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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 7, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and victoria fritz. our headlines today: president trump's white house is branded inept, insecure
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and dysfunctional in leaked emails from the uk ambassador. a three million pound plan to transport medicines and blood into the uk in the event of a no—deal brexit. it's saturday night prime time on centre court, as andy murray and serena williams play and win together for the first time at wimbledon. good morning, a lot of fine weather around for most of us to finish this weekend. looking perhaps a little bit more changeable into next week, i will have all the details in a couple of moments. it's sunday, the 7th ofjuly. our top story. the white house has been described as "uniquely dysfunctional" and "inept" in leaked memos from the uk's ambassador in washington. sir kim darroch‘s private communications — which were obtained by the mail on sunday — describe president trump's administration as "insecure" and "incompetent".
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our reporter andy moore is outside the foreign office this morning with the details. it is unusual to get such a huge cash on what should be secret documents put in the public domain. there is lots of them, they come from a period of 2017 to present. lots of them are uncomplimentary about mrtrump. lots of them are uncomplimentary about mr trump. they say it is unlikely his administration will ever become competent. kim darroch says the rumours about vicious infighting are probably true. of the president he says the man radiates insecurity even though he is the most powerful man on the planet. he says you have to be simple, even blunt to get your message through to him. of his future, he says he might crash or burn but on the other hand, he says you should not write him
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off. the foreign office are not denying these comments are accurate and true. they sate the private comments are a honest and unfurnished assessment from the ambassador. this is what the general public would expect but not for them to be put into the public domain. no response yet from the white house but the story is being widely reported in the usa and leading bulletins on cnn. it'll be interesting to see how much these comments will test the special relationship between the uk and the usa. you might imagine the twitter account will be activated when president trump wakes up. anyway... it's been revealed that the department of health is planning to spend three million pounds on a service to transport medication, in the event of a no—deal brexit at the end of october.
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it wants to hire an "express freight service" to transport medicines, blood and transplant tissue. but experts have described the timeline for the contract as "tight". katy austin reports. when a multi—million pound ferry contract was awarded to seaborne freight, which had never run a ferry service, the way the government was securing deals to deliver contingency plans for a no—deal brexit came under intense scrutiny. now there is a new brexit date and new plans are being drawn up in case the flow of goods in and out of the uk is disrupted by leaving the eu without a deal. things are being done differently, more flexible freight contracts are already being planned, and tussell, a data provider on government contracts, has noticed the department of health is planning to spend 3 million pounds on an express freight service, making sure there is a continuous supply of medicines, blood and transplant tissue. it says it's good to see a full procurement procedure being used, but that the timeline for the service being ready is tight, something a legal expert agrees with. a department of health and social care spokeswoman said
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the speed of the contract is within the usual guidelines. france and iran have agreed to look at conditions for resuming talks to try to save tehran‘s nuclear deal with world powers. president emmanuel macron expressed strong concern to president hassan rouhani, about the consequences of abandoning the deal signed in 2015, which has been injeopardy since the us pulled out last year. the iranians are demanding that european countries find ways to ease the impact of us economic sanctions. more protests are expected in hong kong today as the row over china's control of the region continues. activists, who caused extensive damage to the parliament building last week, are fighting against a controversial bill allowing extradition from hong kong to mainland china. let's talk to our china correspondent, robin brant. hello, any sense of the likely scale
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today? i think there is probably a couple of thousand people here already, there are a familiar black t—shirts, the unofficial uniform of the protesters. the organisers are saying at least a couple of thousands, it looks it can be more than that if the weather stays good. they were what about two miles north of where i am at the moment up to the train station which can take you to the mainland. the reason they are here and handing out posters like this, and fans saying democracy now, the reason they are here is because this is the side of hong kong that is attached to mainland china and there are lots of chinese tourists that come here to shop. they want the focus of the march and protest to be talking to chinese tourists, tell them what they are upset about and try and persuade them to back
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the cause. the police are here on the cause. the police are here on the periphery in a relatively small numbers but we understand there is a couple of thousand on standby in case there is a repeat of the aggression we saw on monday. at this stage the protesters want to keep the momentum going, perhaps these events will become weekly. in terms of what is going to happen, will there be any trouble on the periphery? the police want them to be peaceful, rational and the organisers mostly what a peaceful protest but there has been trouble in the past. we will have to wait and see. an explosion from a suspected gas leak ripped through a shopping mall in florida injuring 21 people. debris was sent flying across the car park of the fountain plaza shopping centre in plantation, which is about 30 miles north of miami. the blast could be heard several miles away. it's not yet known what caused the explosion.
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41 migrants on board a rescue ship that docked at an italian port without official permission have now disembarked. the ship landed yesterday on the island of lampedusa, which is north of libya, even though italy's far—right interior minister had warned it to stay away. the charity that chartered the vessel said conditions on board were intolerable. the duke and duchess of sussex have released two photographs to mark the christening of their baby boy. archie harrison mountbatten—windsor was baptised by the archbishop of canterbury in a private ceremony at windsor castle yesterday. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. sitting on his mother's lap in the green drawing room at windsor castle. archie mountbatten—windsor after a very private family christening. surrounded by the immediate members of his family, among whom were the two sisters of diana, princess of wales. jane fellows and sarah mccorquodale. a second photo showed archie just with his parents, and that was it.
