Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 2, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two: boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conservative party members in northern ireland. the union comes first, of course. the solution must be for the whole uk to come out in its entirety from the eu. the principle is the backstop which traps us into following eu customs tariffs until the eu give us permission to leave the customs union, and that is not acceptable. the stowaway who fell from this plane into a london garden — an investigation is underway. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc‘s highest paid on air talent. china reacts with fury to the protests in hong kong and warns britain and
2:01 pm
the united states not to interfere. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — olly foster. we've already had british winners on the second day of wimbledon — we'll head live to the all england club and also lyon and the lionesses as we count down to the world cup semifinal. thanks olly, and thomasz has all the weather. the weather is lush. it is beautiful, just right. we will be talking about the european monsoon in halfan talking about the european monsoon in half an hour. also coming up: turning their backs on the eu — meps from the brexit party stage a protest at the opening session of the european parliament.
2:02 pm
hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. it's been one of the major sticking points in the brexit negotiations — but the two candidates vying to be prime minister have been outlining their plans for the irish border after the uk leaves the eu. in the latest conservative party leadership hustings in belfast, jeremy hunt said it would be impossible to have an eu withdrawal deal that included the current irish backstop provision. boris johnson insisted there will, under no circumstances, be a hard border. he said the issue would be resolved in a free trade deal after brexit. chris page has more. they both want to be the prime minister who takes the country out of the eu. and they are in the part of the uk that in many ways is on the brexit frontline. the union comes first, of course, but i believe that we should not be faced with that choice.
2:03 pm
and the solution must be for the whole uk to come out. yesterday i met representatives from the northern ireland farmers' union, the food and drink federation, people from the border towns around newry and they talked to me about their concerns about a no—deal situation. the border is almost invisible, but looms large in the contest for number 10. everyone involved in the brexit negotiations has agreed on the aim. they want the border to remain, in essence, as it is at the moment. open with traffic free—flowing and no checks. but there has not been agreement on how you achieve that and it has become the biggest sticking point in the whole process. the most controversial part of the current withdrawal agreement is the backstop which would guarantee no hard border if there is no big free trade deal between the uk and eu. it would mean the whole of the uk would share customs arrangements with the eu, and northern ireland would follow a number of european
2:04 pm
rules on trading goods. borisjohnson thinks the issue should be dealt with in trade talks after the uk leaves. we should have a standstill, protract the existing arrangements and use that time, whether it is an implementation period or whatever, to do the trade deal and sort out the facilitations we will need. jeremy hunt also wants rid of the backstop. the principle is the backstop that traps us into following eu customs tariffs until the eu give us permission to leave the customs union. and for a brexit vote that was about bringing back sovereignty to parliament, that is not acceptable. both he and mrjohnson have suggested technology could help to avoid checks on the frontier. but the eu said it will not reopen negotiations and the backstop must stay. this expert warns the challenge is not getting easier.
2:05 pm
teh change of prime minister does not change the reality of brexit. the choices that are difficult that the prime minister theresa may has had to face remain the same. the border brainteaser remains unsolved. finding a solution will be one of the toughest tasks for the new man in downing street. let's speak now to our assistant political editor, norman smith. assistant political they assistant political both looked a bit uncomfortable at they both looked a bit uncomfortable at times. this will be crucial. it is perhaps the key issue in the whole brexit negotiations. but listening to both of them they are both pretty much in the same page when it comes to the backstop. they both say it has to go and they both wa nted both say it has to go and they both wanted renegotiated but they both know that the eu have already said no, we are not open to reopening the withdrawal agreement and getting rid of the backstop so they are both facing a huge task in convincing their own people and indeed the wider electorate that they can pull this off. but basically they are not
2:06 pm
very far apart when it comes to the backstop and even to brexit more generally. we have seen mr hunt in recent days coming closer and closer to borisjohnson recent days coming closer and closer to boris johnson is recent days coming closer and closer to borisjohnson is very hard line of this deadline in october 31 no saying pretty much unless the eu sends up to a new deal by september the 30th he too will leave come what may on october the 31st. the two men asi may on october the 31st. the two men as i think largely tonal. when you listen to mr hunt he has a tone of n regret rather than enthusiasm. boris johnson is almost keen to get on to no deal, i think. he seems to see huge opportunities in the aftermath ofan huge opportunities in the aftermath of an ordeal. interesting to on his sort of picture to those mps wary of no deal, saying he would love them up. in other words he is going to
2:07 pm
reach out to them and try to bring them on—board even though we know within parliament there are some mps to thwart an ordeal including possibly the current chancellor at philip hammond who was asked what he would do if it came to no deal and the house of commons this afternoon. let me say this. i think i have been consistently clear that i believe that leaving with a no deal exit will be bad for the uk, bad for the british economy, bad for the british people. we cannot, however, rule out that could happen because it is not entirely in our hands but i do agree with him that it would be wrong for a british government to seek to pursue no deal as a policy and i believe it will be for the house of commons, of which i will continue proudly to be a member, to ensure that doesn't happen. the view of borisjohnson steam is that the appetite for confrontation
2:08 pm
over no deal is beginning to fizzle out in parliament and those tory rebels prepared to make a stand over no deal, the views of those around mrjohnson as they are beginning to wobble, in part because of mr johnson winds he will be a new prime minister so they will give him the space to try and sort out brexit and in parta space to try and sort out brexit and in part a sense of battle fatigue. people want this done and dusted so maybe when it actually comes to it parliament may not be such a block to no deal. an investigation is under way after a suspected stowaway fell from a passenger plane into a london garden where a man was sunbathing. police say the stowaway fell from a kenya airways flight heading from nairobi to heathrow airport. it's thought the man had hidden in the plane's landing gear. it's raised more questions about airport security. a warning that this report from our transport correspondent tom burridge contains an image some of you may find distressing.
2:09 pm
this is the kenya airways flight caught on a webcam on sunday. the plane was high in the sky over south london. a man believed to have hidden in the landing gear compartment shortly before take—off at nairobi airport fell. his body landed in this property's back garden. and this photo shows extensive damage caused to a concrete path where the body fell. according to a neighbour, the body, believed to be ofa man, hit the ground just a metre from a man who rents this property, who was sunbathing at the time. the man stowed away in the undercarriage of the plane would have fallen some 3,500 feet. given the impact, the tenant at this property is lucky he wasn't hurt or even killed.
2:10 pm
the flight kq100 left nairobi at 7:19am on sunday. it landed more than eight hours later at 3:42 p m. just minutes before that, police were called to clapham, where a body had fallen in someone's backyard. hiding in the undercarriage just before take—off should be incredibly hard. security checks like these at nairobi airport increased after 9/11. typically, a pilot or engineer will carry out final checks roughly 45 minutes before take—off. and he would have had to climb up as quickly as possible along this bit of metal and into the rear arch. but after a similar incident a few years ago, a bbc reporter shows in this documentary how someone could do it. but getting inside is the easy bit. to survive an entire flight in a part of an aircraft which isn't pressurised, someone would have to cheat an almost certain death. the undercarriage bay is outside the normal pressurisation part of the aircraft. so they are subjected to freezing temperatures and very
2:11 pm
little oxygen. in addition, they can be crushed by the undercarriage coming up. the chances of survival are very remote indeed. i would say it is almost nil on a long haul flight. additionally, because they will pass out at high altitude, on the approach to land when the pilots lower the gear, they are not hanging on, so if they had survived the crushing and the cold temperature, they then fall to their death. the identity of the person who fell has not been released. british police are not treating it as suspicious. but there are questions over how he made it on board at nairobi airport. some water, food and a bag were found in the undercarriage of the plane where the person hid before take—off. what happened is a major breach of security and the man had next to no chance of surviving the flight. the cabinet office says it will investigate whether senior civil servants told a newspaper jeremy corbyn is "too frail" to be prime minister.over the weekend the times said it was briefed by two officials with suggestions that the labour leader may have to stand down over health issues.
2:12 pm
labour has rejected the government's offer and has demanded a full independent inquiry. three women have now made the bbc‘s list of the highest—paid on—air talent. zoe ball, claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz are among the top ten biggest earners, revealed in the bbc‘s annual report. this is the first time since presenter salaries were disclosed in 2017 that women have made the top 10 — although zoe, claudia, and vanessa come in at numbers 8,9, and ten respectively. 75 stars received more than £150,00, 11 more than last year. the announcement comes at a difficult time for the bbc — already under fire after the recent decision to scrap free tv licences for over—75s — unless they receive pension credit, our media and arts correspondent david sillito reports. the mp damian collins, chair of the digital, culture, media and sport committee joins me now from our westminster studio. the presence of those three women in the top ten is welcomed. progress has been made. the bbc are still some way of achieving equal pay for men and women who do equal work of
2:13 pm
equal value but the fact we are having this debate is because there was transparency over what the high earners get. something the bbc resisted but something i'm pleased to see now the recognised as necessary reform . to see now the recognised as necessary reform. equal pay and the gender pay gap are two different issues. i wonder what's more you wa nt issues. i wonder what's more you want the bbc to do. i support the bbc objective should be equal numbers of men and women amongst the highest paid the bbc. there is a disparity not just highest paid the bbc. there is a disparity notjust on what men and women got paid in doing work of equal value but also the sheer number of senior men on high salaries. it is welcome to see more women in the high levels of bbc earners the top 20 bbc earners and the gender pay gap has been reduced but nevertheless there is still progress to be made. i think overall there is a question of the bbc why there is a question of the bbc why the overall pay bill for top talent has gone up. i think we were led to believe that whilst we would see
2:14 pm
increases for women who deserved a pay increase that would be offset by some senior man leading the organisation. we have seen some of those senior men leave nevertheless the total pay bill is going up. is that not the irony of this that the argument in the past that these presenters are highly paid because they don't work elsewhere and eve ryo ne they don't work elsewhere and everyone says that as ridiculous. that is what has happened. three very highly respected presenters have gone elsewhere for money which rather backs up the argument bbc has to stay with the competitors in terms of pay. i think given the sheer number of people on very high salaries at the bbc, i don't think a few people going doesn't suggest there has been a big shift. if you look at some of the salaries some people are being paid i'm not sure what broadcasters could match that. who are you talking about?” what broadcasters could match that. who are you talking about? i don't wa nt to who are you talking about? i don't want to go through a list of names but there are a lot of people who have been at the bbc for a long
2:15 pm
time, radio and television presenters who have very high salaries and i'm not sure how many commercial operators in this country could afford to pay people those kind of salaries. i think that is why you've seen one or two people go and that could be other reasons but you have not seen big exodus. transparency on senior pay has not really driven people away in any numbers at all. what it has done is exposed the big gap between what men and women were getting paid for doing similarjobs and also the sheer number of very senior men in very high salaries. i think because that transparency has been that we have seen that transparency has been that we have seen progress that transparency has been that we have seen progress because there has been a lot of public pressure for that progress to be made. are you saying they should have cut men's pay rather than increased women's? no, the director—general said that whilst women employees would see their salaries go up some senior men
2:16 pm
may see some of the pay go down. that has happened as well and some senior men have let the organisation altogether. —— mike left. senior men have let the organisation altogether. -- mike left. the timing is not great considering there are over 75 is in this country who will be paying the licence fee where they have not done in the past. there are pensioners who will have to face the prospect of paying the licence fee in the future and they will look at some of these numbers and say why other so many people in such high salaries and why is the salary bill for talent going up rather than staying flat are coming down if the bbc is under such financial pressure? people will challenge it in that way. i also think that should be concern for the future for the decline of viewership across a live television channels and the biggest everfall and live television channels and the biggest ever fall and under 35 is watching live television so i think there are some serious longer term issues the bbc has to address. the
2:17 pm
bbc would say it is addressing that issue and anyone who once here knows thatis issue and anyone who once here knows that is very much at the forefront of many programme meetings. is there an argument that perhaps the bbc never will, the media landscape has changed? of the media landscape is changing. the bbc obviously has to change with the times and remain releva nt as change with the times and remain relevant as well and i know it is working hard to do that. if you look at the decline in audience numbers and younger people watching live television and the decline of live television and the decline of live television as a whole and the video on demand services such as iplayer which it is increasing increasing amounts then, that is a much more competitive landscape sold bbc share with things like amazon prime and netflix is declining. i think we can see the outlines of many of the challenges of the future of the bbc will face to remain relevant to the breadth of audience it wishes to
2:18 pm
sell. if you change are viewing and listening habits over the last four yea rs ? listening habits over the last four years? like many people i watch programmes on catch up and doing the job i do programmes on catch up and doing the jobidoi programmes on catch up and doing the job i do i don't get to see many of the programmes broadcast live. i'm sure it eight o'clock this evening when we watch the lioness is playing sporting events to bring the country together. like many viewers there are some things i would not want to miss seeing live and other things i watch and catch up. of course the bbc has to look to compete against services such as netflix and amazon prime that were not on the landscape ten yea rs prime that were not on the landscape ten years ago. it is good to talk to you, thank you. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conservative party members in northern ireland. an investigation is launched into how a man — suspected to be a stowaway —
2:19 pm
fell from this plane into a garden in south london. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc‘s highest paid presenters. there are eight british players in action at wimbledon. dan evans is through having beaten his opponent in straight sets. it's day two of wimbledon and british number onejohanna konta starts her wimbledon campaign today with a first—round match against romania's ana bogdan. the lionesses play their semifinal today. we will be live from lyon in 15 minutes. the manager says they
2:20 pm
have to win. china reacts with fury to the protests in hong kong the chinese government has condemned the protests in hong kong as an ‘undisguised challenge' to its rule by ‘violent offenders'. yesterday pro—democracy demonstrators stormed the parliament, occupying its chamber and scrawling graffiti on the walls. china's state media have denounced the protests as mob violence, and warned western powers including britain against interference in chinese internal affairs. but here, the foreign secretary jeremy hunt says the authorities in hong kong must not respond with repression. nick beake has the latest. they were already trying to repair the damage done to hong kong's battered parliament. but these protests have inflicted other wounds, deep wounds, which will not be easily healed. thousands of young hong kong people
2:21 pm
besieged the building yesterday, saying they did not want to be part of china. a seemingly leaderless protest powered by social media and anger. they even took over the chamber, where normally it's the city's politicians in control. one demonstrator told us why he was there. i think it is important for us to show what we are fighting for. and we are willing to risk ourfuture, in a sense, to fight for what we are doing. today, when we met this architect again, he tried to defend what happened. nobody wants to step over that line, if there is such a line, and i think the one that steps over the line first is the hong kong government. they have been ignoring us for so many years. their administration is getting worse. they are pushing us towards the edge. but beijing condemned the protesters as violent criminals and told the world not to interfere in its business. translation: the violent storming of the parliament building in hong kong and the indiscriminate damage to parliament's facilities is a serious illegal act that trampled on the rule of law and damaged public order. we strongly condemn this. the former british colony has not seen anything like this in the 22 years since it was handed
