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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  July 5, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, annita mcveigh. —— with me, carrie gracie. the headlines: jaguar land rover pumps hundreds of millions into their west midlands plant — where a new electric car will be produced, securing thousands of jobs. downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from borisjohnson when theressa may made him foreign secretary. five former police chiefs warn that the public has lost confidence in the police — and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness. everywhere wheeler, a blank where she should be —— we look. families of the victims in the boeing ethiopia air crash demand to know why the 737 max was allowed to fly. in pioneering surgery,
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nerves inside paralysed people's bodies are rewired to give movement to their arms and hands. and after his victory in the men's doubles at wimbledon last night, andy murray is back in action in the mixed doubles today — this time with serena wiliams. good morning, and welcome to the bbc news at nine. the british car manufacturer jaguar land rover has announced it is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. it's a boost to the industry after a series of setbacks in recent months. initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure the jobs of 2,700
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workers at the plant. the business secretary greg clark said the announcement was a vote of confidence in the uk automotive industry protecting thousands of skilled jobs at castle bromwich. let's get more on this now from theo leggett, our business correspondent who's atjlr's castle bromwich plant for us. hugely good news morning for them? it isa hugely good news morning for them? it is a massive morning for people working at castle bromwich. i was talking to some as they filed out of the assembly line into the hole where the chief executive was making his statement, they said morale has been at rob wotton for months. they we re been at rob wotton for months. they were worried with the end of the old xj programme the factory would have much less reason to exist. it might have been mothballed or shutdown, they were worried about their jobs. the announcement today says the plant has a future and that the
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future is working on electric cars, which many in the industry believe is the direction the industry will have to go in. some critics outside suggest thatj lr are a bit late to this party? there is an element to that. if you look at other major manufacturers, particularly volkswagen in germany, they are investing billions in electric cars and have a number of different models in the pipeline. so far jaguar land rover has one electric car made in austria, the xj will be the first one made in the uk. jaguar land rover says it has big ambitions and it needs government support so things like batteries can be built in britain in future as well. at the moment, components for batteries, even though they will be assembled forjaguar not farfrom even though they will be assembled for jaguar not far from here, even though they will be assembled forjaguar not farfrom here, the components are brought from asia, so the company says more government support and effort is needed to
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build biggerfactories support and effort is needed to build bigger factories that could make huge amounts of batteries for the entire industry, they could be made for britain. —— in britain. provides what about the brexit argument, there have been mutterings fromjlr argument, there have been mutterings from jlr suggesting a hard or no—deal brexit would be difficult for the automotive industry. some enthusiastic brexiteers would say clearly not by the actions today? the chief executive of jaguar land rover, it has been more than mutterings from him. he has suggested that entire industries could be wiped out if there were to bea could be wiped out if there were to be a hard brexit. today's announcement seems to fly in the face of that. i am hearing from people within jaguar face of that. i am hearing from people withinjaguar land rover that the timing is dictated by the mechanics of the industry, project cycles. if j lr wa nts mechanics of the industry, project cycles. ifjlr wants to get an electric vehicle on the moment in the next couple of years when lots of other electric cars will be
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coming on the market as well, it needs to started now, and in that context brexit, they say, is almost irrelevant. the heart of their business is here in the uk, in the west midlands, lots of the supply chain is here so they decided to make a decision and they are going ahead. we will do lots more on this later, but, for now, thank you so much. five former heads of scotland yard have warned there is a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness and the public has lost confidence in the police. it's being blamed on the amount of knife and drug crime. in a letter to the times newspaper, the former police chiefs say that resources are at dangerously low levels. the home office says, police funding has increased by more than £1 billion this year and there are plans to recruit more than 3,500 extra officers and staff. our home affairs correspondent ben ando sent this update from new scotland yard.