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just the two images, underlining the determination of harry and meghan to draw as much privacy as possible around their son's life. but there are concerns that the principal members of a family that receive so much public money should be prepared for some scrutiny. it is a shame, everyone has come for the day and no—one gets to see them. i think they are entitled to their privacy. personally i think they should have been a bit more accessible. i think it is fine to be private, but it would be nice if they could have come out. as a father of five, the first instinct is to protect your children, so i understand that. archie harrison mountbatten—windsor, already at the heart of an argument about where the line on privacy should be drawn. the singer stevie wonder has made an announcement about his health at a gig in hyde park.
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iam going i am going to have a kidney transplant. in september of this year. applause iam all good, applause i am all good, i am all good. you get a sense of the gravity of the music rippling amongst the crowds. the singer will perform three more shows before the transplant operation in september and said he shared the news because he wanted to prevent rumours spreading about his health. it is about ten past eight in the morning. england "touched the hearts of the nation" according to head coach phil neville, but they could only finish fourth at the world cup after defeat by sweden. the team thought they'd secured an equalizer until the goal was disallowed after a controversial var decision. that word controversial and dar are
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glued together so often. with us now is annejohnson who plays for kidderminster harriers, and in london is kate dale from the women's sport trust. morning. give us a sense, because what has been striking about this tournament is how mainstream women's football has become. it is worth starting by retracing to what it used to be like, the experience for women players some years ago when the picture was just totally different. completely different. i first started to play 30 years ago and we did not have half the opportunities. it was not in the public eye and we do not have any role models. it was not normalfor girls to play football. there were situations where girls were told they could not play. yes, i was chosen for my primary school team andi chosen for my primary school team and i wasn't allowed to play because i was and i wasn't allowed to play because iwasa and i wasn't allowed to play because i was a girl. we went to a game and the other teacher at the school said
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no. girls couldn't play football. this was the situation with you. you we re this was the situation with you. you were told you are not allowed to play as a little girl. yes, dust did not play football when i was growing up. we weren't allowed to take part. how much do you think the game has changed? how much do you think the game has changed ? is how much do you think the game has changed? is it partly to do with funding orat changed? is it partly to do with funding or at the both? both absolutely. if you look across all the things that have been happening, the things that have been happening, the success of england has been a real committed fa plan and funding through sport england. it is making sure that girls and women have those opportunities. that is the crucial thing, and what happens now, building on the legacies of this past couple of weeks. money is essential but somehow making the most of this momentum and not allowing it to drift away. we have
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an opportunity to get more children and girls involved. the fa are doing and girls involved. the fa are doing a get involved scheme from the youngest children to ladies who may have played before. in bridgnorth we are doing a fa world cup scheme where girls aged five to 11 who have never played before in conjunction with regional sport can play football. it is amazing. we have had 14 football. it is amazing. we have had 1a girls every week you have never played before. if that could be replicated in every town in england, look at the increased opportunities and the effect on performance. look at the increased opportunities and the effect on performancem look at the increased opportunities and the effect on performance. it is about seeing these role models and heroes in your own society. it is easy to find yourself some world cup players to watch on the weekend. absolutely, and that is important. if you enjoyed watching the team you can go to the super league matches and take your children along to. it is really accessible and easy and
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cheaper to go to. we can all play a pa rt cheaper to go to. we can all play a part in keeping this going whether we are playing or watching. a big pa rt we are playing or watching. a big part is visibility because there has been a debate raging this summer contrasting the women's world cup with the cricket world cup which has been behind a pay wall, subscription tv versus something you can incidentally come across, whether you are a football fan or not and having that profile on prime time is important. the bbc has been amazing in giving women's football the audience it deserves. and the players, at the top level are accessible and willing to stay behind and talk. you feel you can relate to them and children can aspire to be them. they are not people who earn lots of money and are not like me or are you, that is the main thing for the girls.|j couldn't believe it. my dad called off on couldn't believe it. my dad called offona couldn't believe it. my dad called off on a phone call, he said, really sorry, the match is on, i have got
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to go. he has never watched football before, it is extraordinary to the amount of support. my point is the widespread levels of support here is interesting because perhaps for some people watching football might not necessarily be a football fans. people watching football might not necessarily be a football fanslj ee, necessarily be a football fanslj agree, there might football fans —— they might be football fans are now they might be football fans are now the including women in watching football. 0n the including women in watching football. on our estate we have had gathers to watch the women's football like we have always done with the men, and for me, and the girls in ourfamily, that is amazing and great for them. by the end of the tournament people aren't even saying the women's world cup, they arejust saying the women's world cup, they are just saying the world cup which tells you something about how mainstream it is getting. hopefully it is mainstream, that is the main word at the moment. thank you bill for coming on. —— thank you both for
