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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 11, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. back off: tensions high as the royal navy sees off iranian boats obviously very concerning developments. we look at the role that they play in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. -- strait of hormuz. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. six tourists, including two children, are killed and more than 100 others injured after severe storms hit northern greece. coming up on afternoon
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live all the sport. england take their first three wickets for just 1a runs. england take their first three wicketsforjust14 runs. 217—8 australia, you would say england are in control but we saw what happened to india from a similar position against new zealand yesterday, lots of drama so far, we will have the latest from edgbaston at 2:30pm. bit of drama coming in the weather forecast. thunderstorms across the uk at the moment, mostly affecting the far north—east, one or two into edgbaston for the cricket this afternoon. all the details coming up shortly. also coming up: re—writing history — the skull discovery which suggests modern human beings lived outside africa much earlier than previously thought
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tension is mounting in the gulf after a royal navy warship warned off three iranian gunboats that were trying to intercept a british oil tanker in the strait of hormuz. the ministry of defence says hms montrose moved between the british heritage and the iranian vessels. the montrose issued several radio warnings and the iranian boats then turned away. iran had been threatening retaliation after one of its tankers was seized last week by british royal marines off the coast of gibraltar. our defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. iran's revolutionary guard regularly patrol the narrow waterways in and around the strait of hormuz. a major highway for oil and international shipping. these pictures, taken earlier this year of an iranian exercise, show the type of fast boat that harassed a british tanker last night in what is being viewed as an attempt to seize it. the tanker, british heritage, was entering the strait of hormuz from the gulf when it was approached by three armed, fast iranian boats.
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the incident began near the disputed island of abu musa, claimed by iran. british officials say the iranian boats tried to force the tanker to change course into iranian waters but a royal navy warship rushed to its aid, positioning herself right next to the tanker and exporting her to safety. the frigate, hms montrose, was already there providing reassurance. an american military surveillance aircraft above watched and filmed the incident. the us said hms montrose trained its weapons on the iranian boats. the mod says it issued warnings over the radio. no shots were fired. obviously very concerning developments but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we are continuing to monitor the situation very, very carefully. tensions have been rising in the gulf, with iran already accused of targeting vessels. the us says it was responsible for placing mines on two tankers last month.
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and then last week, british royal marines seized a tanker off gibraltar loaded with iranian oil, prompting iran's president to issue this warning. translation: you, britain, are the initiator of insecurity and you will realise the consequences later. now you are so hopeless that when one of your tankers wants to move in the region you have to bring your frigates to escort it because you are scared. there is a special place in iranians' thoughts for america as the great satan. they always see us as the little satan and they always feel that they lose face if they back down against either us or the united states, so i think it is an ongoing issue. america, which has taken a much harder line on iran and its nuclear programme, has already reinforced its military presence in the region. it has sent an aircraft carrier with several warships. the question now is whether britain will have to send more as well,
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and would that risk deepening the crisis? a public inquiry has blamed greater manchester police for a "catastrophic" series of errors which led to an unarmed man being shot dead. anthony grainger, a 36—year—old father of two from bolton, was in a stolen car in cheshire seven years ago when police shot and killed him with a submachine gun. they believed he was planning an armed robbery. but thejudge heading the inquiry has concluded that the police operation was planned incompetently. danny savage is at the court in the football for us now, danny. this is a public enquiry that has taken some two years to take place, and the conclusions today, the family of anthony granger say that this proves the ruling today, that he could, that his death could and should have
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been prevented. yes, he was in a stolen car and he did have a criminal record but the information police had about him on that day was not correct, he was not the member ofan not correct, he was not the member of an organised crime gang, there was no weapon in the vehicle he was m, was no weapon in the vehicle he was in, that is the reason the policeman who shot him said he pulled the trigger, he believed that anthony grainger was reaching for a gun but no gun was found in the vehicle. the judge today, the chairman of this enquiry, had very strong criticism for greater manchester police, this is what he had to say.|j for greater manchester police, this is what he had to say. i have concluded that greater manchester police is to blame for the death of mrgrainger, police is to blame for the death of mr grainger, because it failed to authorise, plan or conduct the firearms operation in such a way as to minimise records to the use of lethal false. firearms command is authorised and planned the operation incompetently and in breach of
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national guidance. i have made a numberof national guidance. i have made a number of recommendations that i hope will reduce the chance of such a catastrophic series of failings and errors ever being repeated. a catastrophic series of failings and errors ever being repeatedlj have and errors ever being repeated.” have been joined by and errors ever being repeated.” have beenjoined by marina schofield, outside liverpool crown court, she is anthony grainger‘s mother, and has been following this very closely. it must have been quite emotionalfor you in court very closely. it must have been quite emotional for you in court to hear those conclusions. very emotional, yes, it was, but, also, it was really good to hear it. mixed emotions, happy, and still sad, it is not going to bring him back. what do you want to see come out of this? i want the police officers to be charged, i have said this from day 1. charged, i have said this from day 1, everyone of them has contributed to his death, as far as i am concerned. through, through fake intelligence, false intelligence, whatever you want to call it. ijust
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hope today, has set a precedent, where it does not happen to anybody else. what do you say to those people, may be watching this, who say, he was in a stolen car and he had a criminal record, even the judge today said, he may have been up judge today said, he may have been up to no good basically, what would you say to people who say, i have no sympathy? well, i would say to them, one day, it could be somebody you know. and then you will understand how it feels. my son was not a violent person, how it feels. my son was not a viole nt person, he how it feels. my son was not a violent person, he has never been done for violence, from day 1, he had a past when he was younger, but he did not deserve that. he deserved to be arrested and may be put in prison, but not shot. are you satisfied they have got to the bottom of what happened and the truth about events now?” bottom of what happened and the truth about events now? i am satisfied but we have still got a bit more to go yet, with the cps, to
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see what, if and when they will charge some of these officers. should the police apologise to you? have they apologise? they have not, they wanted to do it the first day of the enquiry, in court, the judge would not let them, the judge told them straight, you have had five years to do that, you are not doing it in michael. they wanted it on record. i don't accept the apology because, they knew what they was doing. thank you very much for speaking with us. the mother of anthony grainger, she has been following that very closely over the last couple of years. it was supposed to be an inquest but because of sensitive information it turned into a public enquiry so some could be heard behind closed doors because there were certain things about police tactics and other things that could not be in the public domain as part of the investigation into the death of anthony grainger. the family feel as though they have had answers and some very strong though they have had answers and some very strong criticisms for the mp, from the judge,
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some very strong criticisms for the mp, from thejudge, who was some very strong criticisms for the mp, from the judge, who was the chairman of this enquiry. —— for the gmp. tom watson of the labour party has called for an independent investigation into anti—semitism in the party, some ofjeremy corbyn's closest allies try to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. the programme heard from a number of former officials who worked in the pa rty‘s former officials who worked in the party's disputing. former officials who worked in the pa rty‘s disputing. labour says former officials who worked in the party's disputing. labour says that the former party officials were disaffected opponents of jeremy corbyn and the party rejected any claim that it is anti—semitic. reaction was swift and strong to the panorama programme on anti—semitism within labour ranks. the party is now under huge pressure after being confronted with what are serious allegations.
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are you concerned about the anti—semitism accusations from within your party? but no reply from the man at the top. his shadow chancellor though did have something to say. some serious charges there, they have been hotly contested. some of the ex—staff and statements have been contested by existing staff. i think the bbc should investigate the claims and we can come to a conclusion. but others within the labour party have expressed deep alarm at what was said by former staff, that mr corbyn's closest allies, including secretaryjennie formby, try to interfere in the disciplinary processes involving anti—semitism cases. her testimony is difficult to hear. the thought crosses my mind as to whether i should send her my resignation and then do something nobody should ever consider, and i actively considered committing suicide. the labour party has totally rejected the allegations.
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it said... but the party was own deputy leader, —— but the party's only deputy leader, in direct contrast, says thatis leader, in direct contrast, says that is a deplorable thing for labour to say. to see those young members of staff, many of whom come from different wings of the party, it must have taken great courage for them to whistle—blow. and now a letter has been sent to jeremy corbyn from three prominent labour mps, margaret hodge, louise ellman and ruth smee. in this letter they criticise mr corbyn for what they say is his continuing failure to act and say the current complaints process has not only failed but normalises and encourages anti—semitism, and they want a fully independent inquiry process. given anti—semitism has dogged the labour party
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since mr corbyn came to power, something he's the only person who can and should fix this. —— some think. a seriousness can be gleaned from the ferocity of the reaction from tea m the ferocity of the reaction from team corbyn, which basically has thing to go to war with the bbc and to seek to undermine the credibility and frankly to denigrate the character of those young whistle—blowers who spoke out in the programme. “— whistle—blowers who spoke out in the programme. —— team corbyn. it is a sta nce programme. —— team corbyn. it is a stance that has intensified the display and the anger that many labourmps, including display and the anger that many labour mps, including the deputy, tom watson, now calling for a com plete tom watson, now calling for a complete overhaul of the complaints procedure, suggesting it should be a fully independent process. —— it is a stance that has intensified their dismay. and that individuals who make anti—semitic remark should be
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automatically excluded. whatever the nips and tucks to the complaints process , nips and tucks to the complaints process, and it has been suggested thatjewish people should be involved in adjudication, there is a feel that at the end of the day, all roads leads tojeremy corbyn, that you cannot disentangle him from this controversy. tom watson says that he has allowed a permissive culture towards anti—semitism and what he means is that by the huge expansion in membership seen underjeremy corbyn, there has been a vast influx of individuals from the far left, with views that previously would never have been acceptable in the labour party, coupled withjeremy corbyn's own mindset on the middle east, deeply hostile to israel, which has bled over into attitudes of anti—semitism. on this i think jeremy corbyn's critics and supporters do agree, at the end, this is all about the leadership of jeremy corbyn. there is a significant problem in
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parliament with bullying. bullying and harassment has been condemned. the leader of the investigation said that the behaviour has affected the health and welfare are far too many people, and a collective response is needed. i think some of the problems are needed. i think some of the problems a re reflected in needed. i think some of the problems are reflected in other workplaces but the key differences you have here are, and enormous power imbalance, between people who are working together, as one put it, it is like having an intern working directly alongside the ceo. there is a power imbalance which makes things difficult, it makes people frightened to ask for help if they need it. the other difference is that there is no overarching structure looking at how the employment relationship runs, and in any other public sector work place with so many employees, there would be detailed policies and procedures in place to help the line manager manage performance.