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the letter was signed by five former commissioners of the metropolitan police, covering apb from 1993 to 2017, when cressida dick, he was doing thejob now, took over. if they become victims of crime they feel their chances of getting a resolution precariously low, they say these problems have been caused notjust by 30,000 cuts in police and police staff numbers but also because of what they say is lawful police techniques like stop and search being undermined, particularly, i suppose, by politicians. the second part of the latter is a question of what we do about this, they don't believe the current structure of 43 different forces in england and wales is equipped to make the kind of changes needed to police britain in the 21st—century and they suggest the possibility of
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and they suggest the possibility of a royal commission to examine all sorts of different ways that the police might be organised to be more functional and successful and to restore public confidence going forward. in response, the home 0ffice forward. in response, the home office has said we are spending 1 billion p on the police this year, recruiting 3500 new police officers and talking to police leaders about ways to use technology and efficiency to be better at giving thejob we are efficiency to be better at giving the job we are doing. it seems likely that this is a debate that will run and run. bbc news has learned that downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from borisjohnson when theresa may made him foreign secretary three years ago. the move caused concern among senior intelligence officials, who were worried he could approve operations without being given all the relevant information. a source close to mrjohnson insisted he'd seen everything he needed to see. 0ur security corresondent gordon correra reports. after he was appointed foreign secretary in july 2016, downing street tried to limit
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borisjohnson's access to some secret intelligence, according to multiple sources with direct knowledge of events. one person attributed the attempt primarily to what they called "control frea kery" by number ten, rather than simply concerns over mrjohnson's discipline. a source close to mrjohnson denied there was any row about access, and said he saw everything he needed to see from his first day as foreign secretary. officials had concerns about the attempt to withhold material, the bbc understands. they took legal advice as to whether they could sustain a position in which the foreign secretary, as minister with day—to—day responsibility for m16 and gchq, could authorise operations for which he might not be shown the intelligence material that was produced. one source said that excluding the foreign secretary would have been unprecedented. in the end, a compromise is believed to have been agreed. both the foreign office and number ten said they did not comment on intelligence matters.
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back to that in a moment. researchers have warned that the number of cars on the road will have to be reduced, even when all vehicles are powered by clean electricity. the report, from the centre for research into energy demand solutions, says that electrifying all cars will do nothing to address trafficjams, urban sprawl and obesity. it calls on the government to devise a strategy that will eliminate the need to own a car. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin has more. cars create local air pollution. they are overheating the planet. the clean electric car will solve our problems, the government thinks. but wait a minute. in many city streets, car charging is a tangled obstacle. and not ideal if you can't get a spot outside your house. the report says targets for electrifying the car fleet may
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be very hard to meet. meanwhile, congestion won't be solved by electric cars either. in fact, self—drive electric vehicles could even make jams worse, as people choose to live further and further from the office. the key message is that we need to reduce energy demand in transport by reducing the amount of use of private cars, and by using other forms of transport to substitute for that — so public transport, safe cycling and walking, access to a car through sharing facilities. the government says it is investing and getting people walking and cycling, but critics say that is dwarfed by road—building. we do need technical innovation, the report says, but the innovation needs to help people whether they have a car or not. let's get more on this now from professorjillian anable, who's co—author of the report
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and chair in transport and energy in the institute for transport studies at the university of leeds. good morning. what are the key points for you? they have been ca ptu red points for you? they have been captured very well by your correspondence, roger harrabin, that we really cannot rely on electric vehicles to solve our transport problems. unfortunately we can't rely on electric vehicles to solve the key problems around the environment, around climate change, they will not happen quickly enough, u nfortu nately, they will not happen quickly enough, unfortunately, and also air quality, they are clearly much better for air quality but not zero impact. that is because of the admissions from bra kes because of the admissions from brakes and tyres. a lot other problems in transport, congestion, people relying on their cars which is contributing to an obesity epidemic, at quarter of households don't have any cars and, for then,
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where we don't invest in the alternatives, it gets worse and worse. i suppose the government would say it is investing in alternatives and would point out that some people absolutely need their cars, essentially because they live in the countryside or areas without good public transport networks? we accept that argument, we are not suggesting that the car will go away, that everybody needs to live without a car, that would be silly, but in this report we are trying to suggest that what seems to bea trying to suggest that what seems to be a very, very large emphasis on electric vehicles at the moment, there are pockets of investment and other alternatives but we don't have a national transport strategy, we don't have a strategy which says this is what we need to do to fix all the problems in the transport sector and so we all the problems in the transport sector and so we are all the problems in the transport sector and so we are trying to warn against the over reliance on electric vehicles. if you had a pot
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of money from the transport strategy that the government is spending, what would be your top priority for spending? one of the things that needs to be done is to accept the principle that we need to limit traffic growth, we need to push on the introduction of electric vehicles but sake that is great but we can't allow traffic to keep on rising, we need to say that first and have this basic principle, then we need to spend the money particularly in urban areas, not just large cities but in medium—sized towns, on public transport. we have had a severe decline in local bus provision in recent yea rs, decline in local bus provision in recent years, local authorities in their drive to have to cut their expenditure have had to cut the subsidise lines for bus travel and lots of people have been really cut short by that, so we need to