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coming on. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. some of those women's world cup matches were played in france and what a challenge that was because they were playing in a record—breaking heat across france. for the match this afternoon i think we will have a lot of sunshine and temperatures in the high 20s but not the high 30s that some people had to endure. since hopefully some more favourable conditions. there is a cloudy scene back at home with a weather front setting to the south of the uk tying into this band of cloud. the front that is diving to the south is a cold front, trying to feed that thicker cloud into the west is a warm front. they are tied together but the whole thing will shift away south this morning and we
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will lose the rain we had first thing in the south—east. a bit more cloud feeding into the south—westerly and west wales. a keen northerly breeze affecting northern scotland and north—east of england, quite gusty winds and that will add to the cool feel here. 12 in aberdeen, in newcastle. all of us are into fresher air today. 22 is probably the high. a couple of showers across the pennines, one or two for lincolnshire and parts of east anglia. 0vernight, largely dry and quite chilly in a couple of rural spots. we were down below 2 degrees in northern ireland this morning. lots of sunshine to come on monday, more widespread if anything than today. essentially a fine day until the afternoon when that warm
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front comes into play for northern ireland thickening up the cloud and bringing outbreaks of rain. not especially heavy but greyer and wetter. the front starts to go into the uk, high pressure claims on in the uk, high pressure claims on in the south but for northern ireland, quite cloudy prospects but should the drier is the day goes by. some outbreaks of rain which could be heavy across the likes of cumbria and central parts of scotland. the average values are 16 — 22 in the south. the middle part of the week isa south. the middle part of the week is a showery outlook across the northern half of the uk. some possible lively showers on friday but stick with us because it looks better by next weekend if you are after some fair weather, the high pressure will return and some warmth. up to 25 in the south—east of england. just in time for the weekend.
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feels like in summary, british summer. it summer. it is 19 minutes past eight. there were feather boas, rainbows and plenty of glitter on the streets of london yesterday, as 1.5 million people turned out to watch britain's biggest ever pride event. many floats reflected 50 years since the first stonewall uprising in new york — which were a turning point 0ur lgbt correspondent ben hunte reports. politics, protest and one big party. pride came to london, and for many here it was a day like no other. this is believed to be the country's biggest pride event ever, with diversity the central theme. it is for everyone to be accepted as they are, isn't it, in the community and the world.
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we need to keep fighting to make sure we actually achieve equality and just acceptance. it is about making people more visible. a lot of good examples that i probably didn't have when i was young. 0rganisers estimate that more than 1.5 million people were on the streets of the capital to watch the parade today. with homophobic and transphobic attacks on the increase across the uk, some activists had called for this year's flagship pride event to return to its roots as a protest. however, for many of the attendees we spoke to today, they were just grateful to have the opportunity to be so visible and so proud. ben hunte, bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers.
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let's look at the front pages. many papers, including the daily telegraph, show a christening portrait of the royal baby archie on the lap of his mother, the duchess of sussex. even looking at the camera which is quite impressive. i wonder how many they took before they got this. it also leads on an interview with borisjohnson, who is a columnist on the paper, saying he is "not bluffing" about leaving the eu without a deal. the sunday times focuses on conflict within the labour party, claiming senior mps have demanded thatjeremy corbyn should sack his advisors as the row over anti—semitism and bullying continues. the observer reports on a ‘secret programme' set up by the home office to acquire the personal data of homeless people from charities, that could lead
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to them being deported. extraordinary story. and the sunday mirror welcomes the royal baby's debut showing the black and white image of the duke and duchess of sussex doting over their 8—week—old son. very sweet. and the digital marketing and technology expert dan sodergren is here to tell us what's caught his eye in the papers this morning. let's head to the observer, your first choice. this ongoing question about huawei, the chinese technology giantand about huawei, the chinese technology giant and the question about security. it is an interesting one, this because we have 5g coming in and huawei is going to be the biggest provider of this technology. because of certain people of the
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political establishment, they say we have to be careful of the chinese. we have to be more sensible because it is the infrastructure which is important. 5g has the potential to become the fourth industrial revolution, you can get at least 4000 devices from square kilometre on 4g, it could go up to a million. it could power industry. it is good we are planning on with it rather than being too worried about being fea rful of than being too worried about being fearful of the chinese because they do 80% of the technology anyway.“ you are in government and you do worry about this, because of the speed of the technological element and the increasing power of china, they are wary around the security concerns. i am not saying we should not be weary but we have to be realistic. this is happening anyway, it is not just realistic. this is happening anyway, it is notjust one operator and it is been happening 5—10 years. it is
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now a little bit to late. the industrial revolution should not be around oh no, they have already started manufacturing. they have been doing it for years. they have already started. that is perhaps not reassuring. they would say there is no connection between the government and the company. let's talk about the story in the sunday telegraph. these battle grounds being drawn on the fight for online buyers. this is cooperation and competition in one. it is a new trend because of the way that online is more important, it is 843% increase they are predicting in the next five years, about 11 billion it is worth, maybe more for online shopping. everyone is starting to join forces to try to get into this market and people like amazon and