2:22 pm
back to beijing. the uk has condemned the violence, but says it happened for a reason. we urge the authorities not to use what happened as a pretext for repression, but rather to understand the root causes of what happened, which is a deep—seated concern by people in hong kong that their basic freedoms are under attack. causes of what happened, which is a deep—seated concern by people in hong kong that their basic freedoms are under attack. hong kong's police, who deny claims they lured protesters in by simply standing by, say they are now gathering evidence for future prosecutions. and the prospect of hundreds of young citizens being put on trial is likely to generate yet more anger in a city already in turmoil. there have been more emotional testimonies from people infected with hiv and hepatitis as the inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal moves to scotland. an estimated 3,000 people
2:23 pm
were infected with tainted blood products in scotland in the 19705 and 805. victims and their families will be giving evidence during the two weeks the uk—wide inquiry is in scotland. the scandal has been labelled the worst treatment disaster in the history of the nhs. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is in edinburgh and joins me now. there was an enquiry in 2015 which took six years and cost more than £12 million already. there has been an enquiry already in scotland that had a scotland wide remit and took a long time to reach his conclusions and was labelled a whitewash by victims. they only had from a handful of those who had suffered. it had no ability to compel witnesses from the united states are from outside of scotland to come and give evidence and it's only made one small conclusion at the end, basically it concluded there was little that could have been done
2:24 pm
differently. this uk wide enquiry, that she had of it sir brian la ngstaff that she had of it sir brian langstaff said this enquiry will be independent of government and frightened of no one and conclusion is that it reaches. he says he wa nted is that it reaches. he says he wanted to be as accessible to as many people as possible and people would be put first at the heart of this enquiry. so today we have been hearing the stories of those who have suffered. with me is jason evans. jason — who is the founder of factor 8, the independent haemophilia group — lost his father in 1993 after being infected with both hepatitis c and hiv from contaminated factor viii products. also i'm joined by gillian fyffe in edinburgh who was contaminated with hepatitis c after giving birth to her daughter in 1988 and is giving evidence in the inquiry. perhaps i can start with you because you were a 29—year—old teacher, i think. you went in to give birth and
2:25 pm
what happened ? think. you went in to give birth and what happened? before i answer that question the television lights are too strong for my autoimmune condition but what happened, to a nswer condition but what happened, to answer your question, was i was getting a blood transfusion after the birth of my daughter. i asked that i only be given if it was given as an emergency. i was assured that i only be given if it was given as an emergency. i was assured i needed it and then it was delayed unaccountably. so i don't think i had to have that blood transfusion. seven yea rs had to have that blood transfusion. seven years later i received a letter telling me i had been contaminated with the hepatitis c virus and it took another four yea rs, virus and it took another four years, including two treatments with a drug injected myself twice a day for six months and that treatment failed and then again for a year in combination with another drug before i was cured. however the cure has
2:26 pm
left me with autoimmune disease which means i can't do a normal light levels. i'm going to go to jason for a moment. these stories which we have all heard of recent weeks, all of them devastating on a personal level but what are you hoping that this enquiry will achieve and mean for you having lost your father? i think this enquiry has been a long time in the making. i think for me personally and for eve ryo ne i think for me personally and for everyone impacted by this it hopefully will bring some form of closure. we have been quite clear since the beginning of the campaign that what we want to do is put the truth on record and that what you had at the beginning of the segment here, penrose concluded that little could have been done differently and we would like to turn that round that there was a helluva lot could have been done and should have been
2:27 pm
done differently. what is driving this, frustration? anger?” done differently. what is driving this, frustration? anger? i think it is the fact that people have lost people close to them. my father is dead and the father of many other people are dead and people of lost husbands and children and people are seriously ill, those who still survive. they have never had the full truth about what is happening to them which in the record. we have never had it known that the vent subsidiary companies, companies supplied products which killed a generation of haemophiliacs left many others seriously ill. they want that acknowledged and where negligence is found compensation comes with that. the thing at the forefront of this is getting the truth on record about the largest loss of life incident that has happened in modern britain. gillian,
2:28 pm
ifi happened in modern britain. gillian, if i can come back to you we were talking about how you came gave birth and then you are aware that you're not feeling great. what happened. for the next seven years i was always exhausted and very cold. but because of my nature i wanted to do well and i felt ashamed that i wasn't coping. so the more difficult, the less i was able to cope, the more i felt ashamed and just kept trying to do harder, to work harder. then seven years later a letter arrived to the post saying that the blood donation had been affected by the hepatitis c virus andl affected by the hepatitis c virus and i knew immediately that i was infected. you, i think, felt she wa nted infected. you, i think, felt she wanted to do some research on your own. what did you discover and how
2:29 pm
did you react when you find out you are not alone? know, and that was one of the things that i think is most wrong about what has happened. eventually i had to resign from my teaching post after i was cured because of the side effects. i wrote a book and the publisher said you need to do some research to put it in context so went to the british library newspaper archive day day and discovered from newspaper cuttings in all the national newspapers that in fact thousands of people had been infected and there had been numerous attempts to have some sort of enquiry that had been enquiries which had not actually been useful. and one of the things that i think was most strong was that i think was most strong was that nobody ever told us that. i find that researching for a book.
2:30 pm
this enquiry, which is happening this week in edinburgh, is completely different. it is so unlike anything that has ever happened before. my family and i can hardly believe it. what way is it different? sir brian and his team have made enormous efforts to talk to people like me, to all the people this happened to, to listen to their stories and properly assess the full impact of what has happened. and i think they have had about two and a half thousand statements. lots and lots of people are being invited to give evidence at, a cross section representing everyone who has suffered and all the families who have suffered. it is only now that a proper assessment is being made of the full impact of the contaminated blood disaster. the effect that has had already is transforming for the first time we feel that we are,
2:31 pm
there is some official recognition of what has happened to us that when we talk to people about it they will understand. i think gill is right. there has never been anything like this before. of course the previous inquiry you had in scotland, the penrose inquiry, was limited by the fa ct of penrose inquiry, was limited by the fact of its terms of reference, they we re very fact of its terms of reference, they were very short, it wasn't in there for instance to look at pharmaceutical companies. they couldn't compel people from outside
2:32 pm
of scotland, and bear in mind this happened pre—devolution under westminster, so what happened when the penrose inquiry tried to compel civil servants for instance from outside of scotland, it couldn't, for example i have a document on the screen freely available on the website, and it is from diana wolford from the department of health, this was her reply when she was asked to give evidence... there is no obligation upon former department of health officials to provide a statement and after careful consideration i respectfully declined to do so. that will not be able to happen in this inquiry because this inquiry can compel witnesses throughout the uk, whether thatis witnesses throughout the uk, whether that is civil servants or politicians, pharmaceutical company executives, so there's a lot more power here and that's why i think everyone, not just power here and that's why i think everyone, notjust myself and
2:33 pm
power here and that's why i think everyone, not just myself and jill, are confident this inquiry has got the teeth to get the truth. jason eva ns, the teeth to get the truth. jason evans, good to talk to you, and jill, | evans, good to talk to you, and jill, i hope it leads to some sort of closure to this period of your life. thanks for joining of closure to this period of your life. thanks forjoining us this afternoon. and don't forget, you can let us know what you think about that. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. and the weather now with tomasz schafernaker, and the weather now with tomasz schaferna ker, and that and the weather now with tomasz schafernaker, and that is india?” wa nt to schafernaker, and that is india?” want to talk about a monsoon... has there been one? i will get to that. this is recent pictures in mumbai of the monsoon which is an annual
2:34 pm
occurrence. it is something that is very much in some ways they look forward to it because it helps the crops but also too much rainfall in a short space of time causes flooding and this is what has happened recently in mumbai in india. tremendous amounts of rainfall at this time of year. before we go to the european monsoon, i want to go back to gcse geography and talk about what is the monsoon. when i say the word monsoon to you, what do you think of? rain. exactly! was i right? yes, but it actually refers to the wind, so during april, may and intojune, the subcontinent heats up tremendously. we know it is hot in india and basically the monsoon is the
2:35 pm
planet's biggest sea breeze so the land heats up, the air rises into the atmosphere almost like a vacuum, and the air is drawn in and around the ocean so basically it is the sea breeze and then these sea breezes co nve rg e breeze and then these sea breezes converge inland and form storm clouds and you get the rainfall. here is the interesting bit. it turns out... i know you are drifting away a bit! meteorologists are suggesting we kind of get a bit of a monsoon so in the month of may there isa monsoon so in the month of may there is a bit ofa monsoon so in the month of may there is a bit of a lull. before we get to that it's best if i illustrate it. the thinking is as we head into this time of year, the end ofjune into earlyjuly, the south of europe heats up and there is almost like an
2:36 pm
oomph and the winds pep up. so the south heats up. are you taking notes ? south heats up. are you taking notes? there is no direct evidence this is definitely the case but it is something that we do observe in europe. actually before this happens in may, that is when scotland tends to get their summer, the best of the weather happens in may, then europe heats up and injune and july we get the westerly winds and more frequent showers. a lot of people watching will say you said it is an annual event, the monsoon in india. is it any worse than it has been in the past? this year the monsoon has been delayed. it pretty much arrives within the space of a few days of about a week or so but this year it was delayed and actually they have had in some areas less rainfall than
2:37 pm
normal but suddenly they have had an awful lot so there you go. and i have the forecast? yes. here are the north—westerly is. this is what we have right now, high pressure a cross is what we have right now, high pressure across the uk. a lot of fine weather, very quiet on the weather front at the moment, in fact temperature is expected to rise in the south of the country in the coming days. all eyes to the north—west of the british isles because here in the area of cloud with rain is drifting in and over the next 2a hours into thursday the weather will go downhill in scotland and parts of may be northern ireland. by the end of the night, turning cloudy. still clear across most of the uk. tomorrow a beautiful day for most of us, certainly across england, wales and northern ireland but notice the weather front reaches scotla nd but notice the weather front reaches scotland and it is only around 13
2:38 pm
degrees, in the south a comfortable 22. for the bulk of the uk wednesday is looking fine. this is thursday, the high pressure we have got over us the high pressure we have got over us right now slips to the south and we have that weather front coming in so on thursday it looks like it will bea so on thursday it looks like it will be a lot more cloudy, much more breezy across scotland, some outbreaks of rain but i suspect from around glasgow, edinburgh southwards, the bulk of thursday should be fine. in fact the further south you are the better the weather will be. on thursday and friday the thinking is across the south of the country the temperatures will be going back up again, possibly into the high 20s so we are turning hotter across the south but it won't last for long because these cooler winds blowing out of the norwegian sea will push some cooler air further south in our direction at the time we get to saturday. here is
2:39 pm
the time we get to saturday. here is the outlook for the coming days. notice how for example in cardiff and london the temperatures hit the mid 20s. then come the weekend it turns a little bit fresher. i don't think there is any hint of any european monsoon in this outlook but there you go. the outlook is what it is. that is the latest from me.
2:40 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conservative party members in northern ireland. (cg the stowaway who fell from this plane into a london garden — an investigation is under way. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc‘s highest paid on air talent. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. the main news later will be the lionesses. the main news, yes, but we are not going to start with that. all eyes on wimbledon right now as well? yes, six hours away from the england women in the world cup.
quote
2:41 pm
defending women's champion angelique kerber on court, rafa nadal and roger federer to come later, but a lot of british interest today. a clean sweep is looking unlikely? yes, talking on the lionesses we have two brits who have gone roaring through into the second round which is big news for dan evans, who is one of those to have booked his placed in the second round today. he came through in straight sets on court number 18 behind me and it is a significant win for him. just over a significant win for him. just over a year ago he returned from the drugs ban, ranked way outside the top 1000. worked his way up back up the rankings outside the top 60 now, and with two grass court titles in the challenger series, he has managed to work his way back up the rankings so it is a big win for him
2:42 pm
in the second round. also through today, harriet dart and the duchess of cambridge was watching so if she wasn't feeling the pressure, it didn't show. as we knowjohanna konta is out on court now, court number one. she beat this opponent before so she will fancy her chances to become the fifth british player to reach the second round today. beautiful conditions out on court number one on the second day of the wimbledon championships. you can take your pick from any match you want to watch on the bbc sport website. i mention some of the heavyweights of the game playing later, what are the highlights? worth pointing out
2:43 pm
angelique kerber is through, ashleigh barty is also through, but we also have roger federer on centre court now. the big day for those on centre court with roger federer in action. an interesting matchup against lloyd harris. they have never faced each other before so with the experience roger federer has you would anticipate he will get through, serena williams will follow, then last up to film the dell. if you have tickets for any of the show courts today, what a series of matches we have in store. —— last up of matches we have in store. —— last up is rafael nadal. after a couple of rest days at the women's world cup the time has come for the england lionesses they face the usa in their semifinal tonight. jane dougall, everything should point towards the reigning champions making it through to their fifth world cup final, but england seem so confident. yes, and well they might be. this is the fittest england squad there has
2:44 pm
ever been. and phil neville said he would not have taken this job on if he didn't believe they could win the world cup. england drew with usa in february on their home soil and in 2017 as well it was a goal from ellen white that separated the two sides and england beat the usa for the first time ever so the usa are not infallible and that's why this will be such an exciting match. it is predicted to be a sell—out crowd, 57,900 at the stadium. they have been getting it ready with the red, white and blue seat. the bankers have been on. fortunately they have been turned off because we were in danger of getting soaked! but the pictures looking fantastic and also the temperature has dropped. it was
2:45 pm
37 degrees yesterday, fortunately it will be 26 so more comfortable playing conditions tonight. this is the pitch where lucy bronze plays her club football and has never lost here in two seasons. let's see if you can keep that going. thank you. the women's ashes starts today, a terrible start for the women. they are 43—4 after ten overs. they play 31—day tests to start. they are four wickets down. more sports news in the next hour. a batting collapse in an england team, who knew? thank you, talk to you later. let's return now to the protests in hong kong, and china's central government has backed the hong kong authorities to investigate what it called "the criminal responsibility of violent offenders"
2:46 pm
after pro—democracy protesters ransacked the territory's legislature. beijing branded the demonstrators "ultra—radicals" and said they had trampled on the rule of law. kerry allen is our china media analyst and has been looking at how the hong kong protests have been reflected in chinese media today. kerry, what have you found? however newspapers reporting what is happening? they are completely different to some of the striking images we have seen. mass loads of police protesters out on the street. so in the newspapers today, i mean basically hong kong is regarded by mainland china is almost a small region that belongs to it so it is like a regional story, the equivalent here for example of something political happening in say lincolnshire. there's not a lot of coverage, so papers that would traditionally cover this, global times and reference news, the front page is all about a trade war.