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the founder of the far—right group the english defence league, stephen yaxley—lennon, has beenjailed for nine months for contempt of court. yaxley—lennon, otherwise known as tommy robinson, seen here arriving at court this morning, was found guilty after a two—day hearing at the old bailey last week. the charges came after he filmed men accused of the sexual exploitation of young girls and live—streamed the footage on facebook, breaking reporting restrictions. a labour member of the welsh assembly took his own life days after being sacked as a minister over claims of inappropriate behaviour towards women, a coroner has ruled. 49—year—old carl sargeant was found dead at his home in november, 2017. the coroner, john reported a conclusion of suicide but said more support should have been in place. we are awaiting a news conference, carl sargeant‘s in place. we are awaiting a news conference, carl sargea nt‘s family will be emerging, and we will take you over as soon as we... as you can
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tell, we are waiting for some movement. —— john gittins. tell, we are waiting for some movement. ——john gittins. i don't think anything is happening imminently, we will return as soon as we see some movement. headlines: number ten calls for de—escalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three uranium boats harassing a british oil tank in the gulf. a public enquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by manchester police. labour rejects accusations that senior members of jeremy corbyn's team interfere during investigations into alleged anti—semitism. coming up, dark secret of the river kiko, lined with plastic that now has to be removed. england's bowlers put their side into a strong position, having bowled australia out for 223 at edgbaston, they will short their innings —— start their innings
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shortly, it will put them into the final. semi finals day at wimbledon, simona halep has taken the first set against her opponent on centre court, serena williams looking for an eighth title, against baba streets of r. sam allardyce says he has turned down a return to newcastle united to replace rafa benitez, who left last month, sheffield wednesday boss, steve bruce, is the current favourite for thejob. —— bruce, is the current favourite for the job. —— barbora bruce, is the current favourite for thejob. —— barbora strycova. the french senate has approved a new tax on the world biggest internet and technology firm such as google and facebook. the measure, which will initially raise around £360 million a year sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french plans which could lead to retaliatory tariffs on french imports to the us. a storm in the gulf of mexico could evolve into a hurricane this weekend,
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when it is expected to reach new orleans. louisiana's governor has declared a state of emergency, as the us state prepares for as much as 15 inches of rain. cbs correspondent manuel bojorquez sent us this update. up to 18 inches of rain could be on the way for louisiana. combined with the potential storm surge of a tropical system, the concern is it could send this already swollen mississippi river up to 20 feet this weekend. the problem is, that's the same height as some of these levies that protect this city, which has already been let's hear from the son of carl sargeant, who let's hear from the son of carl sargea nt, who committed let's hear from the son of carl sargeant, who committed suicide after brief investigation. eight months later we have had to sit through a continuing need changing version of events, delivered in a defensive, evasive and argumentative manner. the discrepancies in the form of the first minister evidence are deeply troubling, and remain
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significant questions over the integrity of this evidence. after eight months, we pause for thought... and we would have expected him to have a clear and unambiguous expiration. we are also deeply offended by the lack of any remorse or regret from the former first minister. and we are astounded to hear him say in evidence that one text message sent by a special adviser was sufficient for someone who claimed to be a friend, adding that he did not even have to do that. as his brother said, the former first minister has been engaged in a damage limitation exercise, ever since ann jones
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courageously came forward to give her evidence. as a family during these proceedings we have been subject to underhand tactics, delays, and opportunism, engineered by the former first minister. we recognise the murkiness of the coroner referred to in his summing up, it has also been a thoroughly distressing and dehumanising process that has added to our heartbreak. foran that has added to our heartbreak. for an inquest focused on mental health, very little thought has been given to our own mental health. at times it seemed to have been forgotten that this was an inquest into the death of a dearly beloved husband, son, father and into the death of a dearly beloved husband, son, fatherand brother, instead, it has felt more like a criminal trial. all too often, politics has been at play, with the sole aim of plotting a dead man's name to protect another. where the
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humanity in that? there is no stigma to suicide, and if dad's case highlights anything, it is that you can never truly know what is going on in someone's mind. having access to the right support is essential, we would encourage anyone who needs help to reach out. we thought we had done everything we could as a family, it is heartbreaking to know that we could not save him. we sincerely hope no political family will go through what we have been through, these past 19 months. as we have heard, on the witness stand, ministers are not employees, and therefore, we are not afforded any employee rights and have limited access to support. while they may not be employees, they are still human beings. they have their own
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fears and frailties. it is reassuring to hear from the labour party about some of the changes made around safeguarding and the steps taken around safeguarding and the steps ta ken by around safeguarding and the steps taken by the assembly since dad's death, and it is also notable that the new first minister, when taking post, immediately set out to learn lessons by putting in places own guidelines around the impact of reshuffles on minister's mental health, for which we are grateful. however, as the coroner recognised, this does not go far enough, and we fully endorse the coroner's report to prevent future deaths. it is too late for dad, but we may save someone late for dad, but we may save someone else. we hope that political parties and governments across the union take note and make it possible for safeguarding measures to be in place for all public servants. we are very grateful to the coroner and
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to his team, for the careful consideration they have shown and we would like to thank our legal team, neil hoddle, vicky richardson, and lesley thomas qc. and to all those people from across the country and across the uk for all the love and kindness they have continued to show us, in what has been and continues to be the worst time of our lives. —— neil hudgell. we will now take a period of reflection, take stock, and review our options. in the meantime, we very much hope that the former first minister will come forward with a genuine apology. thank you. we will take four questions, who wants to go...? inaudible question and, what do you want is a family, do you feel you have got it, what
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you want next? as soon as carl died, we thought that we never want this to happen to another person involved in politics or any walk of life. there has got to be some safeguarding, whatever your profession. steps have been made today, but we will have to wait and see what comes from the coroner's letter to the government. inaudible question it is time to take stock of the situation, throughout the process, there has been a disregard to the human aspect of this, this is an ordinary family, that as jack has said, 600 days ago, lost a much loved family member. they did not have the opportunity to grieve, now is the time to take stock. who knows what the next steps are going to be but for now, it is time to close doors and have a reflection, brief a loved one, and we will see where we
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go from there. inaudible question there is clearly no equality of arms, we have seen there is clearly no equality of arms, we have seen tactical game playing, a puppet master who has used the public purse to pursue his own ends, again, without any regard for the wider mental health implications. it is up to us to determine whether that is money well spent. we have a lovely family here, who have given their own personal service to try to find some equality of arms and try to take on this issue. ultimately do you think that your father was let down by carwyn jones? inaudible question
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ido jones? inaudible question i do feel dad was certainly let down by the former first minister, carwyn jones, carwynjones said on the stand himself that he was a friend. my only statement to that is, i cannot see myself letting down a friend the way that he supposedly let down dad. 0k, thank you, that is everything, for now. the family of carl sa rg ea nt everything, for now. the family of carl sargeant giving their reaction following the inquest ruling, that was jack sargent, his son. who has taken his father's seat in the welsh assembly. the coroner, john gittins, says that not enough has been done to make sure that help and support is given to ministers who are removed from office, as he considered that the death of karl student was —— carl sargeant was suicide. —— as he ruled. colin
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jones, welsh assembly, we heard how they responded to the allegations which were made against carl sa rg ea nt which were made against carl sargeant in the days before he killed himself. —— carwynjones. six tourists have been killed in greece. the freak storm, —— six tourists have been killed and at least 30 other people injured in a violent storm that swept across northern greece. such severe weather is unexpected at this time of year in greece, which is why so many people — including authorities — were unprepared when it struck in the halkidiki peninsula. let's look at what happened in greece, clearly very devastating. very devastating pictures, worth stressing that it is quite extreme, the weather, but each week we seem to be talking about what has happened in europe, do you remember, on monday, we were talking about the hailstorms, and the
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localised flooding that we have been having in france. this is all tied into that, the extreme heat they have been seeing just recently. temperatures in greece just yesterday were 38 degrees, 100 fahrenheit, so that is having an impact. what happens is, when the temperature changes, everything reacts. very similar story we have been telling you about this for the la st been telling you about this for the last couple of weeks, actually, we have got this very warm air, that has been up across parts of italy and greece, coming into slightly less warm air, and that extreme is the dividing line, and that produces the dividing line, and that produces the energy, like when we were talking about tornado activity across the united states. it produces violent storms, started yesterday afternoon, with a real cluster of thundery downpours, baseball —sized hail across parts of italy, and then move steadily east. red alerts were out, there were
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warnings issued, but we had huge super cells, developing, across greece, and producing these really violent thunderstorms. greece, and producing these really viole nt thunderstorms. that greece, and producing these really violent thunderstorms. that was significant enough, we could have seen significant enough, we could have seen hurricane strength winds at times, it obviously caused devastation and destruction. it is starting to move away, pushing further east towards turkey. similar problems here, some yellow warnings issued for storms. yes, you tend to get that happening when you get these heat and humidity, if you have been out today, you can feel it in the air, quite humid, and a similar story, not as extreme, but we have some thunderstorms at the moment. in the last couple of hours, just across parts of scotland and we have seen one or across parts of scotland and we have seen one or two into the north—east of england. don't do this, because england are doing all right! you are going to tell us... possibly, a slim chance...! going to tell us... possibly, a slim chance. . .! maybe going to tell us... possibly, a slim chance... ! maybe a going to tell us... possibly, a slim chance...! maybe a thunderstorm into the afternoon. let's hope it doesn't
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happen. the rest of the afternoon, staying with that humidity, high 70s likely in the south—east, it will feel a little uncomfortable and then this evening we could really see the sharp showers, then we will get as much as one inch of rainfall in a short space of time and some pretty intense thunderstorms as well. worth bearing in mind, whether warnings have been issued for scotland and north—east england, elsewhere, a few isolated showers but as we go through the night, showers should start to decrease, quite mild through the night. 13 to 17 degrees, 63 fahrenheit first thing on friday morning. but, it does look as though this front will move away and high pressure starts to build from the west, for the weekend. interestingly enough, winds will come from the north light breeze, fresh wind direction, making it feela north light breeze, fresh wind direction, making it feel a little more comfortable, little more pleasant, if it has been unpleasant. the risk of isolated shower but not a bad day, dry with sunny spells,
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temperatures potentially into the south—east, 25 degrees. not ruling out the risk of a shower, perhaps into wimbledon, through friday and saturday but as they go through the weekend, the risk diminishes and sunday will be a dry, lovely day. subtle difference on saturday, as we start to see the wind swinging to a north—easterly direction, so across the east coast, cooler, fresher feel, still the risk of shower around on saturday, hopefully few and far between. if you keep the sunshine, the best of the sunshine, and warmth, 24 degrees, 75 fahrenheit. feeling a bit fresher but nevertheless, not bad at all. sunday looks dry, subtle, sunny and warm, and looks as though it will be really quite pleasant on sunday and into monday.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: downing street calls for a de—escalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats trying to impede a british oil tanker in the gulf. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. the officer who shot mr granger did not act unlawfully, because he honestly but mistakenly believed that he was reaching for a gun.
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invites, he was probably trying to get out of the car. a coroner has ruled that carl sargeant killed himself after claims of inappropriate behaviour towards women. senior labour figures say they're appalled by allegations that close allies ofjeremy corbyn tried to interfere in anti—semitism cases. a study in france suggests people who have a lot of sugary drinks — including pure fruitjuice — are at a slightly higher risk of developing cancer. sport now on afternoon live with azi farni. england's bowlers have made a great start to their cricket world cup semifinal. having taken some crucial early wickets, england's bowlers looked very much in control against australia, eventually bowling them out for 223 at edgbaston. after being sent into fields, england made an outstanding start, reducing the defending champions to 14—3. steve smith led the recovery for the
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aussies, top scoring for 85. but he was one of only four players to make double figures, as australia were bowled out for a below par score in the 49th over. england's chase will get under way in the next ten minutes or so. and a strong position, chasing 224, but remember india were in a similar position yesterday, chasing 240, before that shock loss to new zealand. so no—one's counting any chickens yet. and if you just saw the forecast, that may play a role yet. and who's playing at wimbledon today? the first semifinals to simona halep, the world number one has beaten svitolina in straight sets. the question now is, who willjoin her in the final? that is the big question. it is serena williams in the other semifinal, perhaps unsurprising to see such a big name
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there, because as we know, the other three in the semifinal line—up is not perhaps what people would have predicted. the big seeds tumbled early in this tournament, but simona halep, booking her place in her first wimbledon final. she came past svitolina. she is the highest seed remaining in the women's draw. these are the seventh and eighth seeds facing each other, and she was hugely impressive, dismantling a svitolina in that first set, taking it 6-1. svitolina in that first set, taking it 6—1. much the same in the second, she closed out 6—3. it is the first grand slam final, her first on grass, her first at wimbledon. we wonder who she will face. it is hard to bet again serena williams, with the pedigree she has in grand slam finals and grand slam tournaments, she's been hugely impressive and has clearly benefited from that extra much time in the mixed doubles alongside andy murray. she said that's why she took that invite to
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play alongside andy murray, because he didn't play any tournaments between the french open and here at wimbledon. but had served her well. she perhaps hasn't hit top gear, but she will have to be her best against strycova, who knocked outjohanna konta, a big upset in the last round. but it's her game, she will mix it up, she could be a formidable opponent for serena williams when they head out on centre court in the next few moments. at 33, she is the oldest grand slam semifinalist, so perhaps peaking late in her career, but she's been supremely impressive and will have to be so if she is to come past serena williams. and talk thank you very much forjoining us. arsenal captain laurent koscielny has refused to travel on the club's preseason tour of the united states. the 33—year—old has a year left on his contract, but is understood to want a move away this summer. arsenal have put out statement saying they're
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very disappointed by koscielny‘s actions, which they say are against their clear instructions. staying with the premier league, and sam allardyce says he's turned down the chance to return to newcastle united as the club's manager. the former england boss was in charge from 2007 to 2008 and was considered as a replacement for rafa benitez. sheffield wednesday boss steve bruce is the favourite to take over. stage six of the tour de france is under way. it's a 177km loop around nimes. defending champion geraint thomas is currently seventh overall, 45 seconds behind race leaderjulian alaphilippe. follow it live via the bbc sport website and app. that's all the sport for now. just getting some more reaction to that story of the member of the welsh assembly who killed himself, carl sargeant. during
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welsh assembly who killed himself, carl sargea nt. during the welsh assembly who killed himself, carl sargeant. during the inquest, the coroner said the former first minister carwynjones had the coroner said the former first minister carwyn jones had been the coroner said the former first minister carwynjones had been aware of the events of 2014 but didn't recognise any events thereafter. we heard from mr sargent‘s son, critical of carwyn jones. heard from mr sargent‘s son, critical of carwynjones. he has issued a statement saying this has been a difficult time for everyone, the family most of all, and to offer my deepest condolences. the nature of these proceedings has meant there appear to be two sides of this matter, and while it is right that the arguments are tested, the process is driven a wedge between those who are united in their ongoing shock, trauma and grief. no—one wanted no—one could have seen foreseen it. we hope that some healing can begin. that is coming in from the former first minister of wales, ca rwyn from the former first minister of wales, carwynjones. forensic scientists have dug up two graves in a small cemetery in the vatican city. it's part of an investigation into the disappearance
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of a 15—year—old schoolgirl, more than 30 years ago. but it's led to further mystery. 0ur correspondent, james reynolds, is in rome. first of all, let's have some background? in 1983, a schoolgirl, a 15—year—old schoolgirl, emanuela 0rlandi, was on her way home from a music lessons. she got so a bus stop in the centre of rome, and then vanished. her trace simply disappeared. 36 years later, her family doesn't know what happened to her. there been endless speculation over the years that she might have been kidnapped by gangsters, but earlier this year, her family received an anonymous tip...” earlier this year, her family received an anonymous tip... i will return to james reynolds when we re—establish that link. i don't think we're going to get him back, that looks rather final that freezing of the picture. we will try and get james back for a
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freezing of the picture. we will try and getjames back for a remarkable story. in fact, and getjames back for a remarkable story. infact, i and getjames back for a remarkable story. in fact, i think we've got her to stop him back. james, can you hear me? yes, i can! good news! when wanting to technology, it was because technology was doing so well, back in those days! apologies to everyone, shall i begin from the beginning because it was at” to everyone, shall i begin from the beginning because it was at i think that's probably best. 1983, there was a schoolgirl, emanuela 0rlandi, she was 15 years old, on her way back from a music lesson, she got to a bus stop and all trace of her vanished. no—one knew what happened to her. her family vanished. no—one knew what happened to her. herfamily have been looking for her, they track down every single lead, to kidnapping and abduction by monsters. in march, they received an anonymous tip suggesting her remains might be buried in the vatican's teutonic cemetery, and for that reason, this morning, two graves were dug up, and
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as you said, the graves were dug up. no remains were found, it was another dead end. what is the teutonic cemetery, where this was happening? this is a small plot of land in the shadow of st peter's basilica. it's a graveyard which is usually reserved for, generally speaking, members of catholic institutions. the two graves that will attack today were of german princesses, minor royalty, one who died in the 1800s, one who died in the 1700s. their descendants... died in the 1800s, one who died in the 1700s. their descendants. . ” think, james, i'm going to have to quit there, we'll quit while we're behind. we will return for the rest of the story, which is quite remarkable. just to say, the family received a letter suggesting the 15—year—old's remains might be in that cemetery, but as you can see, more questions now than answers as a
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result of digging up that grave. research in france suggests people who have a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, may be at a slightly higher risk of cancer. the study found that drinking an extra 100 millilitres a day increased cases of cancer from 22 to 26 in a thousand over a five—year period. the study did not establish a direct causal link, and doctors say more information is needed. lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. but now a study by scientists in france suggest they are significantly associated with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people forfive risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two cou nts the average person drank around two counts of sugary drinks a week. but the study found, if the conservatives too, consumes around two more counts on top of that, they had an18%
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two more counts on top of that, they had an 18 % risk increase of cancer. are those who can shoot the highest amounts of sugar in the study, the equivalent of around four teaspoons a day, when at an increased risk. not only from fizzy drinks, but 100% fruit juice not only from fizzy drinks, but 100% fruitjuice as not only from fizzy drinks, but 100% fruit juice as well. not only from fizzy drinks, but 100% fruitjuice as well. these may count towards your five a day, but are also full of sugar. sign to save it and find any links with artificial sweeteners and cannot conclude that sugary drinks to cause cancer, but campaigners say it's another recent cut back our intake. this is an interesting link, but we do need to do more research on this. in the meantime, there's already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. obesity is a major cause of some cancers, but re—churches claim the association they found suggest that sugar levels in the blood may also play a role. uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on sugary drinks,
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but borisjohnson criticised... the british soft drinks industry say overall sugar intake from drinks has dropped by almost 30% since 2015, and they're safe as part of a balanced diet is. by scientists and doctors agree more research is needed, but the findings were now down to feed into the ongoing discussion about how we should live healthier lives. tonnes of plastic are being removed from a river bed in cumbria. the keekle was lined with plastic around 20 years ago in an attempt to stop the water being polluted by a disused mine nearby. but that plastic is now being eroded and fragments of it are being washed away into the sea. so now the plan is to replace the plastic lining with a riverbed of rocks instead. alison freeman has been to watch the work. at first glance, the river keekle looks like any other, but take a closer look and you can see its dark secret. reams and reams of black plastic.