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morrisons. it is still only 696 of the uk grocery market online and nobody has worked out how to make money from it. isn't it fascinating? this next leap will be more exciting for them because of express delivery. when you go into this new world of getting everything in an hour, that percentage will go up considerably but should we be doing that? i am a smidgen sceptical about everything being delivered in an hour. absolutely. what was that word, competition? yes. apparently fry ups are out as the army goes avocado. i had the worlds worst avocado. i had the worlds worst avocado toast the other day, it was avocado toast the other day, it was a floppy bread, green mash. so millennial it hurts!|j
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a floppy bread, green mash. so millennial it hurts! i cannot vouch for this particular thing but healthy is key. 57% of the army are considered to be overweight. the avocado moment, do not put it on toast because toast is high carb, a very millennial thing to say, but it is interesting they are having a battle against obesity in the army itself. they are taking this seriously. we might laugh about them changing their diet but it is key for them being effective. it does not mean it has to be avocado to be fair. it also includes a healthy smoothie. try a slice of lemon and chili fla kes. try a slice of lemon and chili flakes. absolutely, it is quite nice. we have got one more. your brain has
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no chance against a high—level computer, i think we all know that. this is great work by a chap in silicon valley who worked with google and other companies about how to make the internet more addictive. more addictive? exactly, he has begun advocating for how dangerous this is. i believe technology is a great thing but underneath it all, he says it is a race to the bottom of the brainstem and countries do not know they are doing it. it is not know they are doing it. it is not intentional, it is like fossil fuels, they do not know the side—effects but the government is going to look at this more. if you look at the technology, we could be doing things to next generations without thinking the consequences. it is so true. i was told i have to
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delete the twitter app from my phone. i do not know if it is the dopamine or whatever, but for no good reason, it is impossible for me to rationally justify good reason, it is impossible for me to rationallyjustify it, i am just faffing about. that is what they learnt about this, the design and schooling is an intended thing to mean your brain cannot unconsciously link from the two things. you cannot mindfully do it. you have to become digitally mindful and realise the positive side but realise they are designed to keep you on it for ever. maybe put a timer on it. there are apps for that that limit your screen time. you don't have to look at it when it is downloading. i will a lwa ys when it is downloading. i will always defend technology. you can turn your notifications off. that is
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willpower which i do not possess. the argument as they go around europe willpower. it is not you, it is the technology. put your notifications on and have the positive side of technology, not just the negative. thank you very much. the andrew marr programme is on later this morning at ten o'clock, and andrew is with us to tell us what's coming up. the labour party troubles are all over the front page, i am going by the shadow chancellor to talk about that and his tax plans. i'm joined by david gauke, thejustice secretary who rightly expect a beast sacked by the next conservative leader but he is talking about populist politicians poisoning the public conversation. no idea who he is talking about. i am having a rare interview with the chinese ambassador and a real star of classical music, all at ten o'clock. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and victoria fritz. here's a summary of this morning's main news. the white house has been described as "uniquely dysfunctional" and "inept" in leaked memos from the uk's ambassador in washington. sir kim darroch‘s not so private communications — which were obtained by the mail on sunday — describe president trump's administration as "insecure" and "incompetent". the foreign office says strong relations with the white house would not be damaged
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by the "mischievous" leak of the memos, but did not deny their accuracy. it's been revealed that the department of health is planning to spend £3 million on a service to transport medication, in the event of a no—deal brexit at the end of october. it wants to hire an "express freight service" to transport medicines, blood and transplant tissue. but experts have described the timeline for the contract as "tight". iran has announced it will break a limit set on uranium enrichment, in breach of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal. the country's deputy foreign minister said iran still wanted to salvage the deal but blamed european countries for failing to live up to their own commitments. the us unilaterally withdrew from the agreement in 2018. it has since reimposed strict sanctions on iran. the home secretary, sajid javid, has thrown his weight behind borisjohnson to be the next prime minister. mrjavid, who was eliminated from
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the leadership contest last month, is the most senior cabinet member to endorse mrjohnson, saying he was "better placed" thanjeremy hunt to "deliver what we need to do at this critical time". more protests are expected in hong kong today as the row over china's control of the region continues. last week activists stormed the parliament building to oppose a controversial bill which allows extradition to china from hong kong. china has already issued a sharp rebuke to the uk over its support for pro—democracy campaigners, warning britain not to "interfere in its domestic affairs". an explosion from a suspected gas leak ripped through a shopping mall in florida injuring 21 people. debris was sent flying across the car park of the fountain plaza shopping centre in plantation, which is about 30 miles north of miami. the blast could be heard several miles away.
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it's not yet known what caused the explosion. 41 migrants on board a rescue ship that docked at an italian port without official permission have now disembarked. the ship landed yesterday on the island of lampedusa, which is north of libya, even though italy's far—right interior minister had warned it to stay away. the charity that chartered the vessel said conditions on board were intolerable. more than 1.5 million people lined the streets of london yesterday as part of britain's biggest ever pride event. it was an all—singing, all—dancing carnival of colour with 30,000 people from all parts of the lgbt community taking part in the parade. quite some costumes. this year's event marked 50 years since the first stonewall riots in new york — which were a turning point in the gay rights movement. the duke and duchess of sussex have released two photographs to mark the christening of their baby boy.