2:47 pm
people's daily, the mouthpiece of the chinese government, has a big picture of people in a formation which they literally spell out the words i love hong kong, or hk. and a caption that says 20 years old, happy birthday. talking about the anniversary yesterday of the handover of hong kong from the uk to china. that's the newspapers, what about television? we have seen some remarkable images in the last 12 hours or so. the images we have seen, nick beek showing inside the legislative council, the ransacking, none of this is being shown in
2:48 pm
mainland china so people instead are seeing a press conference with a background not showing anything, strongly condemning the protesters. this is footage from the rolling news channel, like the bbc news channel in china. i suspect not! but that was it? yes, people haven't seen anything beyond this, they haven't seen images of protesters. and big police movements as well because the chinese people have been getting the impression from state media... bearing in mind the state controls everything so they have been putting across the idea that the police are being peaceful and not getting involved and what they are seeing instead is hooliganism in hong kong. the idea they are stepping back is reflected in
2:49 pm
mainland china and you are not seeing what we saw last night, huge police presence with shields and batons. what about social media? chinese social media, a lot of terms become censored because the communist barty doesn't like the idea there is any activism against laws it supports and it was strongly supportive of this extradition bill so what i have noticed in the last 24—hour is, the word hong kong has become censored, so people will see results from people with a blue v, which is kind of like a blue tick, accou nts which is kind of like a blue tick, accounts that have been approved by the government and official accounts like police and fire departments. fascinating. we are out of time but will you come back and talk to us one day about what you actually do because it is fascinating? yes!
2:50 pm
thank you. the leaders of the european union's member states are meeting for a third day of talks to try to break a deadlock over who should fill the bloc‘s top jobs. this is the opening session after the european parliament elections in may and there was a ceremonial aspect to it. there was a string quartet performing the european anthem, which is beethoven's ode to joy- anthem, which is beethoven's ode to joy. all of the meps stood up apart from those from the brexit party. the outgoing president said you didn't need to agree with the eu's values to show some respect and if it was the national anthem of the country would stand up, so they stood up and then turned their backs to the chamber for the duration of the anthem. they then took their seats and the session drew to a halt. i don't think it is a breach of parliamentary rules of protocol
2:51 pm
and the brexit party say it is part of their strategy of cheerful defiance. they would rather the uk had left the eu by now and if they are going to be here they will play nicely but not too nicely. in terms of the big picture, the other thing to note is this is a more fragmented european parliament and we have had for yea rs european parliament and we have had for years and years, decades in fa ct. for years and years, decades in fact. in previous years, it was dominated by the centre—left parties and the centre—right parties who teamed up together to get legislation through and make big decisions. that is no longer the case. the centre—left and centre—right lost their majority at the elections which means other parties, the liberals and greens, will play a much more decisive role in the european parliament in strasbourg. british meps in theory will only be in for four months if the uk leaves on the new deadline which is the 31st of october. in a
2:52 pm
moment the business news but first a look at the headlines. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conservative party members in northern ireland. an investigation is launched into how a man — suspected to be a stowaway — fell from this plane into a garden in south london. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc‘s highest paid presenters. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: scotch whisky could be hit be new import tariffs in the us. that's because america is threatening tariffs on around three billion pounds worth of goods from the eu. including scotch whisky and some cheese and pasta. activity
2:53 pm
in the construction industry fell dramatically last month. a new survey says activity fell to its lowest level since 2009. building firms are blaming uncertainty over brexit. the country's five biggest gambling firms say they're going to spend more money to help treat people with gambling issues. the firms say they'll donate around £60 million a year by 2023 and say it'll be a big help in tackling addiction. critics argue it's not enough. a new trade dispute opening up and whiskey cup with a difficult issue? in the firing line, so what has happened is the eu and the us are at loggerheads over subsidies to airlines so america is cross about the amount of money the eu... really cross! so cross they are saying they will retaliate by imposing tariffs on things like scotch whisky, some pasta, cheese and a range of other goods until we see a change in your
2:54 pm
behaviour towards subsidising airbus. the reason it's important for the scotch whisky industry is the us is the biggest market for scotch. £1 billion worth of scotch exported every year. after brexit, if that goes ahead in october the 3ist, if that goes ahead in october the 31st, we won't be part of this dispute. that's right but the point is the industry is so dependent on the amount it makes from that market, the worry is they might be singled out for special treatment. if we are talking booze there is only one person to talk to. michelle, in new york, i did not make that connection, simon did! but tell us more about this dispute. too early here. never! this is a tit for
2:55 pm
tat dispute that has been going on for nearly 50 years between the eu and the us and involves airbus and boeing. the governments claim the eu u nfa i rly boeing. the governments claim the eu unfairly subsidises air boss. the eu has fought back and said hang on, the us unfairly subsidised boeing. this row has been going on for over a decade and has been dragged into the realm of the world trade organisation, which rules on trade disputes of this nature. so far there was a 2016 ruling in favour of there was a 2016 ruling in favour of the americans saying that yes, the eu did unfairly subsidises airbus but there was also a separate ruling in favour of the eu when it comes to the us unfairly helping boeing. this summer we are the us unfairly helping boeing. this summerwe are waiting the us unfairly helping boeing. this summer we are waiting for a ruling from the wto on the harm caused which will determine the size of the
2:56 pm
sanctions that the us can impose on the eu and the eu is already rattling off a list of products it has in mind. why have the americans chosen the specific goods to have a go at potentially? some in america have been concerned about the ripple effect and have urged the government to try to target products carefully to try to target products carefully to cause the least damage possible but when you are talking about tariffs it is a blunt instrument and can be difficult. for example talking about scotch whisky, but the trade body for that says hang on, a lot of these scotch whiskies use bourbon barrels from the us so you have this knock—on effect that here they will have to pay more for their drink and there will be a knock—on effect of buying less bourbon barrels. i'm calling time on this. simon. thank you, let's take a look at the
2:57 pm
weather now with tomasz schafernaker. great weather for most of us today are not looking bad tomorrow either. staying pretty much settled across southern parts of the uk as far as the rest of the week is concerned but in the north there will be some changes. just south of iceland, that is heading in the direction of scotla nd is heading in the direction of scotland so soon this high pressure over us now scotland so soon this high pressure over us now will slip further southwards and give way to this low which will ride around it and head towards scotland. but today across most of the uk it is a case of sunny spells, pleasant temperatures, light winds in the south so feeling warm. through the night we will see increasing clouds across north—western scotland. this is a weather front encroaching into the edge of our forecast. this line is our forecast area. clear skies
2:58 pm
across much of the country first thing in the morning and the temperatures tomorrow will rise from 14 temperatures tomorrow will rise from 1a in london to around 22 in the sunshine. light winds across the south so feeling pleasant but the freshening winds in scotland will meana freshening winds in scotland will mean a weather front is approaching. in fact on thursday it looks to overcast a cross in fact on thursday it looks to overcast across much of scotland. outbreaks of rain so not a pretty picture i don't think. there will be a lot of grey cloud for stornoway. maybe some rain as well moving into glasgow and edinburgh, but south of that, south of the southern uplands it will be a decent day. in the south it will be quite warm and temperatures could rise to 26 degrees in london so starting to feel quite hot across yorkshire into the low or mid 20s as well but much cooler across the north. as we head
2:59 pm
into friday you can see colder northerly winds, in fact some lime green and blue here which is cooler aircoming from green and blue here which is cooler air coming from the arctic so it will be quite a chilly end to the week across the far north of the uk. even around edinburgh 15 degrees, but in london on 26 on thursday and friday, then pressure for the weekend. —— fresher.
3:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at three: boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conservative party members in northern ireland. the union comes first, of course. the solution must be for the whole uk to come out in its entirety from the eu. the principle is the backstop which traps us into following eu customs tariffs until the eu give us permission to leave the customs union, and that is not acceptable. the stowaway who fell from a plane entered this london garden.
3:01 pm
three women make it into the top ten of the bbc‘s highest paid on air talent. scientists say the temperatures last week were five times more likely because of climate change. johanna konta is playing at the moment. and also the lionesses are playing this evening their semifinal in lyon. members of the brexit party make a
3:02 pm
protest at the opening of the european parliament. hello everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. it's been one of the major sticking points in the brexit negotiations — but the two candidates vying to be prime minister have been outlining their plans for the irish in the brexit negotiations — but the two candidates vying to be prime minister have been outlining their plans for the irish border after the uk leaves the eu. in the latest conservative party leadership hustings in belfast, jeremy hunt said it would be impossible to have an eu withdrawal deal that included the current irish backstop provision. boris johnson insisted there will, under no circumstances, be a hard border. he said the issue would be resolved in a free trade deal after brexit. chris page has more. they both want to be the prime minister who takes the country out of the eu. and they are in the part of the uk that in many ways is on the brexit frontline. the union comes first, of course, but i believe that we should not be faced with that choice. and the solution must be
3:03 pm
for the whole uk to come out. yesterday i met representatives from the northern ireland farmers' union, the food and drink federation, people from the border towns around newry and they talked to me about their concerns about a no—deal situation. the border is almost invisible, but looms large in the contest for number 10. everyone involved in the brexit negotiations has agreed on the aim. they want the border to remain, in essence, as it is at the moment. exactly as it is at the moment. open with traffic free—flowing and no checks. but there has not been agreement on how you achieve that and it has become the biggest sticking point in the whole process. the most controversial part of the current withdrawal agreement is the backstop which would guarantee no hard border if there is no big free trade deal between the uk and eu. it would mean the whole of the uk would share customs arrangements with the eu, and northern ireland would follow a number of european rules on trading goods. borisjohnson thinks the issue should be dealt with in trade talks after the uk leaves. we should have a standstill, protract the existing arrangements and use that time, whether it is an implementation
3:04 pm
period or whatever, to do the free trade deal and sort out the facilitations we will need. jeremy hunt also wants rid of the backstop. the principle is the backstop which traps us into following eu customs tariffs until the eu give us permission to leave the customs union. and for a brexit vote that was about bringing back sovereignty to parliament, that is not acceptable. both he and mrjohnson have suggested technology could help to avoid checks on the frontier. but the eu insists it will not reopen negotiations and the backstop must stay. this expert warns the challenge is not getting easier. the change of prime minister does not change the reality of brexit. the choices that are difficult that the prime minister theresa may has had to face remain the same. the border brainteaser remains unsolved. finding a solution will be one of the toughest tasks
3:05 pm
for the new man in downing street. ina in a moment we will be speaking to chris morris but first let's hear what both leadership candidates had to say about how they will deal with the irish backstop. i think it is important that a loyal foreign secretary but i think we have to find a technology led solution. we are rapidly understanding the potential of technology now. i think the work done by greg hands and nicky morgan in the alternative arrangements solution is the best solution. the solution is the best solution. the solution must be for the whole uk to come out in its entirety from the eu.
3:06 pm
michel barnier and others have said those solutions are there and they would not impose a backstop themselves and i think it would be lu na cy to themselves and i think it would be lunacy to do so. chris morris, to the idea stack up? the trouble is we have not seen the detail. jeremy hunt talks about technology led solution. he has been saying that for the long term and it forms the basis of both of their plans. yes, there is technology which can make things easier such as the number plate recognition and radio frequency and bar chords. but it doesn't get rid of things altogether and specifically on the border with the single murky does not get rid of the single murky does not get rid of the need for checks on food and animals. there is this alternative arrangements commissioned involving arrangements commissioned involving a lot of tory mps who support brexit to put out a report a few weeks ago.