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this plastic was used to line the river to protect it from contamination from a nearby disused mine. but over the past two decades it's deteriorated and it's become the pollutant itself, as well as an eyesore. there's been such a knee jerk reaction to worry about what the river will do once the coal mine operations had finished. it was a natural thing — let's just constrain the river, put it in plastic, and then we can walk away and it will be fine. well, in only 20 years that plastic‘s starting to degrade. we've got to remember that, we're not just taking plastic out of a river — rivers go to the sea. so this potentially would end up in the sea. what's happening here is thought to be the biggest river restoration of its kind in the uk. this summer's project is a pilot with plastic being cleared from a 200 metre stretch. next year the rest of the 2.5 kilometres will be restored, costing more than £1 million. it'll benefit wildlife as well as people. the plastic isjust a sheer plane,
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so the water's going down the river very quickly. there's no boulders and cobbles and things to stop that water. so the water's whooshing downstream into cleator area, where there is some flooding of some homes. what are the improvements we are going to see when the plastic‘s gone? it will be a fully functioning river. so it will be meandering, it will work properly, it will shift its gravels as rivers like to do. and we'll get much more wildlife, there'll be more fish spawning. at the moment there are hardly any fish in here because there is no spawning habitat for them. and people will be able to enjoy it much more. catherine and her family live nearby. they welcome the project. the benefit of getting this back to nature for us as a community is that we'll be able to spend more time here safely and we'll be able to enjoy more wildlife, because when the river's restored, obviously, the wildlife that lives in it will be increased as well. it will be a better habitat, a more natural habitat for the wildlife. it's just going to be brilliant. and dogs can paddle and there will be so much wildlife
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and kids can paddle in it. it's just going to be amazing. more rivers have been re—naturalised in cumbria than anywhere else in the uk. but the keekle is the most challenging by far. in a moment, we'll be getting what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: number 10 calls for deescalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. labour rejects accusations that senior members ofjeremy corbyn's team interfered during investigations into alleged anti—semitism. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the virgin boss sir richard
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branson has warned that a no—deal brexit would cause the pound to plummet and become worth the same as the us dollar. in an interview with the bbc, he said it would be devastating for virgin and force the group to shift investment out of the uk. retailers should remove plastic—backed fridges and freezers from sale, according to a consumer group, as new, tougher manufacturing rules come in. the testing standard has changed, making the manufacture of plastic—backed appliances far less likely. now which wants to see such products still on sale removed from the shelves, as it sayes they pose a fire risk. the bank of england says the likelihood of a no—deal brexit is rising, but that britain's banks are strong enough to cope. since last year, banks have been forced to keep more money in reserve in case of shocks to the economy. the central bank says this should be enough to ensure that credit continues to flow, even if the uk is cut off from international markets for a few months.
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things ain't what they used to be, used to mean teeth, but now it is facebook, apple and google? there is a whole new acronym, fangs is a popular acronym for the tech giants. 0ther tech companies as well, including amazon... so fangsa? they all caught up this new digital service task, the idea that this will be a 3% tax levied on local sales by all these tech companies within france. this is something a lot of countries, including the uk, have been talking about, although francis the first to actually push the button on it. what it's seeking to ove rco m e the button on it. what it's seeking
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to overcome is this long—running issue over multinational tax avoidance, this idea that you tax sales and a high tax country and a lower tax country instead. you declare in a lower tax country and avoid them altogether in the country whether revenue was generated. just to crystallise the issue at hand, the european commission has done research on this and says that businesses in general, on average, in the eu, pay 23% tax on average, but when it comes internet companies, it's as low as 8 or 9%. this new role from france means that any this new role from france means that a ny sales this new role from france means that any sales generated in france will be subjected to this additional tax. and donald trump is not happy about this? when is he happy? he has been looking to pick this fight for a while with europe, in the senses he has the eu in his sights, once the chinese trade war is resolved, showing that does happen. his representatives are picking on this tax today, saying it unfairly targets american companies. itjust
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so targets american companies. itjust so happens that most of the big tech giants are american, but it's not exclusively affecting american companies, there are companies from other countries affected too. he is running tariffs in retaliation. he was doing that already, so. we are joined by a reporterfrom the new york stock exchange. the president there is unhappy, but talk to us first about the companies and in those companies? companies themselves, like facebook and google and its parent company alphabets, have not really been commenting about this. you look at the way investors are reacting, there hasn't been that much movement in terms of their stock valuations just yet. a lot of that has to do with the fact that you see us president donald trump is lodging this fight against this. there is a little bit of a sense of let'sjust
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this. there is a little bit of a sense of let's just see this. there is a little bit of a sense of let'sjust see how a lot of this plays out over the next several months. according to the us trade representative, they have up to a year to investigate whether this violates fair trade practices and whether that means the united states can apply retaliatory tariffs onto these companies. took to me a little more about what else is happening around you there at the new york stock exchange? investors are still digesting what they heard yesterday from the bus of the us federal reserve , from the bus of the us federal reserve, reading between the lines about what it means for a potential interest rate cuts, how is it being received? i'm not sure you heard some of that cheering that happened just before you came to me, you might think they were cheering for me, but there were cheering because the dow hit another record high, just a few moments ago. a big reason for that has to do with mr powell at
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the federal reserve. and the fact that he's signalled that we are probably going to see a rate rise at the end of the month. that is good news for people here on the floor of the stock exchange. we're cheering for you always! rest up, honey, lemon and whisky, that's my recipe. what's yours, simon? forget the honey and lemon. we'd see you later on. there's new evidence that modern human beings lived outside africa much earlier than previously thought. a fossilised skull, discovered in southern greece, suggests the first homo sapiens may have arrived in europe about two hundred and ten thousand years ago — a time when the continent was populated by the neanderthals. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. in the distant past,
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the first of our kind evolved here in africa. there were also other now extinct species of human, such as the neanderthals and denisovans in europe and asia. our ancestors eventually left the continent and spread across the globe, and quickly took over from all the other species. so the theory goes. but the discovery of this human—looking skull in apidima in southern greece has changed everything. scientists used to think that 200,000 years ago, europe was exclusively populated by the neanderthals, whereas our kind — modern humans — remained in africa until 40,000 years ago. but the discovery of the new skull in greece has shattered that view. it doesn't have the flatter, elongated shape of the neanderthal, but rather, it's much more like our own, rounder. so this means that the two species could have interacted for 100,000 years.
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it had been thought that our ancestors had been prevented from leaving africa for tens of thousands of years, perhaps by the other types of humans, or the climate. researchers now have to rethink their old ideas. there was nothing to stop modern humans getting out of africa more than 200,000 years ago, and expanding. it potentially means that even places further to the east, so there are claims of modern human fossils in china at 130,000 years, i'd been very sceptical about those up to now, but given the evidence from apidima, maybe i should be more open—minded about those early chinese records' claim to be homo sapiens. it's potentially the biggest shift in our understanding of how modern humans left africa. instead of overlapping briefly with neanderthals in europe, our kind may have coexisted with a wide variety of human species all across the world for tens of thousands of years.
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just keeping an eye on the cricket for you, england are chasing 224 to win. the weather may play its part. luis is the latest. uh—huh oh dear my! there are some sure not too far from edgbaston. there are some showers up to the north, up in north and eastern scotland. some thunderstorms in the last couple of hours, some across northeast england as well. but the showers we will need to keep a close eye on, as they drift a little bit further east, they may well arrive towards the birmingham edgbaston area, but fingers crossed, they will stay away. they could be hit and miss, some of you may escape them.
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they will fade through the afternoon. if you keep the sunshine, it will feel humid out there, warm temperatures, into the mid 20s for some. those showers are a bit of a nuisance, some heavy, with the odd rumble of thunder through this evening, bringing the far north of the country about an inch of rain before the start to ease through. they will do so overnight, most of the game was easing away, and we keep a relatively quiet night in prospect. it will be relatively mild night, so a mild start to friday. 0vernight lows in the double digits across the country, up to 17 degrees. so we start relatively quiet, relatively dry and bright. but the subtle change will be a change of wind direction. alliance, northwesterly wind will make it feel
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fresher with a loss of humidity. if you dodge isolated showers, we will still see temperatures in the mid 20s. that means we can't rule out the chance of an isolated shower friday and saturday for wimbledon, but you would be very unlucky if you do catch those on sunday, when it will be dry for the men's final. the reason is high pressure building in from the atlantic, gradually drifting eastwards. at the weekend, we will have winds coming off the northeast, so long the east coast, more cloud and a fresher feel. western area seeing the best of the sunshine. it would run the risk of a few isolated showers. highs of 22 in scotland, up to 24 further south. it does look like would be dry, settled and sunny for sunday.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. the uk urges iran to "de—escalate" as the royal navy sees off iranian boats trying to stop a british tanker in the strait of hormuz. obviously, very concerning developments, but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping and safe. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. six tourists, including two children, are killed, and more than 100 others injured, after severe storms hit northern greece. and, coming up on afternoon live all the sport with azi farni. inc and chasing 224, in the cricket
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world cup semifinal against australia, having reduced the australian batsmen to 14—3 they had them all out, 223 in the 49th over, very reachable target for england but we saw what happened to india from a similar position against new zealand yesterday. we'll have the latest from edgbaston coming up, england now 19 without loss in reply. and we will be watching the weather as well, they will be too. yes, good afternoon, so far, so good in terms of the weather forecast, small chance a little bit later on of some isolated showers. more details coming up. also coming up: re—writing history — the skull discovery which suggests modern human beings lived outside africa much earlier than previously thought.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. our top story this afternoon, tensions in the gulf. the defence secretary penny mordaunt is urging iran to de—escalate the situation after a royal navy warship had to warn off three iranian gunboats that were trying to intercept a british oil tanker in the strait of hormuz. hms montrose moved between the tanker british heritage and the iranian vessels. the montrose issued several radio warnings and the iranian boats then turned away. iran had been threatening retaliation after one of its tankers was siezed last week by british royal marines off the coast of gibraltar. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. _by —— by british royal marines. iran's revolutionary guard regularly patrol the narrow waterways in and around the strait of hormuz. a major highway for oil and international shipping. these pictures, taken earlier this year of an iranian exercise, show the type of fast boat that harassed a british tanker last night
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in what is being viewed as an attempt to seize it. the tanker, british heritage, was entering the strait of hormuz from the gulf when it was approached by three armed, fast iranian boats. the incident began near the disputed island of abu musa, claimed by iran. british officials say the iranian boats tried to force the tanker to change course into iranian waters but a royal navy warship rushed to its aid, positioning herself right next to the tanker and exporting her to safety. the frigate, hms montrose, was already there providing reassurance. an american military surveillance aircraft above watched and filmed the incident. the us said hms montrose trained its weapons on the iranian boats. the frigate, hms montrose, was already there providing reassurance. an american military surveillance aircraft above watched and filmed the incident. the us said hms montrose trained its weapons on the iranian boats. the mod says it issued warnings over the radio. no shots were fired. obviously very concerning developments but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we are continuing to monitor the situation very, very carefully.
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tensions have been rising in the gulf, with iran already accused of targeting vessels. the us says it was responsible for placing mines on two tankers last month. and then last week, british royal marines seized a tanker off gibraltar loaded with iranian oil, prompting iran's president to issue this warning. translation: you, britain, are the initiator of insecurity and you will realise the consequences later. now you are so hopeless that when one of your tankers wants to move in the region you have to bring your frigates to escort it because you are scared. there is a special place in iranians' thoughts for america as the great satan. they always see us as the little satan and they always feel that they lose face if they back down against either us or the united states, so i think it is an ongoing issue. america, which has taken a much harder line on iran and its nuclear programme,
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has already reinforced its military presence in the region. it has sent an aircraft carrier with several warships. the question now is whether britain will have to send more as well, and would that risk deepening the crisis? with me now is dr ian black, a visiting senior fellow from the london school of economics middle east centre. this is quite tense and a moment, perhaps, for taking stock, for both sides. defence secretary, prime minister, theresa may, have talked about the need for de—escalation, jeremy hunt, foreign secretary has said he is very concerned by what has happened. it is a volatile situation. britain finds itself caught, if you like, between a very assertive american policy, and its own remaining commitment to the nuclear agreement which president trump abandoned. when you talk about assertive, it is a policy to pull
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out of an agreement that everyone else involved is a signatory to. that has been the driving as has, the responsibility for the recent attacks on tankers, denied by iran but agreed by everyone else, and the incident earlier today involving the british tanker.” hesitate to use the word game but is there brinkmanship going on, a bit of testing out of each other? the formal british position is that it remains committed to the 2015 nuclear agreement, with iran, france and germany, the other european signatories to the agreement, president trump has abandoned it and has talked about applying maximum pressure on the iranians. the iranians are behaving quite cleverly with this, they certainly don't want
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confrontation, they appear to need to flex their muscles in the way that they have been doing. they have an interest in driving a wedge between the europeans and the united states, britain, as ever, finds itself in an awkward position, when faced with a choice. formally, it is important to say that it remains committed to that landmark agreement. what we are talking about isa number of agreement. what we are talking about is a number of issues coming into one. the tanker stopped by the british was, they believe, on it's way to syria. that's right, the british government has been clear and consistent, the detention of in and consistent, the detention of in a rainy and tanker, off gibraltar, last week. it was carried out under the rubric of european union sanctions against syria. that was welcomed by the united states, and, of course, condemned by the americans. by the iranians, sorry. and, the british position,
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nevertheless, is a formal and legalistic one. it doesn't take part in the reimposed american sanctions against iran. 0n the other hand, it cannot ignore the fact that what appears to have happened was an attack on its own freedom of navigation, in international waters. so much of diplomacy is about face—saving. where is the pressure at the moment, is it on iran, to back down, which they clearly have no intention of doing at this stage. 0r, no intention of doing at this stage. or, is there a graceful exit for the uk? the uk will remain committed to freedom of navigation in international waters. it is possible that one of the things we have heard in the last 48 hours is an american idea for a return to what happened in the 1980s, when the iran/ iraq war was in the 1980s, when the iran/ iraq warwas waging, many in the 1980s, when the iran/ iraq war was waging, many attacks on international shipping in the gulf.