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archie harrison mountbatten—windsor was baptised by the archbishop of canterbury in a private ceremony at windsor castle yesterday. the royal couple opted to exclude the press and the public from the day and chose not to reveal the names of archie's godparents. a cayman islands sea turtle who was destined to end up as soup has been rescued and is now living in blackpool. the large creature, called phoenix, weighs in at a hefty 19 stone and was brought to the uk as part of the sea life centre's protection programme. turtle numbers are dwindling around the world due to threats like breeding for the food industry and industrialfishing. what do they do with the shell for soup? croutons! i hope not. horrible. who could eat phoenix? you could make quite a few bowls.
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those are the main stories, bringing you all the breaking news on bbc brea kfast. you all the breaking news on bbc breakfast. good to find out the name, if you hours ago we didn't know it was called phoenix. we have improved human knowledge by discovering that. andy murray and serena williams both clearly happy about the terrible news. big fans. interesting to see them smiling. this is the kind of game, doubles, if you are an amateur tennis player, you tend to enjoy the game most when you play doubles. great to see two legends in the sport enjoying mixed doubles come in the way that many of us would play it, incredibly badly on a daily basis. they have become #serandy and they have a win under their belt. johanna konta came from a set down
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to beat sloane stephens and reach the fourth round. she'll play the sixth seed and two time fomrer champion petra kvitova tomorrow in the last 16. harriet dart and dan evans both lost in the singles. you can see all the highlights on the bbc sport webiste. well phil neville didn't particularly enjoy it, calling england's third place playoff at the world cup ‘nonsense' and the players were pretty crestfallen afterwards too. they lost to sweden in nice after going 2—0 down in the first 22 minutes sofia jakobsson getting the second. england rallied later in the first half and got a goal thanks to fran kirby. and their comeback would have been complete were it not for another intervention from the var. just like in the semi—final against the usa, ellen white thought she'd scored an equaliser. but replays showed she'd handled the ball in the build up. it finished 2—1. i just think maybe there was a carry on from the emotion. and the two goals, actually, probably sparked us into a bit of life.
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after that, i don't think i've seen us play better after that, after that first 20 minutes. i thought the courage to keep going forward, the energy at the end, both teams were on their knees, to be fair. they gave everything. we gave it our best shot, we fell short. and we've just got to make sure next time we're better. the final of the women's world cup takes place tonight in lyon between the usa and the netherlands. it's been a hugely successful tournament. but who will eventually walk away as the winning team? 0ur sports correspondent katie gornall is there for us. morning katie. most of us watching, not least the usa, think that the usa are overwhelming favourites for the match this afternoon? well, they absolutely are. they just seem match this afternoon? well, they absolutely are. theyjust seem like absolutely are. theyjust seem like a team that is built to win. they are the most successful country in women's football. they have won the world cup three times, they have won 0lympic world cup three times, they have won olympic gold four times, they have an incredible self—confidence that comes with winning. at times, they have been accused of arrogance. but whatever you think of this usa team,
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you have to you just admire their will to win. you have to admit that they really have done it the hard way in getting to this final the women's world cup. they overcame spain, a very gritty game. they beat the hosts and knocked out england as well. the team ranked third in the world were meant to push them further than they have been pushed. that is why they will be overwhelming favourites for this game. they've got alex morgan on six goals, she is chasing the golden boot. news for them yesterday with megan rapinoe saying that she expects to be fit for the final, recovering from a hamstring strain. she has been the star forward recovering from a hamstring strain. she has been the starforward on recovering from a hamstring strain. she has been the star forward on and off the pitch. she gave a press conference yesterday that was packed to the raft to live at the rafters, she is so outspoken and colourful, she is so outspoken and colourful, she doesn't shy away from questions, she doesn't shy away from questions, she was singing at one point, there we re she was singing at one point, there were tears, she took a swipe at fifa a couple of times and she also said even though she has been there and done it before the us, she still get a real sense of excitement about being ina a real sense of excitement about being in a final. i'm like a kid in
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a candy store right now. this is the absolute best stage i can feel already more anxious and nervous than the other games. you know, looking around and seeing my team—mates, that kind of excitement, anxious, focus that you have to have in these moments. quite the task for their opponents, katie. the netherlands, they have a winning habit as well. they are the european champions? yes, they are the european champions. they one of the euros two years ago, knocking out england on the way to that title in their home country. the interesting thing about the netherlands as they very nearly didn't make it to the world cup. they struggled in qualifying, and they had to do so through a play—off. there is an argument that perhaps they haven't really brought their best football to this tournament, they haven't played in the same way as they did at the euros two years ago. they are also sweating on the fitness of one of their star players, martins, the
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former ballon d'or winner. we don't know if she is going to be fit for the final. a number of reasons why the final. a number of reasons why the odds are stacked against the netherlands. there is an interesting subplot, there will be two female coachesin subplot, there will be two female coaches in the dugout this evening, jill ellis for the usa, and also for the netherlands. and when she led the netherlands. and when she led the netherlands. and when she led the netherlands to the european championship, she won coach of the year that year. i think if you pulled off what would be an incredible upset tonight, i think we are going to see she would win that award again. it's been incredible. for now, thank you very much indeed. you can watch it on bbc one at four o'clock. england are going to play australia in the semi—finals of the cricket world cup — that's after two positions changed following the final round of games in the group stage. australia lost to south africa by 10 runs at old trafford. that means that australia finished second in the final standings and therefore play third—placed england at edgbaston on thursday in a match the aussie captain aaron finch says will be a blockbuster.
