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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  July 3, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five: police say they're now investigating a double murder after the death of a baby delivered from an eight—month pregnant woman who was stabbed to death. kelly fauvrelle was killed at her home in south london, her baby was delivered at the scene. he died this morning. this is horrific incident. a double homicide and my primary motivation in this, leading on the murder investigation, is to identify the person responsible, and arrest them as quickly as possible. the police have released footage of a man seen running away from the house on the night of the attack. police say they're yet to establish a motive. we'll have the latest from the scene. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: two railway workers are killed after being hit by a train in south wales.
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a third man is being treated for shock. after the hong kong protests, china's ambassador says his country's relationship with the uk has been damaged over what china calls "interference". obesity now causes more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than smoking according to cancer research uk. at the cricket world cup — england's bowlers make steady progress — as they take on new zealand hoping for a place in the semi finals. a match—winning moment, maybe! hello, good afternoon. our main story at five:
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the baby of a heavily pregnant woman who was stabbed to death in south london at the weekend has died. kelly fauvrelle, who was 26 and eight months pregnant, was attacked in her home on saturday night. her baby, named riley by her family, was delivered by paramedics at the scene, but died in the early hours of this morning. the police have released footage of a man seen running away from the house that night. they say they are still unclear about the motive. sarah campbell has sent this report. for five days since the stabbing to death of kelly mary fauvrelle, her family have been able to hold onto the hope that her son might survive. now that hope is gone. the emergency services were called here to the family home in the early hours of saturday morning. kelly was eight months pregnant and she'd been stabbed. she couldn't be saved but paramedics did manage to safely deliver her son, who the family named riley. he was taken to hospital but sadly died just after three o'clock this morning. forensics officers are continuing to look for any clues which may help to determine what happened
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in what the police are describing as a fast—paced and extremely challenging investigation. the family were alerted just before 3:30am in the morning by panicked screams. 3:30am in the morning by panicked screams. kelly's sister was the first to go into kelly's room. at that point, there was no chance. today, two cctv recordings have been released, the first shows a man walking towards kelly's address on raymead avenue. this footage is timed at 3:15am on the morning kelly was killed. the second brief piece of film shows what police are saying is the same man running back along the street. we want to appeal to people who may know that person. if you do, please come forward and contact the incident room. and also if people were in the area and they've seen something, however insignificant it may be, again,
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i would ask them as a matter of urgency to please contact our officers in the incident room as soon as they can. two men, one aged 37 and another aged 29, were arrested at the weekend on suspicion of murder. both have been released without charge. many people in this part of south london are struggling to comprehend the stabbing to death of a heavily pregnant women and now the death of her baby. sarah campbell, bbc news, thornton heath. our correspondent, leigh milner, is outside kelly fauvrelle‘s home in thornton heath. when a woman is attacked in her home, the obvious initial assumption is that it is a domestic incident. our police are now suggesting that they are looking for somebody unconnected with kelly and her family? to be honest, they have been extremely vague about who it could be. i will tell you about the cctv recordings that will show in as we saw in the report, this was
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the family home where the ambulance was called in the early hours of saturday morning. police told us this afternoon the family were woken at about 3:30am to screams coming from the downstairs bedroom. that was in fact kelly, who was eight months pregnant when she was stabbed to death. unfortunately, the paramedics could not save her but they did deliver her unborn baby who has been named as riley by the family. unfortunately, as we have been hearing this afternoon, he u nfortu nately been hearing this afternoon, he unfortunately died after spending five days in hospital this morning. if you take a quick look behind me, though, it has gathered quite a reaction from the neighbourhood. there are floral tributes from friends and family and neighbours, one of them which reads, "kelly was excited to be a first—time mother. she looked radiant and she shone like a star". throughout the afternoon, we have seen forensic officers coming in and out of the property all throughout the
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afternoon, trying to discover what actually happened on that night. going back to those cctv recordings i was talking about earlier, if you look here, the first one shows a man walking towards this address at about 3:15am on the morning kelly was killed. the second brief piece of film shows the same man running along the streetjust a few minutes after the emergency services arrived at the scene. the police have been very vague about who that man is, whether he knew kelly or was either involved in the incident. but they wa nt to involved in the incident. but they want to know who he is and they are urging him to come forward and contact the police. also at the weekend, a 37—year—old man and a 29—year—old man were arrested. they have since been released without charge. thank you forjoining us. two railway workers have been killed after being struck by a train in south wales. a third man is being treated for shock.