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reinvest in public transport. and where buses are not the answer, because they are not the answer everywhere, we can try to encourage using our cars much more efficiently. if you think about it, because of stationery for huge amounts of hours per day, 90% of their lifetime they are sitting stationery, which is a huge waste of resource. sophie can encourage people to share their vehicles, there are lots of platforms emerging to say you do not need to own a car, you can share it with friends and family, there are lots of cars running around with one person in eight all the time, there is lots of inefficiency which is wasting a lot of money for us all and we can make better use of that, so we would like a concerted effort and what we call car clu bs a concerted effort and what we call car clubs where you can hire as you
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go acre, they are emerging but not quickly enough. underinvestment in public transport. professorjillian anable, so much. back to the story but downing street tried to withhold some information from borisjohnson tried to withhold some information from boris johnson one tried to withhold some information from borisjohnson one theresa may maytin foreign secretary three is a go. gordon corera, what are the key points in this for you? when boris johnson was appointed foreign secretary, i understand he was not shown some, and it is a very small subset, of secret into. this caused some problems. i cheats because he is the day to day pulse, the prime minister is ultimately responsible forforeign intelligence minister is ultimately responsible for foreign intelligence and security but the foreign secretary signs off on warrants and authorises operation, he or she is meant to do that based on balancing the risks
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and rewards of any operation. if potentially he did not see everything produced, that could be a problem. so i understand there was a discussion with the government and concerns within the intelligence agencies about this. concerns within the intelligence agencies about thislj concerns within the intelligence agencies about this. i am a little puzzled as to the cause. the sun has a quote from somebody saying boris was a loud mouth and theresa may was a control freak and you have the worst of both personalities? one source said control freak riyadh number ten was the primary cause, they thought, but others said it was a mix and there was concern about mr johnson's record of being able to keep secrets and be disciplined, going back a while. and there was the personal hostility between theresa may and borisjohnson, which i think explains a lot of it, the lack of trust between those two individuals and then security and intelligence being drawn into that tension. number ten says it will not comment on intelligence matters and
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a source close to borisjohnson denies any row and says he saw everything he needed to from day one. the vice so everyone is saying nothing to see here and it is an historical problem, it is nothing signalling from any quarter that this prime minister, potential primary stick—on is a security risk? people have suggested is this a politically planted story. it has not come come from people with an axe to grind about borisjohnson, some people may say that budget has not come from that direction. but it gets to the question of dysfunction, trust and relationships, including national security. the headlines on bbc news... jaguar landrover is to investing hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. bbc news has learned that downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from borisjohnson when theressa may made him foreign secretary three years ago.
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five former heads of the scotland yard have warned that the public has lost confidence in the police, and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness. andy murray has returned to wimbledon with a bang. a former world number one and his partner pierre—hugues herbert thrilled the home fans in a late—night comeback in the first round of the men's doubles. additional one konta book to place on the third round of the women's singles, beating katerina siniakova, harriet dart and dan evans also their places. england lose the second one day of the women's ashes in leicester. i will be with you at 9:40am. china's then. -- join be with you at 9:40am. china's then. ——join us be with you at 9:40am. china's then. —— join us then.
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the bbc has uncovered disturbing evidence that muslim children in china's xinjiang region are being systematically separated from their families and placed in secure state schools. official documents reveal large numbers of boarding schools have been built — housing children as young as two. critics of china's government say it's a deliberate policy, targeting children from the minority uighur population, to cut them off from their own communities. 0ur china correspondentjohn sudworth has this exclusive report. in account after account, gathered in a meeting hall in istanbul, muslims from xinjiang speak again and again of the immeasurable grief of separation from their children. who is looking after the children? back home, china has been sweeping xinjiang's uighurs,
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kazakhs and other minorities who have their own languages and culture, into giant camps where they are taught chinese and to love the communist party. abdurahman tohti moved to turkey in 2013. three years ago his wife and children went back to xinjiang for a short trip and vanished. but then he found this — a video posted online of his son in a boarding school, speaking not in uighur, his mother tongue, but in chinese. alongside the camps, china has been building something else. giant new schools, many
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with huge dormitories. this kindergarten sleeps hundreds. we film at one camp. while the adults are kept here, their children are in this nearby school. and this kindergarten has barbed wire, cameras and signs that say, only chinese should be spoken. chinese officials deny the adult detention camps have left large numbers of children without anyone to look after them. but such cases are not hard to find. amine wayit, who now runs a clothes shop in turkey, recently found this picture of her stepdaughter on social media.
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it's a sign her close relatives are in the camps, her stepdaughter in a boarding school and wearing traditional chinese costume. if you could send a message to her today, what would you tell her? research of online documents commissioned by the bbc show is only an 8% increase in kindergarten places for china as a whole, but in xinjiang, as the camps have been built, there's been an 82% jump, and in some uighur majority areas numbers have shot up even further. the xinjiang government is attempting to get full control over the young generation, to literally raise a new generation that has been cut off from original roots, from religious beliefs,
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from cultural knowledge, even from their own language. i believe the evidence really points what we must call cultural genocide. kalida akytkankyzy has moved to kazakhstan but when she heard that the chinese camps had left her 1a grandchildren without parents she phoned the village official. we try to look for her missing relatives. the family home is locked and deserted. we call the village official. but he hangs up on us too. we find only the signs of a giant vanishing and the shattering of countless families.