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india meanwhile will play new zealand at old trafford on tuesday after they thrashed sri lanka to finish top of the table. rohit sharma became the first man to score five centuries in a world cup, as india won by seven wickets. there was an eventful start to geraint thomas' defence of his tour de france title in belgium. the briton collided with barriers on the right side of the road a mile from the end of the opening stage in brussels. he was able to get to the finish where he said he was fine. mike teunissen beat peter sagan in a photo finish to become the first dutchman for 30 years to claim the leader's yellow jersey. and finally lionel messi has been sent off for only the second time in his career. the first was on his international debut. that was 14 years ago as an 18—year—old. last night he was also shown a red card playing for argentina in their third place playoff at the copa america. this was in the first half of the game against chile. a confrontation with gary medel. they were both sent off although it looked like one was doing more
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pushing than the other. they even checked it via the var. still messi was sent off. afterwards he claimed argentina were the victims of corruption is promised, i don't know what your saturday night tv watching habits are. but i doubt it very often includes mixed doubles tennis. andy murray and serena williams teamed up for the first time on centre court and the all—star partnership has played one, won one. i'm ready, i'm excited, but i'm definitely nervous. the most famous mixed doubles pairing in wimbledon history. serena, get up! she didn't want to get in the way. andy murray was working back there. and the murray—williams show is under way. and for andy murray, a successful return to the centre court. we can discuss this with andy murray's good friend, and former davis cup team mate,
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colin fleming who joins us live from wimbledon. the first thing we should talk about is how pleased you must be that doubles, mixed doubles is on tv, on prime time, on saturday night. i don't know if you are planning to watch casualty or something, but andy murray and serena williams instead ? andy murray and serena williams instead? absolutely brilliant. i think doubles and mixed doubles in particular is so unique. mixed doubles is only really played at the grand slam and the olympics. and i think everyone saw how exciting and dynamic a discipline of the sport it is. so much fun as well, which is exactly what andy and serena had. didn't they play so well?|j exactly what andy and serena had. didn't they play so well? i was going to ask you the difference between singles and doubles. i guess thatis between singles and doubles. i guess that is a rather stupid question, given the obvious answer. beyond the obvious fact that there are two people on either side, give us a sense of how different a game it is from singles tennis. well, very,
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very different, in that straightaway you are not just very different, in that straightaway you are notjust worrying about yourself, you've got to think of yourself, you've got to think of your partner, keeping their energy high. we are used to seeing andy murray playing singles in drawn—out rallies, he is serving and volleying, about the net. serena had a couple of amazing reactions last night ina a couple of amazing reactions last night in a match, where the ball was coming so quick at her, able to fend her off four winners. they are being tested outside of their comfort zone, that is what it is so great to see, two of the all—time great players coming together out of their comfort zone, having fun with it and ultimately playing really good mixed doubles. it was a strong start to their campaign. really interesting, they looked pretty intuitive with each other. a lot of it is the relationship between the two. how do they rate the relationship between andy murray and serena?” they rate the relationship between andy murray and serena? i was very impressed with the team chemistry, considering it was their first match together. neither have played a whole lot of mixed doubles and careers. andy won the silver medal
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here in 2012, the london olympics. serena has won the mixed doubles here in 1998. they have not played a lot of mixed doubles. i thought they hit the ground running. knowing andy, he leaves no stone unturned and we know that from his singles career. it's the same for the doubles and mixed doubles, analysing his opponents, he will have spoken to serena a lot, discussing tactics, how they want to play. i think it was a really strong start. if they can keep progressing, get through a match, they will just can keep progressing, get through a match, they willjust get better and better. i am sure a lot of teams will want to play them from in excitement and spectacle point of view, but not for their chances of progressing, because they were so impressive last night. given the fa ct impressive last night. given the fact it is a specialised skill, we saw andy murray going out of the men's doubles earlier in the day, what are the expectations of progressing? how good can they be, can they even win the competition? yeah, dare to dream. they played really, really well. the one thing and serena got is that they are used
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to winning on the big stage. when it comes to key moments, they raise their level and play their best tennis. it only gets harder. they now face seeds in the next round, the 14th seeds. but that team have had a bye, so they've not played a match yet. maybe that benefits andy and serena, the fact they have had a match and know what to expect. also, jamie murray coming through with his partner, bethanie mattek—sands. they are unseeded because she had an injury. they are in the other half of the draw. let's see how that progresses. maybe we will get a dream mali final at wimbledon? but a lot of tennis to be played and good players to be beaten before that can happen. give us an insight into how pairings come about in doubles, how people end up being coupled up in doubles in order to try and work out if they can work together. as we have been saying, there is the dynamic between two human beings, as well as two tennis players. you are