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british transport police and the rail accident investigation branch have begun investigations into what happened on the line between bridgend and port talbot. unions are calling for track—side railway works to be suspended, until it's clear what happened. this report is from angus crawford. stopped where the accident happened. emergency workers are still on the scene. the call came just before ten o'clock this morning on the main line between swansea and cardiff. two maintenance workers were killed, another person treated for shock. hours after the incident, passengers were finally taken off the train. the only thing i noticed was the train was braking really sharply, which was normal, and the staff kept us sharply, which isn't normal, and the staff kept us updated with everything and we've been on there over three hours now. we never know, do we, when we leave the house, whether we're coming home? but the poor people that
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got killed, that's... the service had just left port talbot and struck the workers near margam. the line remains closed in both directions. the question now for investigators, in broad daylight and good conditions, how could two people lose their lives? angus crawford, bbc news. our transport correspondent tom burridge is following the story and joins us now. first, how common are incidents of people being hit or potentially narrowly avoiding being hit on the line. near misses are not really unusual and they are reported and investigated almost in the same way by the rail accident investigation branch as this incident will be but fatalities have become very rare on the rail network. then after ten yea rs, the rail network. then after ten years, for example, only six rail workers have been killed, either contractors or employees of network rail, as in the case of these two people who are sadly killed this morning. safety has improved over
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the last couple of decades. the safety record has improved a lot. safety protocol is strict. i've experienced it when we have been filming on the rail network. that is i guess why it is rare but the rail accident investigation branch and the police will have to establish what went wrong in this case. this was a train on a routine journey, so the line was active but there were workers on the line. what kind of precautions exist to ensure workers are aware when a train might be coming? often, when someone is doing work in and around the line, you will often have their buddy, if you like, looking out and that will be their specific job. like, looking out and that will be their specificjob. there has been incidents in recent years where there was... actually, one incident in recent years where the body, the person looking out, got hit on the track. —— the body. there are protocols in place and safety are taken incredible seriously. for all of the failings of the railways in recent yea rs, of the failings of the railways in recent years, safety is the one kind of shining example, safety has
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generally been very good out on the ra i lwa ys generally been very good out on the railways in the last couple of decades. but you know, the rail accident investigation branch is pa rt accident investigation branch is part of the department for transport, the government, but it a cts transport, the government, but it acts independently of it. they will basically be trying to find the truth. they won't approach and grain —— apportion blame, they will try to find the truth so lessons can be learned and british transport police will then investigate to see if, and that's a big if, there a criminal investigation. the rmt general secretary mick cash, the rail maritime and transport union, said they would like a suspension of all track—side works until it is established what happened. any indication that network rail is prepared to consider that? well, you know, i have not put the point to network rail today. i would imagine, given the amount of maintenance work and upgrade work on our network at any given time, i think at any given time, it is fair to say, there are hundreds of rail workers across the uk doing various types of work, so the idea that all of that would be
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suspended is quite hard to imagine. that said, we don't know what has happened in this particular case. i think it will be up to the police and the rail accident investigation branch to potentially give some early indications as soon as possible what happened and therefore a decision on that basis can be made. thank you forjoining us. police have begun searching land in worcestershire in connection with missing estate agent suzy lamlugh, who disappeared more than 30 years ago. miss lamplugh was 25 when she went missing in 1986. she was declared dead in 1994 but a body has never been found. police say they received new information following a search in sutton coldfield last year. the european parliament has elected a left—wing formerjournalist from italy as its new president. david sassoli takes up the role immediately. the vote comes a day after eu leaders agreed nominations for the bloc‘s top jobs, with a woman for the first time proposed as european commission chief. our europe correspondent, adam fleming is in strasbourg. the german defence minister ursula
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von der leyen arrived here in strasbourg this afternoon to be met by a huge group of cameras and journalists from across europe, who want to know more about her and more about what she plans to do. they were probably a bit disappointed because she kept tight—lipped and said absolutely nothing. she first of all met meps from the centre—right european people's party, who are her allies in this process, then she's going to meet the centre—left and the liberals. they're a little bit more sceptical, both of her and her record and also the process by which she was selected in secret by eu leaders, because she hadn't put herself forward explicitly as a candidate for the job. what really matters is in two weeks' time when there's a vote here in strasbourg, and she has to get a majority of meps to get the job. the other vote that took place here in strasbourg today was for a new president of the parliament, who is more like the chair or the speaker. there were two rounds of votes, four candidates and the winner with david sassoli, who is a centre—right former tv
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journalist from italy, who will be in the chair for proceedings going forward here in the european parliament. adam fleming reporting from strasbourg. a man on trial accused of lying about being the victim of a vip paedophile ring has described to a court the sexual abuse he claims he was subjected to as a child. carl beech, who denies perverting the course of justice, also repeated the allegations he's made against a series of public figures. our correspondent alison freeman has been following the trial at newcastle crown court. we can speak to her now. what was said in court? today, carl beech began giving evidence in his own defence. he's on trial because he is accused of lying about being the victim of a vip paedophile ring backin the victim of a vip paedophile ring back in the 19705 and 805, which he claims wa5 back in the 19705 and 805, which he claims was made up of famous people from the worlds of media, politics and the intelligence services.
