south london needs 20 such clubs to reach all of the vulnerable children. they say that would be a small price to pay for the lives that could be saved. we are dealing with young children who are frightened, they are stressed, they are going through trauma, because this youth violence has now got so out of control. today london‘s mayor, sadiq khan, has revealed research which he says proves a link between serious youth violence and poverty, exacerbated
4:49 pm
by cuts in public services. we know that the time of day when there‘s most likely to be serious street violence is between 3pm and 6pm. so it beggars belief that because of government cuts we have closed down after—school clubs, closed down youth centres. which is why you see this increase in serious street violence at this time. the government says it‘s put an extra £100 million in to combatting serious violence, and there are plans to legally compel schools and other bodies to collaborate on solutions, but youth leaders say that‘s not enough for london, let alone the rest of the country and they‘re in downing street today to appeal for a lot more cash. dominic casciani, bbc news. egon is here with all the business news coming up in a moment but first the headlines on afternoon live. jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans of all ages celebrate england‘s dramatic world cup win. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four congresswomen should "go back" to where they came from. a man from south london is found
4:50 pm
guilty of the murder of a businessman using the sex drug ghb. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. shares in sport direct have been falling after it delayed releasing its latest results. it blamed the delay on uncertainty over trading at house of fraser — which it bought last year. more on this in a moment. two million low—paid workers could get statutory sick pay for the first time. right now, only people on minium wage for more than 14 hours a week get statutory sick pay. but that time limit could be cut under plans being considered by the government. china‘s economy grew at its slowest pace since the early 90s over the last three months, according to official figures. the world‘s second biggest economy grew 6.2% from the same period last year. it‘s been hit by the trade war with america.
4:51 pm
shares in sports direct are under quite a lot of pressure. yes, mike ashley is the boss of sports direct. what has happened as the company has delayed putting out its latest results. they were due out on thursday. they may be delayed by about six weeks, which has got markets not particularly happy. the reason it is doing this, it says, is because it is not sure about trading conditions at house of fraser, which it bought last year. let‘s talk to shanti kelemen is senior portfolio manager at coutts. how serious is the situation at house of fraser? we don't know, which is why shares have gone down because of the uncertainty about it. whenever you have a company that can't release results, they don't know what is going on in the business, so that is why they are
4:52 pm
down today. do you think it could impact the overall results? it could. house of fraser was a fairly big acquisition, i'm sure they did due diligence before they bought it but sometimes you do an acquisition, you never know what you're going to find until you start running the business and you see what things you can change. speaking to an analyst earlier he was speculating mike ashley might have bitten off more than he can chew. i'm sorry, i could not hear you. my earpiece is at.” can see you are having difficulties, there is speculation that the company spot direct might have bitten off more than it can chew in buying house of fraser. ok, i think we have lost her. shall we have a look at the markets? let's do that.
4:53 pm
here they are. so the ftse100 doing well. that is because it is of the bad news out of china, slowing growth. there is thought there might bea growth. there is thought there might be a stimulus package from the government to boost things. mining companies like antofagasta, which have a big stake in building things in china, they have done well. sports direct, as we were just saying, not doing well, that is because of the situation with having to delay the results of their latest results. travis perkins has been the source results. travis perkins has been the source of a lot of attention, and thatis source of a lot of attention, and that is because it is thought to have been speeding up the process of selling wicks. ok,... ithink have been speeding up the process of selling wicks. ok,... i think we might have shanti back. yes. thank
4:54 pm
you for coming back. they‘re sorry about that! we were just saying, just wondering whether or not they might have been a situation whereby house of fraser is really going to impact the overall results for sports direct, what do you think?” think it could. sports direct had guided that there might be earning is about 20% lower, and part of what they said is it is possible that earnings guidance could change, i suppose it could be better but generally when there are delays like this, people think it will be worse, and there hasn't been great news of the retail sector in general. just quickly, one analyst i spoke to earlier said mike ashley may have bitten off more than he can chew with the house of fraser, what do you think? i think it is possible, we will have to wait and see. a lot depends on the wider economic climate, if the economy picks up it is possible everything will go 0k. if we slip into a recession or there isa if we slip into a recession or there is a lot of disruption from brexit, that could be his undoing. so it is
4:55 pm
notjust within his that could be his undoing. so it is not just within his control, that could be his undoing. so it is notjust within his control, i think. thank you for bearing with us. that is all the business from nuts. thank you for bearing with me. some pictures that will make you go wow. a huge waterspout was spotted off the coast of corsica today. a resident in bastia captured this video here showing it here in the sea. while they are relatively common near the french island, local media report its been been placed on orange alert for storms and rainfall. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. the weather is getting off to a very quiet start this week, high—pressure right across the british isles.
4:56 pm
there are weather changes as we go through the rest of the week. by the end of the week we might not seeing as much of this and it might not be as much of this and it might not be as one for some of us too, slap bang right across the uk is this area of high pressure, but low pressure, a couple of areas waiting in the wings. that is where the change is coming from this week. on the satellite picture, while most have broken cloud and sunshine, this zone of thick cloud, into parts of the south—east, only slowly getting smaller and for some of us stuck underneath that for the remainder of the afternoon, although it is dry, temperatures may just be the afternoon, although it is dry, temperatures mayjust be around 18 degrees or so, whereas elsewhere into the low 20s, in some sunshine, a few spots in the west approaching the mid 20s and the warmest areas here. some cloud building, there may be an isolated shower somewhere but very few and far between, most will be staying dry for the remainder of this afternoon. in tonight, we are going to see a lot of clear weather out there, and it will cool down.
4:57 pm
some of the towns and cities are ok, but rural spots into single figures, and for northern ireland and western scotland, a weather front moving in, expect some thicker cloud. as it pushes eastwards, a bit of patchy rain along with that. still a few showers around. for england and wales, eastern parts of england, noticed this, cloud free and warmer compared with today, into the mid 20s. the big picture going into wednesday, low pressure firmly taking hold, sending in these weather fronts. there could taking hold, sending in these weatherfronts. there could be taking hold, sending in these weather fronts. there could be some thundery bursts of rain in some spots. there will be some sunny spells around. a few showers breaking out still at this stage, very hit and miss and still that warmth across eastern parts of england, the temperature comes down to northern ireland and western scotla nd to northern ireland and western scotland where you see the rain.
4:58 pm
this is to move south across the uk as we go on through thursday, another low pressure coming through friday to the start of the weekend, a bit more in the way of widespread, heavy and thundery rain, so temperatures coming down a few degrees and the breeze picking up too.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm
today at five: the pioneering surgery in britain to separate conjoined twins. safa and marwa from northern pakistan were born joined at the head — the rarest form of the condition. over the past year a team of specialist surgeons at great ormond street have been trying to separate the girls — the bbc has been given exclusive access to the family and the surgery. the twins have been in theatre now for more than seven hours and there are still several hours in this operation to go. so far everything is going to plan and both girls are doing well. we have a special report, and hear from the girls‘ mother. the other main stories on bbc news at five.

456 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on