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john sudworth, bbc news, xinjiang. johnjoins us from beijing. an extraordinary bit of reporting. absolutely heartbreaking. it is hard to see the reason for those people to see the reason for those people to have hope? it has long been known that if china has been locking up hundreds of thousands of uighurs and adults than there must be an impact on wider society and children in particular. i think our report has quantified that, has shown the true traumatic impact, at least as much as we could. the idea behind the
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aduu as we could. the idea behind the adult pants, it has been well documented, it is the idea of thought transformation, that china, in its drive, it says, to the extreme of five xinjiang's muslim population is trying to bend them closer to the chinese ideal. —— in its quest to de—extremify xinjiang's muslim population. and it seems that they are now trying to do that with children, to bring children to the kind of schools where the state has control over ideology, thinking, loyalty, and clearly the intention is to re—engineer uighur society. the visor puts those parents in an impossible position, they can choose to stay in excel, know their
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children are growing up in effective detention or they can go back and then they will be moved into detention and will still not see their children, there are no good choices for them. it is truly an impossible situation. after reports of —— have been added over the last few hours, seven people have asked why those parents have left their children. let some people have asked. there are deep and long—standing connection between xinjiang and turkey, xinjiang's muslims share culture and language routes with people in turkey. these people had left children in the care ofa people had left children in the care of a husband or wife, intending to make a temporary visit of a few weeks also as the camps began and suddenly found themselves cut off with this dreadful choice. to go back mean certain detention, but to stay where they are, they watch
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helplessly as whole extended families disappear into the camps and they lose contact with their children too. that raises questions about what the world is doing, you are doing yourjob in reporting on edge, the academic in your report was talking about cultural genocide, doing academic work, but what about governance? normally you would expect other governments to really shout about it, particularly muslim governments seeing it is very much muslims being targeted ?m governments seeing it is very much muslims being targeted? it is a really good question. there has been some criticism, of course, some governments have voiced their concern through forums like the un human rights council. through quiet diplomacy, we are being told, some governments are pushing on this issue. the americans have talked about sanctions against some senior
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officials involved in setting up and running the detention camp system but it is yet to be translated into legislation. in the really interesting side is the silence in large part from the islamic world, very little criticism. chinese state media a few days ago reported glowing comments from president erdogan of turkey himself on a visit to china, speaking of how happy china's muslims are, at least the quotes in state media suggested that is what he was saying. i think lots of very interesting things to say about the way in which some of what you would expect to be very vocal criticism as being neutered and critics would suggest it really speaks to china's growing political and economic clout, particularly in this region. —— some of what you would expect to be very vocal criticism is being muted. lets hear
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from joanna, who is presenting derbyshire this morning. the programme has found evidence that banks may be forging signatures on repossession documents to get people out of their homes. once the signature is on there, whoever's it is, that is it. whoever's it is. because you have no power against that signature. the banks strongly deny the allegations but a member of the influential treasury select committee calls for an investigation into whether the practice is widespread. all the details just after 10pm on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online. now lucy has the weather. hello there. the best of the dry, fine weather to be found across central and southern england and wales again today. here, it will stay dry with some lengthy spells of sunshine. cloudier skies for scotland, northern england, northern ireland.
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the best of any breaks in the cloud and the north to be found in eastern areas and also some outbreaks of rain in the north and west. north—west scotland will see some more heavy and persistent rain. there will be patchy outbreaks of rain for northern ireland and north—west england and temperatures generally in the mid to high teens in the north. could see 27, 28 degrees though in london. the cloud and outbreaks of rain are courtesy of this cold front and it's slipping its way south through tonight and tomorrow. drier behind it with some clear spells and it will stay dry ahead of it through tonight. some early brightness for southern england first thing tomorrow, but patchy rain and drizzle will feed their way south through the day. drier behind it with some sunny spells. temperatures a little cooler across central, southern england and wales but we could see 2a, 25 celsius for southern england. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: jaguar landrover is investing
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hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. bbc news has learnt that downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from borisjohnson when theressa may made him foreign secretary three years ago. five former heads of the scotland yard have warned that the public has lost confidence in the police and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness. in pioneering surgery — nerves inside paralysed people's bodies have been "rewired" to give movement to their arms and hands. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. chancellor philip hammond has said it would be "shocking" if the house of commons was sidelined by a government who wanted to push ahead with a no—deal brexit. you can hear the full interview on nick robinson's podcast political thinking, available now on bbc sounds, but let's take a listen.