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today, he repeated tho5e and the intelligence services. today, he repeated those claims. tho5e claim5, today, he repeated those claims. tho5e claims, in fact, led to the metropolitan police launching 0peration midland, which cost £2 million and resulted in no charges being brought. today in court, he described how he claimed he was abused from a young child by his stepfather, major raymond beach, and he claimed not only did he rape and abu5e him but he went on to introduce him to other abuser5. among those famou5 introduce him to other abuser5. among those famous people, well people he claimed were part of the ring, he said that they were lord bramall, the former head of the armed forces, the former prime minister sir edward heath, and the former tory mp harvey proctor. he also claimed today he was introduced tojimmy also claimed today he was introduced to jimmy savile, who also claimed today he was introduced tojimmy savile, who was a guest of this group of abuser5, who he claimed wa5 raping and torturing young boys at the same time as him. he said thatjimmy savile in fact raped him al5o. he claimed that the abu5e took place at various army
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barracks in wilt5hire, a5 abu5e took place at various army barracks in wilt5hire, as well as other locations throughout london. previously in the trial, the court has been told that mr beech admitted to making indecent images of children and charges of voyeurism. he's been painted by the prosecution a5 he's been painted by the prosecution asa he's been painted by the prosecution a5 a fanta5i5t. mr beech, 51, denies 12 charges of perverting the course of justice and 12 charges of perverting the course ofju5tice and one charge of fraud. he is due to give evidence again tomorrow at the trial continues. allison freeman at newcastle crown court, thank you. breaking news on a developing story we are covering on the bbc news. we will hear in a few minutes from a dip in that it can —— diplomatic correspondence james landale who's been at a briefing with the chinese amba55ador landale who's been at a briefing with the chinese ambassador to london, who has been accusing the uk government interference in china's affairs over the violent prote5t5 government interference in china's affairs over the violent protests in hong kong. the chinese amba55ador, we are told, has now been summoned to the foreign office following inaccurate and unacceptable comments
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from beijing's mini5try inaccurate and unacceptable comments from beijing's ministry of foreign affairs in relation to the situation in hong kong. we will hearfrom james landale in a few moments on that story but that is the latest. it is now 5:15pm. the headlines on bbc news. police say they're now investigating a double murder after the baby of a heavily pregnant woman, who was stabbed to death in south london on saturday, dies in hospital. two railway workers are killed after being hit by a train in south wales — a third man is being treated for shock. after the hong kong proce55, china's amba55ador has been summoned to the foreign office. and in sport: england tighten their grip on a must win game at the cricket world cup. chasing 306 for a victory that could send the hosts out of the competition. new zealand are struggling on 139—6. british number one kyle edmund is pegged back in his second round match at wimbledon. he's two sets to one up on fernando verdasco. earlier heather wat5on lost her second—round match earlier
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against 20th seed anett kontaveit. and atletico madrid have confirmed manchester city are set to sign their spanish midfielder rodri for a club record £62.6 million after paying his release clause. i'll be back with more on those stories after half—past. the chinese amba55ador the chinese ambassador in london has been summoned to the foreign office after he uk to stop interfering in china's hong kong affairs, saying hong kong is not what it used to be under uk colonial rule. speaking in the last hour the ambassador warned the uk to seriously reflect on the consequences of its words and deeds. it comes after china reacted angrily to criticism from the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, about the handling of recent protest5. beijing made a formal complaint becausejeremy hunt had said there'd be consequences, if it failed to maintain freedoms in the territory. let's hear what the chinese ambassador to the uk had to say. the uk government cho5e to stand on the wrong side. it has made inappropriate remarks.
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not only to interfere in internal affairs of hong kong, but also to back up the violent lawbreakers. it even attempt to obstruct the hong kong government from bringing the criminals toju5tice. this is utter interference in hong kong's rule of law. the chinese side has made repeatedly the representations with the british side. here i would like to reiterate that hong kong is china's 5pecial administrative region. it is not what it used to be under the british colonial rule. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale was at the press conference and joins me now. we don't hear that often from the chinese amba55ador we don't hear that often from the chinese ambassador in public. is beijing's riled what jeremy chinese ambassador in public. is beijing's riled whatjeremy hunt has
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5aid? beijing's riled whatjeremy hunt has said? completely, you are right, we don't hearfrom him very said? completely, you are right, we don't hear from him very often but when we do, is very forthright and he gave the british government both barrels, saying their comments about the handling has been utterly inappropriate, we are interfering in the sovereignty of both china and the sovereignty of both china and the hong kong government. what was fascinating about it is that there was no pretence. there was no attempt to gloss this over. this was visceral and it was something that is systemic. this is merely the british end of an operation. there we re british end of an operation. there were similar remarks in beijing and hong kong. there is a definite push back by the entire chinese system, to say, "look, thus far and no further", and the british government is not happy. there's been criticism —— criticism of the british government in the past by the hong kong companies who have said they are not as active as they might be. reasonably, they don't feel that now, isn't britain supposed to be joint guarantor of the freedoms that
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we re joint guarantor of the freedoms that were agreed, one country, two systems ? were agreed, one country, two systems? this is the point of dispute, the chinese say the deal the british did with them, the joint declaration that established the two systems has now passed and it is purely a chinese matter. britain says no, this is a sovereign international treaty that lasts until 2047 and britain has a say. the british are so infuriated by what has happened that the ambassador has now been summoned to the foreign office within the hour to be spoken to by the most senior civil servant, the permanent secretary, and to be told in no uncertain terms that what he said this afternoon, what the foreign ministry said in beijing this morning, is inappropriate and inaccurate. i think what was a war of words now has a risk of becoming a substantial issue between both countries. james landale, thank you very much. 0besity now causes more cases of four common cancers in the uk than smoking, according to cancer research uk. the charity says bowel, kidney,
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ovarian and liver cancer is more likely to be caused by being overweight than by tobacco. more details from our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. 0besity affects over one in four adults and one in five children leaving primary school in the uk. today's report by cancer research uk says it is now clear that being obese puts people at greater risk of four types of cancer than smoking. every year, obesity is believed to be responsible for almost 2,000 more cases of bowel cancer than smoking. for kidney cancer, its 1,300 more cases. around 500 more of ovarian cancer, and 100 more cases of liver cancer. 0ur figures show that there is a low level of awareness, in comparison to smoking, where well over 80% of people tell you it is a cause of cancer. when we started our campaign, only around 15% of people would mention obesity unprompted. and as we are saying, obesity is actually the biggest cause of cancer, after smoking.