3:07 pm
—— a week ago. they said why not have a joint area for food standards between britain and ireland. that might work for the british side but what is in it for the irish? if they are tying themselves in regulation to britain, that is one step away from the single murky. there are threes places especially. if there are checks coming into the single murky, there are three places you can have an island for them. as on the other land border, or between ireland and the rest of great britain, i no no for the dup and these tory leadership candidates are between the republic of ireland and the rest of the eu which would set them apart from the single murky. it isa them apart from the single murky. it is a mad riddle as danny dyer said and we have not had anything from these leadership candidates that
3:08 pm
would resolve that. —— single market. these are conservative hustings. we are not looking necessarily at something that will please those looking for the real answer. it was interesting listening to the questions that were asked, quite a few of them, totally understandably if you're conservative in northern ireland, well what would the candidates due to boost the profile of the tory party in northern ireland. that is not truly what the rest of the country not truly what the rest of the cou ntry wa nts to not truly what the rest of the country wants to hear about. everyone knows the question for the incoming prime minister will be very rapidly about brexit and at the heart of that is a question about the irish border. technology and alternative arrangements can all help but the promise has been there will be a frictionless border is open as it is now. there is nothing so far in those technological solutions that can guarantee something as frictionless as the
3:09 pm
borderers at the moment. i don't know what danny dyer would say. cheers, mate. an investigation is under way after a suspected stowaway fell from a passenger plane into a london garden where a man was sunbathing. police say the stowaway fell from a kenya airways flight heading from nairobi to heathrow airport. it's thought the man had hidden in the plane's landing gear. it's raised more questions about airport security. a warning that this report from our transport correspondent tom burridge contains an image some of you may find a warning that this report from our transport correspondent tom burridge contains an image some of you may find distressing. this is the kenya airways flight caught on a webcam on sunday on its approach into heathrow. the plane was high in the sky over south london. a man believed to have
3:10 pm
hidden in the landing gear compartment shortly before take—off at nairobi airport fell. his body landed in this property's back garden. and this photo shows extensive damage caused to a concrete path where the body fell. according to a neighbour, the body, believed to be ofa man, hit the ground just a metre from a man who rents this property, who was sunbathing at the time. the man stowed away in the undercarriage of the plane would have fallen some 3,500 feet. sunbathing at the time. the man stowed away in the undercarriage of the plane would have fallen some 3,500 feet. given the impact, the tenant at this property is lucky he wasn't hurt or even killed. flight kq100 with the person stowed away left nairobi at 7:19am on sunday. it landed more than eight hours later at 3:42 p m. just minutes before that, police were called to clapham, where a body had fallen in someone's backyard. hiding in the undercarriage just before take—off should be incredibly hard. security checks like these
3:11 pm
at nairobi airport increased after 9/11. typically, a pilot or engineer will carry out final checks roughly 45 minutes before take—off. and he would have had to climb up as quickly as possible along this bit of metal and into the wheel arch. but after a similar incident a few years ago, a bbc reporter shows in this documentary how someone could do it. but getting inside is the easy bit. to survive an entire flight in a part of an aircraft which isn't pressurised, someone would have to cheat an almost certain death. the undercarriage bay is outside the normal pressurisation part of the aircraft. so they are subjected to freezing temperatures and very little oxygen. in addition, they can be crushed by the undercarriage coming up. their chances of survival are very remote indeed. i would say it is almost nil on a long haul flight. additionally, because they will pass out at high altitude, on the approach to land when the pilots lower the gear, they are not hanging on, so if they had survived the crushing and the cold temperature, they then fall to their death. the identity of the person who fell has not been released. british police are not treating it as suspicious. but there are questions over how
3:12 pm
he made it on board at nairobi airport. some water, food and a bag were found in the undercarriage of the plane where the person hid before take—off. what happened is a major breach of security and the man had next to no chance of surviving the flight. the cabinet office says it will investigate whether senior civil servants told a newspaper jeremy corbyn is "too frail" to be prime minister.over the weekend the times said it was briefed by two officials with suggestions that the labour leader may have to stand down over health issues. labour has rejected the government's offer and has demanded a full independent inquiry. three women have now made the bbc‘s list of the highest—paid on—air talent. zoe ball, claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz are among the top ten biggest earners, revealed in the bbc‘s annual report. this is the first time since presenter salaries were disclosed in 2017 that women have made the top 10 — although zoe, claudia, and vanessa come in at numbers 8,9, and ten respectively. 75 stars received more than £150,00,
3:13 pm
11 more than last year. the announcement comes at a difficult time for the bbc — already under fire after the recent decision to scrap free tv licences for over—75s — unless they receive pension credit, good morning, radio superstar listeners. when the bbc first revealed its favoured stars, the top ten was entirely male. things have changed. zoe ball is now one of three women in the list of highest—paid stars. alongside claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz. how does it feel being on the top earners list? i'm not quite sure how these things are calculated and i'm not certain that it's an accurate assessment of who is actually
3:14 pm
earning what. assessment of who is actually indeed many famous faces are not on the list. those employed by bbc studios do not appear but what it does show that the number being paid over £150,000 has increased from 64 to 75. all at a time when nearly 3 million pensioners are about to lose their free tv licences. i understand the dilemma of somebody who is thinking, iam having the licence fee taken away from me, of course i do. i understand that. £154.50 a year is a lot of money for people. on the other hand, what comes back from our consultation is, we also want to make sure that you have got stars you want to watch, want to listen to on the bbc, and that includes gary lineker. yes, gary lineker remains the highest paid star, on £1.75 million. but even if every star's pay was cut below £150,000, you would still save only about £20 million. the cost of tv licences is about £740 million.
3:15 pm
however, after months of protest about the pay gap between men and women, things have begun to change. it was a mixed bag. on the positive front there was a significant drop in the gender pay gap come on the negative front there was a substantial increase in the overall payments to presenters to 158 million. that against a background of the bbc's decision to pay for only 1.5 million licenses from next year, has been hugely controversial. so, the pay gap has begun to shrink. but the issue of star pay and a rising talent bill does ask some awkward questions at a time when nearly three million pensioners are about to lose their free licenses. borisjohnson boris johnson and jeremy hunt borisjohnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next payment minister to conservative members in northern ireland. an investigation is launched into how a man suspected to bea is launched into how a man suspected to be a stowaway fell from a plane into a garden in south london. three
3:16 pm
women make it into the top ten of the highest—paid bbc presenters. dan evans has won his game at wimbledon. harriet dart is also through and james ward and katie swann have been knocked out. it is the start of the women's ashes in england have lost five early wickets. the england lionesses are preparing for their semifinal in lyon against the usa. coach phil neville says the simply have to win. we will be live there in the next 15 minutes. the heatwave that gripped europe last week and led to record temperatures in france and other countries was made five times more likely by climate change. analysis shows heatwaves are four times higher than a century ago and
3:17 pm
occur more frequently than frequently thought. that previously thought. i'm speaking to a climate researcher at the royal netherlands meteorological office. what does this tell you about these recent heatwaves exactly? we know in europe climate change makes the world warmer in europe warmer. we were all together in a conference of extreme weather with climate change into lose when the heatwave struck. —— in toulouse. this heatwave in particular. we want to investigate. is this climate change that is driving this? there are many factors but climate change is really the big one of the whole century. there was some cooling due to air pollution in the 19705 but if you look at the train from the 19505 to know our
3:18 pm
1900 to no climate change is really a big factor and it has made these heatwaves much more severe. we were really surprised to find that in june it was an increase of 4 degrees which is more than i expected. what would you predict? are we going to see would you predict? are we going to 5ee higher and higher temperatures in future? ye5, 5ee higher and higher temperatures in future? yes, as long as we don't bring co2 emissions under control and bring them back to zero. and they will become regular occurrence? they are already regular occurrence. la5t they are already regular occurrence. last year there was a big heatwave in scandinavia and the year before the mediterranean and 2015 it was central europe and theyjust keep coming. 4 degrees quite dramatic. how high can temperatures go before we are physically unable to deal with this? that is a good question.
3:19 pm
it depends a lot on humidity and wind and other factors it depends a lot on humidity and wind and otherfactor5 but it depends a lot on humidity and wind and other factors but if it is really humid around 37 degrees it becomes very dangerous and you can almost not get rid of heat anymore. what might we keep saying it is the elderly and young who find it particularly difficult to deal with. ye5, particularly difficult to deal with. yes, and there are other countries 5uch yes, and there are other countries such as india and in africa where heat is really deadly because people are not protected against the heat. when you have these discussions, i5 there a sudden moment when you look at each other when you say this is dramatic? being scientists, we first look at each other and say are you sure, can we double—check it? can i do the calculation independently? even ina do the calculation independently? even in a reputable institution like this that gets all the work in one week —— rapid execution where we do all the work in one week we try to
3:20 pm
check all the work as much as po55ible check all the work as much as possible so we do not publish wrong numbers. we all think of scientists sitting there and analysing it even you get 5urprised sitting there and analysing it even you get surprised when you see these figures coming back at you? yes, definitely. especially heatwaves which are increasing much faster than the observations —— in the observations than the models. the model say it would be 2 degrees warmer but we see more than that. it i5 warmer but we see more than that. it is the same here in the netherlands. we do not know at this moment why there is this discrepancy. other factors there is this discrepancy. other fa cto r5 ca n there is this discrepancy. other factors can affect the observations and are the climate models mi55ing some readings? we do not know i need more resources to find it out. i find it disconcerting that we based a lot of projections of climate change on the models when and these local heatwaves they are not up to thejob local heatwaves they are not up to the job yet. local heatwaves they are not up to thejob yet. their
3:21 pm
local heatwaves they are not up to the job yet. their collective local heatwaves they are not up to thejob yet. their collective —— they are great for the global mean temperature but are not doing a good job for these very local and very extreme event5. are more local weather forecast in the next ten minutes or so. three women have made it into the top ten of the bbc highest—paid woman presenter5. thi5 of the bbc highest—paid woman presenter5. this is the talent manager and chairman of the inter—talent right5 manager and chairman of the inter—talent rights group and he joins from central london. three women in the top ten. what sort of progress is that? i think first of all it is fantastic progress and assign the bbc of the future which i5 tony hall said some years ago is that they have redre55ed the balance of the not being a qualitative between man and woman and also more diver5ity. i think everything is
3:22 pm
pointing towards positive things for the bbc and i as a talent manager, an agent, i delighted the bbc are taking full responsibility and making a difference. you know what people have been earning longer than mo5t people have been earning longer than most of us and i wonder why men still dominate like this. numbers eight, nine and ten other positions of the top three women. when you look at it holistically you can look ata look at it holistically you can look at a league and a chart and goal men dominate our women this odd man out but the truth is the bbc doe5 dominate our women this odd man out but the truth is the bbc does not sit down and make a big decision about what percentage of people present the programmes. individual programme makers 5elect present the programmes. individual programme makers select the best person for that programme on an individual basis. i'm not saying it i5 individual basis. i'm not saying it is right or wrong but at this time the seam to be more men available the seam to be more men available the moment for major bbc programmes. that is not to say women are not
3:23 pm
better or equal because in the past women have dominated. there's a lot of focus on lack of impartiality but there is a focus on the bbc on a of hiring. you do see when a programme producer has the ability to hire lots of people they do try to make sure there is a cross thread are people working on a show. like bbc brea kfast a re people working on a show. like bbc breakfast are good morning britain rather portfolio shows you see a whole diversity of presenter5. an individual shows the individual presenter will select the right person for thejob. you could argue one of the biggest programmes in britain is to women, not a woman and a man. i am talking about strictly. claudia and tess have been selected because they are the best. in radio 2in because they are the best. in radio 2 in the morning you go from vanessa feltz to another lady pre5enter. two
3:24 pm
prime—time radio 2 radio shows. men accepted prime—time radio 2 radio shows. men a cce pted to prime—time radio 2 radio shows. men accepted to women in the morning, va nessa accepted to women in the morning, vanessa and zoe ball, an absolutely brilliant for thejob. vanessa and zoe ball, an absolutely brilliant for the job. i do vanessa and zoe ball, an absolutely brilliant for thejob. i do not think there is this big wish to not have one kind of person but i think programme makers are con5ciou5 have one kind of person but i think programme makers are conscious of the fact they have to make sure there is equality and fairness and they are making sure of that. it is a slow process but it is a process thatis a slow process but it is a process that is happening. certa still about talent rather than box ticking? yes, i think that is right and i don't think people want to be hard for box ticking. you talk to people who do get hired for box ticking and they don't want that. they want to be hired on the basis of the talent and ican think hired on the basis of the talent and i can think of some fantastic woman. ican think i can think of some fantastic woman. i can think of some fantastic woman. i can think of fantastic non—white people who are leading in the roles that they do and are fantastic. zoe ball taking over from chris that they do and are fantastic. zoe ball taking overfrom chris evans on radio two breakfast is a case in
3:25 pm
point. she is absolutely fantastic and the right person for the job. she was not chosen because she is woman but because she is simply brilliant. what does the release of this information due to the prices in the commercial sector? does it as the bbc would argue rai5e in the commercial sector? does it as the bbc would argue raise the bar if everybody 5ee5 with the bbc is being? —— everybody 5ee5 with the bbc is bein — everybody 5ee5 with the bbc is being? -- paying. lets everybody 5ee5 with the bbc is b' __ . everybody 5ee5 with the bbc is bei 7-- ' everybody 5ee5 with the bbc is being? -- paying. lets say itv want gary lineker. if they know what he i5 gary lineker. if they know what he is being paid they know what to offer to get him. i am not sure it help5 offer to get him. i am not sure it helps the bbc commercially, their rivals knowing the price. but i do think very strongly it is a balance between it being paid for by the taxpayer and you and me and the cameraman and anyone else watching the show. so there is the need for transparency in terms of what we would pay people. i question as to whether exact 5alary should be
3:26 pm
listed as opposed to bands because i think people are entitled to privacy. even though you a highly paid television presenter it is not exactly right people in your street no how much you paid other parents of your children's friends. but clearly it is paid for by the taxpayer so it should be opened what the bbc spans and it is very transparent now. does this make your life a lot harder a5 transparent now. does this make your life a lot harder as an agent?” don't think it makes my life harder or ea5ier, don't think it makes my life harder or easier, it is part of the bu5iness. or easier, it is part of the business. as a taxpayer i believe in transparency and openness. i pay a licence but like anyone else and i wa nt licence but like anyone else and i want equality. what i do think perhaps it is wrong sometimes the com plete perhaps it is wrong sometimes the complete focu5 perhaps it is wrong sometimes the complete focus on salaries. organisations pay their staff a big percentage of the income to get the bus staff to work for them. presenters and staff and if you want presenters —— migrate sent are
3:27 pm