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the commons has been clear already that it does not support a no deal exit. that is my position and as a backbencher, i will continue to argue against a no deal exit. but there are lots of experts who say it can't really be blocked, you need a bit of legislation to change and if the government doesn't offer up any legislation, there'll be nothing that can be changed or amended. is there a way of doing this? let me quote the speaker of the house of commons, who has said that if the house of commons is determined to do something, he's quite sure that it will find a way and i am quite confident the house of commons will find a way and indeed, should be able to find a way. because this is a parliamentary democracy and it would be frankly rather shocking if the house of commons, the elected representatives of the people, could be simply sidelined by a government that was doing
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something the exact opposite of what the house of commons clearly wanted done. there's been a remarkable development for a group of people with paralysis in australia. following pioneering surgery, they can now perform everyday tasks, like feeding themselves, brushing their teeth and writing. the procedure involves "rewiring" the nerves to give movement to arms and hands, and was successful in 13 of the 16 patients who took part in a study. neuroscientist professor tara spires—jones spoke to bbc breakfast. i have to say it is fairly remarkable. it is not my work, it is done by people in australia. they recruited the 16 people who had spinal—cord injuries in the lower necks and the cervical spinal code. this means they couldn't use their hands. what the surgeons did was remarkable. they took nerves that come out of the spinal—cord injury site and reconnected them back below the injury site. so physically, they could have been injured lower neck
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down, so then where would you take the nerves from? just above. your nervous system is amazing. to move your hands voluntarily you have a signal that comes from your brain, it sends an electrical signal to your spinal—cord and in this case your spinal—cord and in this case your lower neck. it then goes through a nerve and sends the signal to the muscle. but, if you think about it, if you are injured here, the signals don't get from the brain to below where the injury is so the surgeons took nerves that exited above the site of the injury. so they would innovate things above your arm or your they would innovate things above yourarm oryour hand. they would innovate things above your arm or your hand. they cut the nerve and physically attached it to one of the nerves from the damaged pa rt one of the nerves from the damaged part of the spinal code. it is really remarkable. even more remarkable, the nerves that come down that they have attached, regrow down that they have attached, regrow down the path of the old nerve and innovate the muscles that move the hand. so nerves can regrow? the peripheral nerves can regrow their excellence. and then the brain
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reprograms itself. so the brain that used to move things higher up your body now get used to move things in your arm body now get used to move things in yourarm and your body now get used to move things in your arm and your hand and you can get better with that technique. your arm and your hand and you can get better with that techniquelj get better with that technique.” know you were not there for this particular study, but is there an operation, do they do an operation so someone operation, do they do an operation so someone is under and understand anaesthetic, they come round and then are they asked, you say they can move their hand, they haven't move their hands, they come round from an operation and the scientists say, try and move your hand and then, i mean they can? is that how it works? eventually, buti then, i mean they can? is that how it works? eventually, but i wasn't involved in the study, but my understanding from the paper is there is a period of healing stop but after awhile of regrowth, they are able to voluntarily move their hands again. there is a wonderful set of videos that came out with this paper showing people doing activities daily living. we have seen one or
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activities daily living. we have seen one or two, and you think it looks like nothing, but these people had no control over their hands previously. this is paul robinson, he came off a bike in february 2015 and damage the spinal—cord in his neck. he has been part of this project? it is important to know this isn't a miracle cure. 0nly project? it is important to know this isn't a miracle cure. only 13 out of the 16 people had improvement, it is not a cure for paralysis. but for people who don't have control over their hands, this will make a difference in daily living. and we can go back to one of our top stories now, which is the warning made by five ex—met police chiefs that british policing resources have been "drained to dangerously low levels". former head of counter terrorism sir mark rowley spoke to radio 4's the today programme, where he said the government was responsible for ‘eight years of policy misdirection' serious crimes in the public space have grown but meanwhile, we've got online crimes which are not sort of fully recorded and not fully