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but the latest attempt to warn of the harm of obesity has come under fire. this billboard is meant to look like a cigarette packet. it says, like smoking, obesity puts millions of adults at greater risk of cancer. but some have described it as "fat shaming" and say it is stigmatising and campaigns like this simply won't work. the government says we must be much more ambitious in halving childhood obesity rates by 2030. it says it has cut sugar from half the drinks on sale, is funding more opportunities for children to exercise in schools, along with other initiatives. but campaigners say it's just not enough. a year ago we were really encouraged when the government published a strong childhood obesity plan, and it had some really good, effective measures to help to curb childhood obesity. it helped change the environment we live in, such as a 9pm watershed on junk food adverts on tv, and restricting things like buy one get one free on biscuits in supermarkets. but a year later, we have had a lot of talk and consultations,
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but very little action. ultimately, it is the figures that will prove policies to tackle overweight are working, but at the moment, a reduction in the numbers of people who are obese still seems a long way off. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. let me bring you some breaking news about a story we have already covered in this half an hour. we are getting some more news on the railway workers who were killed on the south wales line earlier today. the two people killed near port talbot this morning where a 58—year—old man and a 64—year—old man, both from bridgend, british transport police are saying. three people were railway workers working on the line at the time. you may remember, there was a third person referred to who was treated for shock. they were all working together on the line. the two men killed, according to the btp, where wearing ear defenders at the time and could not hear the train
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approaching. more on that as soon as we get it. borisjohnson has been accused of "turning back the clock" in the fight against childhood obesity, with his pledge to review so—called sin taxes. the frontrunner in the contest to become prime minister has come under heavy criticism after promising to look again at the levies on sugar, tobacco and alcohol. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster. this is turning into a proper little ding—dong. 0f this is turning into a proper little ding—dong. of course, it was his government, the conservative government, the conservative government with george osborne at the treasury, which promoted the sugar tax. and also, boris johnson as london mayor come in to do something similarfor as london mayor come in to do something similar for the products being sold at —— introduced something similarfor being sold at —— introduced something similar for the product being sold at city also people are saying he's changed his mind about this. it is controversial and there isa this. it is controversial and there is a big debate about how you deal with obesity and the accusation is
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by putting taxes on sugary drinks and the like that you are penalising those on lower incomes, it is the nanny those on lower incomes, it is the na n ny state those on lower incomes, it is the nanny state interfering and people should be able to make their own choices. that seems to be the route that boris johnson choices. that seems to be the route that borisjohnson is going down now, saying he thinks it is ambiguous as to whether these taxes on sugary drinks are working. there are on sugary drinks are working. there a re m oves on sugary drinks are working. there are moves to expand it, for example, to milkshakes. what is interesting about this is that matt hancock, the current health secretary, who is backing borisjohnson, current health secretary, who is backing boris johnson, he current health secretary, who is backing borisjohnson, he now says that he supports borisjohnson in all of this even though he is looking at an extension of the sugar tax. equally, jeremy hunt, who of course was health secretary for a very long time, has hit back at all of this, saying he's very confused by boris johnson's of this, saying he's very confused by borisjohnson‘s stance in all of this. he says everybody knows there is an obesity epidemic and it is incredibly harmful, particularly to young children. he says anyone who is talking about scrubbing the taxes or reviewing there needs to come up with a plan about exactly what they
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wa nt to with a plan about exactly what they want to do and certainly, the treasury feels it has worked. they think it has meant there's a cut in the amount of sugar everyone is consuming and as we were hearing earlier, actually, the sugar tax is going into promoting sport and a healthy lifestyle for children. borisjohnson healthy lifestyle for children. boris johnson talked healthy lifestyle for children. borisjohnson talked about his own weight. he says he, like everybody else, struggles with that. but he says actually, exercising, may be getting children to walk and cycle more, is a better way to approach all of this and that could go down quite well with some of the conservative party who don't like this state interference. but health professionals say actually, to lose weight, the amount of exercise you have to do, it would take so much walking and cycling, so many miles, to get rid of those calories and lose weight, that actually, imposing these kind of taxes is a far better way to do it. vicki young, thank you. in a sign of the changing media landscape, us tv giant netflix is opening a production base at the famous shepperton studios. the company will make new and existing tv series and feature films at the iconic studios, which are part
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of the pinewood group. the move is being hailed as a major boost for the uk's entertainment industry. shepperton studios started out in 1932 and has films such as alien, four weddings and a funeral and love actually among its credits. tv critic and broadcaster scott bryan is with me, he presents the twitter review show, what 2 watch. well, there's going to be a lot more to watch from netflix by the sound of it. what is behind this decision? i think it is essentially a move by netflix to say they are there for the long term. they have been spending a lot on original content for quite a long time but they have also started to really build up their british base. they have had sex education which has been a big hit and they have realised britain is the place where successful tv around the world comes from, a multitude of different programmes, and they want in on that, notjust in terms of the studios but in terms of the talent. in terms of the examples, the obvious one everyone will speak of is what we are seeing
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right now, is a crown, which has been a massive success in the us and in this country as well and in various countries around the world. the question is, is this adding capacity or is it then saying they are going to do the stuff they do already but in one location?|j are going to do the stuff they do already but in one location? i would say netflix has been building up their content for quite awhile. that shows no sign of stepping back. there's been speculation that they are spending $15 billion. the figures are so large, it beggars belief. but essentially, it is them trying to enhance, you know, they have only been based in the uk for about five or six years but it has only been in the last six months that they have been announcing a lot of new acquisitions. i think it is sort of suggesting that they are going to be on the same turf as the bbc and channel 4 and the existing broadcasters. this is part of a big global war that we have been between amazon, apple tv is launching its service and disney as well, and it is kind of showing that these providers who have been paying a lot
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of money to try to make themselves stand out. the question is, the thing that people will ask, to what extent will it be british content? there's an endless debate, isn't there? it happened in france when they made a dedicated programme for a french audience, using french actors, with a french setting, and it flopped in france and everywhere else. presumably they feel a bit more confident, notjust because of the language but because so much of what is produced is vitamin e, as are the actors, to american audiences. yes, you only have to show, like you said, about the crown, it has massive international appeal. they have realised that instead of trying to make a new wheel, like reinvent the wheel, it is very much along the ideals of what existing formats, shows and su ccesses a re what existing formats, shows and successes are there in the british and european market for quite a long time? iam and european market for quite a long time? i am starting to see as a critic and watching a lot of success of all netflix chose recently, they