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the americans want to organise some system of convoys, re—flagging, as it is called, by the powers that have an interest in security of shipping and of oilflows, of course, in that part of the gulf. it is possible that britain may be asked to part in that. i imagine that it asked to part in that. i imagine thatitis asked to part in that. i imagine that it is hard to see britain along with its european partners abandoning, take the initiative, taking the initiative to abandon the nuclear agreement with iran. that may well happen along the lines, the iranians take steps to escalate, as they have done, with component. you could sympathise with iran on this, america, withdrawing from the agreement, leaving britain, france, germany practically with nothing to play for here. well, the problem with the agreement is everyone has said from the start, even those who support it, concede it is a narrow agreement, restricted entirely to
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iran's nuclear programme. sanctions we re iran's nuclear programme. sanctions were lifted in return for changes to that programme. there are many other things, iran is part of a confrontation across the middle east, particularly with saudi arabia, united arab emirates, and its footprint has increased in recent times, the war in syria, where it supported president basher al—assad, and the war in yemen, as well, where iran backed the houthi rebels, who are fighting the saudi backed coalition, so there is a lot of geopolitical complexity in all this, and the stakes are very high. thank you for coming in, good to talk to you. a public inquiry has blamed greater manchester police for a "catastrophic" series of errors which led to an unarmed man being shot dead. anthony grainger, a 36—year—old father of two from bolton, was in a stolen car in cheshire seven years ago when police shot and killed him
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with a submachine gun. they believed he was planning an armed robbery. but thejudge heading the inquiry has concluded that the police operation was planned incompetently. 0ur correspondent, danny savage, was in court. this is a public enquiry that has taken some two years to take place, and the conclusions to come back today. the family of anthony grainger say this proves the ruling today that he could, that his death could and should have been prevented. yes, he was in a stolen car, yes, he had a criminal record, but the information police had about him on that day was not correct, he was not a member of an organised crime gang, there was no weapon in the vehicle he was in, that is the reason the policeman who shot him said he pulled the trigger, because he believed anthony grainger was reaching for a gun, but no gun was found in the vehicle. the judge today, the chairman of this enquiry, had some very strong criticism for greater manchester police and this is what he had to say.” greater manchester police and this is what he had to say. i have concluded that greater manchester police is to blame for the death of mrgrainger, police is to blame for the death of mr grainger, because it failed to authorise, plan or conduct the
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firearms operation in such a way as to minimise recalls to the use of lethal force. firearms commander is and planned the operation incompetently, and in breach of national guidance. i have made a numberof national guidance. i have made a number of recommendations that i hope will reduce the chance of such a catastrophic series of failings and errors ever having been repeated. joined here by marina schofield, outside liverpool crown court, she is the mother of anthony graingerand court, she is the mother of anthony grainger and has been following, of course, this very closely. must have been emotionalfor you in course, this very closely. must have been emotional for you in court to have these conclusions. it was, it was very emotional, but, also, it was very emotional, but, also, it was really good to hear it. mixed emotions, happy and still sad. it is not going to bring him back. what do you want to see come out of this?”
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wa nt you want to see come out of this?” want the police officers to be charged, i have said this from day 1. everyone of them has contributed to this death, as far as i'm concerned, through fake intelligence, whatever you want to call it. i hope today has set a precedent where it does not happen to anyone else. what do you say to those people who may be watching this say, he was in a stolen car, he had a criminal record, even the judge today said that he may have been up to no good. what would you say to people who say, i have no sympathy? i would say to them, one day, it could be somebody you know, and then we will understand —— you will understand how it feels. my son was not a violent person, he has never been done for violence. he did have a bit of a past when he was younger, we have said from day 1,
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but he did not deserve that. he deserves to be arrested and may be put in prison, but not shot. are you satisfied they have got to the bottom of what happened and the truth about events now?” bottom of what happened and the truth about events now? i am satisfied but we have a bit more to go, yet, with the cps, to see what, if, if and when they will charge some of these officers. have the police apologised and do you think they should? they have not... they wanted to do it the first day of the enquiry, in court and the judge would not let them: the judge said, you have had five days to say so, you have had five days to say so, you are not doing it in my court. he wanted it on record that he denied it, they wanted the apology on record. he didn't accept the apology because they knew what they work —— he knew what they were doing. anthony grainger‘s mother, following that closely over the last couple of yea rs, that closely over the last couple of years, it was supposed to be an inquest but because of sensitive information it turned into a public enquiry, so it could be heard behind
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closed doors. certain things about police tactics, and other things that could not be in the public domain. as part of the investigation into the death of anthony grainger. the family feel as though they have had answers, and strong criticism for gmp, from the judge, had answers, and strong criticism for gmp, from thejudge, who was had answers, and strong criticism for gmp, from the judge, who was the chairman of this enquiry. more support should be available to sacked ministers, a coroner has said, after ruling a welsh assembly member killed himself after being dismissed. 49—year—old carl sargeant was found dead at his home in 2017. it followed claims of inappropriate behaviour towards women. speaking after, his son criticised the "distressing and dehumanising process" that had added to the family's heartbreak. the former welsh first minister carwynjones said that he hoped some healing can now begin. tomos morgan is in ruthin for us. what has the family response being?
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a scathing attack on the first minister, following the judgment, the ruling given byjohn gittins, a formal conclusion of suicide, he said the evidence showed that no arrangement had been put in place to provide support for mr sargent following his sacking from cabinet, that was despite the probability that was despite the probability that carwyn jones, that was despite the probability that carwynjones, former first minister at the time, knew of his vulnerabilities in relation to his mental health. safeguarding changes have been made to provide support to ministers if they are dismissed, from future cabinets by the current first minister, however, the coroner said he had concerns that the other first ministers in future would provide the same level of support and has written to the welsh government asking for actions to be taken to government asking for actions to be ta ken to prevent government asking for actions to be taken to prevent similar deaths in future. the welsh government say that they will consider that report, into preventions of future deaths carefully a nd into preventions of future deaths carefully and respond in full. as you respond, the family did respond straightaway after the coroners
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decision, and launched a scathing attack on the former first, carwyn jones. the discrepancies in the evidence of the former first ministerare evidence of the former first minister are deeply troubling, and there remain significant question marks over the credibility of his evidence. we pause for thought after this time... aftereight evidence. we pause for thought after this time... after eight months, we pause for thought, and we would have expected him to have had a clear and unambiguous explanation. we are also deeply offended by the lack of any remorse or regret from the former first minister. and we are astounded to hear him say in evidence that one simple text message by a special adviser was sufficient for someone he claimed to be a friend, adding that he didn't even have to do that. as dad's brother, andy sargent,
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said, the former first minister has been engaged in a damage limitation exercise, ever since ann jones courageously came forward to give evidence. as a family we have been subject to underhand tactics, delays, and opportunism engineered by the former first minister. we recognise the murkiness, the coroner refer to, during his summing recognise the murkiness, the coroner referto, during his summing up. it's also been a thoroughly distressing and dehumanising process that has added to our heartbreak. foran that has added to our heartbreak. for an inquest focused on mental health, very little thought has been given to our own mental health. at times, it seems to have been forgotten that this was an inquest into the death of a dearly beloved husband, father, son, and brother. instead, it has felt more like a criminal trial. all too often,
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politics have been in play, with the sole aim of blackening the name of a dead man, to protect another. where is the humanity in that? there is no stigma to suicide, and if dad's case highlight anything, it's that you can never truly know what is going on in someone's mine. having access to the right support is essential, and we would encourage anyone worried about someone, to reach out. ina worried about someone, to reach out. in a statement, carwynjones, former first minister, has said this has been a difficult time for everyone, the family most of all, "and i offer my deepest condolences, nobody could have full saying this". this inquest has come to a close but there is another independent investigation pending which will look into the way that carwyn jones pending which will look into the way that carwynjones handled the sacking of carl sargeant.
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labour's deputy leader tom watson has said he is appalled by allegations of anti—semitism raised in a bbc panorama programme and has called for an independent investigation. a bbc panorama investigation that aired last night heard claims that some ofjeremy corbyn's closest allies tried to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. the programme heard from a number of former officials who worked in the party's disputes team. labour says the former party officials were disaffected opponents ofjeremy corbyn and the party rejected any claim that the party was anti—semitic. 0ur poliitical correspondent helena wilkinson reports. reaction was swift and strong to the panorama programme on anti—semitism within labour ranks. the party is now under huge pressure after being confronted with what are serious allegations. but no reply from the man at the top. his shadow chancellor though did have something to say. some serious charges there, they have been hotly contested.
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some of the ex—staff statements have been contested by existing staff. there's complaints put into the bbc and i think the bbc should investigate the claims and we can come to a conclusion. others within the labour party have expressed deep alarm at what was said by former staff, that mr corbyn's closest allies, including jennie formby, the party's general secretary, to interfere in the disciplinary processes involving anti—semitism cases. her testimony is difficult to hear. the thought crosses my mind as to whether i should send her my resignation and then do something nobody should ever consider. . .and i actively considered committing suicide. the labour party has totally rejected the allegations. it said...
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but the party's own deputy leader, in direct contrast to the leader, says that's a deplorable thing for labour to say. to see those young members of staff, many of whom come from different wings of the party, it must have taken great courage for them to whistle—blow. now a letter has been sent to jeremy corbyn from three prominent labour mps, margaret hodge, louise ellman and ruth smee. to see those young members of staff, many of whom come from different wings of the party, it must have taken great courage for them to whistle—blow. now a letter has been sent to jeremy corbyn from three prominent labour mps, margaret hodge, louise ellman and ruth smee. in this letter they criticise mr corbyn for what they say is his continuing failure to act and say the current complaints process has not only failed but normalises and encourages anti—semitism, and they want a fully independent inquiry process. given anti—semitism has dogged the labour party since mr corbyn came to power, something he is the only person who can and should fix this. —— some think.
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and helena wilkinson joins us from westminster now. bit of a mess for the labour party, because different parts a different responses. what the labour party has said today is that the bbc was wrong to broadcast the panorama programme last night, it was full of inaccuracies, and in particular they we re inaccuracies, and in particular they were criticising the former staff who used to work at the labour party, who spoke out in this panorama programme last night. it's worth bearing in mind that these, some of the staff had signed nondisclosure agreements, what that means is that they are legal agreements which they have decided to basically rip up because they wa nted to basically rip up because they wanted to talk about this issue. the labour party, the official line, very much saying that they disagree with the comments in the programme.
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there is a report that the deputy leader, tom watson, was on radio four this morning, saying that actually, that was not true, that they were disaffected, and he said they were disaffected, and he said they were disaffected, and he said they were very courageous in coming out, in talking about their concerns on anti—semitism within the labour party and how it is dealt with. in terms of what happens next, we heard from tom watson, who says that, basically, he wants a complete overhaul, of how complaints within the labour party, complaints about anti—semitism, are dealt with within the labour party, and he wants a couple of things. he wants a full independent system of investigating anti—jewish racism. and what he is suggesting is, on the panel, to look at these complaints, he wants to see
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jewish representatives from around the country, and those who are not members of the labour party. he also says he wants people to be automatically excluded if they make anti—semitic comments. so, very different line from tom watson, compared to the official labour line on this story. but, you saw there, jeremy corbyn left his house earlier today not saying anything at all to reporters. yet to say anything, but many people think the buck stops with him. thank you very much. an update on the iranian boats, that came from the ministry of defence a little earlier, hearing from the department for transport, which has issued new guidance to all british flagged ships in the strait of hormuz, the uk department for transport says, as the competent
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authority regularity provides security advice to uk and group shipping on how they should operate in areas of high risk... ordering british flagged ships to go to a heightened state of security. we'll find out who that means, we will get hold of our transport corresponding to put some flesh on the bones of that the founder of the far—right group the english defence league, stephen yaxley—lennon, has beenjailed for 9 months for contempt of court. yaxley—lennon, otherwise known as tommy robinson, seen here arriving at court this morning, was found guilty after a two—day hearing at the old bailey last week. the charges came after he filmed men accused of the sexual exploitation of young girls and live—streamed the footage on facebook, breaking reporting restrictions. the french senate has approved a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook.