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absolutely right. i think andy's quest for a mixed doubles partner bought it into the spotlight, how difficult it can be at times. i think he spoke to ashleigh barty, the recent open champion, then you number one. got a knock back there that was probably tough to take. and thought, do i want to go through this process of finding a partner? i guess he asks different people. at the level they are operating at, i am sure the management companies involved are having discussions. coming down to a personal level, it is about having a chat and seeing if we wa nt is about having a chat and seeing if we want to play, first and foremost, see if we are matching up together in ourgames and see if we are matching up together in our games and also in our personalities. i think last night was really encouraging in both aspects. they seem to get on great and really enjoy being on the court with each other. supporting each other. i thought the game is matched up other. i thought the game is matched up really well. also, serena on the deuce court, hitting returns at mach
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three. and andy are so tactically astute. the combination was really good. colin, thank you very much indeed. colin fleming at wimbledon, we should probably say that aspect of the partnership being brought about perhaps by management companies, having a conversation, let's not be too cynical at this point. but it is interesting that we are focusing a great deal on this pair. that will do them no harm. sign up go the other thing i noticed that you've got to perfect in doubles is crouching like this when the person behind you is about to send one down at 100 and something miles per hour. indeed a significant tactic. shall we get the weather? here is susan. i will not crouch for the forecast, it looks all right for most of us. it isa it looks all right for most of us. it is a slow start if you're waiting for sunshine across southern england. we have a weather front in place, clouding up the skies across cornwall, and that band sits all the way across into the south—east. there is some rain around first
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thing this morning. it will be clearing off into the continent as the front drifts away from us. blue triangles on the front, cold weather front. the air behind it is not especially cold. cool, certainly cooler than it was yesterday in southern counties of england. yesterday we got up to 26 degrees. today we will probably sit in the lower 20s. a bit more cloud to the afternoon, drifting back into the south—west of england and wales. elsewhere, lots of sunny spells. quite a nagging, northerly breeze for northern scotland on down the north sea coast, even more cloud here. come the afternoon, if you showers are possible for scotland and across northern england, particularly for the pennines, may be down the north sea coast. 15 degrees in newcastle, feeling quite cool in the breeze. through the evening and overnight, a largely dry picture. perhaps an evening shower for lincolnshire and parts of east anglia. quite chilly and some of the scottish glens coming to the small hours of monday. 0vernight lows of just two three degrees. chilly enough for a touch of frost. we got
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below two in northern ireland this morning. lots of sunshine to get the new week under way. but more cloud arriving into northern ireland, through monday morning. we will start to yield some rain by the afternoon. so, grab the brolly on the way out, because you will need it later in the day. top temperatures for monday, 16 in aberdeen, more in the way of sunshine, up to 17 in newcastle, 22 or 23 across southern counties of england. monday and into tuesday, this front comes into play a little bit more. it topples into scotland and northern england. there will be some rain around here. high pressure clings on to the south. a little more cloud around at times. dry for the majority of england and wales, just northern england were thick cloud, rain at times. scotland seeing some heavy rain through the central belt on and off. northern ireland is drier come the afternoon. looking towards the middle of the week, weather prospects are quite showery across scotland and northern ireland, and then the end of the week, potentially, some quite hefty
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showers. at the moment it is quite ha rd to showers. at the moment it is quite hard to pin down exactly where, just about anywhere, which could see some disruption for wimbledon. looks like we are in the clear again come finals weekend is high pressure builds across the uk. sunny spells for most of us in temperatures back into the mid 20s. not bad news. thanks very much. more and more of us are living the single life — around 16 million people in the uk are currently not in a relationship — but what does it mean to be single today? well research shows it could mean being happier, healthier and more successful than the married population. 0ur reporter graham satchell has been taking a look at the issue. an amble through the countryside in kent organised by a group called weekday walks. some here are not in a relationship. andrew davidson, for example, has been single all his life. for me, it suits me. you're your own boss, your own ceo. you can get up when you want to,
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you can sleep with your cat if you want to. you know, financially i think it is cheaper. i don't feel lonely, i have plenty of close friends and i enjoy my life. being single has been stigmatised and stereotyped as sad, lonely, miserable. but more and more studies are now showing the opposite is true. the latest research from the hebrew university ofjerusalem shows single people are more social and better at staying in touch with friends, are better educated, get greater satisfaction from theirjobs, eat more healthily and are less lonely in old age. the single most important factor of happiness and well—being is not whether you are married and not whether you have a family or not, a nuclear, traditional family, it's the number of friendships you have and the richness of those friendships. a park in north london.