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are variations of things that have been successful throughout europe for quite a while, like dark which isa for quite a while, like dark which is a german thriller, is definitely atypical scandi noir thing which has been very successful for a while. i think they are going to be finding tried and tested format, reinventing shows, like top boy, which was successful for channel 4, they are doing their own version of it, and it is capitalising on the talent and success they have had already. . and bbc is jumping success they have had already. . and bbc isjumping in with netflix success they have had already. . and bbc is jumping in with netflix with a new co—production of dracula. bbc is jumping in with netflix with a new co-production of dracula. yes, they are. netflix have clearly said they are. netflix have clearly said they are. netflix have clearly said they are working with co—productions, they've got the end of the... world. not co—productions, they've got the end of the. .. world. not a route title? no, that is the title. always nice to have you with us. time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. good evening, a lovely end to the day across many parts of the country and the cloud that bubbled up
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melting away but the big exception today, lots of clout in scotland which will be in place tonight and a wet night for parts of 0rkney and shetland in particular. things drying out a little bit in the north—west highlands and islands but it won't last too long with more rain closing in. these areas in scotla nd rain closing in. these areas in scotland and northern ireland where you see the most cloud, temperatures holding up tonight, cool night across parts of england and wales, particularly in the midlands and east and wales, temperature down into single figures, lovely stout, blue skies overhead, quickly warming up blue skies overhead, quickly warming up and warmer for blue skies overhead, quickly warming up and warmerfor many blue skies overhead, quickly warming up and warmer for many across the southern half of the uk with blue skies overhead but for the north of lancashire, west yorkshire northwards, increasing cloud through the day with the odd bright spell, away from the north of scotland, cloud and outbreaks of rain becoming heavy and persistent, highlands and hebrides especially. damages in the teensy about mid 205 further south. we could get a notch warmer across southern counties of england and wales on friday but cloudy and cool conditions heading southwards, even though most will be dry this weekend. goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: police say they're now investigating a double murder after the baby of heavily pregnant kelly fauvrelle, who was stabbed to death in south london on saturday, dies in hospital. two railway workers are killed after being hit by a train in south wales were aged 58 and 64. both men were from bridgend and wearing ear defenders at the time. after the hong kong protests, china's ambassador says his country's relationship with the uk has been damaged over what china calls "interference". he's now been summoned to the foreign office. he will be rebuked. 0besity now causes more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than smoking, according to cancer research uk. time for a round—up of the day's sport, and hugh ferris is at the bbc sport centre. good afternoon.
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plenty going on and over the next hour, it may be the climax of the first to the cricket, but firstly, kyle edmund's match at wimbledon could well be heading to a fifth and deciding set. john watson is there. the british number one has been pegged back after a good start against fernando verdasco. yes, he has. the british number one kyle edmund, it is now 2—2 in sets and edmund, it is now 2—2 in sets and edmund will be disappointed he has not booked his place in the third round already. 2—0 up in sets, he had a break in the third and looked on course to close out the match before fernando verdasco hit back. verdasco has just served out to take the fourth set, and. the decider. kyle edmund with plenty to —— and forced a decider. kyle edmund with plenty to do to matches best result at wimbledon, reaching the third round here last year. lots of expectation on his shoulders, as we
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can see verdasco, some of the highlights of the fourth set, more highlights of the fourth set, more highlights for verdasco than kyle edmund, it has to be said, in that one. no andy murray in the singles this year so all eyes on kyle edmund on centre court at the moment, with plenty to do in the fifth set. disappointment already today with heather watson having gone out. she was beaten by anett kontaveit, the 20th seed from estonia. she played well in the first set but lost it 7-5. well in the first set but lost it 7—5. she was well beaten in the second set, 6—1. watson after this said she is not playing at the level she knows she can play. at 27, she is no longer a youngster in women's tennis and she probably won't have too many more opportunities to find her level to take into the second week of this grand slam, where she has never been before. harriet dart and joanna kaunda are the only two british players left in the women's singles. —— john hannah
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british players left in the women's singles. ——john hannah contra —— johanna konta. joyful anett kontaveit whenever heather watson, and kyle edmund's match concluding on centre court. just seeing that kyle edmund has begun the deciding set. you mentioned andy murray and asa set. you mentioned andy murray and as a result of his participation in not one but two doubles competitions, we have had the draw today for those and we have probably been watching them a lot more closely than we might have done in the past. yes, absolutely. ever since the rumour circulated that andy murray might be teaming up with serena williams in the mixed doubles, it was confirmed last night, head of the draw, which was made today and it is going to be fascinating to see. serena williams has won a total of 39 grand slam titles in doubles and singles, now teaming up with andy murray, who we know was playing in the men's doubles alongside piet hugues—herbert. —— pierre hugues—herbert. —— pierre hugues—herbert. we know he could potentially be in line to face jamie
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murray in the finals of the mixed doubles if they could both get there. could meet a lot sooner, though, in the men's doubles, if they progress, as you imagine they might do. that would be in the third round. so what does mum judy make of the prospect of their meeting?” have been fortunate that andy's career was have been fortunate that andy's career was singles and jamie's was thomas —— 77 terms of family harmony it's great because they have not competed against each other for a long time. —— jamie's was doubles. if it happens i will go to the pub stop when you won't be watching courtside? no chance! it would be torture. jamie murray will be playing alongside bethanie mattek—sands and jay clarke has teamed up with coco galvin the mixed doubles who we will see in the singles after that superb performance knocking out venus williams in her first performance knocking out venus williams in herfirst match. she faces magdalena rybarikova, something of a grass court specialist. if she can get past her, that really would be one of the big
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stories of the championship so far. thanks, john. 0nto the other big story and england seem to be on the verge of clinching a place in the semifinals of the cricket world cup. here is the latest gore from durham, the hosts made 305 58 off 50 overs, starting brilliantly, jonny bairstow getting his second successive century. —— 305—8. after pegging them back towards the end of the england innings, new zealand struggled in response and are currently 153—6. more in sportsday at half past six but that is it for now. back to one of our main stories this hour — and in the last few moments the british transport police have been giving more details about their investigation into the deaths of two railway workers who were hit by a passenger train in south wales this morning. superindendent andrew morgan said the victims were two men aged 58 and 64 and were both from bridgend.