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the measure, which will initially raise around £360 million a year sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french the us has called the tax unfair. how nervous our tech companies going to be about this move? nervous not just because it is france, but because it could be picked up everywhere else, and if the eu as a whole backs it and potentially other countries could be looking at this, it would hit the bottom line for many of these tech companies. they are trying to grow globally. this is something not just are trying to grow globally. this is something notjust closely watched but obviously, many of the company supporting the trump administration in this section, 301, they started this investigation, kind of a to psy—tu rvy this investigation, kind of a topsy—turvy healing. —— situation. and who is supporting what. not a
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lot of sympathy for these companies, given the margins, given the profits, given that they seem to manage to get away with not paying the amount of tax that other companies do. yes, and i think that is the thing about this, if there is a consistent basis on what is going to be the new norm on tax, obviously when this new technology innovation, most economies don't know how to really interact with this, and now we are talking about, you know, about, it is 3%, like you mention, £300, that is 3% of revenue stream that france is taxing them. this is what is causing the uproar. yeah, the way that technology going forward , the way that technology going forward, it is going to have to be looked at differently when it comes to how data privacy and how you get taxed. looking at the uk position, to leave the european union, and
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then out in the wide world, looking for trade deals. what will this do for trade deals. what will this do for that? there is two things, the uk, when it comes to the us and uk trade deal, this gives them a potential ship there., not really doing anything to see how this plays out, right now france is by itself, it will yet be determined whether the eu will come into this multilateralism to support france. how will they support this tax, if it does not go well for france, they could create a different language that creates a better deal for the us and orjoin this tax as well. i think the uk, when it comes to tax, they are not in a rush and they could use it as a bargaining chip with the us in this trade deal, as we have seen with the us in this trade deal, as we have seen over with the us in this trade deal, as we have seen over the last few days. a lot of back and forth when it comes to diplomacy. and yet, chancellor of the exchequer, lynn hammond, has discussed the possibility of a digital tax and borisjohnson, could possibility of a digital tax and
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boris johnson, could be possibility of a digital tax and borisjohnson, could be the next prime minister, he has suggested the same on the hustings. it is already there in their minds. and the great pa rt there in their minds. and the great part is, how will it be executed in deal, they do not have to be the first, they can see how it plays out. i think that is key here, because this could, we have seen the trump administration go. this section, 301, it could be what has led to the china trade war, if this goes a full fledged trade war now, we could see what happens. thank you forjoining us. a freak storm has struck greece, lasting 20 minutes, spreading widespread damage. are more than 140 rescue workers are being brought in to help
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deal with overturned cars and further damage. the storms come after a very high temperatures in the region. taking a closer look at the region. taking a closer look at the weather. we're playing the weather lottery this afternoon, some will have sundry downpours, other will have sunshine. in the sunshine, highs of 26 degrees, the thunderstorms most widespread across northern scotland and northern england. some heavy, we could see as much of an inch as rain ina could see as much of an inch as rain in a short space of time. they will start to ease through the evening and overnight, and then we will have and overnight, and then we will have a mild night to come, 17 degrees the high. we start tomorrow relatively quietly, we will see a few showers, but not as widespread, winds coming round to ignore northwesterly field, with sunny spells coming through and
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values at 25 degrees the high. pressure building from the west, keeping things quiet, with the best of the sunshine in western areas for the weekend. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: downing street calls for a de—escalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats trying to impede a british oil tanker in the gulf. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. the officer who shot mr grainger did not act unlawfully, because he honestly — but mistakenly — believed that mr grainger was reaching for a gun. in fact, mr grainger was probably trying to get out of the car. more support should be available to sacked ministers, a coroner has said, after ruling a welsh assembly member killed himself after being dismissed. senior labour figures say they're appalled by allegations that close allies ofjeremy corbyn tried
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to interfere in anti—semitism cases. a study in france suggests people who have a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, are at a slightly higher risk of developing cancer. sport now on afternoon live with azi farni. england are in a strong position against australia in their cricket world cup semifinal? we're very impartial on this matter! england are chasing 224 after bowling the aussies out in the 49th over. a great display from the england bowlers, their batsmen have also made a solid start. tell us how england are getting on? simon trying to get you in trouble there! and glen durrant a strong position to reach their fourth world cup final. —— england are in a strong position.
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as you say, or so they were all out for 223, it didn't look like they we re for 223, it didn't look like they were going to get anywhere near that at one stage, because they were 143 at one stage, because they were 143 at one stage, because they were 143 at one point after early wickets fell. steve smith, he put on 103 with alex carey eventually being run out for 85, giving australia a bit ofa out for 85, giving australia a bit of a chance. that was before mark would wrap things up with a 90mph yorker, australia out for a 223. england have started really well, the opening partnership ofjonny ba i rstow the opening partnership ofjonny bairstow and jason royle, which has been so good in the last two matches against india and new zealand, they are both unbeaten. short while ago, england were 63 without lows in the 11th over. you can follow it on the bbc website and get commentary on
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tms. thank you very much. simona halep is the first women to book her place in the wimbldon final after beating elina svitolina in straight sets. serena williams is in action right now, trying to book her place in saturday's final. these are live pictures of william's match against barbora strysova on centre court. williams took the first set 6—1, racing to an early lead, currently going with serve. strycova took the first set —— first game of the second set. williams is bidding for a title. you can follow this on the bbc website and app. simona halep will be in the wimbledon final for the first time. she barely put a foot wrong against elina svitolina. the 2018 french open champion took the first set 6—1. the second set was a little bit harder. she eventually won it 6—3, to become
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the first romanian woman to reach a wimbledon singles final. it's halep's fifth grand slam final. andy lapthorne has made history, as the first briton to reach a quad wheelchair tennis final at wimbledon. the two—time paralympic silver medallist beat david wagner in straight sets, as the event made its competitive debut at the championships. he'll play his doubles partner dylan alcott of australia on saturday. arsenal captain laurent koscielny has refused to travel on the club's preseason tour of the united states. they've been in talks over his future since late last season, but when he returned from his summer break, he asked to be released from his contract with a year still to run. arsenal refused and say they're very disappointed by koscielny‘s actions. staying with the premier league, and sam allardyce says he's turned down the chance to return to newcastle united as the club's manager. the former england boss was in charge from 2007 to 2008 and was considered as a replacement
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for rafa benitez. he said, it's that thing, don't go back. sheffield wednesday boss steve bruce is the favourite to take over. that's all the sport for now. if you want to keep up with all today's action, including the tour de france, there's the bbc website and app. there is a significant problem in parliament of mps bullying and harassing staff, a new report says. the house of commons commission said it condemned bullying and harassment. barrister gemma white, who led the investigation, said the behaviour had seriously affected the health and welfare of far too many people and a collective response is needed. i think some of the problems are reflected in other workplaces, but the key differences you have here are an enormous power imbalance between people who are working together. as one put it, it's like having an intern working directly alongside the ceo. so there's a power imbalance which makes things difficult, it makes people frightened to ask
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for help if they need it. and the other difference is there's absolutely no overarching structure, looking at how the employment relationship runs. and in any other public—sector workplace, with so many employees, there would be detailed policies and procedures in place to help the line manager manage performance. research in france suggests people who have a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, may be at a slightly higher risk of cancer. the study found that drinking an extra 100ml a day increased cases of cancer from 22 to 26 in a thousand over a five—year period. the study did not establish a direct causal link, and doctors say more information is needed. lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. but now a study by scientists in france suggest they are significantly associated
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with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two cans of sugary drinks a week. but the study found, if they consumed around two more cans on top of that — around 100ml a day — they had an 18% increased risk of cancer, which worked out as 26 people in every thousand. those who consumed the highest amounts of sugar in the study, the equivalent of around four teaspoons a day, were at an increased risk. not only from fizzy drinks, but 100% fruitjuice as well. these may contain vitamins and count towards your five a day, but are also full of sugar. scientitst didn't find any links with artificial sweeteners and cannot conclude that sugary drinks do cause cancer, but health campaigners say it's another recent cut back our intake. the fact that this did find a link, regardless of weight, is interesting and potentially concerning, but we do need to do more research on this.
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in the meantime, there's already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. obesity is a major cause of some cancers, but researchers claim the association they found suggests that sugar levels in the blood may also play a role. since last year, uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on high—sugar drinks, but borisjohnson provoked criticism from health professionals by vowing to review what he called sin taxes if he becomes prime minister. the british soft drinks industry says overall sugar intake from drinks has dropped by almost 30% since 2015, and they're safe as part of a balanced diet. both scientists and doctors agree more research is needed, but the findings will no doubt feed into the ongoing discussion about how we should live healthier lives. forensic scientists have dug up two graves in a small cemetery in the vatican city. it's part of an investigation into the disappearance
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of a 15—year—old schoolgirl more than 30 years ago. but it's led to further mystery. 0ur correspondent, james reynolds, is in rome. you were close to telling us the story earlier on, let's try again! apologies for early hour, we are now on the street and only about 300m away from what family members hoped might be the centre of this mystery. taking its might, injune1983, this schoolgirl emanuela 0rlandi was on way back from a flute lesson. she was last seen at a bus stop in the city, and then she disappeared. for the last 36 years, her family, largely led by her brother, has been looking for her. they chase down endless rumours and speculation she might have been abducted by mobsters, and then several months ago, they received an anonymous tip, ago, they received an anonymous tip, a letter, with a photograph of the
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vatican's teutonic cemetery, which is around 300m behind me. that photograph was of specific the family said to the vatican, please excavate these terms. their daughter's bones might have been in there. that's what the vatican did this morning, they found the remains at all. the mystery continues, it was a dead end. so what of the family said since and what i think was the motivation behind the letter? they've shown some frustration, pietro, the brother, complained in the past that the vatican had not been cooperating. he is now very deeply frustrated and the family's lawyer said essentially that there are, there must be still people out there who know what happens, and she urged those people as the family and lawyers have done for 36 years, to get in contact. and
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in terms of italy, rome, the vatican, how big a story has this been? for many, many decades, it's been? for many, many decades, it's been incredibly big. it seems almost anywhere you go, everyone has their own pet theory about what might have happened, and over the years, any rumour or piece of speculation has been attributed to her disappearance. that it was abduction, it might be related to an assassination attempt on john abduction, it might be related to an assassination attempt onjohn paul ii. the problem is, for the family, this excavation this morning shows there are no further to finding out what happened to emanuela at the age of 15. and any chance they might find out who wrote that letter, presumably the family would like to meet them? there is some suggestion from pietro, the brother, that he might know some of the identity of the person who wrote clearly, the family thought the suggestion was credible enough to ask the vatican
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to excavate two terms. to the family must go back to what it thought was a reliable contact and find out why that did not turn out to be the case. thank you very much, james. tonnes of plastic are being removed from a river bed in cumbria. the keekle was lined with plastic around 20 years ago in an attempt to stop the water being polluted by a disused mine nearby. but that plastic is now being eroded and fragments of it are being washed away into the sea. so now the plan is to replace the plastic lining with a riverbed of rocks instead. alison freeman has been to watch the work. at first glance, the river keekle looks like any other, but take a closer look and you can see its dark secret — reams and reams of black plastic. this plastic was used to line the river to protect it from contamination from a nearby disused mine. but over the past two decades, it's deteriorated and it's become the pollutant itself, as well as an eyesore. there's been such a knee—jerk reaction to worry about
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what the river will do once the coal mine operations had finished. it was a natural thing — let's just constrain the river, put it in plastic, and then we can walk away and it will be fine. well, in only 20 years, that plastic‘s starting to degrade. we've got to remember that we're not just taking plastic out of a river, rivers go to the sea. so this potentially would end up in the sea. what's happening here is thought to be the biggest river restoration of its kind in the uk. this summer's project is a pilot, with plastic being cleared from a 200m stretch. next year, the rest of the 2.5km will be restored, costing more than £1 million. it'll benefit wildlife as well as people. the plastic isjust a sheer plane, so the water's going down the river very quickly. there's no boulders and cobbles and things to stop that water. so the water's whooshing downstream into cleator area, where there is some flooding of some homes. what are the improvements we are going to see when the plastic‘s gone? it will be a fully functioning river.
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so it will be meandering, it will work properly, it will shift its gravels, as rivers like to do. and we'll get much more wildlife, there'll be more fish spawning. at the moment, there are hardly any fish in here, because there is no spawning habitat for them. and people will be able to enjoy it much more. catherine and her family live nearby. they welcome the project. the benefit of getting this back to nature for us, as a community, is that we'll be able to spend more time here safely and we'll be able to enjoy more wildlife, because when the river's restored, obviously, the wildlife that lives in it will be increased as well. it will be a better habitat, a more natural habitat for the wildlife. it's just going to be brilliant. and dogs can paddle and there will be so much wildlife and kids can paddle in it. it's just going to be amazing. more rivers have been renaturalised in cumbria than anywhere else in the uk. but the keekle is the most challenging by far.