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reflected in the crime figures, paedophilia and terrorism and other content online which is of concern to people and then of course we have cybercrime as well, which is a big factor. there is a range of crimes which affect people in their daily lives. 0n affect people in their daily lives. on top of the sense of safety in the community when you don't see local police officers. the letter says resources are drained to dangerously low levels, what does that mean in practice? that means everyone notices that a community policing has been cut back to extreme levels. people notice the police struggling to deal and struggling to respond to all the calls that are put in. and investigative resources are stretched massively. the growth in confidence in the police in reporting serious sexual offences, means in the last seven or eight yea rs got means in the last seven or eight years got close to tripling those offences. for the police service to build the detective capabilities to deal with that has been a stretch. resources are away from the serious
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crimes like car crime and burglaries. the public see that. we have had eight years of what i would say policy misdirection, that has been characterised by parochialism, whittling up hours and cutting resources and it is that combination of factors where policing needs to bejoined up, of factors where policing needs to be joined up, the of factors where policing needs to bejoined up, the reason we are talking about a royal commission or something equivalent is there needs to bea something equivalent is there needs to be a fresh look to deal with challenges today. it is not only about resources. lets have a look at the stories you are picking up on our website. i wa nt to are picking up on our website. i want to look at two of the most watched, domestic abuse reports. we haven't discussed that this morning. this is an interesting story from the psni, the police service of northern ireland and it is about the number of domestic abuse cases in
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the summer. it is going through all the summer. it is going through all the forms domestic abuse cases take. a p pa re ntly the forms domestic abuse cases take. apparently domestic abuse has hit record levels, a sombre detail. from the 1st of april 2018 to the 31st of march 2019, there were 31,682 cases. worth a look, that piece. many of the other ones we are covering one way or another. i know some of you will have seen this already but it is always worth another look. this is always worth another look. this is the queen going to gorgie city farm in edinburgh. she gota is the queen going to gorgie city farm in edinburgh. she got a guided tour, as he can see from olive the dock. people say about this little tour that 0live gave the queen, that she thinks she is human, olive, but i think it shows several things about the queen. look at that, she has got the best manners following
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along behind the duck at its face. let's play it again. she talks to all her subjects and deals with them in their own way. it tells us something about us as a nation, we area something about us as a nation, we are a nation of eccentrics. we have got all kinds of rules on royal protocol on what you may or may not do in the presence of the queen. but of course, when the queen meets duck, a dot protocol comes in somehow. that's it for today's morning briefing. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's will perry. good morning. it's like he's never been away. andy murray returned to wimbledon in style with a late—night win in the men's doubles.
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the former world number one and his french partner pierre—huges herbert lost the first set, but came back to win three sets to one against marius copil of romania and france's ugo humbert. that first—round match finished just after 9.20pm in front of a sizeable crowd under court 0ne's new roof. a little bit nervous at the start, but obviously i think got better as the match went on and it was a really nice atmosphere at the end. you know, the new roof and stuff is brilliant. it changed the conditions slightly under there but the crowd make a bit more noise, it seems all of the noise stays inside the court so it was great to get the win and nice atmosphere. murray will be in action in the mixed doubles this evening with serena williams. in the singles the seven time champion recovered from a set down to beat teenage qualifier kaja juvan to reach the third round. three british players remain in the singles draw. johanna konta had few problems winning in straight sets against the czech republic's katerina
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siniakova. harriet dart is also through to round three. and dan evans is the only briton left in the men's singles. he was impressive, beating 18th seed nikoloz basilashvili in straight sets. two—time wimbledon champion winner rafa nadal has accused nick krygios of being dangerous after a feisty four set win over the australian kyrgios twice served underarm, spent much of the match questioning nadal‘s speed of play, was given an official warning by the umpire, who he later called a disgrace and aimed a shot directly at the spaniard. afterwards he was unrepentant. why would i apologise? he didn't look too pleased? why would i apologise? he didn't look to please.
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i don't care. i think he can take a ball to the chest, i don't apologise at all. where you aiming at him? i was wanting to hit him square in the chest. the umpire today was terrible. what about him was terrible, the way he wouldn't pull up terrible, the way he wouldn't pull up roughy nadal? i am serving and starting my routine and rafa say stop. the rule is play at the speed of the server so why should i have to wait for him to get into his rhythm. i got angry and he said i will tell him when i want to tell him. a little bit of a power trip. he obviously feels pretty important sitting up in the chair. top seed ashleigh barty is through to the third round and will play britain's harriet dart next. but defending champion angelique kerber is out. she was beaten by world number 95 lauren davis. now you'll remember jo wilfried tsonga took just 58 minutes to beat australian bernard tomic on wednesday yesterday.