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0ur units attended the scene and reg retta bly 0ur units attended the scene and regrettably it was confirmed a short time later that a 58—year—old man and a 64—year—old man were pronounced dead at the scene by those paramedics. a third person was treated at the scene for shock but tha nkfully treated at the scene for shock but thankfully was not injured. clearly i thoughts are with their families as they come to terms with this tragic news. following a number of other inquiries into the incident it has been established that the three people were railway workers and were working on the lines at the time. the initial stages of the investigation suggest that the two men who died were wearing ear defenders at the time and did not hear the passenger train approaching. we have a number of officers remaining in the area working alongside the rail accident investigation branch to understand the full circumstances of what happened. the families of the men have both been informed and we are
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providing them with as much support as possible through this undoubtedly difficult time. it's100 years since the housing act was introduced — its aim, to build "homes fit for heroes" for the soldiers coming back from the first world war. it marked the start of a nationwide system of council housing that lasted for most of the 20th century. danjohnson has been looking at the impact of social housing in sheffield. this is the council house marion and john call home. hello! how are you doing? they've built a life here, and a family, over more than half a century. come on in. thank you. there was a back porch here. in this corner used to be the toilet. these are solid homes with proper facilities that replaced overcrowded victorian slums. i thought i'd moved into a palace. you know. and there was a bathroom, i didn't have to have a tin bath
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in front of the fire! i could have a bath. the children used to call the neighbours their aunties and uncles. it was easy to get to parks. so it was very nice. we loved it. sheffield is a typical front line city... "homes fit for heroes" was the slogan when social housing originally sheltered those returning from the first world war. the terraces of back—to—back houses are being cleared away to create a completely new landscape... vast new neighbourhoods were laid out. sheffield's flower estate, green and leafy, was an early experiment in council house design. largely free of the anti—social behaviour that has dogged some other areas. it's lovely, i wouldn't live anywhere else. i evenjoke that if i won the lottery i would just build an extension. and lifelong residents still value its safety net. a lot of people do, you know, consider council houses a good house, a good home to have, compared to some of the private landlords.
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you know, they can't afford to buy a house. so there's still a need for them? definitely. so who are these estates supposed to be for, who deserves to live in these homes? should this be a mixed community made up of people from a variety of backgrounds, or should council houses be reserved just for the most needy, the most vulnerable, people who can't afford anything else? this is the dilemma that's driven social housing policy in different directions. council housing is for anybody. you know, whether you can afford to buy a house, to me anybody should be able to be entitled to a council house. tenants' entitlement to buy their home helped build up long waiting lists for what remains. councils have struggled to build more, leaving over a million people dreaming of the sort of stable home marion and john have enjoyed for 53 years and counting. were you never attempted to move away?
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no. people did say to us when right to buy came along, you'll get it for next to nowt. no, i'm a council tenant. and i'll stay a council tenant. proud of it. so you're staying? oh, yes. definitely. for as long as we can. danjohnson, bbc news, sheffield. let's talk now to former home secretary lord blunkett. he was mp for the sheffield brightside and hillsborough constituency for 28 years and grew up on a council estate in the city. you are one—time leader of the council, so responsible for all that housing. what sort of state was it in by the time you were leader in the early to mid 805? in by the time you were leader in the early to mid 80s? not very good is the honest truth. three things had happened. very low rent where very attractive but they did not allow local authorities to reinvest and modernise the estate, add the
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flour estate which was as still as ed the constituency i was proud to represent, was really quite run down. it needed refurbishment. secondly, regrettably, we had not until that point, because we came in ona until that point, because we came in on a radical agenda, until that point, because we came in on a radicalagenda, in 1980 until that point, because we came in on a radical agenda, in 1980 we had not allowed tena nts' on a radical agenda, in 1980 we had not allowed tenants' choice, add 94,000 houses that we have and as a city at the time were all painted the same colour, a job lot, people we re the same colour, a job lot, people were given choice about their window frames or their refurbishment in the kitchen. the third thing of cause which was the killer was the right to buy without any restrictions, without any sophistication, so houses were sold off at a massive knock—down rate and because not replace them. i was interested by what usa and, i grew up on a small housing estate in devon, the kind that was only built because of flooding and there was urgent need, it would not have been built otherwise. cheap and cheerful but they did thejob
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otherwise. cheap and cheerful but they did the job that it was required to do and survive for many yea rs required to do and survive for many years longer than it was probably originally built for, which is often pa rt originally built for, which is often part of the problem, but you were talking about the one size fits all approach. we talk to a woman who grew up after the war and she said that the day that things changed was when the dads were told they had to stop cutting the lawn on a sunday morning because that was the council's responsibility, and her feeling was that that was when pride started to disappear. was that a problem? i do not think we went that far in sheffield before my time, but similar things occurred. we had to say, let's get a grip of theirs. firstly we should give choice, secondly it would be good effort council tenants were involved in making their decisions themselves, so decentralising the whole decision making process. we were in the process of doing that at the time when council house sales suddenly took off. i think it would not have been as popular had we actually been