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in a moment, we'll be getting what's hot and what's not in the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: number 10 calls for deescalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. labour rejects accusations that senior members ofjeremy corbyn's team interfered during investigations into alleged anti—semitism. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the virgin boss sir richard branson has warned that a no—deal brexit would cause the pound to plummet and become worth the same as the us dollar. in an interview with the bbc, he said it would be devastating for virgin and force the group to shift investment out of the uk. the bank of england says the likelihood of a no—deal brexit is rising, but that britain's banks are strong enough to cope. since last year, banks have been
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forced to keep more money in reserve in case of shocks to the economy. the central bank says this should be enough to ensure that credit continues to flow, even if the uk is cut off from international markets for a few months. us president donald trump has ordered an investigation into france's new tax on tech giants, a move that could result in retaliatory tariffs. his trade representative said the us is very concerned that the tax unfairly targets american companies. where you are spending your disposable income these days?m where you are spending your disposable income these days? in my garden. not your local pub no, an actual garden, there's my dog! and thatis actual garden, there's my dog! and that is really your garden? i'm part of her trends, apparently, a social media fuelled trends of showing
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off... ware of those flowers? those in the kitchen, we are looking out of the garden. i kill most of the pla nts of the garden. i kill most of the plants i buy, unfortunately. what sort of dog is that? a giant moat. we're not sure! we're talking about a report from market research company mintel about what we're spending our money on and how it is increasingly fuelled by social media. so people are spending more on the garden and home ware in general, so we on the garden and home ware in general, so we can on the garden and home ware in general, so we can show off. and we are having a more diverse range of leisure activities. night clubs are falling out of fashion and we are looking at more different things like tenpin bowling, so you can have more hilarious instagram stories. we are equally spending more on health and fitness, because we want to protect the idea that we are really
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fit on social media. you can see i'm absorbed in this, it makes complete sense! people are drinking less alcohol overall, but what they do spend on alcohol, to spend on premium drinks and more sophisticated soft drinks. 0ne premium drinks and more sophisticated soft drinks. one in five uk adults now say they do not drink, and have to say they do drink say they have been cutting back over the last 12 months. and also, you'll like this and as you don't work from home, you can't. .. like this and as you don't work from home, you can't... it would be a little difficult! i would like to have a garden like that put a studio and, though. because more of us are working from home, it is leading to a boom in pyjamas and soft clothing to wear on the couch. so my smoking jacket is no longer in the? 2596 boom over the last five years. let's
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bring injack over the last five years. let's bring in jack duckett, over the last five years. let's bring injack duckett, who works for mintel, who's behind this research. jack, thank you forjoining us on afternoon live. is it purely fuelled by social media, all these changes, or is there something else going on in terms of how we want to enjoy ourselves? i think the experience economy has been around for such a long time now, people always want to get more out of life, but the last ten years, the blame on social media mean that people are trying to live up mean that people are trying to live up to mean that people are trying to live uptoa mean that people are trying to live up to a certain standard more. sometimes we think of social media experience as a currency, and with that, the more unusual and abstract, the more unobtainable the experience, the higher its value. so people are looking at various ways in their lives to experience things, to bolster their online profiles, and also bring more to their personal lives, the two come
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together. this is also been borne out from what we have heard from high street retailers, i'm thinking of ikea and next. ikea, their boss warned recently that society has reached peak stuff, we've packed our homes was so much nonsense, we're reached peak stuff, we've packed our homes was so much nonsense, we're no more interested in spending on experiences. i think that's true. young people need to spend less on furnishings to fit out these homes. with the change in traditional life stage goals, people are looking at other goals in their place. that could be travelling more, seeing the world, starting newjobs and is really pushing a new experience boundaries. and talk jack, really pushing a new experience boundaries. and talkjack, let's get real — every time someone shows a picture on instagram, you know i'm not having that good of a time! finance
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later, you think, i'm not having this much fun, so you apply one and... we fill our lives with so many exciting expenses, we don't look at our own lives for solace now. have you seen this photograph of his garden, that is the level that some of us can get to! signs are that might be very aspirational time out i would be veryjealous if i could create such crowning achievements. at can i take back control of this interview? is there something we're just seeing amongst younger consumers, seeing as something we're just seeing amongst oun er consumers seein as it's them who are mostly on the likes of instagram? the social media boom is biggest amongst younger adults and they are the driver of the experience, we have done additional research which shows that most generations who are social media
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users, particularly among baby boomers, hideous things like facebook and pinterest, are looking online for inspiration. might not be fashion or beauty or where to go out, but it might be for a good re sta u ra nt out, but it might be for a good restaurant or holiday destination. what might be interested in seeing in the future? so there are a lot of opportunities for lots of people on social media, and they gradually find their way to look for that.” don't use instagram much myself, more than some. in terms of instagram years, what's the age? when you talk about young people, what is the cut—off? when you talk about young people, what is the cut-off? that is really platform—specific. instagram, snapchat, those are really young adults, up to 30. instagram tends to go adults, up to 30. instagram tends to 9° up adults, up to 30. instagram tends to go up to the age of about 39. beyond that, baby boomers, gen x, aged 40
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plus, using things like facebook and pinterest. so these may not be your classic go to thoughts for social media — imean, media — i mean, facebook is, of course, — but... so if you just use twitter, you're just but... so if you just use twitter, you'rejust a dinosaur? but... so if you just use twitter, you're just a dinosaur? twitter is very popular with millennials, and thatis very popular with millennials, and that is a different format, less of a search for inspiration, because it is text—based, so a platform for finding out about current affairs. sorry about that game, you're expecting a gentle business interview but i leapt in. like a dog made it all the better! regards to max, your dog and lovely garden.
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thunderstorms could be an issue with the weather through the afternoon. it's midsummer, the last thing we need is low pressure in control, and that's what you're going to get until the weekend. pressure were built in behind it. full the time being, showers developing, particularly towards the far north, some could be thundery. there are some could be thundery. there are some filtering down towards the midlands, not great news for the cricket at edgbaston. thick clouds, maybe a little drizzle along the west coast of wales. but if you dodge the showers, a human to feel out there, highs of 26 degrees. into the evening, the showers further north becoming more widespread, as much as an inch of rain in a short space of time, some of those showers with rumbles of thunder mixed in as
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well. that's worth bearing in mind. but other nights, those showers will tend to ease, dying back towards the coast. clearer skies, quite tend to ease, dying back towards the coast. clearerskies, quite a mild night, backhoes and the south east of 17 degrees. a relatively quiet start in the morning, the wind direction to more of a northwesterly. a fresher feel at there. is still a list of scattered showers into the afternoon, coming in from the northwesterly direction, top temperatures of 25 degrees. for wimbledon, the outside chance of a shower, particularly on friday and saturday, but generally speaking, it should state largely fine and dry and a pleasant field. is high pressure continues to build in from the west, quietening things down nicely. the wind direction on the east coast, coming from the northeasterly direction, it never
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particularly warm, so could striking a little more cloud. the risk of an isolated shower on saturday, but generally speaking, relatively quiet, and the further west you are, the best of the warmth, with highs of 24 degrees. into sunday, quite still, is the high pressure continues to build. the further west, you see the best of the wa rra nts west, you see the best of the warrants and staying largely dry. but if you do this weekend, enjoy.
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i hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the government issues new guidance for british—flagged vessels going through one of the world's busiest shipping lanes after the royal navy sees off iranian boats trying to stop to stop a british tanker. obviously, very concerning developments, but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping and safe. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. six tourists, including two children, are killed — and more than 100 others injured — after severe storms hit northern greece. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. we have the latest on the cricket. england have made a strong start to their reply against australia, in
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their reply against australia, in the cricket world cup semifinal, chasing 224, they are 119 without loss, having earlier bowled out the australians in the 49th over. a place in the final against new zealand awaits the winners, we will have the latest from edgbaston coming up at half past. and, looking at the weather forecast... coming up at half past. and, looking at the weather forecast. .. a warm and humid afternoon across the uk, giving way to a few sharp and thundery downpours. i will have all the details on potentially when and where coming up shortly. also coming up, re—writing history — the skull discovery which suggests modern human beings lived outside africa much earlier than previously thought. hello, everyone, this is afternoon
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live, i'm simon mccoy. our top story this afternoon — tensions in the gulf. and the government has issued new guidance for british—flagged vessels going through one of the world's busiest shipping lanes. it follows an incident between three iranian boats which tried to intercept a bp—oil tanker in the strait of hormuz. a royal navy frigate was forced to intervene. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. iran's revolutionary guard regularly patrol the narrow waterways in and around the strait of hormuz. a major highway for oil and international shipping. these pictures, taken earlier this year of an iranian exercise, show the type of fast boat that harassed a british tanker last night in what is being viewed as an attempt to seize it. the tanker, british heritage, was entering the strait of hormuz from the gulf when it was approached by three armed, fast iranian boats. the incident began near the disputed island of abu musa, claimed by iran. british officials say the iranian boats tried to force the tanker
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to change course into iranian waters but a royal navy warship rushed to its aid, positioning herself right next to the tanker and exporting her to safety. the frigate, hms montrose, was already there providing reassurance. an american military surveillance aircraft above watched and filmed the incident. the us said hms montrose trained its weapons on the iranian boats. the mod says it issued warnings over the radio. no shots were fired. obviously very concerning developments but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we are continuing to monitor the situation very, very carefully. tensions have been rising in the gulf, with iran already accused of targeting vessels. the us says it was responsible for placing mines on two tankers last month. and then last week,
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british royal marines seized a tanker off gibraltar loaded with iranian oil, prompting iran's president to issue this warning. translation: you, britain, are the initiator of insecurity and you will realise the consequences later. now you are so hopeless that when one of your tankers wants to move in the region you have to bring your frigates to escort it because you are scared. there is a special place in iranians' thoughts for america as the great satan. they always see us as the little satan and they always feel that they lose face if they back down against either us or the united states, so i think it is an ongoing issue. america, which has taken a much harder line on iran and its nuclear programme, has already reinforced its military presence in the region. it has sent an aircraft carrier with several warships. the question now is whether britain will have to send more as well, and would that risk deepening the crisis?
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0ur security correspondent frank gardner is here. how deep is this crisis at the moment? as serious as it has been in many years, the last time it was as serious as this as far as britain is concerned is when iran captured royal navy sailors and marines in a disputed area of the northern gulf and took them ashore, eventually parading them. this is a dangerous moment. comes after two separate attacks on tankers, the last of which set them ablaze. that was blamed on western powers by iran, iran has denied it, it has never been admitted who was responsible. it comes on the back of the shooting down of an unmanned drone, a us drone, a surveillance drone. iran said it shut it down, over its own territory. it comes on the back of iran territory. it comes on the back of ira n slowly territory. it comes on the back of iran slowly withdrawing, from the nuclear treaty, it may deny that is
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what it is doing but in practice, it is no longer complying with that because the united states administration of donald trump withdrew unilaterally from it. this is the heart of the problem, isn't it, with america pulling out, that leaves britain, france, germany totally exposed. very exposed, trying desperately to keep iran in the deal but they do not have a great deal to offer it and the iranian economy is tanking, inflation is up, goods are not going in, exports are down to a fraction of what they were. iran is saying, we signed this deal in good faith. what is in it for us to stay in it? the idea was, sanctions would be lifted, in return for iran submitting itself to very intrusive inspections by un nuclear inspectors, which it has done. the sanctions are back in place, effectively, because the us has slapped them on. iran is in a very difficult place and so are the european countries. as far as the uk is concerned, the incident off
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gibraltar, with the royal navy, that was sanctions against syria, several issues playing into a rather dangerous area. don't forget, syria and iran are allies, and the gibraltar and british version there was that they intercepted a tanker that was on the way to supplying iranian oil to that was on the way to supplying iranian oiltoa that was on the way to supplying iranian oil to a syrian terminal, in the mediterranean. iran is furious about that, it has called it an act of maritime piracy and has vowed to retaliate, that is why the montrose, this type 23 frigate, escorted this bp tanker, very close to an island which is disputed territory between iran and the uae, and got between it and the three iranians gunboats trying to steer it away, essentially huack trying to steer it away, essentially hijack it. how does that work, do they just get hijack it. how does that work, do theyjust get on the radio and say, keep away, is that it? yes, they identify the frequency they are on and say, warning, this is... this is
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and say, warning, this is... this is a royal navy warship, and they may even say, we have 4.5 inch guns trained on you. and they say, back off. and they did back off. iran has denied it and said, absolute nonsense. they have mocked british attitudes, saying it is a little island, it is scared, behaving irrationally. i got a message today from an iranian official saying that britain in all of this is sending out the wrong message and it needs to de—escalate. out the wrong message and it needs to de-escalate. thank you very much. our state department correspondent barbara plett usher is in washington. is their acceptance that it was the decision to pull out of the nuclear deal which has helped to escalate things thousands of miles away in the gulf? well, nobody actually says that, they will talk about iran's location, we have not seen a public acknowledgement that it is the american actions, the american
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stand, that has caused the breakdown in relation to these provocations, but certainly, that is the view of many countries around the world, including the europeans. the us has been trying to get other countries to support its strong stand against iran, without much success, for that reason, many countries state that the americans are responsible for the americans are responsible for the situation. with this incident involving the british ship, perhaps that will change some minds or get a little more support from the americans in what they are trying to do, that seems to be what president donald trump thinks. he hasjust one way they would want to see support is building up a coalition of states to help share the burden of states to help share the burden of protecting commercial vessels in the gulf, they have been asking for countries to send boats to patrol and escort, and perhaps this is going to increase the will to do that. we will have to wait and see,
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as well as the europeans being relu cta nt, as well as the europeans being reluctant, asian countries get oil from the gulf, they would be relu cta nt, from the gulf, they would be reluctant, they don't want to be seen as reluctant, they don't want to be seen as hostel, tojoin reluctant, they don't want to be seen as hostel, to join a reluctant, they don't want to be seen as hostel, tojoin a us led coalition is a bit of a sensitive issue. if i can also say, donald trump has tweeted there will be more sanctions, even more sanctions, coming, they have sanctioned iran substantially, so it is not clear what else they could do, perhaps targeting entities that are... the feeling there, the united states would rather get more involved in the region, and ratchet up the pressure, if you like, rather than de—escalates, which is the call we are hearing from this country.” think they are trying to do both, for example, with this coalition to protect commercial vessels, the americans want other countries to come and help, they say, we will be the command and control, send your boats, join us. this is not to confront iran, just to keep eyes on the gulf, to make sure that it knows
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we are watching. that is one thing. there are... the authors of this very hardline policy against iran, they do believe that it is working precisely because they have seen these actions. they feel that if they continue to increase the pressure, iran will eventually have to give and this kind of action that iran is taking, and others for which they blame it, are signs that iran is beginning to buckle under pressure. does this take public attention away from anything that might trouble president donald trump ona might trouble president donald trump on a domestic issue? well, it might, but not significantly, i don't think, there are many ways that he can divert attention from issues that trouble him, and i don't know that trouble him, and i don't know that this particular case, the british incident, for instance, is going to play a big factor in that. thank you very much forjoining us. a public inquiry has blamed
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greater manchester police for a "catastrophic" series of errors which led to an unarmed man being shot dead. anthony grainger, a 36—year—old father of two from bolton, was in a stolen car in cheshire seven years ago when police shot and killed him with a submachine gun. they believed he was planning an armed robbery. but thejudge heading the inquiry has concluded that the police operation was planned incompetently. 0ur correspondent, danny savage, was in court. this is a public enquiry that has taken some two years to take place, and the conclusions to come back today. the family of anthony grainger say this proves the ruling today that he could, that his death could and should have been prevented. yes, he was in a stolen car, yes, he had a criminal record, but the information police had about him on that day was not correct, he was not a member of an organised crime gang, there was no weapon in the vehicle he was in, that is the reason the policeman who shot him said he pulled the trigger, because he believed anthony grainger was reaching for a gun, but no gun was found in the vehicle. the judge today, the chairman of this enquiry, had some
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very strong criticism for greater manchester police and this is what he had to say. i have concluded that greater manchester police is to blame for the death of mr grainger, because it failed to authorise, plan or conduct the firearms operation in such a way as to minimise recalls to the use of lethal force. firearms commander is and planned the operation incompetently, and in breach of national guidance. i have made a number of recommendations that i hope will reduce the chance of such a catastrophic series of failings and errors ever having been repeated. i'm joined here by marina schofield, outside liverpool crown court, she is the mother of anthony grainger and has been following, of course, this very closely. must have been emotionalfor you in court to have these conclusions. it was, it was very emotional, but, also, it was really good to hear it. mixed emotions, happy and still sad. it is not going to bring him back.