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for a while it looked as though it might take him longer to string a tennis racket. he was at the stringing section of the all england club, getting to grips with some new technology and he chalked up an impressive time of two minutes and 13 seconds. at the cricket world cup west indies beat afghanistan in both teams' final match of the tournament. while in leicester, england lost to australia in the second one—day international of the women's ashes. tammy beaumont scored a century as england set the tourists a target of 218, but that couldn't stop australia from winning by four wickets. the tourists go four points to zero up in the multi format series let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages. wimbledon all over the as is frank lampard. franks for nothing. playing days will count for zero says frank
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lampard. he says i will prove myself all over. you can see on the right—hand side, danny cipriani, who made england's world training squad. it will be cut to 31, it is currently at 35. going well under eddiejones so currently at 35. going well under eddie jones so far. currently at 35. going well under eddiejones so far. in the daily mirror, good to be back. picture of andy murray and frank lampard. andy murray makes a return to sw 19. and this in the guardian, the picture you can see there are rafa nadal celebrating. it meant so much against nick kyrgios yesterday. john marla back in the england squad. he had retired, the harlequins prop. and the cricket world cup final should be free to air, which is a
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controversial story. before we go, let's look ahead to another big day at wimbledon. remember you can follow all the action across all bbc platforms, including andy murray's much anticipated mixed doubles match in partnership with serena williams. here's the order of play on centre court. the men's fourth seed from south africa kevin anderson starts things off against guido pella. then simona halep faces victoria azarenka, before the 15—year—old sensation cori gauff plays polona hetzog. plenty of interest on number one court too with women's third seed karolina pliskova first on against su—wei hsieh. then men's number one seed novak djokovic is up against hubert hurkats. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 11.15. the families of 157 people, who were killed when an ethiopian airlines plane crashed earlier this year, believe the "commercial motivation" of the aerospace giant boeing, led to the deaths of their relatives. speaking exclusively to the bbc, family members explained the devastating effect the last few months have had on them. simon browning reports
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from north america. everywhere we look, there's a blank where she should be. struggling with their loss. nadia and michael's daughter samya rose was on a boeing plane that crashed in ethiopian. samya's right here. she was one of 157 people on board. how did those first couple of hours evolve for you both? i learned standing right over there in the laundry room. i — it was 3:00am in the morning, and ijust started physically shaking, like, icouldn't stop my body from shaking. and then ijust thought, "i can't tell the other people in the house." it was the second identical boeing jet to crash in five months. initial reports say they happened for the same reason — a faulty flight control system. the 737 max has been grounded ever since. critics say the development and launch of the jets was rushed,
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and that boeing cut corners at the expense of safety. definitely my daughter died for the profit of boeing, and i don't want anyone else to die for that reason. i want these planes to be safe, and invest in the company, and the hardware and the infrastructure, to make our aviation systems safe. nadia and michael want to know why their daughter died, and their fight has taken them to the top of the american government. they are now representing families from across north america. when et302 crashed, there were passengers from more than 30 countries on board. the highest proportion of those were from kenya, because the flight was bound for nairobi. but the second—highest amount were from here in canada, and families in toronto are starting to want answers as to why their loved ones were killed. well, i lost my wife, carol, my three children, ryan, kelly and ruby,
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and i also lost my mum—in—law. i feel so lonely. 0ur i look at people, i see them with their children, playing outside, and i know i cannot hug my children. paul njoroge lost his entire family. he believes they would still be alive if boeing had grounded the planes earlier. the crash of ethiopian airlines flight 302 was preventable. but these individuals knew that they will not be held criminally liable, they will not face years in prison. but, if they knew that they would face years in prison, then they would have grounded those planes in november. we asked boeing for an interview, and they declined. in a statement, they said:
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but, for the families, life is changed forever. their resolve now — finding the truth. simon browning, bbc news, in toronto. donald trump's opponents have accused him of politicising america's independence day celebrations to boost his campaign for re—election. the president's "salute to america" event included military flyovers, tanks and fireworks. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler reports with jet fighters overhead and tanks on the ground, president trump stamps a military mark on america's independence day. that wasn't without criticism. some felt he had hijacked the national holiday, putting himself at the centre of a series of expensive
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events in washington. aware of the controversy, the white house have promised that in mr trump's speech, he would stick to patriotism rather than politics. this was an event to celebrate service, not a campaign rally. today we come together as one nation with this very special salute to america. we celebrate our history, our people and the heroes who proudly defend ourflag, the brave men and women of the united states military. usa! what the white house couldn't plan for was the weather. there were several heavy downpours but many of mr trump's supporters braved the rain to see him, dressed in red, white and blue. oh, it's just electric. what's better than being around tens of thousands of american—supporting, freedom—loving americans. in the rain! what's better? trump! this was not a typical donald trump speech. there were no attacks on political opponents and he praised america's
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civil rights movement. this was a president doing all he could to appear presidential and that may have been deliberate with an election next year. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. a strain of the common cold virus could help infect and kill bladder cancer cells, a small study suggests. 15 patients were given the cancer—killing virus through a catheter one week before surgery to remove their tumours. all signs of the disease disappeared in one patient, and in 1a others there was evidence that cancer cells had died. current treatments for bladder cancer are invasive and toxic, and university of surrey researchers say the virus could revolutionise patient care. postal ballots will be going out to conservative party
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members from tomorrow, as the race for number ten enters its final few weeks. either borisjohnson orjeremy hunt will be announced as the new prime minister on the 23rd july. yesterday, we had a closer look atjeremy hunt — today, it's mrjohnson's turn. here's our political correspondent chris mason as a child, borisjohnson said he wanted to be world king. oh, well, being prime minister isn't too bad, and if he beats jeremy hunt, he will be. he's made a political career out of being different. i could've illustrated this with all sorts of pictures, but these take some beating. oh, and this is pretty good too! oh, no! so who is borisjohnson? he went to school at eton, and then to oxford university. i declare the motion overwhelmingly carried. good morning, boris! then it was journalism. he got sacked from one job for making up a quote. he became an mp and got sacked as a shadow minister because his boss said he'd lied to him. and then he was mayor of london during the olympics. release the rings into position now. as one of the biggest voices in the leave campaign, he travelled about on this bus
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with that claim about sending the eu £350 million a week — a claim the uk statistics authority, among many others, said was rubbish. shortly after he had a brief, doomed attempt at becoming prime minister. that person cannot be me. but this time, he's the front—runner and his supporters welcome his clarity on leaving the eu this autumn with or without a deal. under theresa may's premiership, the eu never thought we would be prepared to walk away from the negotiation, and boris is very clear he's prepared to do that. as foreign secretary he had to apologise for remarks he made about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian woman imprisoned in tehran accused of spying. she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand. she was actually on holiday. sonia purnell wrote a book on boris johnson called a tale of blonde ambition.