producers working behind the scenes to ensure a high standard of broadcast for the bbc, if you don't hire the best you don't get the best. i think there is a balance between not paying too much and not hiring the best. i think the bbc straddle that well. i as an agent often straddle that well. i as an agent ofte n get straddle that well. i as an agent often get the best fees for my clients and the bbc often say no and say your client has to make the decision whether they want to work for the bbc are not and there is a valid case for that. but i think people are right to work for the bbc and talent that does work for the bbc generally accept they get less than commercial rivals for the privilege of working for the bbc and the bbc remains the greatest broadcaster in the world. england are playing in the semifinals of the world cup but they're not the only tea m world cup but they're not the only team from the uk to have success in the uk this month. the woman's parliamentary book club was set up
3:28 pm
last year and at this part was part ofa last year and at this part was part of a world record attempt in leon for the largest number of players to play in a five aside much. after 69 hours and 807 players on the pitch and a score of 440 369 they succeeded. we will talk about that and the match tonight. we are topped that joined by tracey and the match tonight. we are topped thatjoined by tracey crouch, the new world record holder. it came about because i was banned from playing with the men's team years ago and there was always this desire and ambition to set up a woman's parliamentary team. it has taken quite a few years to encourage other mp5 to come forward and join us but eventually with the support of our sponsor we managed to get a team together. and we have played our first match and really we're just building the from there. —— building
3:29 pm
the team. i have always played striker so i am kind of the goal hanger ultimately. in my younger days i played on the wing but i have those been a centre forward striker. give us some highlights. what happened at the weekend? give us some highlights. what happened at the weekend7m give us some highlights. what happened at the weekend? it was an initiative run by equal playing field which involve the guinness world record attempt which were successful but also being used to highlight there is still huge inequality in women's sport around the world so it was wonderful we we re the world so it was wonderful we were there as the uk parliamentary tea m were there as the uk parliamentary team but to meet other people from as far as saudi arabia and other countries that still face enormous challenges for women who want to play any sport but also football. we are all watching the lionesses tonight. what is your name? we have thought about green goddesses and things like that but we are just the
3:30 pm
parliamentary team. who are the stars players? to be honest with you, we haven't really kind of built the team to be designed like that. it is competitive and we are all members of parliament so we are competitive there are a lot of players playing football for the very first time and one of the great things about the success of the england team and the growth of football across the country as it is not just about girls football across the country as it is notjust about girls getting inspired to play football but older woman have never played before and actually now kicking a ball for the very first time i do think if can encourage that and get people getting out there on a page, no longer standing on the sidelines i think that is part of the success about what the lionesses is achieving. and your team brings left—wingers and right wingers together. we certainly do. we could build many political analogies but
3:31 pm
we leave politics aside. it is one of the nice things about both training and playing football, it is not actually about politics and who you support. in parliament. it is about kicking a ball and having fun and keeping fit. it has got you off the benches. that was a tough one. let's talk about tonight. this is quite a moment, notjust for england and eglin's women footballers, but actually for the nation, because we realise this is a sport that really has captured the imagination. realise this is a sport that really has captured the imaginationm realise this is a sport that really has captured the imagination. it is, we have come a long way, i was fortu nate we have come a long way, i was fortunate enough to be in montreal to see the lionesses in the last world cup, and not many people noticed, and if i mayjust say, i think there has been a vindication of the bbc head of sport and that she has pushed for women's football to be on the bbc, on terrestrial tv,
3:32 pm
not just to be on the bbc, on terrestrial tv, notjust on to be on the bbc, on terrestrial tv, not just on the to be on the bbc, on terrestrial tv, notjust on the red button or any of the other digital platforms. that has helped grow the game. the more people that can watch women's football, see it is something that isa football, see it is something that is a good spectator sport, family friendly, technically very good, the more the game will grow. i do think that there is still a lot to do, a huge amount of inequality which you we re huge amount of inequality which you were just talking about, pay in the bbc, the average female professional footballer earns about £27,000 per year. the average male footballer is about £2.4 million. there is still a huge pay difference. there is still sponsorship difference, infrastructure differences in terms of facility provision. there is a long way to go, but the lionesses are long way to go, but the lionesses a re really long way to go, but the lionesses are really inspiring a nation to get behind football and women's football and see them grow from the grassroots up. does mike i suspect the tougherjob in football would be
3:33 pm
managing a group of mp5 on the pitch. i have been a manager and i managed a girls team from under tens up managed a girls team from under tens up until they were ladies, it is pretty tough to stop girls from chatting throughout a football match. but it was an enormous privilege and i still stay in contact with many of the girls who are now young women who still continue to play football, i diameter readily proud to see them grow up and still have this passion for a sport. managing anything is particularly different. i imagine it managing us as a group of mp5 must be an enormous challenge. phil neville would be welcome to come and instill some discipline into our tea m instill some discipline into our team talks. there are some jobsjust not even slightly that you would wa nt to not even slightly that you would want to do. tracey crouch, good to talk to you, congratulations for playing that weekend. but have a look at the weather. we have been talking about climate change and the heatwave, but you are looking up
3:34 pm
monsoon weather, that is mumbai. an annual occurrence in india, something that happens, the onset is protected within a few days, a very regular pattern. interestingly the monsoon has actually been very late in india this year, meaning that the rains have arrived, slow to arrive, but any last couple of days have all ofa but any last couple of days have all of a sudden reached by agger had been problems because a lot of rainfall ina been problems because a lot of rainfall in a short space of time. the reason why i am showing this is because we are going to talk about the european monsoon, because that is something we have never heard of before. we see the headlines in papers, monsoon britain or monsoon strikes the uk overnight, and we think of rainfall. we will talk about the european monsoon in a
3:35 pm
second, but i want to just before we get to that illustrate what the monsoon actually is. contrary to popular belief, the word monsoon does not actually talk about the rainfall, it is all about the wind. this is the subcontinent, so we have india, heating up through the months of april, may, earlyjune, we get the highest temperatures, and the monsoon is a joint sea breeze. if you're at a beach early in the morning, heating up in the afternoon, you get a sea breeze of the english channel, this is a seasonal thing. the heater draws it in, the warmth from the ocean. this is the latest satellite picture, you can see cloud across india, now i will show you the european monsoon. this is a very loose theory at the moment. it is proposed. it is not mine, iam moment. it is proposed. it is not mine, i am sure there are many
3:36 pm
papers written at universities about theirs, but it is observed that as we head into this time of the year, the end ofjune and july, the continent particular southern areas of europe heat up and we see the westerly wind petting up a bit. quite possibly spoiling the weather. this might better tell us what is in store. know monsoon is, i am pleased to say. mid week it is looking quite across to say. mid week it is looking quite a cross m ost to say. mid week it is looking quite across most of the uk, decent warm sunny spells. having said that, wind blowing off the atlantic, north—westerly wins, this area of cloud here, that is heading towards scotland, that will upset the weather a little bit in the next couple of days. high pressure over us couple of days. high pressure over us right now will slip further towards the south and give way to a low pressure and weather front and some cloud and rain across scotland. not today, today is looking beautiful out there, if you have
3:37 pm
been out you know her how lovely it is, fair weather cloud. cleaving sky tonight, a lovely sunset, temperatures early not to low, 14 celsius in london, rearing its head is the weather front approaching our north—western scotland. spots of rain in stornoway first thing. tomorrow cloudier, but i suspect glasgow and edinburgh should get away with it, a decent day with some sunny spells add a beautiful day for the most part across northern ireland, wales and england. that high pressure that i mentioned is in fa ct high pressure that i mentioned is in fact slipping a little bit further southwards as we head into sunday, here is the icelandic low, bringing the rain and the cloud to scotland, this thursday is probably going to be the cloudier state, and the wettest across the northern half of scotla nd wettest across the northern half of scotland this week, whereas in the south we still hang onto the fine weather, you can see a big difference in the wind, blowing out of the north—west across scotland,
3:38 pm
in the south windless weather, sunny, orange building, the temperature expected to rise across the southern half of the country. by thursday we could be talking about 26 class. we will keep that weather into friday as well. —— 26 plus. it will not last for too long, you can see the cool northerly winds sweeping in across the uk, pushing warmth back into europe as is often the case. the forecast, brief spell of warmth thursday, friday across southern parts of the uk and come the weekend those temperatures drop. if you look at these weather symbols, it actually looks not bad at all across most of the uk. some decent weather to come.
3:39 pm
this is bbc news, our latest headlines. borisjohnson this is bbc news, our latest headlines. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conserve the party members in northern ireland. an investigation is under way after a stowaway fell from this plane into a stowaway fell from this plane into a london garden. we women make it into the top ten of the bbc's highest paid on—air talent. sport now, here is ollie. british success at wimbledon, we are all hoping for more success later. a bit of a mixed day for the british players on the second day at wimbledon. court number one, live pictures ofjohanna konta, the british number one facing the romanian qualifier. met on clay
3:40 pm
earlier this year, johanna konta one that that in three sets. it is johanna konta's eighth wimbledon, only reached the second week once and that was a couple of years ago when she made the semifinals. good start against the remaining. she won the first set 7—5, quite tight, but just growing into the game now. it is all square in the second set by the looks of it. johanna konta is one of eight british players in action today. dan evans cruised through to the second round, beat federico bonus in straight sets. next up is the 18th seed who came from two sets down to knock out the british playerjames. from two sets down to knock out the british player james. great from two sets down to knock out the british playerjames. great win for harry and dart. she beat the american player who is ranked over 70 places above her. she lost the first set, won the last couple, 6—4,
3:41 pm
6-4, the first set, won the last couple, 6—4, 6—4, the much likely to hours and 20 minutes. a shock looked to be on the cards on centre court, the eight time champion roger federer, these are live pictures from centre court on bbc one, that is the south african lloyd harris who took the first set against federer. 6—3. the first set against federer. 6—3. the first time he is on the whim of the main draw. right 86 in the world, but federer got angry. he took the second set 6—1, so all square. order has been restored. after a couple of rest days that the women's world cup, the time has come for the england lionesses to face the usa in their semifinal later tonight. jane dougal is in the stadium. afternoon. the usa are looking to get into their faith world cup final. why should england feel so bullish, they
3:42 pm
have been, haven't they? some might say confident, and perhaps that confidence has been lacking in some england sides in the past. confidence and belief in the fight they can win is something that the usa team have in buckets. that is why the art world number one and by the one—day world cup four times. perhaps if england do need to get to a final then they have to emulate that confidence, and phil neville has said he would not have taken thisjob 18 months ago if he felt that they could not when this cup edition. do not forget that eglin have beaten the usa before entering 17, and ella white goal separated them and on american tour. eggert also drew 2—2 with america the as many as are of the opinion, say "aye". to the contrary, "no".. america not infallible. someone who has been in the squad a long time where you lead got knocked out, alex
3:43 pm
scott, she believes they can go one better. a semifinal is not good enough, it is not good enough we get toa enough, it is not good enough we get to a semifinal and go home or play ina to a semifinal and go home or play in a bronze medal match. this england team now want to win. they are not scared to say it, they believe that they should be winning four double that is different, a step forward, and rightly so, because we have got to this stage three times in a row, you need to go one better. i love that they come out and they have the confidence to say that. i think a lot of people like that they have that confidence, as it will be a lot of people watching a sell—out 57,900 crowd here at the stadium. you can see the pictures looking lush, watered, they have 20 speckles off now because we we re have 20 speckles off now because we were getting a little wet earlier. all set for tonight. stay cool, stay many thanks. eight o'clock kick—off
3:44 pm
on bbc one. the women's cat mike ashley starts today, england and australia playing the first in leicester. terrible start for england. they have lost a seventh wicket in the last couple of seconds, they were 103—6, but now they have lost a seventh wicket only one day. the then the test, a multiformat as it has been over the last couple of times, and then to 620 is. last couple of times, and then to g20 is. england making a poor start. you can follow that on radio four and on the bbc sport website where we will her have an update. the chinese government has condemned the protests in hong kong as an undisguised charge to israel by violent offenders. yesterday pro—democracy demonstrators stormed the parliament, occupying its chamber and scrawling graffiti on the walls. china's state media have denounced the protests as mob violence, and warned western powers including britain against interference in chinese internal affairs. but here, the foreign secretary jeremy hunt says the authorities in hong kong must not respond with repression.
3:45 pm
nick beake has the latest. they were already trying to repair the damage done to hong kong's battered parliament. but these protests have inflicted other wounds, deep wounds, which will not be easily healed. thousands of young hong kong people besieged the building yesterday, saying they did not want to be part of china. a seemingly leaderless protest powered by social media and anger. they even took over the chamber, where normally it's the city's politicians in control. one demonstrator told us why he was there. i think it is important for us to show what we are fighting for. and we are willing to risk ourfuture, in a sense, to fight for what we are doing. today, when we met this architect again, he tried to defend what happened. nobody wants to step over that line, if there is such a line,
3:46 pm
and i think the one that steps over the line first is the hong kong government. they have been ignoring us for so many years. their administration is getting worse. they are pushing us towards the edge. but beijing condemned the protesters as violent criminals and told the world not to interfere in its business. translation: the violent storming of the parliament building in hong kong and the indiscriminate damage to parliament's facilities is a serious illegal act that trampled on the rule of law and damaged public order. we strongly condemn this. the former british colony has not seen anything like this in the 22 years since it was handed back to beijing. the uk has condemned the violence, but says it happened for a reason. we urge the authorities not to use what happened as a pretext for repression, but rather to understand the root
3:47 pm
causes of what happened, which is a deep—seated concern by people in hong kong that their basic freedoms are under attack. hong kong's police, who deny claims they lured protesters in by simply standing by, say they are now gathering evidence for future prosecutions. and the prospect of hundreds of young citizens being put on trial is likely to generate yet more anger in a city already in turmoil. meps from the brexit party have turned their backs on the anthem of europe in the european parliament any first official sitting in the new session. those mike adam fleming gave us this update. two things to point out about this new session, the first is that the make—up of the chamber is much more fragmented than it has been in the past. for
3:48 pm
decades, here was dominated by the pan—european political alliance of the centre—left parties and the centre—right parties who clubbed together to get legislation through an approved big decisions in their favour. the european parliament elections back in may saw them do much less well than they had done in the past i had a better performance for liberal parties and green parties, so they will have much more ofan parties, so they will have much more of an influence, and things here will just be of an influence, and things here willjust be a bit more unpredictable. the other big thing to look at is the presence, continued presence of british meps. the uk was supposed to have left on the 29th of march, that was extended and then extended again, because the uk are stilla and then extended again, because the uk are still a member state it still legally is obliged and entitled to said members of the european parliament. there is still 73 british meps here. 29 of them are from the brexit party, and they staged a bit of a stunt at this morning as the opera singer and
3:49 pm