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much more flexible, more responsive in those early days, and of course later when i had the privilege of being in government, we got some stick for not building as many houses has been issued rightly, we should have built more. and we should have built more. and we should have built more. and we should have read local authorities from the restrictions by allowing them to borrow against the assets that they held so that they could then service that from the rent. but then service that from the rent. but the truth was that we were trying to invest in putting those older houses that you describe back into use. to stop them being the slums of the present time. quite a lot of investment went into double glazing because the double glazing i had when i was a child was the ice on the inside of the window. there was no such thing. winter double glazing only. and putting central heating and, making the houses fit for the 21st—century, that was a good thing, but it took up an enormous amount of
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resources that people would otherwise have used for new build. young people now will be rather envious of the idea that it was possible to get a council house because they are struggling, many of them, to get a foothold in the private rented sector. what do you think is the prescription for now? and terms of what we call social housing, but basically what you die would have called council housing. to set aside the ideological divide, we do not want ghettos or housing thatis we do not want ghettos or housing that is only for the poor, because as was once rightly described, things that are only for the poor will be very poor. we want mixed tenure, to build for sale as well as read in the same area, we want to read in the same area, we want to read to be affordable but we want people to have pride in them. and to ta ke people to have pride in them. and to take pride in what they do with and for themselves and their family. if we can get that right, we build not the cheap and nasty but we build for the cheap and nasty but we build for the future, and would ensure that people wanted a home are notjust an
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asset. prescription for the future labour government, perhaps, should jeremy corbyn become prime minister. 0rdo you make jeremy corbyn become prime minister. or do you make of these stories that some civil servants have been privately suggesting that he is too frail? i have my considerable differences in terms of the politics of the future with jeremy, and particularly the people around him, but i do not think it is appropriate for civil servants to make any comments, i do not believejeremy corbyn's problems are about being frail or old. iam corbyn's problems are about being frail or old. i am just slightly older than him and i do not feel the least bit frail. i don't like element could accused you of that. david blunkett, thank you very much, you did beat you again. —— good to speak to you. the headlines on bbc news: police say they're now investigating a double murder after the baby of a heavily pregnant woman, who was stabbed to death in south london on saturday, dies in hospital. two railway workers killed after being hit by a train
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in south wales were aged 58 and 64 and were from bridgend. they were wearing ear defeanders. after the hong kong protests, china's ambassador has been summoned to the foreign office. eu leaders have put forward their nominations for the bloc‘s top jobs, with a woman for the first time proposed as european commission chief. the surprise choice of german defence minister ursula von der leyen to replace jean—claude juncker came after the main front—runners were rejected. let's talk through some of those in line for the top jobs with matthew karnitschnig, chief europe correspondent for politico. hejoins me now from berlin. let's start with ursula von der leyen, the current german defence minister. what is the attraction of herfor the eu minister. what is the attraction of her for the eu leadership?” minister. what is the attraction of her for the eu leadership? i think there are a lot of points about her that her quite attractive. 0ne there are a lot of points about her that her quite attractive. one is that, as you say, she is not very
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well—known, they have presented europeans with something of a blank slate, but she is also a very energetic politician, someone who is also telegenic. she has shown that today and her visit to strasbourg where she is meeting with members of the european parliament. i think that she is somebody who really on the surface at least seems to symbolise what the europhiles across the eu think the eu should be full stop she speaks ever like witches, bono brussels, grew up in germany, defence minister, a working mother, seven children. —— she speaks several languages. born in brussels. there is very little to take issue with when ed comes to ursula von der leyen's cve. she will be a fresh face, you could not say that about the previous sense has been prime as that of belgium. now he is nominated
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to ta ke that of belgium. now he is nominated to take over from donald post. that of belgium. now he is nominated to take overfrom donald post. is that a real job? to take overfrom donald post. is that a realjob? -- donald trump. behind the scenes, the job that a realjob? -- donald trump. behind the scenes, thejob is that a realjob? -- donald trump. behind the scenes, the job is to get all of these disparate forces. —— donald tusk. it is this hurting job, there are been varies people who have held that and some have done better than others. there has been a fairamount of better than others. there has been a fair amount of criticism of donald tusk, criticism was that he try to make thejob tusk, criticism was that he try to make the job more about him that the institution. his predecessor was a belgian who was more of a behind—the—scenes operator, some of your viewers may remember him, and that was how he would have preferred that was how he would have preferred that because he wanted to be behind the scenes. he will probably operate in that mould. i remember hughes to pen haiku is in the boring moments.