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we can't afford to have that sort of chaos with our next prime minister. we are, as borisjohnson himself says, in a time of national. we need stability, calm and a lot of attention to detail. and then there's his private life, and there's a lot of it. "who cares," say his supporters, and there's a lot of them as well. they see borisjohnson as one thing above everything else — a winner — someone they hope can be jeremy corbyn, nigel farage and the liberal democrats. say brexit! all: brexit! so delivering brexit and winning elections is his pitch, and we've never been closer to finding if he can do it. chris mason, bbc news. attempts by amazon to move into the uk food delivery sector have suffered a blow after the competition watchdog revealed it was launching an inquiry
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into a deal with deliveroo. the competition and markets authority said it would look into the details of the tech giant's purchase of a significant stake in the food delivery platform two months ago. it is the court case that has rocked france — well almost. on one side — a retired couple who own a holiday home on the picturesque island of 0leron. 0n the other — a noisy rooster called maurice. the couple say he makes too much noise — and now they want the judicial system to sort it out. tim allman explains. meet the accused. morris is a rooster, a symbol of the french republic no less. but when he goes for his early—morning cock a doodle doo, the next neighbour say cock a doodle don't. the dispute has made it all the way to course, although maurice has not. other roosters were there to offer moral support of him
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and his owner. translation: i am fighting for a course and many people support me and we are trying to explain that the rooster is normal in the countryside and if you don't adapt, you need to leave the countryside. his owner say she has tried to lock up his owner say she has tried to lock up maurice up of a night and used 999 up maurice up of a night and used egg cartons to soundproof his coop, none of which has worked. translation: my clients don't blame the rooster for singing translation: my clients don't blame the roosterfor singing but they wa nt the roosterfor singing but they want him to be quiet in the morning between 6:30am and 8:30am and they would like to sleep. it isn't the dreyfus affair but it has highlighted the divide between urban and rural life. the court is expected to announce a verdict in september. if maurice wins, he will have plenty to crow about. whose side are you on? i am not going to
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say. time for the weather with lucy. are you on the side of maurice other people who want to sleep? sleep is very necessary , people who want to sleep? sleep is very necessary, isn't it? we have a dry, fine day for much of central and southern wales. cloudy skies across northern ireland, scotla nd skies across northern ireland, scotland and northern england. some outbreaks of rain here as well. heaviest and most persistent for north—west scotland. the best of any brea ks to north—west scotland. the best of any breaks to be finding eastern parts in the north. as we go through this evening and overnight, clouds and outbreaks of rain courtesy of this cold front, gradually pushing its way south. behind it, something dry for the far north of england and the head of it they will stay dry during the night. early brightness for southern england but we will see patchy outbreaks of rain spreading into the day. behind it a fresh feel to things. a fair amount of sunny
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spells to come, but the chance of seeing one or two showers further north. temperatures tomorrow, cooler than they have been. in the south we could see 2a celsius. that's the forecast.
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hello, it's friday, it's ten o'clock, i'm joanna gosling. this programme has found evidence that banks may be forging signatures on repossession documents to get people out of their homes. once that signature's under, whoever‘s it is, that is it. whoever‘s it is. yeah? because you have no power against that signature. the banks involved strongly deny the allegations, but a member of the influential treasury select committee is calling for an investigation into whether the practice is widespread. the labour mp jess phillips is to leave her son on the steps of downing street today to highlight school funding cuts that mean his school will start closing at lunchtime on fridays from september.
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hundreds of children, teachers and parents are travelling

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