string quartet began playing the european anthem, adverse the brexit party m ps european anthem, adverse the brexit party mp5 refused to stand up then they stood up and turned their backs to the chamber and faced the wall, which some people thought was disrespectful, but i doubt it will attract any kind of disciplinary action. also here we saw a group of liberal democrats who are very pro—eu and very anti brexit. they wore bright yellow t—shirts with the word stop brexit on the front and much less light brexit on the back. egon is here with the business use, but first the headlines. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next by minister to conserve the party members in northern ireland. investigation is launched into how a man suspected of being a stowaway fell from this plane into a garden in south london. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc's taipei presenters, but the first seven are all men. —— top
3:50 pm
ten presenters. these are your business headlights. scotch whisky could be hit by new import tariffs in the united states. that is because america has threatened paris on around £3 million worth of goods from the eu. including scotch whisky and some cheese and plaster. activity in the construction industry fell dramatically last month. a new survey says it fell to its lowest level since 2009. building firms are claiming uncertainty over brexit. the country's five biggest gambling firms stay they are going to spend more money to help treat people with gabbling issues. the firms say they will donate around £60 million a year by 2023, i say it will be a big help in tackling addiction. critics argue it isjust help in tackling addiction. critics argue it is just not enough. help in tackling addiction. critics argue it isjust not enough. will pull coming under pressure over the
3:51 pm
safety of its tumble dryers. special committee in westminster is looking into this and bosses have said there could be as many as 800,000 faulty tumble dryers in the uk. last month the government did say they would force the recall of around half a million whirlpool tumble dryers because they could pose a fire risk. the company says they are committed to safety, they say they have been bitterly fixing, dries around the country. —— busily. at that one take and what right has been modified it is absolutely fine to use. the problem with that is that even so, whirlpool tumble dryers have been implicated in 750 fires over 11 years. lets talk to rachel reeves who chairs the business energy and industrial
3:52 pm
strategy select committee. she is joining us now from westminster. this is quite an admission from the company. it was quite shocking some of the things we heard in the select committee meeting this morning. first of all we had a whirlpool customer who had heard, drier modified and yet it caught fire. two a long time for the modification to happen at when it did happen the tumble dryer clearly was still not safe and she was in her home with her three young children point happened that was lucky to get out. she spoke about her experience of dealing with whirlpool and said she was made to feel like nobody by the company. many months on she still had not had an apology or even seen the forensic report of what had caused her public drier to catch fire. whirlpool apologised to her today in our select committee and
3:53 pm
thatis today in our select committee and that is welcome, but they are still ina that is welcome, but they are still in a situation where after 300,000 -- 800,000 in a situation where after 300,000 —— 800,000 tumble dryers who have not been modified, where there is a complete lack of confidence even in that modification programme, so the 1.7 million machines that have been modified, there is still a concern about whether those are safe because of the experience of customers who gave evidence to our select committee. what is your advice to consumers? whirlpool told committee. what is your advice to consumers? whirlpooltold us they are now stepping up their recall process, everybody with an affected machine to court contact whirlpool but they still have not given out the full list of models that are affected by this defect. they say that if you go on their website you can identify whether your machine is affected. whirlpool also today gave affected. whirlpool also today gave a commitment that you can also get a new tumble dryer rather than just having to get your existing one
3:54 pm
modified, and we are seeking clarity of exact what that means in practice, but it could be good news for some of these up to 800,000 customers who have still got an unmodified machine in their home. code three still have a lot of questions to answer, for example the customer who gave evidence to us today had to sign a nondisclosure agreement when she was given compensation by whirlpool, ad there are many instances of these nondisclosure agreements, confidentiality clauses being used by the company to effectively silence people who have experienced problems with their tumble dryers. when the company say they want to learn from their experiences out they want customers to come forward, i think it is disappointing that they are gagging customers who do wa nt they are gagging customers who do want to speak about what has happened to them, to draw attention to these issues and to stop buyers like that experience by the customer and other people's homes. thanks for
3:55 pm
joining us. more business a little later on, thank you. chris pike is qualified government action to tackle persecution of birds of prey after two young golden eagles disappeared from a peugeot estate. lee scotland has confirmed it is looking into the disappearance in april. a review is expected to be published in the coming months. i can speak to ian thomson who is the rspb scotland head of investigations and it followed the police investigation into theirs. we are talking about adam and charlie, two golden eagles who disappeared some time ago. yes, these are two birds that were tagged as young birds in loch lomond national park, one of them a couple of years ago and won last summer. we had monitored them using satellite transmitters which would provide very accurate location information, and i like your last
3:56 pm
piece, they were fitted with reliable kits, studies have shown tagged reliability to be 97—98%. on the 18th of april, both birds were in an area managed for driven grouse shooting in perthshire, and inexplicably they both very suddenly went off the air. that is exceedingly suspicious. notjust went off the air. that is exceedingly suspicious. not just for those two birds, but because these arejust those two birds, but because these are just the latest of something like 50 golden eagles to disappear in scotland in a similarfashion of the last ten years. the estate that is not under investigation, the police are saying that no crime has been committed. there is no evidence that a crime has been committed, that a crime has been committed, thatis that a crime has been committed, that is correct, but what we have here is an increasing amount of circumstantial evidence, not just from these cases but from now something like 50 cases where birds are fitted with these very reliable
3:57 pm
satellite transmitters have been in these areas managed for driven grouse shooting and just suddenly disappeared. these disappearances are happening almost exclusively in that habitat. if the birds had died naturally, we would expect to be able to find them. they would be lying on the ground, transmitters still functioning, but they suddenly stopped, that is concerning. what is to be gained by doing anything to golden eagles, beauti creatures like this? it is not skilled in eagles, it is hen harriers, red kites, peregrine falk and, buzzards, and u nfortu nately peregrine falk and, buzzards, and unfortunately some associated with the driven grouse management industry feel that any bird of prey poses a threat to potential profits and has to be got rid of. we have had numerous convictions and court cases, findings of poisoned birds, almost exclusively in areas managed for driven grouse shooting. it really appears to us at many other people that we have an industry that
3:58 pm
is sticking to fingers up to all of us is sticking to fingers up to all of us who care about the conservation of our wildlife. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. a lot of fine weather today, a beautiful and to the day, how about midway? more of the same, warm and sunny spells on the way, but not everywhere. on the satellite image, if you cast your ice to the north—west, this is a weather front and it is approaching scotland, carried by these north—westerly winds. motocross across scotland the weather will be a lot more cloudy, particularly across the north. but todayit particularly across the north. but today it is sunny spells pretty much all around. tonight you will start to see that when the front encroaching into the western isles, so it turns cloudy. and away, may be spits and spots of rain but to the south of that it is looking clear and quite warm first thing. 14
3:59 pm
celsius. cloudier skies with a little bit of rain and northern parts of the uk on wednesday, but south of the lowlands of the weather should be sunny and temperatures widely into the high teens or the low 205.
4:00 pm
borisjohnson boris johnson and jeremy hunt borisjohnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conservative party members in northern ireland. the union comes first. the solution has been for the whole uk to come out in its entirety from the eu. the principle is the backstop, which traps a centre following eu customs tariffs until the eu give us permission to leave the customs union, and that is not acceptable. the stowaway who fell from this plane into a london garden. an investigation is under way. three women make it to the top ten of the bbc's highest paid on—air talent. and coming up, or the sport. joe johanna konta is a couple of games
4:01 pm
away from winning her first round match at wimbledon. we will head live to the all england club. it remains very quiet on the weather front. for most of us, sunny spells, turning warmer towards the end of the week. ahead of the lioness‘s semifinal, we will be at beth mead's old school in yorkshire to see how she is inspiring the next generation in halfan she is inspiring the next generation in half an hour. it has been one of the major sticking points in brexit negotiations but the two candidates vying to be prime minister have been
4:02 pm
outlining their plans for the irish border. in the latest leadership hustings in belfast, jeremy hunt said it would be impossible to have an eu withdrawal deal that included the current provision. borisjohnson insisted there would be hard border. he said the issue would be resolved ina he said the issue would be resolved in a free trade after brexit. they both want to be the prime minister who takes the country out of the eu. and they are in the part of the uk which in many ways is on the brexit frontline. the union comes first, of course, but i believe that we should not be faced with that choice. and the solution must be for the whole uk to come out. yesterday, i met representatives from the northern ireland farmers' union, the food and drink federation, people from the border towns around newry, and they talked to me about their concerns about a no—deal situation. the border is almost invisible, but looms large
4:03 pm
in the contest for no 10. everyone involved in the brexit negotiations has agreed on the aim. they want the border to remain, in essence, as it is at the moment. open with traffic free—flowing and no checks. but there has not been agreement on how you achieve that and it has become the biggest sticking point in the whole process. the most controversial part of the current withdrawal agreement is the backstop that would guarantee no hard border if there is no big free trade deal between the uk and eu. it would mean the whole of the uk would share customs arrangements with the eu, and northern ireland would follow a number of european rules on trading goods. borisjohnson thinks the issue should be dealt with in trade talks after the uk leaves. we should have a standstill, protract the existing arrangements and use that time, whether it is an implementation period or whatever, to do the trade deal and sort out the facilitations we will need.
4:04 pm
jeremy hunt also wants rid of the backstop. the principle is the backstop which traps us into following eu customs tariffs until the eu give us permission to leave the customs union. and for a brexit vote that was about bringing back sovereignty to parliament, that is not acceptable. both he and mrjohnson have suggested technology could help to avoid checks on the frontier. but the eu said it will not reopen negotiations and the backstop must stay. this expert warns the challenge is not getting easier. changing prime minister does not change the reality of brexit. the choices that are difficult that the prime minister theresa may has had to face remain the same. the border brainteaser remains unsolved. finding a solution will be one of the toughest tasks for the new man in downing street. following the hustings this afternoon, borisjohnson travelled
4:05 pm
to meet arlene foster in stormont. he was given a tour of the historic building's assembly and senate chambers. she has refused to back either candidate but said the deadline had to be met. speaking to me earlier, our reality check corresponded to meet technology and alternative arrangements cannot guarantee a northern irish border as frictionless as it is at the moment. jeremy hunt talked about a technology led solution and forms the basis of both of their plans, and yes there is technology which can make things easier at borders, number plate recognition, radio frequency id, bar codes. but it does not get rid of things altogether and specifically on the single market, it does not get rid of the need for checks on food and animals. there is this alternative arrangement commission involving tory mp5 who support brexit, they put out a big report a week ago. they said, when i
4:06 pm
have an arrangement to have a joint area for food standards between britain and ireland? that might work for the british side but for the irish, what is in it for them if they are tying themselves in terms of regulation to britain, that is one step away from the single market. the problem with all of this as there are three places. if you are going to have cheques going into the single market, there are three places you can have them in ireland, near the land border, or between ireland and the rest of the great britain, and owner for the ireland and the rest of the great britain, and ownerfor the dup and both of these tory leadership candidates, or between the republic of ireland and the rest of the eu which would shut the map of the single market. danny dyer called it a mad wriggle. that is the madrigal for brexit, and so far we have not had anything from either of these leadership candidates. you have just quoted danny dyer?”
4:07 pm
leadership candidates. you have just quoted danny dyer? i have, yes. we ought to perhaps examine what we are listening to here. these are tory hustings. we are not looking necessarily at something that will please those looking for a real answer. it was interesting, listening to the question asked. quite a few of them, totally understandably, what would they do to boost the tory party in northern ireland? to boost the tory party in northern ireland ? that's to boost the tory party in northern ireland? that's not what the rest of the country wanted to hear about. the big question for the incoming prime minister will be, what would you do about brexit? and at the heart of that is the question of the irish border. as i say, technology and alternative arrangements can all help, but the promise has been there will be a frictionless border is open as it is now, and there is nothing so far in those technological solutions that can guarantee something else. the shadow
4:08 pm
chancellor says the civil service should prepare for a general election in the autumn and a labour government. he also says labour is determined to stop or no—deal brexit. let's get more of this from our chief political correspondent in westminster. what else has he been saying? it is interesting that john mcdonnell thinks we are heading towards a general election. the reason he thinks that is because he thinks it will be a very unstable situation, mainly because of brexit, but he had a jibe at borisjohnson, saying the instability of mrjohnson in all aspects of his life and in political decision—making is one of the deepest worries we all must have. he also thought the civil service should be speaking to labour, preparing for a labour government and making preparations for a second referendum on leaving the eu. now, he was questioning philip hammond. it was a very
4:09 pm
bizarre treasury questions because people started paying tribute to mr hammond, all saying they assumed this would be the last time he would appearas this would be the last time he would appear as chancellor, assuming that whoever becomes prime minister, he would no longer be chancellor. the question he asked him was, would he be prepared to help labour stop nodal brexit? let me say this. i have been consistently clear that i believe leaving with a no deal exit will be bad for the uk and the british economy and the british people. we cannot however rule out that that could happen because it is not entirely in our hands, but i do agree with him that it would be wrong for the british government to seek to pursue no deal is a policy, andl seek to pursue no deal is a policy, and i believe that it will be for the house of commons, of which i will continue proudly to be a member, to ensure that does not happen. many people listening to that really felt that was a threat
4:10 pm
from philip hammond that if he was on the backbenches he would do everything in his power to stop an ideal brexit happening. the question is, would he be willing and a vote of confidence to bring down a new tory prime minister who was determined to pursue that? this uncertainty set to continue, john mcdonnell saying thatjeremy corbyn is due to meet the top civil servant mark sedwill shortly. we are not sure when that will happen, but that is all about suggestions in the times newspaper reporting that civil serva nts times newspaper reporting that civil servants were talking about mr corbyn's health, saying he was not fit, he was too frail to be prime minister, labour calling for an independent investigation into all of that. we will see whether that becomes independent or whether the cabinet office pursues it, but labour feels the civil service should do more to engage with them because they think there could be a general election on the horizon. would you describe the mood in labour is angry after those claims of the week weekend? they think it
4:11 pm
is inappropriate. the problem is, it is inappropriate. the problem is, it isa is inappropriate. the problem is, it is a question of whether it is civil serva nts is a question of whether it is civil servants gossiping or whether it was something more than that. downing street had been pressed on all of this, they say there will be an inquiry into all of that, they say that if any individual is found to have done this suitable action will be taken. always good to see you, thank you very much. a fire aboard a russian navy vessel has killed 14 crew members according to reports in the russian media. the vessel was based in the manx region. russian defence ministry says the fire started as the sailors were taken by metric readings and an investigation into the incident is now under way. and an investigation is under way after a suspected stowaway fell into after a suspected stowaway fell into a london garden where a man was sunbathing. police said the stowaway
4:12 pm
had from a kenya airways flight. it is thought the man had hidden in the plane's landing gear and has raised questions about airport security.