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paige, rebecca and joanne are all single. i think it's getting to a time where it's ok to be single and you canjust be happy with yourself. go back a few years and there was a lot of pressure from the media that you need to get coupled up, married and whatever really quickly. it's not like, oh, you're single, you're going to die alone now. it's more fun being single, and you can do whatever you want to do. i think that's the best thing, from my point of view. if you're on your own, you really have to ask yourself what do i want to do? what do i enjoy? and i think it helps you know yourself better. more than a third of the adult population in the uk, 16 million people, are now single and numbers are rising. experts say government policy on things like tax and housing designed to support marriage and families will have to evolve as more and more people choose to live a fulfilled life not in a relationship.
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such an interesting topic. let's discuss it for the next five minutes. we're joined now by the comedian sadia azmat and the artist and activist florence given to talk more about this. good morning to you both. it is such an interesting topic, as i say, not least because there is sometimes a societal expectation that being single is a temporary thing. as opposed to something somebody might be entirely happy with, they don't wa nt to be entirely happy with, they don't want to change their life. there is definitely a narrative, especially for women in particular, that we are the last ones on the shelf, or people definitely view being single as this temporary state, where you are in waiting, and i think once... it is all about perspective. i think if you realise you are single by choice, may you turn some people down, it can be more empowering. if you view it as something... i met a girl ina you view it as something... i met a girl in a bar last night and she said to me, you know, i don't enjoy being single, i've been single for three years. i said, i don't view
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thatis three years. i said, i don't view that is something sad, i view it as something where you are single because you are choosing to be single, you're choosing not to settle for less than you deserve. it's so powerful when you look at it in that way. it could be three years of avoiding bad relationships. exactly, it's just perspective. there are 70 strands to this. picking up on your opening remark about the kind of language that exists around this, on the shelf, plenty more fish in the sea, that kind of stuff. it really plays into this and shapes people's prejudices. i think dating has changed quite a bit, with the internet dating and stuff, because we used to have arranged marriage, now we can arranged marriage, now we can arrange your own marriage on tinder and stuff. if only for the night. 0ne and stuff. if only for the night. one night stands and stuff. i'm not on dating apps, i'm not actively pursuing andi on dating apps, i'm not actively pursuing and i think i am quite happy being single. during the documentary that will come out next sunday, it made me feel comfortable you can own it. might not be on
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tinder. but you know. just because you're single, doesn't mean you're not desirable or attractive, all of things. it was touched upon at the end of the report, the economics of being single as well, single room supplements and all that kind of stuff. it comes back to that cultural thing, society expects people are going to be coupled up. plenty of people aren't, and yet single people can get hammered. the thing about being single is that the world is built for couples. there are certain advantages that come with marriages. like you said, definitely a lot cheaper to be in a relationship. but i definitely think more women are becoming single because of our new—found financial security. in 1975, we weren't allowed to get a bank account without the permission of a man. we couldn't buy property without our father's permission. now we can buy property, set up a business with a
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click of the button on the internet, do all these things. we are now thinking, i don't have to marriage to find that security and i can get it myself. i think women choosing to be single is a sign of progress. sadia, bringing you back in, you are a comedian, observational humour, and you are living life as a british asian, a british muslim, a british muslim single woman, what are your observations there?” muslim single woman, what are your observations there? i think things need to change a little bit more, because when i did the documentary, the single friendly church, i think in the christian community there is a bit more acceptance that a lot of the patrons are single. there are so many people that are single for other reasons. i think we are slowly getting there. but i think there is a lot more work to do in the community to address that there are more women that are single, last man to go around. it's ok for us to be single if that is what life has dealt us. i wasjust inking back to the language thing and how pervasive it is. the whole half thing. the
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idea of being half of someone. that is actually really demeaning.“ idea of being half of someone. that is actually really demeaning. it is woven into society. we see it in disney princess movies. all i knew growing up is that one day i would get married and have kids. that is amazing. that is what you want to do, genuinely, fine. but it is stripping back if that is what you wa nt stripping back if that is what you want all that is what you have been told to want. it takes a while to get there. ijust told to want. it takes a while to get there. i just want there to be an alternative narrative that shows women that there are many ways you can live your life and many ways you can live your life and many ways you can thrive outside of these two emblems of success, marriage and kids. it's really important. relationship is only one aspect of your existence. thank you so much, it is really interesting. you realise how pervasive the languages, you don't notice it is so prevailing. thank you for coming in. for the next week the bbc‘s faith
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in the world week will be celebrating the theme of being single, with programmes and features across bbc radio two and bbc local radio. that's all from us today. dan and louise will be back with you tomorrow. goodbye.
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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines at nine. leaked emails from the british ambassador to washington describe president trump's administration as "in ' ' and "incompetent". iran says it has breached another condition of its 2015 international nuclear agreement. ministers are to spend three million pounds on a service to transport medication, in the event of a no—deal brexit at the end of october. greece is going to the polls to elect a new parliament, with opinion polls suggesting defeat for the left—wing government. a dream start for the pairing of andy murray and serena williams in the mixed doubles — as they delight wimbledon's centre court crowd with a straight sets victory.

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