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—— i remember he used to. what about this dealer guard? she is not unknown. she is returning in a blaze of glory. —— what about christine lagarde? she is extremely well-known because of her role in the imf, she is known and europe as a fairly successful finance minister of france. what she is not known as sa central banker, and i think that will be her big challenge to show that she has the intellectual and academic bono five to play this role, and there is some serious questions. within this fraternity, it is mostly a fraternity of central bankers not just in it is mostly a fraternity of central bankers notjust in europe but around the world, if you remember mario drag a a lot of people credit with saving the euro with his famous, whatever it takes, speech,
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he has a phd in economics, he was ahead of the byker italy for a time and has literally decades of experience in this realm. christine lagarde is a lawyer, effective in various political roles that she has had, but combating inflation, coming up had, but combating inflation, coming up at the right monetary policy solutions to the big problems of the day as a different task, and i think that there are serious and quite justified questions about whether she is the right person. one brief word about the new president of the european parliament. he was a tv journalist, we have to like him for that. he will be to most europeans and other freshfaced. he that. he will be to most europeans and otherfreshfaced. he has been european parliament before, he is a ce ntre—left european parliament before, he is a centre—left figure, very pro—eu, so he will have stability at a liberal for two and a half years before he hands over to somebody from the
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centre—right. hands over to somebody from the centre-right. thank you very much. very brave fa are putting a tv journalist and charge. —— very brave if they are. more people are downloading it than facebook, instagram or twitter — but if you're not a teenager, you may not have heard of tiktok. it's the fastest growing social media app — but its owners have apologised, after it emerged that users have felt pressurised into sending money to their favourite influencers. tiktok lets people send ‘digital gifts', which can cost nearly £50 — and a bbc investigation found influencers promising to share their phone number with fans in exchange for the gifts. joe tidy has more. tiktok is the fastest—growing social media app in the world. it's a viral video machine, hugely popular with teenagers, but there's another side to this platform that is less well known. i love you guys so much, and you guys are amazing. this is live streaming. when you get 1,000 fans or more, you can broadcast straight to your followers. it's an excuse for a lot of people to get closer to their audience, but it's also a place
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where the creators are asking for money. remember, if you are the next person to click that gift box, you get a follow. some of these animated stickers cost pennies, but the most expensive and most sought after cost users £49. drama queen! oh, the drama queen! reactions to videos, collaborations and shout—outs are routinely up for grabs. if you drop another drama queen, i'll speak to you on instagram for a week straight! but some fans feel exploited by the more extreme and persuasive sales techniques being used. thanks so much for the drama queen. if you sell one more, you get my number. we spoke to a 12—year—old girl from the northwest of england who didn't want to appear on camera. you gave a tiktoker £100... she was promised his phone number, but says he has only replied to a few messages and has never answered her calls. sebastian moy did not respond to our requests for comment. and she's not the only one who has given big gifts to tiktokers. i think in the end it was about 400 by the time
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it was all said and done. stephanie barber blames tiktokers for persuading her 11—year—old daughter to rack up the bill over two live streams. adults should know better. and even other teenagers should know better, that you don't ask essentially children for money. i'm going to count to ten and you can send drama queens for a follow or a duet... the neffati brothers from blackburn have 2.5 million followers. their average live stream earns them around £250. a lot of our gifters are 30—year—old women. we don't like it when our gifters are young. we ask them if their parents know about it. but we can't stop them. the chinese company behind tiktok say it's sorry to hear about some of the experiences we documented. in light of our investigation, a spokesperson said they will further strengthen the platform's policies and features. joe tidy, bbc news. hundreds of thousands of people in south america have been lucky enough to witness a rare sight —
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a total eclipse of the sun. the moon's great shadow, or ‘umbra', plunged parts of chile into darkness for a few seconds, before passing over the andes and across to argentina. a solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the earth and the sun, blocking its light. south america is also expected to see the world's next total solar eclipse, which will take place on the 14th of december next year. time for a look at the weather. it will be summer then. at the moment, particularly down there, i am happy with what we have. can't beat that. i lovely day here just now, this was the scene earlier across some southern areas, fairweather cloud ma same everywhere i wish i could say, but more of a pronounced north—south split develop as far as pronounced north—south split develop as farasi pronounced north—south split develop as far as i weather is concerned. today we saw the cloud gather across the northern half of scotland, and
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with that grey skies. let me take you to parts of the highlands. conditions were not of the blue variety, much more like the grave. rain, more to come through tomorrow. that cloud will move further south. tonight, scotland, northern ireland increased cloud, breaks here and there, but those cloud amounts will keep temperatures up, rain for 0rkney and shetland, further south england and wales largely clear, but it will be a cool night in parts of the billows and east wales down at single figures. 0ur early to feel that because the sunshine overhead quickly things up. north of lancashire tomorrow, lots more cloud, not enough sunshine, —— not as much. rain throughout the day in the north of scotland, persistent in the north of scotland, persistent in the highlands and hebrides where there will be a noticeable west to north—westerly when. other half of the country, south like a china yorkshire, blue skies overhead to start the day, quickly warming, barely a cloud in the sky, and
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pembridge as well be two or three degrees warmer than they were today, peaking at around 20—25dc. you can see the split. cooler conditions further north generally in the mid—teens, particularly across scotland. entered thursday night and friday, high—pressure starting to eke away, more of a north—westerly wind developing and these weather front start to push their way southwards. another cloudy day for scotland, northern ireland, brightening up in the north—west later. charity rain working southwards into northern england, north wales, midlands, southern england south wales they will stay with the sunshine and may be a degree also warmer than tomorrow, 26-27. degree also warmer than tomorrow, 26—27. cooler in the breeze to the north and west. cooler air working south as we go through friday, this cold front will introduce slightly fresher conditions, but not much on it. barely a drop of rain as it clears away from the south coast on saturday morning. sunny spells for many on saturday, but the bees most notable eastern scotland, eastern
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angler, feeling rather chilly in the cloudier moments, not too bad and the west where we see the best of the west where we see the best of the sunshine. the rest of the weekend, sunday dry, sunny start, clouding over later. rain returns to western scotland, northern ireland on monday. bbc news at sixes next.
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police launch a double murder investigation after the baby, delivered after his mother was fatally stabbed, died today. detectives say the attack on kelly mary fauvrelle at her home in croydon on saturday was "sustained and vicious" — the motive unclear. police want to find this man, who was seen running away from the house that night. kelly was the victim of a sustained and vicious attack, which has taken place in her own bedroom. also on the programme. 0besity overtakes smoking as the cause of some of the most common kinds of cancer, as millions are warned their weight puts them at risk. an investigation's launched after two railway workers are killed in south wales — police say they were wearing ear

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