4:13 pm
this is the kenya airways flight caught on camera on sunday. the plane was high in the sky over south london. a man believed to have hidden in the landing gear compartment at nairobi airport fell. his body landed in this property's back garden. and this photo shows extensive damage caused to a concrete path where the body fell. according to a neighbour, the body, believed to be of a man, hit the ground just a metre from a man who rents this property who was sunbathing at the time. the man stowed away in the undercarriage of the plane would have fallen some 3500 feet. given the impact of the tenant at this property is lucky he wasn't hurt or even killed. the flight left nairobi at 7:19am on sunday. it landed more than eight hours later at 3:42 pm. just minutes before that, police were called to clapham, where a body had fallen in someone's backyard. hiding in the undercarriage just before take—off should be incredibly hard. security checks like these at nairobi airport increased after 9/11. typically, a pilot or engineer will carry out final checks roughly 45 minutes before take—off. and he would have had to climb up as quickly as possible along this bit of metal and into the rear arch. but after a similar incident a few years ago, a bbc reporter shows
4:14 pm
in this documentary how someone could do it. but getting inside is the easy bit. to survive an entire flight in a part of an aircraft which isn't pressurised, someone would have to cheat an almost certain death. the undercarriage bay is outside the normal pressurisation of the aircraft. so they are subjected to freezing temperatures and very little oxygen. in addition, they can be crushed by the undercarriage coming up. their chances of survival are very remote indeed. i would say it is almost nil on a long haulflight. additionally, because they will pass out at high altitude, on the approach to land when the pilots lower the gear, they are not hanging on, so if they had survived the crushing end of the cold temperature, they then fall to their death. the identity of the person who fell has not been released. british police are not treating it as suspicious. but there are questions over how he made it on board at nairobi airport. some water, food and a bag were found in the undercarriage of the plane where the person hid before take—off. what happened is a major breach of security and the man had next to no chance
4:15 pm
of surviving the flight. borisjohnson boris johnson and jeremy hunt borisjohnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister in northern ireland. an investigation is launched into how a man fell from this plane into a garden in south london. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc's highest paid presenters but the first seven all men. the british number one joe johanna konta is the first seven all men. the british number onejoejohanna konta is true to the second round at wimbledon after a straight sets win after the romanian qualifier. other british players are also through. katie swann and james water out. it is the start of the women's cashes in england have made a bad start in the one day in leicester. 135—8 against australia. the england lionesses are preparing for their world cup semifinal in lyon against the usa, the reigning champions, apm kick—off. phil neville says they
4:16 pm
simply have to win, and we will be live there in the next 15 minutes. let's get more of one of those headline stories. three women have made the bbc's list of the highest earners. this is the first time since present to salaries were disclosed that women have made the top ten. 75 stars received more than hundred £50,000. the announcement comes at a difficult time for the bbc, already under fire after the recent decision to scrap free tv licences for over 75 is. good morning, radio superstar listeners. when the bbc first revealed the pay if its stars, the top
4:17 pm
ten was entirely male. things have changed. zoe ball is now one of three women in the list of highest—paid stars. alongside claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz. how does it feel being on the top earners list? i'm not quite sure how these things are calculated and i'm not certain that it's an accurate assessment of who is actually earning what. indeed many famous faces are not on the list. those employed by bbc studios do not appear but what it does show that the number being paid over £150,000 has increased from 64 to 75. all at a time when nearly 3 million pensioners are about to lose their free tv licences. i understand the dilemma of somebody who is thinking, i am having the licence fee taken away from me, of course i do. i understand that. £154.50 a year is a lot of money for people. on the other hand, what comes back from our consultation is, we also want to make sure that you have got stars you want to watch, want to listen to on the bbc,
4:18 pm
and that includes gary lineker. yes, gary lineker remains the highest paid star, on £1.75 million. but even if every star's pay was cut below £150,000, you would still save only about £20 million. the cost of tv licences is about £740 million. however, after months of protest about the pay gap between men and women, things have begun to change. it was a mixed bag. on the positive front, there was a significant drop in the gender pay gap, on the negative front, there was a substantial increase in the overall payments to presenters to 158 million. that against the background of the bbc's decision to pay for only 1.5 million licenses from next year has been hugely controversial. so, the pay gap has begun to shrink. but the issue of star pay and a rising talent bill does ask some awkward questions at a time
4:19 pm
when nearly three million pensioners are about to lose their free licenses. in the last few minutes, downing street has been talking about this, saying staffing costs have increased ata time saying staffing costs have increased at a time when the corporation cannot afford to pay for tv licences for over 75 is. the unofficial spokesman says the bbc has a responsibility to lead the way in promoting workplace equality and says they welcome this but there's more to do. the heatwave that gripped europe last week has made five times more likely by climate change, according to research by scientists. analysis shows that heatwaves are full degrees higher than a century ago and will occur more frequently than previously thought. 78—year—old man has been
4:20 pm
jailed for three years after he shot dead his six—year—old great—grandson in east yorkshire. stanley metcalfe died in hospital after being hit in the stomach by a pellet from the air rifle. a body has been recovered from waters of plymouth home after a search for the missing diver. the missing diver went missing. ten—year—old girl who social services believed to be at risk of fgm has been stopped by police from boarding a plane to africa. the child had her passport taken away before being detained at heathrow airport. this mother has a daughter who is the subject of an fgm protective order. why do i have to tell them where i am going? we have no freedom of movement, we have done nothing wrong. two weeks ago, she told the school she would take her
4:21 pm
daughter out of lessons before the end of term. her daughter was due to fly on thursday, the family say to visit her grandmother who is unwell. i could not afford the flight are needed to look after my other children so my cousin and her family agreed to take my daughter. butjust as she was boarding the plane, police detained her. she was crying and devastated, to be honest. they say she was kept in an interview room at a police station at the airport the three hours. the police took away her passport, they say she was not able to speak to her mother. can you understand that the police, social services, were trying to protect your daughter? no, i will not send my daughter to an unsafe place. i have a sister who is five yea rs place. i have a sister who is five years younger than me, and she has not had fgm, and she is a mum now, she has daughters and even my nieces, they have not had any fgm so as not even thinking of that. the
4:22 pm
family are also unhappy that even though the court order was issued 2pm, it was not acted on until six hours later. this has been so traumatic for my ten—year—old. hours later. this has been so traumatic for my ten-year-old. but bristol city council say they will a lwa ys bristol city council say they will always act if there is a concern. about fgm? yeah. which teacher is this? the head teacher. tonight a player is being performed by a community who the authorities to fgm is disproportionate. it does not happen any more. in fact, it is illegal in somalia. and speaking to friends and family who live in the country, it is not relevant for them any more. what if they get distracted and take me away? but a big part of the problem is we still don't know how many girls are actually at risk. the chinese
4:23 pm
government has content protests in hong kong is an undisguised challenge to its rule by violent offenders. yesterday demonstrators stormed the parliament. media in china has denounced as mob violence. a newspaper did not mention yesterday's protest but reported celebrations of the 22nd birthday of hong kong, spelling out, i love hk. the chinese nationalist daily paper kept pictures out of their addition but did publish reports in english and chinese, condemning clashes. what this probation newspaper paper ditch pictures of protests, saying mainstream public opinion firmly supports the police taking action as soon as possible to suppress violent terrorist incidents and severely punish the mobs. china's warned
4:24 pm
western powers against interference in china's internal affairs. the foreign secretary says the authorities in hong kong must not respond with repression. they were already trying to repair the damage done to hong kong's battered parliament. but these protests have inflicted other wounds, deep wounds, which will not be easily healed. thousands of young hong kongers besieged the building yesterday, saying they did not want to be part of china. a seemingly leaderless protest powered by social media and anger. they even took over the chamber, where normally it's the city's politicians in control. one demonstrator told us why he was there. i think it's important for us to show what we are fighting for. and we are willing to risk ourfuture, in a sense, to fight for what we are doing.
4:25 pm
today, when we met this architect again, he tried to defend what happened. nobody wants to step over that line, if there is such a line, and i think the one that steps over the line first is the hong kong government. they have been ignoring us for so many years. their administration is getting worse. they are pushing us towards the edge. but beijing condemned the protesters as violent criminals and told the world not to interfere in its business. translation: the violent storming of the parliament building in hong kong and the indiscriminate damage to parliament's facilities is a serious illegal act that trampled on the rule of law and damaged public order. we strongly condemn this. the former british colony has not seen anything like this in the 22 years since it was handed back to beijing. the uk has condemned the violence, but says it happened for a reason.
4:26 pm
we urge the authorities not to use what happened as a pretext for repression, but rather to understand the root causes of what happened, which is a deep—seated concern by people in hong kong that their basic freedoms are under attack. hong kong's police, who deny claims they lured protesters in by simply standing by, say they are now gathering evidence for future prosecutions. and the prospect of hundreds of young citizens being put on trial is likely to generate yet more anger in a city already in turmoil. i will china correspondent has been back to where the protesters smashed their way into the parliament building with this update. this was the area jam—packed with hundreds of protesters on monday night. they are now long gone but the aftermath of what some of them and it is clear to
4:27 pm
see. that huge hole is not supposed to be there. it is the steel rims torn down by some of the protesters and used to smash windows and gain entry to the legislative council. in the last few minutes, we have seen police officers filling up part of that lorry with material from inside, evidence i am sure that has been gathered as part of ongoing police investigations, and it is clear they are serious about investigating what happened on monday night here. they are keen to pursue those behind these illegal acts. as for the building, it is u nsafe for acts. as for the building, it is unsafe for use for now. a big hole where they should not be one. and the interior is not safe for use. so hong kong's politicians will not come back anytime soon to continue their work. in fact, come back anytime soon to continue theirwork. infact, it come back anytime soon to continue their work. in fact, it could go into an early summer recess and return in october. that gives them,
4:28 pm
the protesters, the political bosses plenty of time to consider what their next move should be. lepers might get more on that story we brought you a few moments ago, russia's defence ministry says 14 sailors have died after what it describes as a deepwater submersible. with me now is ogre, from the bbc russian service. what do we know so far? we are getting information in small portions. it is a close city. you cannot get there without special conditions so it is ha rd to without special conditions so it is hard to get any information out. what we know for sure is that the incident happened yesterday. this caught fire, at least 14 members of the crew are dead. everything else is different versions. this brings to mind 2000 and the submarine
4:29 pm
disaster, the same base involved. do we know if still a rescue operation? the russian defence ministry reported that the apparatus itself has been brought back, and now they are examining it, which means that at least the object itself is back to base. no more details are known, but it is interesting to see it in comparison, because in 2000 russian officials did not give any information, they were releasing information, they were releasing information in small portions, now they are the first to report on it, so we see how attitudes are changing and how they are trying to control information and trying to be in charge of the news. for the families of those involved, would they be aware of what has happened? for sure. it is a huge tragedy in the second tragedy which has hit the city. many families who were
4:30 pm
involved in that tragedy were living in the city itself, and for sure eve ryo ne in the city itself, and for sure everyone in that city know someone who serves on the navy, so it is very personalfor who serves on the navy, so it is very personal for people. who serves on the navy, so it is very personal for peoplem who serves on the navy, so it is very personal for people. if you try to drive up there, to try to find out more, at what point would you get stopped, and how would you be stopped? you would be stopped at the entrance to the city because it is a closed city in a military base. you need to have permission. my collea g u es need to have permission. my colleagues have applied for permission now, but it is unlikely we will get it soon. you will be stopped and asked the documents for special permission. it is really ha rd to special permission. it is really hard to get any information out. realistically, will we ever know what went wrong here? the russians do not like to admit to anything going wrong, let alone that there has been a mistake. things change from time to time,
4:31 pm
times change, there are social networks and people are putting out information not just through officials of ace —— sources but also the internet. more may come out, of course be do not know much, we rely on official channels but there is hope there will be some other means of information that may be people will talk. time for a look at the weather. fine weather out there, i don't promises to be a beautiful end to the day. mid week, more of the same. warm, sunny spells on the way but not everywhere. on the satellite image, if you cast your ice to the north—west, south of iceland, a weather front approaching scotland. it is being carried by these north—westerly winds. tomorrow across scotland the weather will be across scotland the weather will be a lot more cloudy, particularly across the north, but today it is sunny spells pretty much all around.
4:32 pm
tonight you will see the weather front encroaching into the western isles, cloudy. and away, may some spots of rain but to the south of that it spots of rain but to the south of thatitis spots of rain but to the south of that it is looking clear and quite warm first thing on wednesday. 14 celsius. cloudier skies with a little bit of rain and northern parts of the uk on wednesday, but south of the lowlands the weather should be sunny and tempted widely into the high teens or the low 205. —— temperatures widely into the high teens.
4:33 pm
our latest headlines. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to co nse rve to be the next prime minister to conserve the party members in northern ireland. the union comes first. the solution must be for the whole uk to come out in its entirety from the eu. the pencil is the backstop which traps as into falling into eu customs tariffs are told that you give us permission to leave the customs union. that is not acceptable. an investigation is under way after a stowaway fell from this plane into a london garden. three women make it onto the top ten of the bbc's highest paid on air talent. meps from the brexit party turned their backs is that you and them is played during the opening session of the european parliament. time for the sport, we go to ollie. full more success for britain's
4:34 pm
players at wimbledon. sort of. i know you are excited by the football, but we cannot go too early. still ours to go before that world cup semifinal. we will get to lyon ina world cup semifinal. we will get to lyon in a bit. british players on the second day at wimbledon, a mixed day, eight have been or are going to be in first—round action, a big ask for all of them to make it through. there has been an off the chair. let speak to john, johanna konta there has been an off the chair. let speak tojohn, johanna konta reached the semifinals a couple of years ago, but that was the only time she has made it through to the second week. not much to bother her today. i think she will be pleased about that, safely progressing to the second round, because she is the british number one in the women's singles, and she had early exits and some of the grass court to admit at eastbourne and birmingham. she makes that transition onto the grass after what seemed a little difficulty for her in those tournaments. she will
4:35 pm
be pleased that she is through. she came toa be pleased that she is through. she came to a straight sets against ana bogdan, a player she had beaten previously, so will have felt confident of notching another one as she did today. as you say, semifinalist two years ago, interesting to hear martina navratilova in commentary saying she think she is a better player than she was when she reached the latter stages of women's into yes ago. the experts clearly thinking that johanna konta has the ability this year to go one step better potentially. talking about other brits in action, we have had two casualties, katie swann and james, but we do have six through to the second round. dan evans came through in his match against federico bonis, a straight sets win for him. also through, harriet dart, who beat christina mchale of the united states, the biggest when of her career. this is a further she has been ata career. this is a further she has been at a grand slam. a bumper day
4:36 pm
with those brits outside, some huge matches, not least in the men's draw with roger federer in action at the moment on centre court. the latest, familiar surroundings for roger federer, slow to get going it has to be said, having dropped the first set against lloyd harris of south africa who features at bremerton for the first time in his career. you see him there in his chair. it was a great start for high—risk taking the opening set, but roger federer hit back and to the next two sets, and roger federer is well on top in that the size of fourth set. he leads 5-2, the size of fourth set. he leads 5—2, so he will feel confident. he is serving now for the match. serena williams in action, and a rough and a dial hasjust taken williams in action, and a rough and a dial has just taken to court numberone, so a dial has just taken to court number one, so huge matches and ash barty also through, as is the defending champion in the women's
4:37 pm
singles, angelique kerber, a bumper day not just singles, angelique kerber, a bumper day notjust for the singles, angelique kerber, a bumper day not just for the british singles, angelique kerber, a bumper day notjust for the british but also those big ties as well whether all of those top names in the men's and women's singles. after a couple of rest days at the women's world cup, the time has come for the england lionesses to face the usa in their semifinal tonight. jane is in position. where are we? three do half hours away? it will be live on bbc one. a record audience which will be packed as well. is it fair to say that whoever comes through this one will be favourites for the whole thing? they are just doing the rehearsals behind me, for the flights and national anthem, so forgive us if it is loud, but not to make assumptions, but the other semifinal is between the netherlands and sweden, and you would predict that if england can beat the usa that if england can beat the usa that they could also beat either of those two sides, and the same goes
4:38 pm
for the usa, the world number ones. they are defending champions as well. in lodi going into this match with a great deal of confidence, because even some usa pundits have said the gap has narrowed between these two sites. phil neville said he would not have taken thisjob 18 months ago if he did not feel that egli could get to a final and could when there is competition. do not forget thatjust a when there is competition. do not forget that just a a few months ago, england drew against the usa on their home turf, in the she believes cup. they have beaten the usa before, so they are not infallible and that is why there is such a feeling of confidence in the england cap at the moment. the usa feel they are confident to, that is white will be such an exciting matchup. as expected, it will sell out, 57,900 well be packed in here. they are doing the rehearsals, we are just about to hear the national anthems.