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what do you want to see come out of this? i want the police officers to be charged, i have said this from day 1. every one of them has contributed to this death, as far as i'm concerned, through fake intelligence, whatever you want to call it. i hope today has set a precedent where it does not happen to anyone else. what do you say to those people who may be watching this say, "he was in a stolen car, he had a criminal record," "even thejudge today said that he may have been up to no good." what would you say to people who say, "i have no sympathy?"
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—— what would you say to people who say, "i have no sympathy"? i would say to them, one day, it could be somebody you know, and then you will understand how it feels. my son was not a violent person, he has never been done for violence. he did have a bit of a past when he was younger, we have said from day 1, but he did not deserve that. he deserved to be arrested and maybe put in prison, but not shot. are you satisfied they have got to the bottom of what happened and the truth about events now? i am satisfied but we have a bit more to go, yet, with the cps, to see what, if, if and when they will charge some of these officers. have the police apologised and do you think they should? they have not... they wanted to do it the first day of the enquiry, in court and the judge would not let them. the judge told them straight, you have had five years to say sorry, you are not
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doing it in my court. he wanted it on record that he denied it, they wanted the apology on record. he didn't accept the apology because he knew what they were doing. anthony grainger‘s mother, following that closely over the last couple of years, it was supposed to be an inquest but because of sensitive information it turned into a public enquiry, so it could be heard behind closed doors. certain things about police tactics, and other things that could not be in the public domain. as part of the investigation into the death of anthony grainger. the family feel as though they have had answers, and strong criticism for gmp, from the judge, who was the chairman of this enquiry. an update on the main story, tensions in the gulf, the government hasissued tensions in the gulf, the government has issued new guidance for british flagged vessels going through the strait of farmers, a busy shipping lane, after the attempted interception of a bp oil tanker, following royal marines helping authorities in gibraltar to seize an oil tanker last week because of evidence it was carrying iranians
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crude oil to syria in breach of eu sanction. —— strait of hormuz. the grace one, that vessel, continues to be detained, they have now arrested the master and chief officer of grace one, for breaching eu sanctions. ratcheting of the tension in the gulf, and that continues elsewhere, that continued action against iranians shipping. we will bring you more on that a little later. that is one of the main stories. the headlines: government issued new guidance for british flagged vessels going through one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world after iranian boats are —— after the royal navy sees off the iranian boats. catastrophic failings led to the shooting by police of a man in manchester. jeremy corbyn's tea m man in manchester. jeremy corbyn's team have been accused of interfering into investigations in alleged anti—semitism. interfering into investigations in alleged anti-semitism. england's
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batsmen make a good start, as they face australia, jason roy hit a half—ce ntu ry face australia, jason roy hit a half—century as he and fellow opener jonny bairstow put on 124 for the first wicket. just gone for 34, and jason roy, for 85, 100 47—2. seven time champion serena williams will play simona halep in the wimbledon women's singles final, after beating barbora women's singles final, after beating ba rbora strycova, women's singles final, after beating barbora strycova, in straight sets, unseeded, winning 6—1, 6—2 in less than 60 minutes. arsenal captain laurent koscielny has refused to go on the club pre—season tour of the united states. he asked to be released from his contract with one year still to run but the arsenal have refused. more on those stories just after half past. more support should be available to sacked ministers, a coroner has said, after ruling a welsh assembly member killed himself after being dismissed. 49—year—old carl sargeant was found
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dead at his home in 2017. it followed claims of inappropriate behaviour towards women. speaking after, his son criticised the "distressing and dehumanising process" that had added to the family's heartbreak. wales's former first minister carwynjones has been criticised. he said that he hoped some healing can now begin. we had this update from the family's reaction. a scathing attack on the first minister, following the judgment, the ruling given byjohn gittins, a formal conclusion of suicide, he said the evidence showed that no arrangement had been put in place to provide support for mr sargent following his sacking from cabinet, that was despite the probability that carwynjones, former first minister at the time, knew of his vulnerabilities in relation to his mental health. safeguarding changes have been made to provide support to ministers if they are dismissed from future cabinets by the current
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first minister, however, the coroner said he had concerns that the other first ministers in future would not provide the same level of support and has written to the welsh government asking for actions to be taken to prevent similar deaths in future. the welsh government say that they will consider that report, into preventions of future deaths carefully and respond in full. as you mentioned, the family did respond straightaway after the coroners decision, and launched a scathing attack on the former first minister. ina in a statement, carwynjones has said it has been a difficult time for everyone, particularly the family, and! for everyone, particularly the family, and i offer my condolences, no one could have foreseen this. this has come to a close, there is another independent investigation pending looking into the way that ca rwyn pending looking into the way that carwyn jones pending looking into the way that ca rwyn jones handled pending looking into the way that carwynjones handled the sacking of john sergeant. in a statement, the former wales first minister said, "this has been a difficult time for everyone, the family most of all, i
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offer my deepest condolences for a loss that is inevitably still painful. the nature of these proceedings has meant there appears to be two sides to this matter, and arguments are tested, that is right, the process has driven a natural wedge between people who should remain united in their ongoing shock, trauma and grief. nobody wa nted shock, trauma and grief. nobody wanted this and nobody could have foreseen it. suicide is a shattering experience and i hope some healing can now begin." statement from the former wales first minister, carwyn jones. pres)the founder of the far—right group the english defence league, stephen yaxley—lennon, has beenjailed for 9 months for contempt of court. yaxley—lennon, otherwise known as tommy robinson, seen here arriving at court this morning, was found guilty after a two—day hearing at the old bailey last week. the charges came after he filmed men accused of the sexual exploitation of young girls and live—streamed the footage on facebook, breaking reporting restrictions. labour's deputy leader tom watson has said he is appalled by allegations of anti—semitism
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raised in a bbc panorama programme, and has called for an independent investigation. the programme heard claims that some ofjeremy corbyn's closest allies tried to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. labour rejects any claim that the party was anti—semitic. 0ur poliitical correspondent helena wilkinson reports. reaction was swift and strong to the panorama programme on anti—semitism within labour ranks. the party is now under huge pressure after being confronted with what are serious allegations. but no reply from the man at the top. his shadow chancellor though did have something to say. some serious charges there, they have been hotly contested. some of the ex—staff statements have been contested by existing staff. there's complaints put into the bbc and i think the bbc should investigate the claims and we can come to a conclusion.
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others within the labour party have expressed deep alarm at what was said by former staff, that mr corbyn's closest allies, including jennie formby, the party's general secretary, to interfere in the disciplinary processes involving anti—semitism cases. her testimony is difficult to hear. the thought crosses my mind as to whether i should send her my resignation and then do something nobody should ever consider. . .and i actively considered committing suicide. the labour party has totally rejected the allegations. it said... but the party's own deputy leader, in direct contrast to the leader, says that's a deplorable thing
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for labour to say. to see those young members of staff, many of whom come from different wings of the party, it must have taken great courage for them to whistle—blow. now a letter has been sent to jeremy corbyn from three prominent labour mps, margaret hodge, louise ellman and ruth smee. in this letter they criticise mr corbyn for what they say is his continuing failure to act and say the current complaints process has not only failed but normalises and encourages anti—semitism, and they want a fully independent inquiry process. given anti—semitism has dogged the labour party since mr corbyn came to power, some think he is the only person there is a "significant problem"
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in parliament of mps bullying and harassing staff, a new report says. the house of commons commission said it "condemned bullying and ha rassment". barrister gemma white, who led the investigation, said the behaviour had "seriously affected the health and welfare of far too many people and a collective response is needed. the french senate has approved a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms like google and facebook. the companies pay minimal tax on their sales in france as they are headquartered elsewhere. the measure, which will initially raise around £360 million a year, sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. the us has called the tax unfair. earlier i spoke to ryan patel, who's a global business executive based in los angeles. i started by asking him how nervous tech companies are going to be, about this move. well, it's nervous notjust because it's france, but because it could be picked up everywhere else, and if the eu as a whole backs it and then potentially other countries could be looking at this, it would hit the bottom line for many of these tech companies.
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margins are getting thin and they are trying to grow globally. this is something notjust closely watched but obviously, many of the company are supporting the trump administration in this section 301, they started this investigation, so it's kind of a topsy—turvy situation in who is supporting what. yeah, to be fair, there's not a lot of sympathy for these companies, given the margins, given the profits, given that they seem to manage to get away with not paying the amount of tax that other companies do. yes, and i think that is the thing about this, if there is a consistent basis on what is going to be the new norm on tax, obviously with this new technology innovation, most economies don't know how to really interact with this. and now we're talking about, you know, about, it's 3%, like you mention, £300, 3% of revenue stream that france is taxing them. this is what's causing the uproar.
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but yeah, the way that technology going forward, it's going to have to be looked at differently when it comes to data privacy and how you get taxed. just looking at the uk position, to leave the european union, and then be out in the wide world, looking for trade deals, what will this do for that? there's two things — the uk, when it comes to the us and uk trade deal, this gives them a potential chip. they don't really have to do anything and see how this plays out, right now france is by itself, it will yet be determined whether the eu will come into this multilateralism to support france, and if they don't, the uk can decide how to approach this. if it doesn't go well for france, they can create a different language which may be creates a better deal for the a different language which may be creates a better dealfor the us, or they canjoin creates a better dealfor the us, or they can join them with this tax.
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i think the uk, when it comes to tax, they are not in a rush and they could use it as a bargaining chip with the us in this trade deal, as we have seen over the last few days. a lot of back—and—forth when it comes to diplomacy. six tourists, including two children, have been killed and more than 100 other people injured after gale—force winds, rain and hailstorms struck northern greece overnight. the freak storm, which lasted around 20 minutes, caused widespread damage in the halkadiki region of greece. more than 140 rescue workers have been brought in to help deal with overturned cars, fallen trees, torn rooves and mudslides. the storms come after very high temperatures in the region. we can pick up on that, the weather forecast, in greece, pretty unusual, what has happened. in europe, generally, extreme summer, we tend to get these kind of storms, not quite as devastating but a little bit later on, because we have had
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this extreme heat that we have been talking about over the last couple of weeks, at some point, there has to bea of weeks, at some point, there has to be a break in that momentum and we have seen really extreme temperatures. that has led to this awful devastation, freak super cells that form these... what is a super cell? there was a red warning out la st cell? there was a red warning out last night across parts of greece, looking at the footage, it is a huge thunderstorm, that developed. what has been happening is we have had very warm aircoming has been happening is we have had very warm air coming up from the south, you and i were talking on monday, temperatures in the mediterranean, 5 degrees above the average for this time of year. a lot of heat and moisture generating in the atmosphere. coming from the north, something a little less hot, not cool. a little less hot. where those form, there is a boundary, this front that has persisted. i started off in italy, some amazing
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footage of baseball —sized hail stones. thousands of lightning strikes into southern italy and then we saw these thunderstorms moving into greece. it is thought it is a super cell, which potentially has the strength of the wind almost like hurricane force wind at times, may be some tornado activity within the storm as well, we will have to wait and see what analysts say. it has produced huge devastation in a short space of time. tone thatis that is how tornadoes are formed, moisture bumping into the cool air. "tornadic activity", i have never heard that before. it was the word... it is a good word... what is wrong with tornadic? nothing at all, it isa wrong with tornadic? nothing at all, it is a good word. it is a word, honestly!