4:39 pm
we cannot hang around, unfortunate, but we will hear it later. many thanks indeed. the women's ashes have started, playing over a multiformat series against one—day internationals, the first at grace roadin internationals, the first at grace road in leicester. as earlier won the toss, they are bowling first, seems to be a good choice, a terrible start for england who are looking to regain the ashes, reduced to 19-4 looking to regain the ashes, reduced to 19—4 at one stage, 64 from that, steady thing somewhat, one hutchinson defour— ninejust a couple of overs left. not sure whether that will be enough. they will have to bowl very well for the thatis will have to bowl very well for the that is all the sport for now, we'll pairable be that is all the sport for now, we'll pair able be back afterfive. —— will pair will be back. lets see what is happening around
4:40 pm
the country in the bbc's users around the uk. sport focused today, jenniferjones in cardiff tells about a possible distributed any ruling for boxers in wales. harry gration is in leeds where they have gone to the school of the england player beth. we will be with you shortly. jennifer, caused by wales amateur boxing body to scrap a field that prevents fighters from having beers. who is leading this call? that prevents fighters from having beers. who is leading this call7m is coming from a 20—year—old seat student at amit boxer, he has been told that he cannot compete in wales i lacey shakes his beard. he is originally from the east midlands but he is studying at cardiff university, and he says that the welsh amateur boxing association's clean—shaven rule is disk thierry and prevents him from competing because of his faith. in short, the seek principle of what is known as cash prevents the removal of hair on the body because it is believed to
4:41 pm
be sacred at a gift from god, therefore mr singh said shaving his beard is simply against his religion. the ban is unfair.” beard is simply against his religion. the ban is unfair. i would like to get a change because it is notjust for myself, like to get a change because it is not just for myself, it like to get a change because it is notjust for myself, it is like to get a change because it is not just for myself, it is for me at my seek brothers and muslim brothers are data out there who has a beard. just the fact you should be able to do it, no one should have to come to you to do that you change your appearance to participate in a sport. that is ridiculous. is that looking likely that this will be reversed? it has already been reversed? it has already been reversed in the lead. that happened around a month ago, at that followed around a month ago, at that followed a campaign by seek and muslim boxers over the border. mr saying what wales do follow, it could go to england to box but it would take a minimum ofan england to box but it would take a minimum of an hour and that of course a sibling particle in the long term. he says that the welsh amateur boxing association has told
4:42 pm
him that this essay health issue. we have been speaking to a fetter in sports ethics at cardiff metropolitan university who says there is some evidence that having facial hair may impede the referee and a doctor's ability to recognise and a doctor's ability to recognise and treat injuries. he says that does not necessarilyjustify a ban on beards. the question from an equality point of view is whether or not the potential harm or injury is significant enough to warrant a ban on beards. the answer to that in wales is in the hands of the welsh amateur boxing association who say they will decide this month whether under the rule is discriminatory and will also consider what is described as the sporting integrity of amateur boxing would be affected by abandoning the clean—shaven rule. that cannot come quickly enough for our amateur boxer, aaron singh, who says his prospects for boxing have already been hampered. lets go to
4:43 pm
harry. the lionesses, hours to go, you have gone down to the school of enclosed are beth, who is a real inspiration. yes, as are others as well. let me show you, this is like my bedroom at home, not with the ladies they are. but the colours are the same. let me introduce you to these ladies who happily captured our imagination. rachel daly from harrogate, lucy from york in the middle, jane moore from dinnington, beth mead from header well in north yorkshire. that is where we have been because we have been to her old school. you may remember in that la st school. you may remember in that last fantastic match when england beat norway, there was a wonderful goal scored by lucy bronze, but better leader created it. what we thought we would do is go back to her school and cf that girl could be created. because gather these pictures. you can see they have been working very hard on trying to
4:44 pm
recreate this goal, and i can tell you it was a very significant success. here comes the shot, eventually. the shot comes in, added his eight goal. there we go. we nearly got it right. we will get it right at 6:30pm on lu north. i have to say, the young girls are very proud of this lady. they worship her, she is a living legend i'd be asked them what they thought about tonight's match. she kicked it to lizzie bronze, lucy bronze even. add lucy briers kicked it into the goal. it isa lucy briers kicked it into the goal. it is a little school in header well, and she has been building up to get into the world cup. when she set up the goal for lucy, it was just incredible. she is from such a small area. as she has grown up into a big standard, and tried really
4:45 pm
ha rd to a big standard, and tried really hard to make it at the top. ghost might harry, a lot of us are still reeling but what is happening on your bedroom wall, but we will not go there right now. i want your commentary over there is goal attempt, and will run at one more time. off you go. this was a beautiful goal rated by beth mead. she puts the ball inside and then eventually lucy bronze came up and cracked it in. waiting for the past, there it is. not quite as accurate as the real thing, there it is. not quite as accurate as the realthing, but there it is. not quite as accurate as the real thing, but here comes the shot. i did went in, absolutely fantastic goal. harry, i do miss all those. will you be watching tonight? 0f those. will you be watching tonight? of course, absolutely. i will be leaving the studio at 7pm and high tailing it back, and i cannot wait for the game because ijust think that phil neville has created something quite extraordinary here and they are saying that we could be getting somewhere in the region of 10 million people watching. you will
4:46 pm
be as well. of course i well. harry, great to see you, thank you very much. jennifer, welcome to the programme, nice to see you both. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer, and a reminder we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm on afternoon life. the leaders of the european union's member states are meeting for a third day of talks to try and break a deadlock over who should fill the topjobs. the break a deadlock over who should fill the top jobs. the contagion break a deadlock over who should fill the topjobs. the contagion is who should be the successor to jean—claude juncker. —— contention. little time for niceties this morning with fatigue and frustration setting and for eu leaders as they struggle to decide on europe's top jobs. three days of negotiations still no white smoke. this has
4:47 pm
become a well worn red carpet over the last few days. the leaders have spent 17 hours inside this building, arguing, negotiating for who they want, the man or woman who will help shape the eu of the next five years, as they have become stuck, i don't like brexit where we solve the unity of 27, suddenly that unity has disappeared. abbey bid to stay three, at what is clear is that the approach taken so far is not producing the results. we have to work very hard today in order to find the best person for the top jobs. does might have you been ignored? we shall see. what is happening is a little power struggle. leaders need to agree on five posts, who replacesjean—claude juncker, the ex—president of the european council, the next president of the european parliament, the foreign affairs chief at the next head of the european central bank. achieving gender balance is important, too. we cannot speak about equality, we have to do it
4:48 pm
when we have the opportunity. this is the day. meps from the brexit party after their backs as the anthem of europe was turned —— played in the european parliament. our brussels corresponded as they are given this update. there are two things to point out about this new session of the european polymer here in strasbourg. the first is that the make up of the chamber is much more fragmented than it has been and the past. for decades the politics here was dominated by the pan—european clinical alliance of the centre—left parties and the centre—right parties, who clubbed together to get legislation through add approved big decisions and their favour. the european parliament elections back in may saw them doing much less well than they had done in the past, i do better performance for liberal parties and green parties, so they will have much more of an influence, i things he willjust be a bit more
4:49 pm
unpredictable. the other big thing to look at is the presence and continued presence of british meps. the uk was supposed to have left on the 29th of march, that was extended and then extended again, and because the uk is still a member state it still has the legal obligation and entitlement to send embers of the european parliament, so there is still 73 british meps. 29 are from the brexit party and they stayed a bit of a stunt this morning as the opera singer and the string quartet began playing the european anthem, at first it brexit party meps refused to sound up then they stood up refused to sound up then they stood up and turned their backs to the chamber and face the wall, which some people thought was this respectful, but i doubt it will attract any disciplinary action. also here we saw a big group of liberal democrats who are very pro—eu and very anti—brexit. they wore bright yellow t—shirts with the
4:50 pm
words stock brexit on the front and much less likely major bout brexit on the back. —— much less polite language. boris johnson and jeremy hunt make their pitches to be the next prime minister to conserve the party members in northern ireland. an investigation is launched into how a man suspected to be a stowaway fell from this plane into a garden in south london. three women make it into the top ten of the bbc's highest paid presenters, but the first seven are all men. these are your business headlines. scotch whisky could be hit by new import parris in the us. that is because america is threatening tariffs on around £3 billion whether goods from the eu. that includes scotch whisky and some cheese and pastor. activity
4:51 pm
in the construction industry failed dramatically last month, a new survey says activity fell to its lowest level since 2009. building firms blame uncertainty over brexit. the country's fibre biggest gambling firms say they will spend more money to help treat people with gambling issues. the firms say they will donate around £6 million a year by 2023. they say it will be able help in tackling addiction. critics say it is simply not enough. scotch whisky, could be hit by new tariffs. yes, part of a spat between the eu and washington over subsidies to aviation companies. people, playmakers, the united states is exercised by the fact that the eu is helping to support airbus, they say they are given to much money and what washington is saying they will
4:52 pm
retaliate by hitting products like scotch whisky, pastor, olives and that sort of thing. one of the big issues that producers face is that the united states is absolutely the biggest market for them. £1 billion worth of scotch is sent over their to the united states every year. they are watching that with a great deal of interest. green interest understates, i suspect. deal of interest. green interest understates, isuspect. no deal of interest. green interest understates, i suspect. no they all need a stiff drink. let's talk to jasper lawler at london capital group. how big of an s collision is this? -- escalation. as we know, this? -- escalation. as we know, this has been going on between airbus and boeing at the wto for about 15 years, so it is not a new dispute. what is new as we now have the self titled paris man, the
4:53 pm
presidency in the united states, donald trump pushing this as part of his agenda globally to reorientate trade back in the us's favour, and so the us is now becoming more active. this is not the first time the us has talked about europe, it has been the automotive sector which has been the automotive sector which has been the previous focus, now the us really using the aerospace industry as an excuse for a broader agenda, which is taking on europe and what it perceives as an unfair trade surplus in europe's favour against the us. this is one part of against the us. this is one part of a broader tactic that the us is going to consider. it is something we will have to live with going forward. and will be used right back? they did last time. -- the eu strike back. the last time they put tariffs on steel, europe fired back with its own measures, hitting
4:54 pm
harley— davidson for example from the us. i would say that is most likely. the biggest? is whether the us goes forth and does this unilaterally outside the wto. if they wait for a ruling from the wto which may take a lot longer, the amount we are talking about would be a fair bit less. lets which tackle and talk about funding. the company which allows individual to lead money to small businesses. they have come up with some news that the markets haven't liked. it looks like revenues of funding circle will be half of what they were briefly estimated, so not the kind of thing that investors like to be caught surprised on. the share top—notch on so well since the company recently listed on the london stock exchange, but they are starting to stabilise. this is another bit of bad news and the shares are down 25%. the company is blaming economic uncertainties as
4:55 pm
pa rt of is blaming economic uncertainties as part of its model. businesses use the platform to find loans from institutional individuals, so obviously less certainty in business, business is not going to be looking for loans as much. what they have not mentioned is also a piece of the puzzle is that there is a lot less certainty around specifically the industry, so there is p2p lending, regulators having to crackdown as a few of their competitors have fallen into administration, and so i think also investors in these platforms not quite as woolly to put up the cash that they once were. talking about the construction industry, a real depth and activity. what is going on there? as you can imagine, it is again this uncertainty, the brexit uncertainty for a while now, what is new is the leadership contest. it is
4:56 pm
understandable that long—term projects, you want to know that, particularly in infrastructure, what government policy will be, i doubt the moment we do not know what the next government policy will be. big project like hs two, even the heathrow airport expansion, we do not quite know when i def those things are taking place, and so this is our holding back, so we have seen this measure which is a survey of purchasing managers, not actual activity, but from the server you get a good feeling as to how confident they are in the industry. it has plummeted according to these surveys. have to leave it there, thanks very much indeed. just make the ftse is doing all right. yes, because the buy covenant has indicated that if i trade war between the us and china start the impact the economy, they could step into stimulator a funding cycle, not doing well because of the reasons we we re doing well because of the reasons we were discussing. thank you very
4:57 pm
much. that is it from us today. coming up, the news at five. let's catch up with the weather. looking good as the rest of the week, not everywhere. cloudy in north—west spots of rain, but the vast majority of the country made we should have warm sunshine. the satellite picture shows north—westerly winds blowing across scotland, an area of low cloud to the south of iceland, that is heading in the direction of scotland. before that happens, high pressure will dominate the weather, but this low here will swing into northern areas for wednesday and thursday. wednesday, thursday, anticipating a bit of a change, a downward trend as far as the weather goes. today, a lot of sunshine, sunny spells, temperatures high teens are low 205. forecast for tonight, not much changing, whether
4:58 pm
front rearing its head to the west and north—west of stornoway. for the lowla nds and north—west of stornoway. for the lowlands of scotland dry, warm in the south in the morning and london, ten which is around 14 celsius, a beautiful sunny start to the day for a bit of clyde building up across england and wales, northern ireland, noticed there is some rain pushing into north—west scotland add the northern isles, maybe staying sunny there. thursday, high pressure slipping further south, through here i think slipping further south, through here ithinka slipping further south, through here i think a lot of fine weather, but in scotland we are expecting more cloud, outbreaks of rain and a slightly stronger breeze. the rain sweeps into the western isles, northern scotland, parts of central scotla nd northern scotland, parts of central scotland as well, noticed that much of thursday the rain at a little bit lighter across the very far south of scotland. cool conditions here and the north—westerly is, but to the south a different story, windless
4:59 pm
weather, temperatures expected to reach around 26 celsius, so we will see the temperatures rising in the south, cool in a north, rising in the south. friday, call northerly winds continue to bring fresh conditions towards northern parts of the country. picking out some orange they are in the very far south of they are in the very far south of the uk. that means the weather will hang on to the high temperatures in the south to around 26 celsius before dipping away for the weekend. on the whole, it is looking fine.
5:00 pm
today at five, ready to roar. england's lioness is just 90 minutes away from reaching the women's world cup final. and a few hours' time they will be taking on the united states of america, defending champions, three times winners and the number one ranked team in the world. we will be finding out how the world cup as energising women's football at every level. boris johnson and jeremy hunt go to northern ireland in their battle to be our next prime minister. both incest the backstop cannot be part of any future brexit deal. the union comes first of course, the solution must be for the whole uk to come out in its entirety from the eu. the
5:01 pm
principle is

255 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on