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we have had yellow warnings here for storms. there were storms around birmingham, somebody had umbrella up, but if you look at the raider, most of the showers were across the far north—east of scotland but these are just moving towards the midlands, potentially. for the are just moving towards the midlands, potentially. forthe rest of us, humid out there and that is one of the reasons for these thunderstorms, temperatures in the mid 20s for some, it will feel fresher in the next few days because we will change the wind direction so overnight tonight we still have a risk of sharp downpours especially across eastern scotland and down into the north of england, they will start to ease to the latter stages of the night and quite mild night to come, temperatures are around london
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falling to around 17 degrees so potentially uncomfortable for sleeping, then we start tomorrow on a warm note, relatively dry and quiet, low pressure moves away and allows high pressure to build from the west so as we go towards the weekend, each date will get that bit quieter and drier. weekend, each date will get that bit quieterand drier. on weekend, each date will get that bit quieter and drier. on friday not as many showers but still a chance of a few showers and the wind is coming from a north—westerly direction. they will still be sunshine and warmth, temperatures perhaps peaking at 27 degrees. a slim chance of a shower on wimbledon friday into saturday, that chance increases substantially for the men's final afternoon as the high pressure moves east so that will quieten things down, unfortunately and north—easterly wind may drive in more cloud and i could feel so
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across eastern england down into east anglia, more cloud on saturday, the risk of an isolated shower but not a bad start to the weekend. temperatures will peak around 24 degrees. it stays dry and pleasant sunday into monday so if you have outdoor plans for the second part of the weekend, i don't think you will be disappointed.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the government issues new guidance for british—flagged vessels going through one of the world's busiest shipping lanes after the royal navy sees off iranian boats trying to stop a british tanker. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. the officer who shot mr grainger did not act unlawfully, because he honestly — but mistakenly — believed that mr grainger was reaching for a gun. in fact, mr grainger was probably trying to get out of the car. more support should be available to sacked ministers, a coroner has said, after ruling a welsh assembly member killed
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himself after being dismissed. senior labour figures say they're appalled by allegations that close allies ofjeremy corbyn tried to interfere in anti—semitism cases. we will have more on that in a moment. a study in france suggests people who have a lot of sugary drinks — including pure fruitjuice — are at a slightly higher risk of developing cancer. we will pick up on that anti—semitism row in the labour party, for that reaction to the bbc labour party investigation into it, and tom watson wants some answers. we already heard from tom watson to date who said he was appalled by last night's panorama broadcast and he called for a new independent system to deal with complaints of anti—semitism but we have now seen a letter he has written to the general
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secretary of the labour party, jennie formby. he says the weight some of that people have been smeared who took part in last night's panorama broadcast, former labour party staffers, he says they have been smeared by labour spokespeople and he describes that as deplorable, he says even if some did not want to hear what they say it is unacceptable to undermine their integrity in this way. the labour party suggested some of the claims in last night's broadcast had been by disaffected members and tom watson says he feels given the gravity of the allegations he must insist that you publish labour‘s submission to the equality and human rights commission, which is investigating the labour party over allegations of anti—semitism. tom watson once the site of the labour
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party submission to that. the labour party submission to that. the labour party has denied that party members intervened over allegations but it seems last night's broadcast has led to new concerns from people like tom watson and he ends his letter by saying that only sunlight can disinfect labour from the anti—semitism row. sport now on afternoon live with azi farni — and dare i say it, all eyes are on edgbaston. yes, where england have made a strong start to their chase on australia. their target is 224 and jason roy and jonny bairstow made an opening stand of 124. will parry is at edgbaston for us. those openers are now gone but england still in a commanding position? yes, in a
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strong position, 160—2 in the 24th over but they have lost both their opening batsman after they started strongly, jonny bairstow falling for 34 in the 18th over, england were 124-1. 34 in the 18th over, england were 124—1. bairstow was bowled plum by mitchell starc, they decided to review it but wasted that review, then jason roy review it but wasted that review, thenjason roy hit review it but wasted that review, then jason roy hit three review it but wasted that review, thenjason roy hit three sixes in a row of the former australian test captain steve smith and then eventually he was incorrectly given out for a delivery from pat cummins, caught from behind by wicketkeeper alex carey and there wasn't a touch on it but england didn't have a choice because they had wasted that review, jason roy was refusing to go but he was gently assured of the field, england had a strong position
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and should be in that world cup final on sunday against new zealand. it will be their fourth world cup final and you would back it to go all the way, and before that steve smith gave the austrians a bit of a chance, the only batsmen to get over 50 runs, then mark run finished off that australian innings for england, he bowled a 90 mile per yorker to wrap up the australian tail and give england that big chance of getting into the final. thank you, will parry. serena williams is on course for an eighth wimbledon title and record—equalling 24th grand slam afet booking her place in saturday's final with a straight sets win
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over barbora strysova. williams will play simona halep, who overcame elina svitolina also in two straight sets. john watson is there for us — both women making short work of their opponents. yes, perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that serena williams appears to be peaking, she dismantled barbora strycova in straight sets. serena williams‘ serve was foreign, as was some of her ground strokes, barbora strycova had no answers for what lay across the net. at 33 she is the oldest first time grand slam semifinalist in the women‘s game but all the experience serena williams has, no signs of slowing up yet as she looks to emulate the record of 24 grand slams. simona halep also came through against elina svitolina, up against the eighth seed, 6—16— three this finished as halep reaches a sect grand slam final, her first on
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the grass at wimbledon and it sets up the grass at wimbledon and it sets up the tantalising prospect of halep facing serena williams in the final on saturday. they have played each other already this year, serena williams came out on top at the australian open and they faced each other at wimbledon eight years ago, against serena williams coming out on top. after that dream partnership with andy murray in the doubles and a street run in the singles, will it come to an end on saturday? thank you, john watson, and we will have more from wimbledon and edgbaston for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. beccy barr is in salford to tell us about plans to resume fracking near blackpool. and peter levy is in hull. he has been talking to the mother of a six—year—old schoolboy who was fatally shot
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by his great—grandfather. beccy, what are the energy firm cuadrilla doing with the site now? fracking or hydraulic fracturing is a technique that many viewers will have heard of comic it extracts gas and oilfrom have heard of comic it extracts gas and oil from the earth have heard of comic it extracts gas and oilfrom the earth by pumping liquid underground at high pressure to fracture shale rock and release gas or oil. fracking in lancashire started last october but was suspended in december after work six tremors at the site near blackpool which were over the 0.5 legal limit. every time that happens the company has to stop work for 18 hours. now cuadrilla have said they will start tracking again at the end of next month. last year they dug to wales and partially attract one, this year they are coming back to crack the second but using a different kind of
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fluid. using less water to carry the sand, the mixture will be slightly more viscous and the seismicity is related to the amount of water so we expect that we will have even less, although we had very little seismicity of any note last time, this time we should have even less. so why are they back now? the chief executive was talking about seismicity which is the issue, cuadrilla say they want more data to prove their case to the government, they want the government to order a technical review to raise that operating limit which is currently 0.5 and made it clear that unless that limit is raised, there cannot bea that limit is raised, there cannot be a fracking industry in this country. protesters remain committed to doing all they can to prevent cracking here. the government has just declared by climate emergency and to look at real loss of fossil fuel industry is incompatible with
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that. cuadrilla site that fracking is safe and an exciting opportunity for the uk offering jobs and this new source for the uk offering jobs and this new source of for the uk offering jobs and this new source of energy for the uk offering jobs and this new source of energy but the anti—fracking lobby site that fossil fuels are not the answer and a need to be more research into the impacts of this process before we allow it to go ahead. thank you, beccy barr. let‘s go to peter leavy and this is a dreadful story. it is dreadful, a year ago stanley metcalfe was shot with an air rifle fired by albert grumman. he is stanley‘s great grandad. stanley was taken to hull royal infirmary but died. it was a tragic accident and last year his grandfather was jailed for three yea rs grandfather was jailed for three years for manslaughter. he kept the gun for shooting vermin. he bought it for £90 from an advert and got
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its power increased for £20 but he never had a licence. in court last week, there is his mumjenny, who said that albert never once said he was sorry. i spoke to stanley‘s motherjenny about the moment that her son was shot and what he said. i came straight in and stanley had his hand over his tummy and he said to me, i asked him what was the matter and he said, granddad shot me. i said, don't be silly, stanley, granddad wouldn't shoot you, granddad wouldn't do that, and he looks up my grandad and he said, why would you shoot me, granddad? i said to him, have you shot him? and he said, i don't know, so my mum picked him up, took him outside and i saw his eyes roll to the of his head. are you ready to forgive or not? not right now. it's not about forgiveness for me, it's the fact i feel really let down. i was brought up to respect my
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grandad and he just hasn't, he hasn't come to say sorry, he hasn't come to see me. nobody understands that. why has he not said sorry? i can't understand it myself. we had a very, very close relationship, we were very close. the day it happened i put my hand on his knee and i said to him, don't worry, granddad, everything's going to be fine, and then stanley passed away and i didn't see him. i haven't seen him since. no parent, simon, you can imagine what stanley‘s parents have gone through this past year and the trauma made even more upsetting by the fact it was a family member who was responsible for stanley‘s death. peter, thank you for bringing us that story, and thank you both very much.
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if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. a public memorial has been held in hong kong for a man who police believe killed himself last month over an extradition bill. the death of the protester has prompted the service. he fell from a banner while carrying a banner condemning the proposal to allow extradition to mainland chinese courts. you can see thousands of people have gathered over many hours
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they have come a long and cute and then under those white tents, they sign that remembrance book and then from there they are moving forward toa from there they are moving forward to a front area where the writing says, we will remember you forever. hearing messages from his parents, saying while they want a better hong kong as well, they are calling on young people to treasure their lives. during this campaign, for young people from hong kong have died and this has been especially distressing for many people here. the government, while it has said there controversial extradition bill is effectively politically dead, they wanted withdrawn altogether and this movement has evolved into something bigger, it‘s really about defending hong kong‘s freedoms overall so the death of this young man in the pursuit of those
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objectives is seen as something worth remembering and that is quite such big numbers of people have come here today to pay their respects. business news in the moment, but first the headlines... the government issues new guidance for british—flagged vessels going through one of the world‘s busiest shipping lanes after the royal navy sees off iranian boats trying to stop a british tanker. a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. labour rejects accusations that senior members ofjeremy corbyn‘s tea m senior members ofjeremy corbyn‘s team interfered with investigations into alleged anti—semitism. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: the bank of england says the likelihood of a no—deal brexit is rising but that britain‘s banks are strong enough to cope. since last year, banks have been
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forced to keep more money in reserve in case of shocks to the economy. the central bank says this should be enough to ensure that credit continues to flow even if the uk is cut off from international markets for a few months. marks and spencer‘s clothing boss is leaving after just two years in the job. jill mcdonald‘s responsibilities will be taken over by chief executive steve rowe. the retailer has been trying to get to grips with what it described as "long—standing issues" in its supply chain which meant that shoppers couldn‘t find what they wanted in store. us president donald trump has ordered an investigation into france‘s new tax on tech giants — a move that could result in retaliatory tariffs. his trade representative said the us is "very concerned" that the tax "unfairly targets american companies". we‘ve been talking a lot about the value of the pound this week and sir richard branson has weighed in.
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he has, yes. the pound has not had a good week. it‘s fallen to levels not seen in two years. it has recovered to date to around 0.3%. earlier this week it was down toi.4. 0.3%. earlier this week it was down to 1.4. -- 1.04. it 0.3%. earlier this week it was down to 1.4. —— 1.04. it was down to concerns about a no deal brexit and diplomatic spats between the us and china, with fears that britain‘s future outside the eu might not be so secure, future outside the eu might not be so secure, but also a lot has to do with the falling dollar because we heard from the boss of the us federal reserve and what he said led people to think he could be cutting interest rates and that typically causes a fall in value of the dollar so causes a fall in value of the dollar so that might be why we have seen the pound recovered today. what has
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sir richard had to say? he is an opponent brexit and he didn‘t hold back on his concerns in an interview with the bbc today, he thinks stirling could plummet to parity with the us dollar, so we would see £1 would buy just with the us dollar, so we would see £1 would buyjust $1. just spelling it out for anyone who wasn‘t clear. here is what he told burridge earlier.
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let‘s bring in james let‘s bring injames bevan. pretty dramatic production bikes are richard branson. is there any circumstance in which you could buy into that theory? the pound will fall until buyers emerge and theoretically sir richard may be correct but i think he is somewhat alarmist. there is an expectation that if the pound falls people will look at british assets and site we liked that price, let's buy, and foreign investors have been significant purchasers of us assets in recent years. the us reserve chief, jerome powell, what he said was taken as a signal that the us could cut interest rates. markets have for a long while estimated that
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mr powell would cut rates. they had determined that because usjobs growth has remained strong, maybe he would hold off longer, now the money is betting that there would be at least one point cut and a number of market participants are looking at 0.5%, that's encouraging people to buy the equity market on the basis that both assets have better values in low interest rates. i want to ask you a another story, this tax announced by the french government, announced by the french government, a3% announced by the french government, a 3% levy on sales by big tech giants like facebook and google, the first such tax we have seen. 0ur investors worried about contagion? investors aren't much worried at the moment because there has been so much talk about the necessity to put some tax on revenue and sales rather than profit. with amazon, most of
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their european sales are rooted to luxembourg and i pay almost no tax and these people anticipate a strong reaction not only from europeans but economies like japan and singapore. james bevan, thank you. and that's it from me. ask me what the cricket score is. we need 224 at edgbaston. that will put a smile on your face, not! there‘s new evidence that modern human beings lived outside africa much earlier than previously thought. a fossilised skull, discovered in southern greece, suggests the first homo sapiens may have arrived in europe about two hundred and ten thousand years ago — a time when the continent was populated by the neanderthals. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. in the distant past, the first of our kind evolved here in africa. there were also other now extinct species of human, such as the neanderthals and denisovans in europe and asia.
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our ancestors eventually left the continent and spread across the globe, and quickly took over from the other species. so the theory goes. but the discovery of this human—looking skull in apidima in southern greece has changed this view. scientists used to think that 200,000 years ago, europe was exclusively populated by the neanderthals, whereas our kind, modern humans, remained in africa until 40,000 years ago. but the discovery of the new skull in greece has shattered that view. it doesn‘t have the flatter, elongated shape of the neanderthal, but rather, it‘s much more like our own, rounder. so this means that the two species could have interacted for 100,000 years. it had been thought that our ancestors had been prevented from leaving africa for tens of thousands of years, perhaps by the other types
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of humans, or the climate. but researchers are now having to rethink their old ideas. there was nothing to stop modern humans getting out of africa more than 200,000 years ago, and expanding. it potentially means that even places further to the east, there are claims of modern human fossils in china at 130,000 years. i‘d been very sceptical about those up to now, but given the evidence from apidima, maybe i should be more open—minded about those early chinese records‘ claim to be homo sapiens. it is potentially the biggest shift in our understanding of how modern humans left africa. instead of overlapping briefly with neanderthals in europe, our kind may have coexisted with a wide variety of human species across the world for tens of thousands of years. just a quick line on our main story,
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iranian boats driven away from british tanker in the gulf, britain has raised the threat for shipping in the gulf to its highest level, level three. this step was taken a couple of days ago and tension in the gulf has not risen as a result of the latest confrontation between iranian and british naval ships, so we will bring more on that 5pm. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with ben brown. time for a look at the weather. we are playing the weather lottery for the afternoon, some of us will have downpours, others will have sunshine. thunderstorms most widespread across scotland and northern england, some heavy rumbles of thunder and we could have an inch of thunder and we could have an inch of rain in a short time, they will
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start to ease this evening and overnight and then we will have quite a mild night, 11—17d the overnight lows so we start off tomorrow relatively quietly, we may see a few showers but not as widespread and the winds will swing around to a north—westerly fresh feel, some sunny spells and highest values of 25 degrees. high pressure builds from the west, keeping things relatively quiet with the best sunshine in western areas for the weekend.
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today at five — britain has raised the threat level for uk shipping in iranian waters in the gulf to its highest level. it comes as a royal navy warship warned off iranian gunboats — which were trying to intercept a british tanker in the straits of hormuz. obviously very concerning developments but i am also proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we‘ll be discussing the growing tensions in the gulf with the former chief of the royal navy admiral lord west. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. a public inquiry concludes this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. tommy robinson — founder of the far—right

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